2,016 thoughts on “Open Thread – Tues 16 Aug 2022”

  1. In the Scotland story:

    Mr Grant gushed of his new role as he claimed it affects men and boys too and people regardless of gender in a nod to inclusivity toward a minority of young trans men.

    He told the Dundee Courier: “I’m absolutely buzzing about it. It’s definitely pioneering as Scotland is the first to do this. It’s about making people aware of the availability of period products for anyone of any gender, whenever they need it.

    He also likes broccoli…


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  2. Rear Window

    Car lobby on EV collision course

    It’s action stations inside the country’s embattled car lobby as most of its members prepare for a comprehensive shellacking on Friday at Mike Cannon-Brookes? National EV Summit in Canberra.

    Climate Change Minister Chris Bowen is scheduled to open the clean energy love-in along with Industry Minister Ed Husic.

    Despite already pledging to scrap the fringe benefits tax on electric vehicles used for business, industry players are hoping for more support in Labor’s electric vehicle strategy.

    The timing of the summit, which was co-organised with the quiet help of Cannon-Brookes’ private equity arm Boundless, couldn’t be better. After all, it’s only a week since a Sydney Morning Herald scoop lifted the lid on how a campaign rolled out by the motoring industry’s peak body, the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries, is lobbying for its weak, voluntary scheme to be mandated by government, a scheme that will slow the roll-out of green cars and electric vehicles in Australia.

    It wasn’t exactly news to the FCAI’s 39 members, which include Toyota, Volkswagen, BMW and newbie outfits such as Tesla and Polestar. After all, it was disgruntled members within the lobby group who leaked the chamber’s confidential CO2 Research Overview, presumably upset over its toothless stance regarding fuel-efficiency standards and overall emissions reductions targets.

    Volkswagen boss Paul Sansom publicly warned in late 2021 that without more aggressive and mandated emissions standards, Australia will continue to be a “dumping ground” for older, less efficient engines and automotive tech.

    The FCAI’s research released in early July only further frustrated members who argue the chamber’s voluntary emissions reductions standard (which it wants the government to adopt as a mandatory scheme) is restraining the era of electric cars in Australia.

    There is also growing disquiet within the FCAI’s ranks over the dominance Toyota has in shaping the chamber’s policy objectives. Toyota internationally has form opposing mandates in Europe and the US, and criticised India’s target for 100 per cent electric vehicles sales by 2030.

    The FCAI’s membership levies are partially based on market share, and the Japanese conglomerate is the chamber’s highest paying member, given it makes a quarter of all cars sold nationally. No wonder managing director Matthew Callachor is chairman of FCAI’s 11-member board.

    In Australia, the FCAI’s latest emissions reduction proposals remain wedded to hybrid vehicles, forecasting they will account for about 60 per cent of cars on the road nationally by 2030.

    That’s the sort of forward thinking that has left Australia without a car manufacturing industry, given Toyota’s 2017 decision to shut down its Altona Camry factory shortly after accepting millions in government handouts. But that won’t stop them asking Canberra for more.


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  3. The disclosure regarding Morrison’s assumption of extensive powers via appointment of a dual role in a number of portfolios is out of left field. But it illustrates the panic that gripped the government when the Wuhan virus took off. Instead of noting available dissenting medical opinion from overseas experts (eg Barrington Declaration) the government – & Morrison in particular- chose, of all things, computer modelling from Peter Dougherty’s organisation to predict a mortality rate that did not eventuate. Because of the impact of that decision, even without other flaws, I regard Morrison as a dud.

    Even so, the disclosure of the portfolios assumption, which must have been leaked by the public service, smacks of a witch hunt. Nowhere near as bad as what is happening to Trump, but the hatred of the Left knows no bounds.


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  4. We are also learning tonight that if any items not contained in the warrant were retrieved during the FBI search at Mar-a-Lago, they will be returned.

    Not covered in the warrant you say? That would be theft wouldn’t it?

    Additionally, since passports are technically U.S. govt property that sounds like a violation of ’18 U.S. Code § 2071 – Concealment, removal, or mutilation generally’. Coincidentally, that’s one of the weak excuses they used in the warrant to raid him.

    Book ’em Dano.


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  5. Even so, the disclosure of the portfolios assumption, which must have been leaked by the public service, smacks of a witch hunt

    Possibly. Still struggling to have any sympathy.


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  6. Why the Fed might be at ‘neutral’ already on monetary policy

    The peak in the federal funds rate during the current cycle will be lower than otherwise because the combination of quantitative easing and the strong dollar are equivalent to at least a 1 percentage point increase.

    Most Fed watchers seem to spend more time criticising the US Federal Reserve than watching it. It’s easy to do. Anyone can play the game and attacking the Fed is like shooting at sitting ducks: officials at the central bank can’t respond directly given their public role.

    Recently, Fed chairman Jay Powell has been skewered by his critics for saying the federal funds rate was now at “neutral” at his July 27 news conference just after the policy-setting Federal Open Market Committee had voted unanimously to raise its benchmark federal funds rate range by 0.75 of a percentage point to 2.25 per cent to 2.50 per cent

    His suggestion that the Fed is on the borderline of restrictive territory and therefore closer to being done tightening was well received by both bond and stock investors, but not by the Fed’s critics.

    Former Federal Reserve Bank of New York president William Dudley said last Wednesday that, given the level of uncertainty, “I’d be a bit more sceptical” in saying policymakers had reached neutral.

    Two days later, former Treasury secretary Lawrence Summers was more critical. He accused Powell of engaging in “wishful thinking” similar to the Fed’s delusion last year that inflation would be transitory. He accused Powell of saying things “that, to be blunt, were analytically indefensible”. He added, “There is no conceivable way that a 2.5 per cent interest rate, in an economy inflating like this, is anywhere near neutral.”

    In fact, there is a conceivable way that Powell might be right after all. The Fed’s critics are ignoring that the central bank has been more hawkish in words and deeds than the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan. Both of their official interest rates are still at or near zero.

    As a result, the value of the $US has soared 10 per cent this year. In my opinion, that is equivalent to at least a half-percentage-point rise in the federal funds rate. Furthermore, the Fed has just started its quantitative tightening programme to unwind its massive asset purchases to support markets and the economy in recent years.

    During June through to August, the Fed will reduce its balance sheet by running off maturing securities, which will drop its holdings of Treasury securities by $US30 billion ($42.7 billion) a month and its holdings of government agency debt and mortgage-backed securities (MBS) by $US17.5 billion a month. So that’s a decline of $US142.5 billion over those first three months of QT.

    Starting in September, the run-off will be set at $US60 billion for Treasury holdings and $US35 billion for agency debt and MBS. That’s $US95 billion a month, or $US1.14 trillion through to August 2023. There’s no amount set or termination date specified for QT.

    In my opinion, QT is equivalent to at least a 0.50 percentage-point increase in the federal funds rate too. Furthermore, in the December 2021 minutes of the FOMC, released on January 5, investors learned “some participants” on the committee favoured getting out of the mortgage financing business entirely.

    That would happen by swapping the Fed’s MBS for Treasuries in addition to letting them run off as they matured under QT. This would have further increased the supply of MBS for the market to absorb adding upward pressure on mortgage rates relative to Treasuries.

    No wonder that the 30-year mortgage rate jumped from 3.30 per cent at the start of this year to a high of 6 per cent on July 15, and 5.46 per cent currently.

    I conclude that the peak in the federal funds rate during the current monetary tightening cycle will be lower than otherwise because the combination of QT and the strong dollar are equivalent to at least a 1 percentage point increase in the federal funds rate.

    In addition, the extraordinary jump in both short-term and long-term interest rates in the fixed income markets has already accomplished much of the tightening for the Fed.

    In my opinion, the markets have already discounted a peak federal funds rate of 3 to 3.25 per cent, which is where it soon will be assuming that the Fed raises the rate by 0.75 of a percentage point again at the end of September as widely expected.

    By the way, on October 1, 2020, Dudley, when he was at the Fed, justified a second round of quantitative easing amounting to $US500 billion of securities purchases saying that it was equivalent to a 0.50 of a percentage point to 0.75 of a percentage point cut in the federal funds rate.

    The Fed undoubtedly has some estimates from its in-house models on the equivalent rate rises represented by the strong dollar and QT. If so, they should share that information with the public.

    The writer is president of Yardeni Research and author of Fed Watching for Fun & Profit.

    Financial Times


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  7. “Even so, the disclosure of the portfolios assumption, which must have been leaked by the public service, smacks of a witch hunt. Nowhere near as bad as what is happening to Trump, but the hatred of the Left knows no bounds.”

    I’m inclined to agree however it begs the question, what did Morrison and the Liberals, in almost nine years of government, do about the politicisation of the public service? NOTHING.

    Remember when the Attorney-General’s department sent a letter to Tony Abbott, a former PM no less, the day before he was due to address CPAC in August 2019, the letter requested that Abbott register as an agent of foreign influence? That one still makes me laugh however think about it, it isn’t funny. And so what did Morrison and his supine and utterly useless government do? NOTHING. In fact, the AG at the time, one Christian Porter, loudly proclaimed that the government would not amend the new transparency laws despite a former Liberal prime minister Tony Abbott being targeted.

    Has any such letter been sent to former Labor PM Paul Keating? I doubt it.

    You reap what you sow, or in the case of the stupid fucking Liberals, you reap the whirlwind when you do fuck all.


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  8. “Remember when the Attorney-General’s department sent a letter to Tony Abbott, a former PM no less, the day before he was due to address CPAC in August 2019, the letter requested that Abbott register as an agent of foreign influence? “

    I forgot to add…that outrageous incident was prompted by Labor’s Mark Dreyfus.


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  9. Horseface is on the nose. Backgrounding is starting.

    New Zealand MP alleges Jacinda Ardern’s Chief of Staff failed to act when several MPs complained about bullying (16 Aug)

    “Jacinda Ardern’s office has been rocked by bullying allegations after a Labour MP alleged the Prime Minister’s Chief of Staff failed to take the complaints seriously.

    Labour MP for Hamilton West Dr Gaurav Sharma took to Facebook on Monday detailing several incidents of the alleged bullying, alongside screenshots from MPs complaining about the behaviour.

