A word from Carpe

In response to a recent post, Carpe wrote a comment that has more thumbs up than any other comment so far on this blog. Reproduced in part below. Which got me thinking.

Watching history videos I have a new word today:

Chevauchée

The chevauchée could be used as a way of forcing an enemy to fight, or as a means of discrediting the enemy’s government and detaching his subjects from their loyalty. This usually caused a massive flight of refugees to fortified towns and castles, which would be untouched by the chevauchée.

Are we being subject to some sort of modern cheevauchee? Is the idea of these insane policies to drive sentiment towards our governments and institutions to utter contempt?

Here it is in part, from Carpe:

My Australian citizenship was something I have always valued, but no longer. What I have seen in the last 2 years from the outside looking in horrifies me, this is not the country I knew as a boy nor is it the place where my children spent their years as toddlers and youths. It is not the place where my wife could spend her working and private life free from the formalities that exist in Japan but could unleash her inner bogan with a joy that was delightful to see.

Many people here know that I am an expat living in Japan, I have met and had dinner with people here and on the old iteration of the Cat. I am a FIFO worker (Building/Civil/Marine) primarily in pacific rim work and SE Asia.

I should thank you I suppose, you have given me the motivation to renounce my citizenship, something I never thought I would do, as being Australian defined who I was overseas. Becoming a Japanese citizen is a very difficult process (google it to find out how difficult it is), but what you write and the sense of entitlement that goes with it leaves me gobsmacked.

Australia is effectively a Gulag, run at the whim of insane premiers and the lackwit CHO’s who’s raison detre seems to be bedwetting and victimhood. The mere fact that the federal political class obviated their duty to the Australian people to these state based swine and their petty tyrants in waiting in both the bureaucracy and policing is a disgrace.

Australia may no longer be my home, but sadly, being an Australian is no longer what I wish to be.

19 thoughts on “A word from Carpe”

  1. A-fucking-men. Well done Carpe, I wish I had that option but alas my world ends at the 5km from my house. I am told beyond that limit them thar be dragons and other dangers awaiting to make my life unsafe. I can only say thank goodness our Premier loves us so much, I’d hate to think what he would do should he hate us.


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  2. There is no doubt that this is not the Australia that I thought I knew and loved. But for me the heartbreak isn’t in the behaviour of the government and their officials. Unchecked, that’s what they do.

    Tyranny is always just a breath away, if the people will allow it. Liberty does have to be hard won and hard kept.

    And so for me, the greatest sadness today is that the clear majority of Australians want this tyranny.

    For most of history, the plebs have not been free. With the ‘internet of bodies’ the tyrant’s control could be complete.

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/0HVmr39Oy1sr/


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  3. Is it true that flying a flag upside down is a sign of distress? Or does this only apply to vessels, and not nations? Is it a myth?

    If it was true, and I possessed a flag pole and Australian national flag, I would be flying it upside down, and would encourage others to do so.

    A very sobering thought is Ellen’s statement that many of our countrymen and women want, and if they could, would revel – in, this tyranny.


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  4. If I wasn’t an old cripple I would do something along the same lines.
    I have Nothing but contempt for our Parliaments, their enablers and the quisling filthy little give ups letting themselves be enslaved by a government gone off the rails.
    And any serving servicemen can kiss my arse. You can’t defend Australia but by golly you can oppress the civilians. Useless filth. Can’t wait to see what medal you get for Operation Oppression of the Peons.


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  5. Eighty years ago, it was 1941.
    Australians -including my Grandfather, a veteran of WW1 – were at war in North Africa and the Middle-East, and the Japanese would shortly attack down through Malaya to Singapore. My father would soon be patrolling through the jungles of New Guinea and one of my Uncles would be piloting a Lancaster through the night sky over France and Germany.

    They did it so that we would not have the kind of Government that could demand; “Papieres Bitte!”

    I am glad that they did not live to see this day.


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  6. We’ll let you back in, Carpe, after the war to end all wars. You’ll be able to take your pick of accommodation – Trumble’ or Rudd’ mansion, Keneally’ pile and yacht, Burnside’ pile. They won’t be needing them. I’ll be hosting a TV show, “ABC and other MSM anchors. Where Are They Now?” Why, they’re doing my laundry and gardening. I don’t have a washing machine or any gardening tools.


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  7. PeterW
    They did it so that we would not have the kind of Government that could demand; “Papieres Bitte!”
    I am glad that they did not live to see this day.

    My Dad fought in Korea in 51/52
    He would be outraged at what he would be seeing now.


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  8. Muddy says:
    September 12, 2021 at 2:18 pm
    Is it true that flying a flag upside down is a sign of distress? Or does this only apply to vessels, and not nations? Is it a myth?

    True story. I had an Oz flying upside on the front of my house last year, during the onerous lockup here in central Victoriastan, and some scum ripped it off its mountings and stole it, would you believe! The Fed Gov actively discourages doing such but they can get …. !


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  9. Carpe Jugulum says:
    September 12, 2021 at 3:51 pm

    Carpe, I have a wonderful friend who, at 89, is still sharp and fought in Korea as a youngster and later in Vietnam, arriving at Long Tan the day after the conflict there. I respect him and love him dearly, and I would not be game enough, nor would I want to, ask him his thoughts on how the world has descended into the current madness. Nor would I ask, if I could, my grandfather (Gallipoli and West Front) and my Dad (Middle East and PNG etc). They would be totally bewildered and probably depressed. I really despair.


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  10. Ellen of Tasmaniasays:
    September 12, 2021 at 1:56 pm
    ..
    And so for me, the greatest sadness today is that the clear majority of Australians want this tyranny.

    Ellen – I’m with you here.

    Politicians will do what politicians do. Grab power wherever they can.

    What has stunned and amazed me is the number of people who want to be ruled over. They *will* trade liberty for security and can’t be reasoned with, nor can they see the dangers. They do not understand we are speeding towards tyranny.

    I have hope that more recent migrants – and their next generation – still hold the memory of the some of the tyrannical shitholes they fled and will fight against this. Because christ knows the ‘average ozzie’ wants to roll over and have his tummy tickled by the government.


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  11. God, I’m 67 yo and I long for the days when I could drink water straight out of a river which is now muddied.
    So many things back then were so normal and now, they are frowned upon by the uninformed self named greatest minds of all time.

    Disgusting.


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  12. Muddy says:
    September 12, 2021 at 2:18 pm
    Is it true that flying a flag upside down is a sign of distress? Or does this only apply to vessels, and not nations? Is it a myth?

    If it was true, and I possessed a flag pole and Australian national flag, I would be flying it upside down, and would encourage others to do so.

    Not far from me is a house with the Australian flag flown upside down in the front yard. It has been flying that way for months. My guess is they are not happy with our current circumstances.


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  13. Here’s another puzzled and furious daughter of an infantryman who fought at El Alamein and New Guinea and of a WAAF who worked for airforce intelligence in WWII. One grandfather served in the Royal Navy in WWI and the RAN in WWII, the other lies in a Commonwealth War Cemetary in Berlin, wounded on the Somme and dying as POW. His brother died at Gallipolli.
    I feel as if their sacrifices, which they willingly made for my freedom, count for nothing as I watch our descent into tyrannical madness.
    I’m sorry, Carpe, but I totally get it. Our oldest son said yesterday that if it weren’t for his partner, he’d be moving back to Italy. The SP and I have talked about doing the same several times during this nightmare. It breaks my heart.


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  14. Leaving this country behind is becoming a realistic option for many. Where to go is the big issue. I have seen that topic discussed before on the old Cat. Not sure what the best options were.


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