24 thoughts on “World’s nicest open air prison”

  1. Think she was nearly teary at the end when she was ‘had it up to here”.

    And she has a great point about the lawyer x crap.
    The peking pox has allowed the same bad actors and compromised shits to stay in power free of consequence.
    How much quiet payoffs, threats and coverup has been carried out in the last 2 years would you think?


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  2. She’s great! First time I’ve heard her.

    Got foraged around into the story and pulled out points that I’ve never considered using historical perspective and acute observation.

    I had wondered why we were so accepting, maybe because we are so comfortable, and there it was – we accept our “parents’” rules because the house is so comfortable and the showers are hot.

    Well appointed open air prison indeed.


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  3. She makes a lot of sense regarding our trust of government.

    Also, compulsory voting and our electoral system being as fair as any in the world, means we generally respect the right of our governments to hold office.
    There are no disenfranchised minorities in Australia, we all had a vote so we accept their right to be there.
    Apart from a brief blip in the 70s when a socialist Fedgov went off the rails, we’ve had reasonably sensible and stable government from Federation up until 15 years ago.

    Since then all our governments have gotten much worse, but the people haven’t updated their perceptions of reality yet.

    Maybe an adjustment is beginning now.
    moderated

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  4. Thanks Arky,
    that was well worth watching. So any state government can promote a referendum to its residents to secede from the Commonwealth. Well, at the moment, given the amount of debt most of the place is in, especially the Commonwealth, I can’t see that happening any time soon. (And the ones I’d like to get rid of I think won’t go anyhow).

    The authoritarian side of her argument is interesting though. Many have quoted Clive James and convicts and overseers. But she’s right that when things work well we always say “why change?” This time round, however, things have to change.


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  5. Thanks for link. I found Helen Dales observations on the political history and more recent Police enquiries of significance. However when it came to teasing out the important issues that have brought the police violence and dire lockdown consequences in Victoria into play she failed to mention:
    1. The total suspension of Parliament.
    2. The hijacking of all mainstream media by the government and the exclusion of dissenting analysis
    3. The increase in the Premier’s powers under Emergency powers
    4. The relationship between Daniel Andrews, the Police and also his previous involvement and influence in the Health sector.


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  6. As much as I like most of what she said, there’s a few points that I find contradictory.

    Dale reckons that the very big problem for Australia is that government is generally efficient. Is it though? Just because the punters are trusting and a former NYTimes reporter stationed here for 6 or so months said so, doesn’t make it so. Dale then mentions how the first attempt at quarantine in Victoria was a huge fucking mess. That’s true, so how does that make for great governance? Then there’s Vicpol who she says is a corrupt force causing a Royal commission. The fact that the Hunchback has put the commission’s suggestions into the forget bin.. well how does that make good governance.

    But yes, going to the dept. of MV is Australia is like dining and the Four Season restaurant on Park Ave compared to say going to the DMV in NY. Having said that, I would suggest experiencing the NYC DMV should be on everyone’s bucket list. It’s an alien universe that needs to be seen to be believed. If not the DMV, then try the office Social Security (SSA).


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  7. An interesting moment when he asked with surprise “why doesn’t anybody know any of this!”.

    I know why. I’ve worked a couple of jobs where I’ve been one of a few Australians, surrounded by Howard era pom and Indian arrivals. Nobody over there knows about any of this stuff because none of them over here care one whit to ask about the ins and outs of this country from Australians. As far as they’re concerned it’s an endless paradise and Australians are pub drinking clownish ‘larakins’ with no depth who just happen to discover the place – as it stands right now, buildings, a couple of WW1 & 2 monuments, and all, a few minutes before they arrived and that’s about it. And nobody bothers to engage with them because Australians are against speaking about politics with other people in public.

    Also older poms who’ve been here awhile don’t want to break the fantasy that they’ve come over to paradise so don’t report shit goings on back home when they happen.

    Essentially it’s Jonestown.


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  8. twostixsays:
    September 26, 2021 at 4:57 pm
    An interesting moment when he asked with surprise “why doesn’t anybody know any of this!”.
    Essentially it’s Jonestown.

    So do you think Daniel Andrews is another Jim Jones? I’m starting to think so. Hence my article/post with the quote from Andrews, “We have come too far to go back now”. He displays all the characteristics, the following and now the power.


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  9. When I was little there wasn’t an idea that government was competent in this culture, public service and government was mercilessly mocked as hopeless.

    Also further to JC’s point, there’s so much Chinese coal and iron ore and borrowed money sloshing around that even the worst most incompetent people on earth could get government ‘right’ here. They have essentially unlimited budgets relative to the highly concentrated population. And a population which has low expectations.

    For instance we can’t even have sewage on, even though the sewage pipe goes right down our road.

    But nobody minds much. Low expectations.


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  10. we have the best journalists money can buy..

    ..
    Without the government spend, those old media shitstains would have died.
    Essentially taxpayers subsidized the arseholes through the new media onslaught and their transition to online platforms.
    Circa 2005 it looked like they were toast, and we would have this wonderful, diverse and thoughtful range of programs, podcasts and news.


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  11. It’s like the invention of the printing press.
    At first it’s wonderful and you have priests printing out shit questioning the authorities.
    But, eventually, the totalitarian dullards catch up with the technology and everything goes grey and boring and stupid again.


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  12. thefrollickingmolesays:
    September 26, 2021 at 5:17 pm
    Another point.

    we have the best journalists money can buy..

    Andrews government spent $357.6 million on advertising in its first term

    NSW government hits record advertising spend ($87 Million *)

    Morrison government spent $128m on advertising in 2019-20, figures reveal

    *inserted amount from original source

    Note that Victoria spent 2.7 times more than the federal government spent and more than 4 times what NSW did. No wonder the media is kowtowing to Andrews. This is extraordinary! Why hasn’t this been exposed? Oh gosh the media is totally compromised.


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  13. Have quite a few Limey friends amongst the junior Albino’s school community – without exception they are gobsmacked at the extent of unionism here still, like we imported the worst of the UK’s bloody minded trade unionism of the 60’s and 70’s and it’s never been reformed. Hard to disagree.


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  14. Along with the issues mem has alluded to above –

    1. The total suspension of Parliament.
    2. The hijacking of all mainstream media by the government and the exclusion of dissenting analysis
    3. The increase in the Premier’s powers under Emergency powers
    4. The relationship between Daniel Andrews, the Police and also his previous involvement and influence in the Health sector.

    …are the contract cancellation of that freeway, the flying of the Chinese flag above one of our police stations, the usurping of the Federal Governments powers under the Constitution of dealing with a foreign power, and the entire Lawyer X business.
    I think there are grounds to suspend the State Government (?how), call for a Royal Commission with extraordinary powers to get answers on all the above, and especially the influence of foreign governments in Australian affairs, and the ?negligence of the Judiciary in enforcing the Constitution.
    I don’t have any real answers as to how it could be done, but at the moment, satisfaction and confidence in the decision making arms of the States are at their lowest point ever.


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