    Dr Sharma claimed he had told Ms Ardern’s Chief of Staff that then-chief whip Kieran McAnulty’s bullying behaviour was so rife one MP spent “almost thee hours in tears talking about how they were being treated”, while another asked how to fake a COVID-19 diagnosis so they could miss work.”

    Backgrounding is a fun sport. Could it be because her poll numbers are lower than mite dung? Nah, that’s unthinkable!


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  10. European ‘Hunger Stones’ Blow Up Key Climate Narrative

    Almost two-thirds of Europe is having what used to be known as a brutal summer, before climate hysterics rebranded the weather, and the latest panic is the re-emergence of grim Hunger Stones from ancient riverbeds gone dry.

    The heat wave combined with the drought currently tormenting the continent truly is miserable. High temperatures are overwhelming Europeans, crops are shriveling, and rivers are drying up. The diminished waterways are crippling crop irrigation, supply chains, and even the capacity to cool nuclear power plants. But the drying riverbeds have also yielded something else: proof that such things have happened before there were tailpipes or cow burps to blame.

    The Hunger Stones of Europe are sub-aquatic cousins of high water markers. During historically severe droughts, local chroniclers would chisel marks and messages into large stones that were only seen roughly once a generation. Some of the low-water markings also included laments of the human tragedy that accompanies drought, notably starvation.

    Dutch journalist Olaf Koens tweeted images of the ominous boulders newly re-emerged from the depths of Europe’s busy waterways:

    If your Dutch is rusty, the internet says he wrote:

    Horrible. Due to the drought in European rivers, Hunger Stones are surfacing. Macabre warnings from our 15th century ancestors about famine.

    ‘When you see me, cry’

    At least Koens had the sense not to write, “Due to climate change…” Because unless his 15th-century ancestors had scuba gear and a weird sense of humor, those bodacious boulders were high and dry centuries before global cooling global warming man-made climate change was ever thought of.

    A group of Czech researchers relied on Hunger Stones for some of the data that went into their 2013 report, Droughts in the Czech Lands, 1090–2012 AD. They described the stones and listed the previous drought years they commemorate:

    A tree-ring study printed in Science Advances, a journal published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, confirmed that “megadroughts” used to be more common before the evil Industrial Revolution kicked off all of that cursed First World tech:

    In addition, megadroughts reconstructed over north-central Europe in the 11th and mid-15th centuries reinforce other evidence from North America and Asia that droughts were more severe, extensive, and prolonged over Northern Hemisphere land areas before the 20th century, with an inadequate understanding of their causes.

    What I am saying is that this drought may not be because of anything we did; at most, we’ve had only a fraction of a fraction of an infinitesimally small effect on the climate. Droughts have happened before and they’ll happen again. Meanwhile, if all the do-gooders who run the global deciding apparatus truly want the best for humanity, then this is not the time to shut down reliable, cost-effective energy generation, or ban farmers from using the fertilizer that actually works, or force the bloody destruction of hundreds of thousands of livestock. Famine and want are already looming over too many vulnerable people; why in the name of God would you make it worse?


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  11. Is Merrick Garland serious about Donald Trump?

    Former president is entitled to the same presumption of innocence as any other American

    Commenting about the FBI executing a search warrant on former President Donald Trump’s Florida home, which he approved, Attorney General Merrick Garland said, “Faithful adherence to the rule of law is the bedrock principle of the Justice Department and of our democracy. … All Americans are entitled to the even-handed application of the law, to due process, and to the presumption of innocence.”

    None of this applies to the way the Department of Justice, the FBI and most of the media have treated Mr. Trump.

    From the Steele dossier, Russian “collusion,” the labeling of Mr. Trump as a Russian “asset,” the Mueller Report and the refusal by the Biden administration to enforce our immigration laws, the Justice Department in this administration has done just the opposite when it comes to equal application of the law and due process.

    Whatever one thinks of Mr. Trump’s character, he is entitled to the same presumption of innocence as any other American. Mr. Trump always suffers from a presumption of guilt. He is forced to continually prove he is innocent of charges, often made by “sources” who leak information to anti-Trump media, or must explain himself to hostile Democrats (and a few hostile Republicans).

    The specter of armed federal agents outside Mr. Trump’s Florida home is not an image I suspect many of us are comfortable with. Even those who do not like Mr. Trump and hope he does not run for president in 2024 should be alarmed at how this focus on him is contributing to what has been a long slide in the trust Americans place in our institutions.

    In 1973, when the Gallup organization began polling on the subject, 42% of respondents had a “great deal/quite a lot” of confidence in Congress. This year that number is just 7%.

    In 1991, 73% of the public had a great deal/quite a lot of confidence in the presidency. This year only 23% feel that way.

    Confidence in the criminal justice system has reached a new low with just 14% coming down on the side of great deal/quite a lot. Is it any wonder with stories of “woke” prosecutors freeing criminals with low or no bail only to see many of them commit new crimes?

    In what should be a warning to the media — a warning that has been apparent for many years — confidence in the trustworthiness of newspapers has declined from a high of 51% in 1979 to a record low of 16% today. Confidence in TV news reflects a similar drop — from 46% in 1993 to the current 11%. Perhaps some introspection by the media as to the “root causes” might be beneficial to the profession and the public.

    Gallup has recorded similar declines in confidence levels for other institutions, including the church (no wonder with all the scandals and some TV evangelists still living the lifestyles of potentates as opposed to that of the one they claim to follow). It may surprise many that the police, which has been under heavy assault from various liberal groups, continue to enjoy major support. Gallup found 45% have a great deal/quite a lot of confidence in the police, down only from 52% in 1993.

    No foreign power could hope to undermine the pillars of our democracy better than we are doing ourselves. Serious attention to rebuilding these and other institutions, which can lead to restoring confidence in them, is urgently required.


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  12. The so-called ‘hits’ just keep on a-comin’ for our friends in the FBI.

    who is going to do anything about it? nobody, criminals are in charge of the entire government


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  13. Feds Oppose Unsealing Affidavit Used To Obtain Mar-a-Lago Search Warrant, To Protect Ongoing Investigation and “National Security”

    “Disclosure at this juncture of the affidavit supporting probable cause would, by contrast, cause significant and irreparable damage to this ongoing criminal investigation.”

    Yeah, like get it laughed out of existence while Trump’s lawyers work on his federal ‘Deprivation of Civil Rights’ case against you. You remember that little jewel? The one you used to pile on to Mark Chauvin?


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  14. No foreign power could hope to undermine the pillars of our democracy better than we are doing ourselves. Serious attention to rebuilding these and other institutions, which can lead to restoring confidence in them, is urgently required.

    criminals never cede power voluntarily


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  15. who is going to do anything about it? nobody, criminals are in charge of the entire government

    In theory this is where Parliament and the Courts step in. We shall see.


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  16. Meanwhile, if all the do-gooders who run the global deciding apparatus truly want the best for humanity, then this is not the time to shut down reliable, cost-effective energy generation, or ban farmers from using the fertilizer that actually works, or force the bloody destruction of hundreds of thousands of livestock. Famine and want are already looming over too many vulnerable people; why in the name of God would you make it worse?

    it’s a purge


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  17. criminals are in charge of the entire government

    Not as allegorical as it sounds. What if the people running the Biden junta aren’t giving criminals a pass just for ideological reasons, but because they are fellow criminals looking after their criminal brothers and sisters?


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  18. atarasays:
    August 16, 2022 at 12:59 pm
    Feds Oppose Unsealing Affidavit Used To Obtain Mar-a-Lago Search Warrant, To Protect Ongoing Investigation and “National Security”

    “Disclosure at this juncture of the affidavit supporting probable cause would, by contrast, cause significant and irreparable damage to this ongoing criminal investigation.”

    Yeah, like get it laughed out of existence while Trump’s lawyers work on his federal ‘Deprivation of Civil Rights’ case against you. You remember that little jewel? The one you used to pile on to Mark Chauvin?

    From the Comments

    – There must be a lot they want to hide.

    – If Garland is so concerned with the investigation, why is he leaking to NYT and WAPO?

    One could theorize that he considers the NYT and WAPO to be fellow employees of the DNC and also of the FBI, so there is no problem giving them anything classified if it serves the interests of the DNC.


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  19. Some surrogates need to think hard before regurgitating “the message”.

    To give things back to someone, you had to have them in the first place.


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  20. I recall that during the early stages of 2020 it was mainly Struth who, much to the displeasure of many, was decrying the likes of Morrison and Hunt as being ideologically in league with Andrews et al.


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  21. Trump Accused of Lying Over FBI-Seized Passports, Then He Dropped the Receipts

    As RedState reported on Monday, Donald Trump accused the FBI of taking his passports during the unprecedented raid of his Florida residence. According to the former president, three passports were taken during the search, which apparently went far beyond just recovering supposedly classified documents that threatened “national security.”

    Predictably, after Trump made the claim, the press quickly jumped into the fray to call him a liar. Norah O’Donnell of CBS News claimed via a source that the FBI was “not in possession of former President Trump’s passports.”

    When I saw that report from O’Donnell, I put out my own post questioning the phrasing. “Not in possession of” is very specific wording that could have simply meant the FBI had passed them on to another agency. Why not just say “we didn’t take the passports” if they didn’t take the passports?

    Incredibly (or perhaps not so), instead of admitting their mistake, members of the press rushed out to somehow make the revelation about…Trump’s supposed dishonesty.

    So let me get this straight. The FBI did indeed seize Trump’s passports, which seems incredibly improper given what was legally allowed to be taken by the warrant, and that’s somehow his fault? A passport is not something you just accidentally grab, thinking it’s a presidential record. It’s the kind of thing that an agent purposely took and knew exactly what they were taking. Yet, the big gotcha here is that Trump was wrong about the expiration date on one of the passports. It’s absurd.

    The big story here is that the FBI took the passports in the first place. It is not that Trump shared an email that ended up embarrassing the bureau’s leadership, who were apparently content to keep lying about the matter via leaks until the former president exposed them. Now, the mainstream media wants to pretend like the seizure was just an honest mistake that shouldn’t be held against the FBI. Yeah, that’s not how any of this works.

    The press and the DOJ working together to push a false narrative isn’t surprising, but that doesn’t make it any less improper and corrupt. There need to be answers provided for how the FBI ended up with Trump’s passports when they obviously weren’t part of what was sought and allowed to be taken in the warrant. O’Donnell and the rest of the press who ran with that lie that the FBI didn’t have the passports also need to answer for why they swallowed a statement from the DOJ without even bothering to get any corroborating details.

    With every passing day, the FBI’s raid of Mar-a-Lago looks worse and worse. We are living under a regime that prides itself in operating like a banana republic. The dishonesty of those always out to get the orange man knows no bounds.


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  22. Jacinda Ardern’s office has been rocked by bullying allegations
    The left are against bullying, except when they do it.
    Against kiddy fiddling but mutilation of kids for “gendering” is ok.


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  23. So Trumps passports are at the Washington office of the FBI.
    He just has to show up at reception and he can claim them.
    According to the FBI & their surrogates, this means the FBI does not have them.


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  24. Keep in mind, if you were questioned by the FBI & used their kind of word-play like they have regarding the Trump passports they could charge you with obstruction of justice (depending on your politics).


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  25. Just how rooted is Australia??
    All Australia total taxation revenue returned to growth, reaching $593.2b in 2020-21 (up 7.5%), while taxation revenue as a percentage of GDP was 28.7%.

    https://nypost.com/2022/08/12/dc-has-never-gotten-this-much-in-taxes-dems-say-its-still-not-enough/
    “Washington has almost never been so awash in taxes. Since 1960, federal tax revenues have remained generally close to the average level of 17.4% of the economy. Yet after jumping last year, revenues this year are scheduled to surge again to 19.6% of the economy — the second-highest level since World War II.”

    We pay nearly 10% more as a portion of GDP for the turds administering us.
    1/3 more as a portion of GDP than the USA.
    Not seeing 1/3 more competence anywhere.


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  26. FBI Is Terrified After Mar-a-Lago Raid Backfires, Now Obsessively Combing Through Social Media Profiles for ‘Signs of Agitation’

    As Americans are rightfully frustrated with the FBI’s raid of Mar-a-Lago, the Biden administration is warning federal and local law enforcement about the possibility of “domestic terrorism.”

    The Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, FBI and Customs and Border Protection also issued warnings using very similar language, Just the News reported.

    “Last night, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice issued a Joint Intelligence Bulletin, accessible via the Homeland Security Information Network, providing information on the potential for domestic violent extremists to carry out attacks on federal, state and local law enforcement and government personnel or facilities,” CBP Commissioner Chris Magnus wrote in a memo to employees this weekend.

    He said the warnings were necessary “in light of an increase in threats and acts of violence, including armed encounters, against law enforcement, judiciary and government personnel, in reaction to the FBI’s recent execution of a court authorized search warrant in Palm Beach, Florida.”

    There have been legitimate attempts at violence against the FBI since the raid, and this is completely unacceptable.

    While warning about potential attacks is one thing, monitoring conservatives on social media is another. Given the federal government’s history of villainizing conservatives, it is hard to trust these agencies to determine what constitutes “domestic terrorism.”

    After all, these are the same people who classified parents as “domestic terrorists” for wanting to have a say in their children’s education. This precedent certainly casts doubt on the federal government’s ability to determine what is or is not a threat from conservative influencers on social media.

    In addition to the FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago, Magnus said some Americans have been pushed towards violence because of their anger about the crisis at the southern border. Even in his description of this problem, he showed how out of touch he is.

    You see, the southern border crisis is not as bad as it looks. Americans’ concerns are simply “false perceptions.”

    Sure, U.S. Border Patrol said it processed over 222,000 this May, an all-time monthly high according to CBS News. But Magnus believes if he just lies about, he can minimize the concerns of a large swath of Americans.

    By belittling the legitimate concerns Americans hold, the federal government is not helping tamp down domestic violence threats. In fact, it is simply adding more fuel to the fire.


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  27. After assisted suicide was legalized in Canada, many severely ill patients have found themselves effectively forced into “voluntary” euthanasia by healthcare costs, or even hospitals just refusing to treat them.

    Euthanasia is now the sixth leading cause of death in Canada.

    it’s a purge


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  28. FBI Had November Midterms on Its Mind While Planning Mar-a-Lago Raid: Ex-Federal Prosecutor

    A former federal prosecutor with knowledge of the Department of Justice’s inner workings said the FBI’s raid on former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago property in Florida was likely conducted on Aug. 8 for a specific reason.

    On Tuesday, Elie Honig, a former federal and state prosecutor turned CNN senior legal analyst, said the DOJ is required to hold off from conducting “politically sensitive moves” within 90 days of any major election.

    The Aug. 8 raid just so happened to be conducted 91 days prior to this year’s midterm elections on Nov. 8.

    “Today is just about 90 days out exactly from the midterms, I think maybe 91 or 92 days out. That policy, that may be a reason why they did it today because they want to stay clear of that if they’re interpreting that as a 90 day rule,” Honig, a former assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, told CNN.

    Earlier reports indicated the DOJ was already weighing such considerations.


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  29. … information on the potential for domestic violent extremists to carry out attacks on federal, state and local law enforcement and government personnel or facilities,” CBP Commissioner Chris Magnus wrote in a memo to employees this weekend.

    Here’s a hint Magnus, it isn’t the state or local plod that the people are pissed at. It’s YOU.


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  30. Comrade Xi must be walking round with a hard on a rat couldn’t gnaw.

    US is busy being driven insane by a geriatric and his enablers.
    Oz is busy bending the knee as its fairly obvious China can kneecap our economy overnight with a few changes to preferred imports.
    The EU is busy stamping on its own nuts shouting “take this you bastard” at Putin….

    Hed be sleeping the sleep of a contented chap.


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  31. Wake Up! 2022 Is More Important Than 2020, and I Don’t Just Mean the Elections

    Two years on, things are getting even dicier. There aren’t any lefty riots taking place at the moment, but my Spidey sense tells me something way more sinister is afoot.

    Democrats have spent the last six years pretending Trump is an existential threat to our Republic, but my radar screen is picking up different “blips.” Now that the Donkeys are in full control, I’ve been getting more than just a whiff of the bolshie nonsense wafting through our nation. Remember, the left accuses Trump of whatever dirty pool they’re shooting. When they say Trump is trying to end Democracy, I immediately assume they are up to some nefarious, Republic-gutting monkeyshines.

    The Democrats just giddily voted to hire and arm 87,000 IRS agents. They have amassed roughly 5 million rounds of ammo. Why would pencil-pushing accountants need guns and bullets? We’re likely to find out the hard way. I hope I’m wrong, but anyway you slice it, the Democrats are building up some serious street muscle.

    Meanwhile, Trump has threatened/hinted he will run for the White House again.

    The left just can’t have that. Merrick Garland sent his FBI to raid the home of one of the two patriots most likely to run as the Republican candidate in 2024. I don’t have a crystal ball but I’m guessing he did it for at least one of two reasons: 1) eventually arrest Trump to try to keep him from running, winning, and purging the federal government of the toilet people in the deep state, or 2) retrieve info about Russia-gate and Hillary’s involvement in it. Either way, it’s unprecedented and unacceptable — and I believe it’s just the tip of the Democrats’ apparatchik iceberg.

    We saw this coming. Let’s remember how the Department of Justice (DOJ) went after Trump cronies like Paul Manafort, Roger Stone, and General Flynn. Manafort just released a book claiming he was threatened with prison if he didn’t lie and help the DOJ entrap Trump. Flynn was accused of lying to the FBI after an FBI agent claimed he didn’t lie at all. The DOJ has been gunning for Trump’s troops since he came down the escalator and announced he was running for the Republican slot in the 2016 election.

    Since that election, the DOJ has decided that standing up for your kids at a school board meeting makes you a domestic terrorist. Wearing a “Don’t tread on me” Gadsden flag baseball cap makes you a “militia violent extremist.” You better trash that “seditious” Betsy Ross flag coozie before your liberal sister-in-law and her man-bunned pansexual partner report you to 1-800-EXTREME. And don’t forget that the DOJ also artificially inflated stats on domestic white violent extremism.


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  32. Trump: America ‘is in a Very Dangerous Position’ and the ‘Temperature has to be Brought Down’

    “The country is in a very dangerous position. There is tremendous anger, like I’ve never seen before, over all of the scams, and this new one — years of scams and witch hunts, and now this,” Trump said.

    “If there is anything we can do to help, I, and my people, would certainly be willing to do that,” Trump said.

    “There has never been a time like this where law enforcement has been used to break into the house of a former president of the United States, and there is tremendous anger in the country — at a level that has never been seen before, other than during very perilous times,” Trump said.

    “People are so angry at what is taking place,” Trump said. “Whatever we can do to help — because the temperature has to be brought down in the country. If it isn’t, terrible things are going to happen.”

    A leader who actually gives a damn about their country. A very rare bird these days.


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  33. because the temperature has to be brought down in the country

    Tomorrows headlines today
    Orange man bad threatens to kill entire country, reduce everyone to room temperature


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    3
  34. The price of defeat: The US fled Afghanistan exactly a year ago, but the real consequences are yet to come

    A year ago, the US suffered its most dramatic military defeat of the 21st century, so far

    The Americans were preparing to pull their troops out of Afghanistan for months, but the operation still turned out to be a disaster. Footage of young Afghans clinging to Lockheed C-5 Galaxy cargo planes at Kabul Airport went viral all over the world. And although it seems these images have vanished from mainstream discourse, the consequences of those events are yet to come.

    Fleeing on camera

    The Cold War was full of symbols. One of the most striking of these was footage of US military personnel pushing helicopters off the landing deck of the destroyer USS Kirk in the Mekong Gulf in 1975. The helicopters had been operated by pilots taking part in the US military mission in South Vietnam who were removing diplomatic staff from a besieged Saigon, along with their families. They no longer planned to return to the burning capital, so the expensive aircraft were sunk in the South China Sea.

    While the helicopters on the deck of the Kirk were a striking, albeit isolated, case of such an incident being caught on camera, the multi-day flight of thousands of people fearing the Islamist dictatorship of the Taliban, who were rapidly taking control of Kabul, was shown on all social networks. The situation was exacerbated by a terrorist attack in the now almost forgotten style of the aughts.

    On August 26, an explosion was heard in an airport terminal building packed with refugees. Approximately 170 civilians and 13 American servicemen were killed. At the same time, the world was innundated by videos of groups of grim men in turbans sitting at tables in the government offices of the presidential palace. Kalashnikov assault rifles from all over the world, as well as American M4s and Swiss SGs, could also be seen in the frame.

    According to available data, including an analysis by auditors from the public organization Open the Books, the US military left up to 650,000 weapons to the rapidly advancing Taliban forces. This includes 350,000 modern M4 assault rifles and obsolete M16s, 65,000 machine guns, 25,000 submachine guns, and 2,500 mortar launchers. According to the organization’s estimates, the Americans left up to 22,000 Humvees and 110 UH-60 Black Hawk combat helicopters. Even if these figures are an exaggeration (as seems to be the case), it is logical to assume that withdrawing all of America’s remaining troops within just a week after pumping the entire region with weapons for 20 years would result in precisely this outcome. Army General Austin Miller, a special forces soldier who was in charge of the troops in Afghanistan, demonstratively handed over his command before the start of the troop withdrawal and now works as an adviser in a private company.


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  35. “People are so angry at what is taking place,” Trump said. “Whatever we can do to help — because the temperature has to be brought down in the country. If it isn’t, terrible things are going to happen.”

    How about you stop talking for a month or two, Flame Guy.


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    1
  36. The last Tsar: How Russia commemorates the brutal communist murder of Emperor Nikolai II’s family

    Over 103 years ago, Bolsheviks shattered a royal line that had lasted for over three centuries

    Long and interesting read on the History up to today

    The procession begins at 2:30am Ural time. It is headed by church leaders, followed by a long column of Orthodox Christians, who hail not only from Russia, but also from Western Europe, Latin America, and Asia. In less than four hours, the first pilgrims appear at the final point of the route – the monastery at Ganina Yama. Orthodox Christians in comfortable sneakers carrying bottles of water cheerfully sing “Lord, Jesus Christ, have mercy on us!” The former mine is now enclosed by a gallery filled with portraits of the royal passion-bearers and their faithful servants.

    RT spoke with people born in the Urals who say that they participated in the procession as children, and now help their elderly parents walk along this long route.


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    2
  37. Records Suggest A Backbench Bureaucrat’s Partisan Grievance Spurred The FBI’s Nakedly Political Raid On Trump

    The purpose of the grand jury investigation and raid on Mar-a-Lago was to get Donald Trump, not documents.

    Last week’s raid on Trump’s Mar-a-Lago home represented the culmination of a criminal investigation pushed by a partisan bureaucrat who called January 6, 2021, the “absolute worst” day of his life. And while since last Monday, the country has focused on the FBI’s raid of Trump’s personal residence, seeing that as the crossing of the Rubicon, the die was cast this spring when the DOJ went to the grand jury about Trump’s presidential records.

    Reporting by the New York Times and Washington Post — some from months ago — when pieced together and considered in tandem with past practices related to presidential and other governmental records, reveals this reality. The relevant reporting started no later than February of this year, when the Washington Post broke the news that the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) confirmed in a statement, issued by the then-archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero, that in January of 2022 NARA had retrieved from Mar-a-Lago 15 boxes of presidential records, which according to sources included items such as mementos, gifts, and letters. NARA added that Trump representatives were “continuing to search” for additional records.

    Months later, in interviewing the then-recently retired Ferriero, the Washington Post detailed the origins of the retrieval of the 15 boxes. At the conclusion of Trump’s presidency, the Post reported, Ferriero “was told by the White House Office of Records Management about a group of boxes in the White House residence that should go to the Archives.”

    “As we were moving materials from the White House just before the inauguration, those boxes hadn’t shown up yet,” Ferriero said. The retired archivist then explained how he remembered “watching the Trumps leave the White House and getting off in the helicopter that day, and someone carrying a white banker box, and saying to myself, ‘What the hell’s in that box?’” According to Ferriero, “that began a whole process of trying to determine whether any records had not been turned over to the Archives.”


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  38. In Its Rage, China Just Offered A Sneak Peek Of Its Plans For Striking Taiwan

    China’s response to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s recent visit to Taiwan gives a glimpse of what future conflicts could look like.

    Last week, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) declared an end to its live-fire military exercises. An enraged Beijing kicked off the drills in response to U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan during her recent trip to Asia. The exercises presented a rare window for the outside world to examine the PLA’s strength, offered clues to how Beijing plans to take over Taiwan militarily, and served as a reminder that Beijing has consistently matched its rhetoric with actions.

    China’s Fighting Power Has Dramatically Improved

    All branches of the PLA, from the army, navy, and air force, to logistical units, participated in the week-long drills. They encircled Taiwan, which effectively imposed a blockade on the island. The PLA showed off its fighting power by deploying fighter jets and bombers in the sky and destroyers, submarines, and aircraft carriers in the ocean.

    Many defense experts were shocked at how much progress the Chinese military had made since the last Taiwan strait crisis in 1995-1996 when China staged military exercises after then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich visited Taiwan.

    According to Oriana Skylar Mastro, a China expert at Stanford University, China’s military exercises in the ’90s felt like child’s play because the PLA “barely had what could be considered an air force and a navy. Its pilots could not fly over water, at night, or in rough weather. In 1999 less than 2 percent of its fighters were the fourth generation, just 4 percent of its attack submarines were classed as modern (nuclear powered, for example), and none of its surface ships was.”

    The PLA’s recent drills demonstrate that China’s investment in modernizing its military during the last two decades has paid off. The PLA has transformed from a backwater fighting force into a modern and cohesive one. Has the PLA advanced enough to be comparable to America’s in quality and quantity?

    While Mastro seems to think so, many other China watchers disagree.

    Based on these recent drills, a realistic assessment of the PLA is that it has made significant progress and has narrowed the gap between itself and the U.S. military in many areas. Engaging the PLA in a war will be a very challenging endeavor. The U.S. military cannot afford to be complacent, and continuing to invest in our military’s fighting power should be a priority for any U.S. administration.

    China Is Testing a New Strategy

    China’s military drills have demonstrated its resolve and ability to invade Taiwan, but these exercises also suggest that Beijing is testing new strategies on Taiwan. Rather than an outright invasion, Beijing may first impose a blockade on Taiwan to starve the island’s economy while cutting off the island’s contact with the outside world and preventing economic and military aid from arriving from Taiwan’s allies.

    It helps to disguise any preparations for a real military campaign” because “China needs an element of surprise to be able to take Taiwan before America has time to mobilize adequate forces in the region to defend the island.”

    The challenge facing Taiwan and the U.S. is how to distinguish China’s routine exercise from a surprise attack because remaining vigilant all the time is mentally and physically exhausting and financially costly.

    Actions — And Inactions — Speak Louder Than Words

    As China conducted live-fire drills near Taiwan, the Biden administration announced it would delay a routine U.S. missile test to avoid escalating tensions with China after Pelosi’s visit.

    Why was the Biden administration concerned about placating Beijing when Beijing was the one who antagonized the escalation? Why didn’t the Biden administration respond to China’s sanctions on Pelosi and her family by imposing sanctions on PLA generals and their families?

    Inaction is the last thing that will deter the PLA from invading Taiwan. If China perceives a consistent gap between the U.S. government’s actions and rhetoric on Taiwan, its military may grow more aggressive. Regardless of the outcome, a Chinese invasion of Taiwan will incur an enormous cost for all parties involved.


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  39. Just walked up to David Jones at lunch to buy a frock and on the way back I ran into Brendan Nelson.
    He’s a nice man, a very nice man.

    We chatted whilst walking and I asked him his thoughts on the Liberal Party, the electoral results and Peter Dutton.

    Re. Peter Dutton, he said that Dutton is doing okay, it’s early days. I said yes, and I said that unlike your good self and Tony Abbott, he doesn’t have anyone undermining and plotting against him. He smiled and said “indeed”. We didn’t need to mention his name.


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  40. Cassie of Sydney:

    “Another confounding aspect is that Morrison ceded an enormous amount of power to state premiers during the pandemic – while at the same time concentrating power for himself.”

    …and that, Cassie, is disturbing on several levels.


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  41. “The last Tsar: How Russia commemorates the brutal communist murder of Emperor Nikolai II’s family

    Over 103 years ago, Bolsheviks shattered a royal line that had lasted for over three centuries”

    It was worse than that. That terrible night the Bolsheviks murdered five innocent children, butchering them with bayonets. The four girls suffered unimaginable brutality, as their dresses and corsets had been sewn with jewels so as to hide them from the Bolsheviks. The jewels deflected the bullets so the murderers clubbed them to death, one of those murderers probably being Imre Nagy.


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  42. M0nty-fa

    “How long after he drops the kids off at school will m0nty-fa arrive here?

    Bloody hell, could you be any more pathetic.”

    After sympathy trolling last week about having “a life”, you have been here most of the day, most days. The question was reasonable, and your reaction answers it.


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  43. He smiled and said “indeed”. We didn’t need to mention his name.

    Somewhere in the outer darkness a ghost whines a little louder and gibbers to itself…


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  44. m0nty says:
    August 16, 2022 at 2:15 pm

    “People are so angry at what is taking place,” Trump said. “Whatever we can do to help — because the temperature has to be brought down in the country. If it isn’t, terrible things are going to happen.”

    How about you stop talking for a month or two, Flame Guy.

    Leftwingers triggered? How unsurprising.


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  45. Crossie:

    I think ScoMo is planning on writing a tell-all book so no point in giving it away for free. You will have to buy his book to find out what he was thinking.

    There is only one condition under which I would buy the book – and that would be to dump it in the piss trough at the local pub – front cover up.


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  46. Cassie – re Brendan Nelson. I confess I didn’t have a lot of confidence in him during his short term as Lib head honcho. But a few years ago I heard him speak on the legacy of our Anzacs & other returned servicemen. It was one of the most moving speeches I have ever heard. Absolutely memorable. This is a very decent and honourable man. I have often wondered why he stepped down from the head position at the Canberra War Memorial. Political machinations from those who do not hold the military in high esteem?


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  47. Mole consulting shall read the tea leaves for the idiots asking this question..

    Federal government inquiry into ‘civic crisis’ amid fall in volunteering indicates ‘collapse in community life’

    The federal government says Australia is in the grip of a “civic crisis” linked to loneliness and unprecedented pressure on the charity sector. *

    An inquiry is underway to see what can be done to reverse what it is calling the “collapse in community life”, with public hearings being held in capital cities through August and September.**

    Assistant Minister for Competition, Charities and Treasury Andrew Leigh said such dramatic language was warranted.

    “Australia today is facing a civic crisis,” Mr Leigh said.

    “We’ve seen a collapse in the number of people volunteering and a decline in the share of people who are donating to charities.***

    “Compared with the mid-1980s, Australians have half as many close friends, and know half as many of their neighbours.****

    The hearings will focus on what can be done to foster a sense of community after a gruelling few years of COVID pandemic restrictions, as well as rebuilding volunteer numbers and boosting donations to charities.*****

    Recent ABC coverage highlighted the significant impact of plummeting volunteer numbers in regional communities.

    The coverage resulted in public feedback about excessive ‘red tape’ making volunteering more difficult. Others pointed to mounting financial stress reducing people’s willingness to donate time or money.

    Mr Leigh said the stakes were high.

    “The Productivity Commission showed us that in the decade to 2020 the share of Australians who were volunteer firefighters declined, which meant that when those awful summer bushfires hit we were ill-prepared,” he said.

    “We just didn’t have enough volunteer firefighters to meet the needs of the community.******

    “I’m not stupid — I get that this is a huge challenge to be taking on — but the benefits are so big, why wouldn’t we give it a go?”*******

    * Step 1, deserving and undeserving poor, rich OAPs turning up at food banks “because they are entitled” is a nice example. Why would people volunteer if they see it being abused or rorted?
    ** Great, “capital cities” as usual.
    *** 1/3 of Australia’s GDP is eaten by government, just where is the provision of services for this need?
    **** A predictable side effect of importing a nation of tribes?
    ***** You bloody did that, not some nebulous “covid restriction” sent from space. The government, state and federal, at all levels with uniparty support smashed and atomized “community”.
    ****** Again, you did that, removing thousands of members based on their being unwilling to submit to a illegal medical directive. You also (come on down Dan o de dead) chucked government employees/unions over the top of many volunteer groups (CFA) to shore up your little feifdoms.
    ******* Because you are miserable failures. Crayon eating dickheads who screw everything they touch. 40+ years on the planet and you havent worked out governments main power is to destroy things.


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  48. ZK2A:

    Some of those “First Nations” comprise clans who have been feuding for so long they can’t even agree on what day of the week it is, good luck in getting them to agree on the terms of a treaty.

    Shame on you, ZK2A – ‘days of the Week’ is a White mans social construct – Aboriginal Culture (PBUI) only recognises Sat. and Sun. and the hypothetical days in between.


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  49. Morro being painted as “destroyer of democracy”, when in fact it was all the state premiers and their henchmen who robbed us of our liberty and beat/fined people for non-compliance with their stupid lockdowns and dangerous vaccines.


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  50. “How about you stop talking for a month or two, Flame Guy.”
    He was Sinc’s Troll Albatross, and now he’s Dover’s. But shooting is preferable to not shooting.
    If you don’t shoot, the Albatross remains around your neck ad nauseum.


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  51. An extremely good write up over at CLs (in the sidebar).

    Well worth 5 minutes to go through.

    He also hits on one of my little bugbears.
    The Alaric at the gate wasn’t them. He was Jacinta, Boris, Justin and Joe. The three savants who napkin-sketched AUKUS were less interested in fanciful nuclear submarines than they were in saving face two weeks after being routed by the Taliban. When Vladimir Putin began his ‘special military operation’ in February they saw a way out of Dodge. They and their guilty ilk turned the attention of their populations away from their own criminality and towards the Russian bogeyman.

    Vlads a turd, but it gave Biden something he could wave his withered schlong at while yelling ” Im smart


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  52. Just walked up to David Jones at lunch to buy a frock and on the way back I ran into Brendan Nelson.
    He’s a nice man, a very nice man.

    I briefly met Brendan Nelson at a function for the charity my rugby club supports. A few years later my father and I went to the ‘Last Post’ ceremony at the War Memorial to commemorate the 100th anniversary of my great-grandfather’s brother’s death in Belgium in WW1. I spoke to one of the public servants at the AWM to see if my great-great uncle’s name could be mentioned in the ceremony but that was all too hard for him and I got a flat “no”.

    Dad and I were in our suits and ties with a wreath waiting for the ceremony when Brendan Nelson walked up. He recognised me and asked what I was doing. I replied that we were here to honour our relative on the 100th anniversary of his death, and Brendan asked what was his name. I told him and he wrote down his name and battalion. The MC at the Last Post ceremony then mentioned my great-great uncle in the introduction to the ceremony.

    A big thumbs up from me as to the character of the man.


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  53. feelthebern says:
    August 16, 2022 at 3:28 pm
    Trump is like the Tolkien’s Witch-King.
    He speaks with Mordor breath, poisoning all who hear it.

    Ahaha! Could be.

    “To crooked eyes truth may wear a wry face.” – Gandalf



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  54. because the temperature has to be brought down in the country

    Ah yes. Joins the inevitable calls for bipartisanship. Strange, I don’t recall those a couple of years ago.


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  55. A big thumbs up from me as to the character of the man.

    My son (AKA The New Broom), has another take on Nelson.

    You can always gauge the character of someone when the plumbing backs up. Weekend. Big party. Guests about to arrive and the loos are overflowing.

    Not a word of frustration or anger, just good humour and gratitude that a plumber was available to fix it.

    And I was wrong about Mike Baird too. Apparently he is a decent person also. But that’s another story.


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  56. Re the supposed decline in volunteering & the supposed lack of civic responsibility:

    I think I have mentioned before that our RFS captain with decades of service resigned last year because of the vaccine mandate for all volunteers. He is an honourable man & although he himself was vaccinated he would not serve when his unvaccinated mates were barred.

    BTW in the 2018 fires the visiting bureaucratic paid RFS officers were strictly 9-5. They would not permit our blokes to backburn NPWS forest adjacent to farms & houses. There was a lot of resentment from the volunteers.

    I am disappointed how many Australians are drawn to the so called (paid) public service . So many volunteer organisations like the RFS and the SES have been debased by the public service administration of what was once a fine community service.


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  57. This Liberal party needs to be made defunct.
    Colluding with state Labor to put us through years of tyranny.
    Silent about the thuggish behaviour of Vicpol and Andrews.
    Utterly oblivious that their chosen leader swore himself in to five portfolios.
    What were these clowns doing?
    They sure as fuck were not safeguarding our Westminster system or representing voters.
    Vote for anyone but these utter wankers or the green lunatics.


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  58. A total undermining of the cabinet system and destruction of proper lines of responsibility.
    We have been subject to two years of dictatorship.
    With state idiots hiding behind the public service and Morrison grabbing control of everything that should have been debated in Federal parliament, and establishing this abominable national cabinet.
    The bastards have gone against everything our system stands for.


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  59. And I was wrong about Mike Baird too. Apparently he is a decent person also. But that’s another story.

    Mike’s name has been drawn into the courtroom drama about the defrauding of NAB by two women, Helen Mary Rosamond and Rosemary Rogers.

    Among the largest of the allegedly fraudulent invoices issued was one for $2.2 million.
    It was purportedly for ‘Project Eagle’ – the codename for the onboarding of former NSW premier Mike Baird as an NAB executive in 2017 – but instead was to cover a substantial amount for a home Rogers had purchased in Williamstown in Melbourne’s west.
    (Daily Mail via MSN news)

    Begs the question – why would $2.2 million be deemed appropriate for the “onboarding” of Mike?

    The whole defrauding scandal raises the tantalising issue of a Big Four Bank being so easily taken to the cleaners by two (alleged) scam artists. It seemed so easy for them – has fraud also been committed on a bigger scale by bigger players?


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  60. And it’s glorious that Eric Weinstein is giving it to Australia’s own Peter Doherty on twitter.

    The Doherty institute needs to be thoroughly audited.


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  61. feelthebern says:
    August 16, 2022 at 4:17 pm

    Apologies if this has already been posted.
    If not, dover please don’t ban me for posting something from the Conversation.

    https://theconversation.com/the-covid-lab-leak-theory-is-dead-heres-how-we-know-the-virus-came-from-a-wuhan-market-188163

    The good news is that I can disregard whatever the author “Edward C Holmes” says about anything in the future.

    Holmes is into this up to his armpits. He’s as far from a disinterested observer as it’s possible to be. He originally was of the opinion that it was man made, then was “got at” and changed his tune. He’s been fully establishment ever since.

    Those involved in GoF are still playing hard defense since if Trump gets in and investigations start, it could get life threatening for some of them.


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  62. It seemed so easy for them – has fraud also been committed on a bigger scale by bigger players?

    Yes.
    But it’s not fraud when banks do it.


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  63. Given the state of the New Zealand government under PM Jacinda Ardern and the arsehat in government here in future we may be able to discern the outcomes for government based on the dentition of its Leader


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  64. Old School Conservativesays:
    August 16, 2022 at 4:34 pm
    And I was wrong about Mike Baird too. Apparently he is a decent person also. But that’s another story.

    Mike’s name has been drawn into the courtroom drama about the defrauding of NAB by two women, Helen Mary Rosamond and Rosemary Rogers.

    Lavish lunches ‘key to planning NAB fraud’

    Rosemary Rogers, the former chief of staff to NAB chief executives Andrew Thorburn and Cameron Clyne, and Helen Rosamond, the owner of events company Human Group, met for lavish lunches in Sydney every few weeks to plan their alleged fraud of the big four bank, the Crown alleges.

    Ms Rosamond is facing 92 charges of corruptly giving benefits to Rogers or her family, and 32 counts of dishonestly obtaining a financial advantage by deception, arising out of alleged falsified and inflated invoices issued to NAB over four years between 2013 and 2017 to the tune of about $15 million.

    The trial, which is expected to take four months, began on Monday at Sydney’s Downing Centre.

    Ms Rosamond has pleaded not guilty. Mr Thorburn and Mr Clyne are not accused of wrongdoing. Rogers will give evidence later in the trial.

    Crown prosecutor Katrina Mackenzie detailed how Rogers would fly to Sydney from Melbourne to meet Mr Rosamond every few weeks and that the women, who in text messages between 2016 and 2018 referred to each other as “besties” and “sister from another mother”, would talk daily.

    Rogers pleaded guilty in 2019 to charges of being an agent corruptly receiving a benefit. In January last year, she was sentenced to a combined eight years in jail, despite having helped authorities with their inquiries.

    “They were meeting for lunch every few weeks … during the period of 2013 and 2018, and you’ll hear from Ms Rogers, these lunches were integral to the offending,” Ms Mackenzie said.

    “Rogers could tell the accused what she wanted, they could work out what invoices they could add to, and they would work out whether they needed to create new invoices or they could just add to existing invoices.”

    Allegations laid out

    Ms Mackenzie stepped through the details of the accusations against Ms Rosamond to the 14-person jury. She detailed how Rogers received gifts, including hundreds of thousands of dollars in prepaid MasterCards, lavish family trips, flights, accommodation, home renovations and even payments related to boats, made by the Human Group.

    The Crown alleges this was done by Ms Rosamond to curry favour with Rogers, and that Human Group’s contract was never properly audited, the allegedly fraudulent invoices never had any supporting documentation, and its contract was extended with NAB without tender.

    Ms Mackenzie went through text messages that the Crown said was evidence that Ms Rosamond knew what she was doing was fraudulent.

    This included an exchange over a Chaparral boat, worth about $145,000. Rogers traded in a Bayliner boat, leaving $115,000 left to pay.

    “I will call Scott in the morning and say we’re going ahead with it and that you will be in touch. They think you’re my accountant ha,” Rogers texted to Ms Rosamond.

    The court also heard Ms Rosamond organised and gave Rogers a weekend at Crown Towers in Melbourne for six people, after initially booking into the Hilton and moving “because the rooms were too small”, Ms Mackenzie said.

    The wide-scale fraud came undone in December 2017 after a whistleblower informed NAB executives and the bank’s chairman of the scheme in which Rogers had received gifts from Ms Rosamond.

    Ms Rosamond’s defence is yet to outline its case. The trial continues.


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  65. Vote for anyone but these utter wankers or the green lunatics.

    Though why not the green loon, accelerate Arky, accelerate and embrace the suck.


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  66. Perfesser Andrew Leigh: “I’m not stupid”.

    Oh yes, you bloody well are. You’re a labore politician for starters.

    Talk about clueless. You gift the plebs with two and half years of obscene fascist idiocy, destroy social cohesion over a period of decades creating an atomised society of tribes (we’re now a nation in name only), engineer an entirely avoidable economic disaster and now seek to divide us even further – yet you have the gall to wonder why there’s an alleged “civic crisis” and “collapse in community life”, while claiming you aren’t stupid.

    Just f*ck off and die, you smarmy infuriating contemptible grinning imbecile.


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  67. Merrick Garland Goes Solo in Mar-a-Lago Search

    Did Biden know about the Trump raid? If not, that’s truly disturbing.

    More than a week after the morning FBI raid on Donald Trump’s Florida home, the White House continues to insist Joe Biden knew nothing about it.

    Many find this hard to swallow. Not least Mr. Trump. On his website Truth Social he wrote, “Biden knew all about this, just like he knew all about Hunter’s ‘deals.’ ” Nevertheless, the White House insists that no one in the West Wing knew that Attorney General Merrick Garland and the FBI would be willing to break with more than two centuries of precedent without so much as a heads up to chief of staff Ron Klain.

    There is, however, an argument for it. Because presidential ignorance here (or at least the pretense of it) serves a useful political game. And it isn’t finished playing out.

    When the media began asking questions last Tuesday, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said: “You know, the president and the White House learned about this FBI search from public reports. We learned, just like the American public did yesterday, and we did not have advance notice of this activity.” Ms. Jean-Pierre went on to say the president “has been very clear” that the Justice Department “conducts investigations independently.”

    And the capper: “I’m just not going to comment on any reaction to what happened yesterday. We are going to refer any incoming to the Department of Justice.” She repeated that several times in response to different questions about the raid.

    Notwithstanding Mr. Garland’s presser Thursday, the Justice Department hasn’t been forthcoming with key details because the Mar-a-Lago search is part of a continuing criminal investigation. Which means the American people get no answers from anyone.

    Whatever this is, it isn’t the way the Framers thought about making democratic government accountable to the people. Contrary to what Mr. Biden seems to believe, the authors of the Constitution never envisioned anyone in the government being independent—except from the other branches.

    Certainly we hope the raid fulfilled the objective criminal and statutory requirements—and wasn’t instigated for partisan reasons by the White House. We can all imagine what would happen if a president abused his power by badgering his attorney general to harass political enemies and go easy on political friends. Mr. Trump was himself often accused of this when he was president. A politicized Justice Department isn’t what anyone wants.

    But the flip side is this: Do Americans really want an unelected attorney general making the unprecedented decision to send 30 FBI agents to the home of a former president and possible presidential candidate without at least running it by his boss, the sitting president?

    Given how extraordinary the move was, wouldn’t a president want to have it run past him first?

    Especially when it comes, as this does, against the backdrop of the FBI and Justice Department having lost the trust of millions of Americans by their actions of the past few years. FBI agents were caught making highly unflattering remarks about Mr. Trump and his supporters while pursuing a case against him based on a fake dossier fed them by the Hillary Clinton campaign. Not to mention one FBI official admitted to doctoring an email submitted to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court to help make the case that Trump campaign adviser Carter Page was a Russian agent.

    It’s true that in the years since our founding, many barnacles have grown on the original understanding of constitutional independence. Independent counsels, inspectors general and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court are a few of the more recent contributions. But the record of these unelected overseers is dubious. In some cases they might have improved accountability. But in others they have eroded it.

    Take the FISA court. The Carter Page warrant shows that it effectively insulates officials who deploy the most formidable powers of the federal government from the consequences of what should be an extraordinary decision: spying on a fellow American. Without a judge to give them cover, FBI agents and Justice officials would be far more responsible for their actions.

    In some ways this is another expression of the growing administrative state. Today there exist dozens of agencies not really under the president’s control, making executive decisions that affect the lives and livelihoods of millions of ordinary Americans. When they are interpreting a question about which Congress was either ambiguous or silent, they effectively make law.

    The cry is thus that unelected bureaucrats are exercising unchecked power against Americans. But that’s only half the story. The dirty secret is that many of the elective officeholders whose authority is being usurped don’t complain because it also means they can get what they want done without assuming any of the political cost. It’s the same with pols who wink at activist courts usurping their lawmaking functions because they agree with the outcome and are spared any of the political heat.

    Maybe what President Biden says is true: He and everyone else in the White House had no idea the FBI was executing a search at Mar-a-Lago until they saw it on television with every other American.

    If so, that’s even more disturbing.


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  68. The question was pretty simple. Did Baird get a cut?

    I’m happy to revise my opinion based on the truth, not a bathtub full of legalese squid ink.


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    3
  69. Government Expenditure crowds out charitable giving and volunteering.

    That’s the idea, for two reasons.

    First is that they want anyone who needs assistance to look to Daddy. Which is the government.

    Second charitable giving and volunteering are practices traditional to Christianity. Which they despise.


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  70. Are you suggesting that Baird got a cut of the 2.2million

    Heavens no calli.
    I am staying that someone, somewhere in NAB thought that $2.2. was a legitimate expenditure when trying to get a former Premier into the business.
    Then the bank would recoup that cost by profiting from Mike’s PS and government contacts in the years to come.


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    1
  71. Boston Children’s Hospital: Children Know They Are Trans ‘the Minute They Were Born’

    A harrowing video from the Boston Children’s Hospital claims that children can know that they are transgender “from the minute they were born, practically.”

    The video was made by Dr. Jeremi Carswell, the Director of the Gender Multispeciality Service at the Boston Children’s Hospital.

    The Boston Children’s Hospital is associated with Harvard University and was the first to establish a clinic that specifically focused on “transgender health” in a pediatric setting.

    In the video, Carswell makes the startling claim that “A child will often know that they are transgender from the moment that they have any ability to express themselves.” She continues and doubles down, remarking, “They knew from the minute they were born, practically.”

    Breitbart News previously revealed that Carswell has received thousands of dollars in compensation for consulting on behalf of Endo Pharmaceuticals, a company that makes a drug that is used off-label as a puberty blocker for children who are considered to be transgender.

    An academic paper, authored in part by Carswell, had to be corrected after it was incorrectly asserted that the researchers had no conflict of interest.

    Carswell is just one of many doctors to have received significant compensation from the companies that manufacture puberty blockers.

    Carswell’s consultation regarded the drug Supprelin LA, which is used as a puberty blocker. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently warned that Supprelin LA can cause swelling of the brain and loss of vision.

    In the video, Carswell cites a number of different behaviors that supposedly provide evidence that a child is transgender and may be suitable to undergo permanent, life-altering surgery or medical intervention, including playing with “opposite gender toys,” refusing to get a haircut, or trying on a sibling’s clothing.

    Breitbart News previously reported that the Boston Children’s Hospital advertised “gender-affirming” hysterectomies for adolescents in a video.


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  72. Vicki

    “I am disappointed how many Australians are drawn to the so called (paid) public service . So many volunteer organisations like the RFS and the SES have been debased by the public service administration of what was once a fine community service.”

    Add in volunteer Marine Rescue.


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  73. criminals are in charge of the entire government

    Not as allegorical as it sounds. What if the people running the Biden junta aren’t giving criminals a pass just for ideological reasons, but because they are fellow criminals looking after their criminal brothers and sisters?

    does the biden cartel have any ideology beyond self enrichment


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  74. Breitbart News previously reported that the Boston Children’s Hospital advertised “gender-affirming” hysterectomies for adolescents in a video.

    stealth eugenics


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  75. Just think about this.

    We live in a world where puberty blockers are considered a legitimate medication.

    Less than 20 years ago it was accepted that wanting to change your physical sex was a form of mental illness.
    What sounds more likely.
    a: Chemical and surgical mutilation to make ones body match the external appearance otf the opposite sex is a normal medical procedure.
    B: The desire to surgically /chemically mutilate your body to match the external appearance of the opposite sex is a mental illness.


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  76. New research: #MeToo movement hurt female productivity

    CV data shows that fewer women academics are collaborating with men

    Using CV data to track collaborations between economists over six years around #MeToo (2015-2020), researcher Marina Gertsberg discovered that junior female academics started 0.7 fewer projects per year than before. 60% of this decline can be attributed to a decrease in collaborations with new male co-authors, which broadly correlates with a reduction in growth of the co-author network.

    Gertsberg attributes this fall to men unwilling to collaborate with women due to fears of accusations of sexual harassment. In fact, several surveys have found that men believe they are more vulnerable to false allegations of sexual harassment in a post-MeToo landscape, and are perhaps managing this perceived risk by reducing their exposure to women.

    #MeToo’s original goal was to improve workplace conditions for women by holding men accountable for sexual misconduct.

    This new research is significant because it highlights that the #MeToo movement had negative effects on women too. Junior researchers depend on collaboration with colleagues to build their reputation and qualify for tenure. But a reduction in interactions and professional collaborations “will exacerbate inequality between the career opportunities of men and women,” the paper concludes.

    The MeToo movement intended to improve the workplace for women, but it may have had the unintended consequence of stalling their careers.

    APPARENTLY THEY COULDN’T SEE THE CONSEQUENCES OF DEMANDING WE BELIEVE ALL WOMEN:

    Because you know what? I’m a woman, and I wouldn’t trust half of the hysterics claiming they’ve been abused within three meters of me, let alone in the same meeting room. Once we got to #metoo accusations that boiled down to “he oppressed me with his male gaze” sane men were going to shut the door on any woman, to avoid getting put over the barrel. Only idiots, hysterics and Marxists (BIRM) couldn’t see that coming.


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  77. I am staying that someone, somewhere in NAB thought that $2.2. was a legitimate expenditure when trying to get a former Premier into the business.

    Amakudari

    The Japanese term amakudari “descent from heaven” stands for the retired civil servants that at the end of their governmental carrier become “counselors” to big companies. Their employment by the companies goes without saying, since hiring a person with such a prestigious background is considered a privilege. But it is at the same time a financial burden for the company, since it is expected to pay not only a salary, corresponding to the high level of their “amakudari” employee, but also a huge retirement allowance once the ex-bureaucrat decides to leave its executive position in the company. In return, companies expect some privileges and support at the highest ministerial level, thanks to the connections of their “counselor”. Bureaucracy, penetrating both in government and business, becomes a mediator between them, creating non-transparent ties and augmenting its role and weight in the society. Many Japanese experts assume that the system should be changed but agree that this process could take many years, since it is deeply rooted in the society structure and the bureaucrats are not likely to accept reforms that would limit their power.

    Sometimes one might wonder who actually won WW2.


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  78. The Hill to Die On

    This country was founded as a middle finger to tyranny and it’s about time we got back to those roots.

    Growing up in our house, Election Night was like the Super Bowl. We would stay up late into the night watching the returns. The 2020 election was no different. That night, I watched Donald Trump take state after state with ease. Then I watched as votes started to fluctuate, barely trickled in, and then, with only a handful of states to go, I watched as counting was halted altogether. A sinking feeling crept over me as I witnessed things I had never seen in my life.

    The media, the Left, and RINOs like to say that these “feelings” about Trump stem from a cult-like devotion to him. It couldn’t possibly be that for years, prior to the election, we observed an unprecedented witch hunt against him. Neither could it be that I, like many others, watched as states halted their counts under the flimsiest of circumstances. It certainly looked odd. Almost two years on, Americans still question—with evidence—whether or not the 2020 election was rigged.

    And now, with last week’s raid on Trump’s Mar-a-Lago home, I felt that sinking feeling again. They are expecting us to believe that a raid that was authorized by a judge who had previously represented Jeffrey Epstein’s staff isn’t fishy? At what point does objecting to such “coincidences” stop being labeled conspiracy-thinking and start being recognized as a true representation of corruption?

    What we have seen over the last year and a half, with hundreds of Americans locked up for a faux “insurrection,” sends a clear message of intimidation from the Justice Department, the FBI, and this administration. They are showing the American people what happens when they don’t conform.

    This goes far beyond Trump. He is simply the one being used to bring their contempt for us and the things we want politically into the light. The ocean of corruption in our government has been building like a massive tidal wave for decades and many are just now seeing it.

    Between now and November, be prepared for the Left to pull out all the stops. These are desperate times for those in power because they are realizing the stronghold they once held over the American people is weakening. Trust in the media is the lowest it’s ever been. The scourge of inflation, coupled with the obvious corruption of our governing elites, leaves us with the perfect storm where people cannot help but be energized.

    This country was founded as a middle finger to tyranny and it’s about time we got back to those roots. As Americans we have to stop waiting for someone else to fix our problems. We have to be courageous enough to be our own saviors.


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  79. calli says:
    August 16, 2022 at 4:59 pm
    The question was pretty simple. Did Baird get a cut?

    When he resigned in 2020 the SMH outlined that year’s payment to Mike from NAB:

    Former New South Wales premier Mike Baird has pocketed more than $1.9 million from the National Australia Bank, accounting for just under 10 per cent of the total payments made to executives by the bank in financial year 2020.

    Figures released in NAB’s annual report on Wednesday show Mr Baird was paid $677,791 in cash plus benefits and a cessation payment of $1.1 million or 26 weeks’ pay.

    Not a cut of the $2.2m but a hefty package all the same.


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    1
  80. Boston Children’s Hospital: Children Know They Are Trans ‘the Minute They Were Born’

    A harrowing video from the Boston Children’s Hospital claims that children can know that they are transgender “from the minute they were born, practically.”

    The video was made by Dr. Jeremi Carswell, the Director of the Gender Multispeciality Service at the Boston Children’s Hospital.

    The skank is a looker.


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  81. The Fifth Law

    Welcome back to the Scuttlebutt. – Pull up a chair and have a beer, let’s talk.

    Anyway, Lehman’s Fifth Law of Politics (there are laws of politics, warfare, tool use, and life.) states: “Never create a political weapon that you don’t want to hand to your enemy to use against you. You will not be in power forever no matter what, and they will do unto you as you have done unto them, only they’ll have had the time to perfect it.”

    Now the DNC just really have a problem understanding this, they keep making the same mistake. Killing the 2/3 majority for judges, killing the “home senator rule” for judges, playing with the House and Senate Parliamentary practice rules, calling things “funding bills” so they can use the reconciliation process…the list goes on and on, and every time they change the rules to benefit themselves, by the time they do it, they get one maybe two shots in, then they lose control of the body in question, and the RNC grab that stick and beat them soundly with it. I suspect this will be another one of those times.

    Look, I’m not a particular fan of President Trump, I thought he batted about 450 during his time in office. (As a reference, RR batted 900, JFK 500, Carter and Biden barely made 050.)

    Of course, part of that was that EVERY SINGLE BUREAUCRAT in the federal government was trying to sabotage his ass. On the other hand, every bureaucrat in the government right now is trying to prop up President Biden, and he’s still a total trainwreck, so there’s that.

    I would really rather that he not run again. Not because I don’t want to see him in office, but because if he runs, he will be such a contentious figure as to further the divide, and push us ever closer to that oxymoron: a Civil War.

    I am also under no delusion that there are no skeletons in his closet. With the laws that we have on the books today, we are nearly at full Lavrenti Beria (the head of the NKVD, forerunner to the KGB) mode here; he’s the guy that said: “Show me the man, and I’ll find you the crime.” There are so many laws when it comes to taxes, real estate law, employment law, etc… (and oh, wait, Trump was a businessman, specializing in real estate, before he was an entertainer, before he was president… So, yeah, I’m sure you can find a place that he crossed a line.) Hell, there’s enough contradictory law in real-estate development that in some states, to follow one law, you have to break another.

    All of that said, the very idea of raiding the house of a former President should have gotten whoever suggested it, sent to McMurdo Station for a five-year tour, after a look that said “Have you lost your ever-loving MIND???” The fact that they went through with it, and did so while Trump and family were not even in residence, (thus you can’t make a case that “we need to do a raid right now because he’s going to destroy the evidence.”) shows the extremely political nature of both the AG who lost his shot at a Supreme Court seat because of Trump and a Judge who is both a political hack and a former employee of Mr. Epstein. https://nypost.com/2022/08/09/judge-who-approved-fbi-raid-on-mar-a-lago-once-linked-to-jeffrey-epstein/

    We have had questionable Presidents before, (Taft, Grant, Jackson, Harding, Nixon, Reagan, (Iran Contra) Clinton, and one of my favorite whipping boys El B.J.) we have had presidents who came into office absolutely HATING their predecessors. (Nixon jumps immediately to mind) and yet, there was this unwritten rule that you don’t sic the Fearless Band of Idiots, (FBI) or the Infernal Reichstag Stormtroopers (IRS) on a past president, and you don’t sic them on a potential opposition candidate either.

    But see, the real problems here are twofold:
    you just gave half the country a Casus Belli. Yes, I am serious. There are a lot of folks out there right now that are wondering “well if they can pull this sort of shit on Trump, what can they do to little old me?” And a lot of folks thinking “this was indeed a put-up job, boxes of stuff were removed, with no accounting and inventoried chain of evidence apparent. That’s enough to make anything that’s presented later questionable from an evidence perspective, and thus “fruits of the poisonous tree” comes into play. The DOJ needs to get out in front of this RIGHT NOW, and senior heads need to roll if they want to preserve any shade of legitimacy.

    What’s good for the goose is good for the gander. Biden has a lot of possible culpability with Hunter’s laptop. There’s evidence of bribery, tax evasion, (“The big guy needs to get his cut”), and potentially: Espionage for things sold to and given to China, Ukraine, and Russia. This could blow up before the 2024 election, or after. (As well as the lesser included charge of acting as an agent of a foreign government without registering as such.)

    But see, the real problems here are twofold:

    you just gave half the country a Casus Belli. Yes, I am serious. There are a lot of folks out there right now that are wondering “well if they can pull this sort of shit on Trump, what can they do to little old me?” And a lot of folks thinking “this was indeed a put-up job, boxes of stuff were removed, with no accounting and inventoried chain of evidence apparent. That’s enough to make anything that’s presented later questionable from an evidence perspective, and thus “fruits of the poisonous tree” comes into play. The DOJ needs to get out in front of this RIGHT NOW, and senior heads need to roll if they want to preserve any shade of legitimacy.

    What’s good for the goose is good for the gander. Biden has a lot of possible culpability with Hunter’s laptop. There’s evidence of bribery, tax evasion, (“The big guy needs to get his cut”), and potentially: Espionage for things sold to and given to China, Ukraine, and Russia. This could blow up before the 2024 election, or after. (As well as the lesser included charge of acting as an agent of a foreign government without registering as such.)

    Honestly, I don’t see any way this goes well unless sometime in the next 48 hours the Attorney General comes out with “this was done without my awareness or approval, all material has been returned to the president, and the director of the FBI, Judge Reinhart, the OIC, and SAIC have been fired, and we are conducting an investigation into who else was involved with this decision, more pink slips to come.” I don’t believe that’s going to happen, because I am quite sure that AG Garland is in this up to his slimy neck. This is often used rhetoric at this point, but sadly, it’s accurate. This is Banana Republic-type shit.


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  82. Haha, this one will piss Albo off.

    Jordan Peterson declares Anthony Albanese’s ‘delusional’ climate change targets will ‘devastate’ Australia (Sky, 16 Aug)

    Jordan Peterson has taken aim at Anthony Albanese’s “impossible” 2030 and 2050 emissions reduction target as he condemned “power mad globalist utopians” pushing for drastic climate action.

    Peterson criticised the global movement towards net zero emissions before slamming the new Labor Government’s recent move to legislate its climate agenda.

    He said the “utterly preposterous and inexcusable goal” of net zero by 2050 was both practically and conceptionally unachievable.

    Power mad? Ouch! Utterly preposterous? Ouch, ouch. Inexcusable? Oh the pain.

    If the Libs had any balls they’d ask Albo and his ministers about this endlessly in Question Time.
    It’d be great trolling.


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  83. Just walked up to David Jones at lunch to buy a frock and on the way back I ran into Brendan Nelson.
    He’s a nice man, a very nice man.

    Brendan Nelson was always too good a man for the filth that is politics — the repulsive Ghost who Talks too much undermined him totally — I recall when he was Minister for Education in the Howard Government and our unique little school for some of the most severely disabled children was going to close because of funding. Brendan Nelson came to the rescue and it stayed open because of the funding he put in place — the eventual closure was precipitated by the red-shoe-wearing, lazy, duplicitous, skinned-rabbit-armed creature from the Liberal Swamp and finally killed off completely by Julia Gillard (the grate Edjakayshun Minister)


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  84. ertsberg attributes this fall to men unwilling to collaborate with women due to fears of accusations of sexual harassment.

    Everything the left touches, turns to shit


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  85. An even More Brilliant Article

    Green No Deal

    Welcome back to the Scuttlebutt. No, the title isn’t a misprint or editorial mistake.

    Let’s talk about the “green” movement today.

    So, that big front-end loader pictured above is a piece of mining equipment. It’s used to dig up the raw ore in open pit mines and take it to a dump truck which then takes it to the refinery/smelter (sometimes on-site, sometimes on the other end of the country. It depends on how big the mine is.)

    The dump truck called a “Mining Machine” gets .3 MPG. The rig above burns 900-1000 gal of diesel in a 12-hour shift, figure the Mining Machine at maybe 20% of that, after all, it’s not running all the time, so that’s another 200 gal.

    Then there’s the energy required to remove what mining engineers call “overburden.” That’s the shit that is in the way and must be removed to get to the ore. Industry-standard calculations for this are 3-20 tons (depending on where you are mining) of overburden for every ton of ore.

    Let’s be charitable here and assume ONLY 3 tons. That means you’re burning the amount of fuel it takes to dig up 4 tons of stuff for every ton of ore, and every ton of ore gives you about .5% of the stuff needed to make one car battery for a Tesla. Industry figures show that for the lithium, cobalt, nickel, graphite, and copper together to make ONE Tesla battery, you’re moving and refining 45 tons of ore. https://www.manhattan-institute.org/mines-minerals-and-green-energy-reality-check This doesn’t count the overburden.

    Oh, and by the way, NO ONE has come up with an electric version of these machines, the tech isn’t there. If it was, the energy to build one would be beyond belief. In short, it’s a reasonable assumption that your Tesla battery cost about 100 barrels of oil to make. (this is probably lowballed)

    The rest is superb – Read and Enjoy


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  86. Thanks OSC. The Wiki page is interesting also. That 2.2 million (or thereabouts) gets a workout there too.

    Gosh that’s a lot of money, more than anyone in a normal type of job can ever aspire to – in one year.

    Small beer compared to the CEO of CSL, but there it is.


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  87. And it’s glorious that Eric Weinstein is giving it to Australia’s own Peter Doherty on twitter.

    The Doherty institute needs to be thoroughly audited.

    The covid Lab leak theory dead
    Relying on cluster cases around the Wuhan wet market supplied from the Chinese data.
    They also couldn’t find precursor viral fragments at the Wuhan Lab, also supplied by the Chinese.

    Dear Professors,
    I have a pyramid for sale.
    Shipping can be arranged.


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  88. Gray Connolly
    @GrayConnolly
    ·
    3h
    The unhinged media reaction in August 2022 to the then Prime Minister in March 2020 holding dormant additional ministerial commissions in case of incumbent ministers dying / indisposed due to the pandemic (as the UK PM almost did) … is why it was wise not to publicise this then

    If this is confirmed, this is all a storm in a teacup.


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  89. If this is confirmed, this is all a storm in a teacup.

    “This” being Labor’s attempt to demonise Morrison as a Trumpian figure (as ludicrous as that is) trashing our democracy.


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  90. Quigley, castigated as a person with a very loose association with the facts by a judge moves to reverse the onus of proof.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-08-16/wa-anti-discrimination-laws-to-be-overhauled/101339080

    Under the current laws, the definition of sexual and racial harassment requires the victim to be disadvantaged by the conduct, or to reasonably believe it will cause disadvantage.

    The long-criticised “disadvantage test” currently means workplace sexual harassment complainants have to prove they were harassed, and that challenging that behaviour disadvantaged them in their employment.

    The review recommends that “it ought not be incumbent on the harassed person to navigate complex legal arguments to satisfy the disadvantage requirement”.

    ….
    Mr Quigley outlined several reforms which are expected to be included in the new Equal Opportunity Act:

    Removing the outdated “disadvantage test” for sexual harassment complaints
    Strengthening equal opportunity protections for LGBTIQA+ staff and students in religious schools
    Providing anti-discrimination protections to those who are trans, gender-diverse or non-binary
    Extending the prohibition against sexual and racial harassment to members of parliament and staff
    Protecting family and domestic violence victims from discrimination
    Introducing anti-vilification laws
    Strengthening victimisation provisions

    They absolutely hate Christianity and the family.
    Despise it.
    And reversing the onus of proof ensures crackpots and weirdoes can engage in never ending lawfare against anyone they dislike.

    If WA had an opposition Quigleys position would be untenable.
    Palmer defamation trial judge says WA Attorney-General’s evidence ‘all over the shop’

    One of the nation’s top silks has given an extraordinary dressing down to Western Australia’s first law officer over what he described as “outright silly” evidence presented to the court during Clive Palmer’s defamation case against Mark McGowan.


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  91. “We live in a world where puberty blockers are considered a legitimate medication.”

    We live in a world where the mutilation of children, through both surgery and medication, is considered a legitimate action, all to satisfy perverts, queer theorists and autogynephiles who, if they can’t sexually destroy children, will happily medically destroy children.

    Prior to 21 May 2022, Katherine Deves was excoriated, smeared, ridiculed, denounced, condemned and had her character assassinated, even spineless Liberal wets joined in the denunciations and condemnations, all because Deves spoke the truth about puberty blockers, cross-sex hormones and the surgical mutilation of children.

    Deves has since been vindicated. I await apologies from Matt Green Kean, Karma Sharma, Rent Zimmerboy and others Liberal scum to Deves but who am I kidding, she’ll be waiting in vain. The good news is though that, apart from one, all are currently jobless. And the one remaining will be jobless after March 2023.


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  92. “This” being Labor’s attempt to demonise Morrison as a Trumpian figure (as ludicrous as that is) trashing our democracy.

    Indeed, Roger. I don’t like Morrison for a second but this looked like a stitch up from the beginning.


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  93. Will the ghost of Bob Hawke be present at Albo’s job summit?

    He’ll certainly be haunting Elbow.

    Big shoes (in Elbow’s estimation, at least) to fill.

    But with technical full employment, and Labor flagging re-starting the immigration ponzi, isn’t it redundant?

    In any case, as long as Elbow comes out of it waxing lyrical its purpose will have been served. Meanwhile, Australian workers can look forward to another decade of depressed wages and declining living standards.


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  94. It’s early days but Elbow is already disappearing in the job. He’s a naturally inconsequential figure.
    The ScoMo exposè commentary by Elbow is ridiculous for a governing PM. You’re in power mate, look like it.


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  95. That night, I watched Donald Trump take state after state with ease. Then I watched as votes started to fluctuate, barely trickled in, and then, with only a handful of states to go, I watched as counting was halted altogether. A sinking feeling crept over me as I witnessed things I had never seen in my life.

    Yes I was the same way- Trump was winning as you would expect.


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  96. ““This” being Labor’s attempt to demonise Morrison as a Trumpian figure (as ludicrous as that is) trashing our democracy.”

    Yep.


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  97. You’ve got to hand it to the woman, first class gibberish without peer.

    What does that even mean? I got the last word, which is “space” but the rest was sort of random syllables assembled together.

    I liked her equity speech last week:

    KAMALA HARRIS: “Equity as a concept says recognize that everyone has the same capacity, but in order for them to have equal opportunity to reach that capacity, well, we must pay attention to this issue of equity.”

    Yep for equity we really do have to pay attention to equity.


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  98. The ScoMo exposè commentary by Elbow is ridiculous for a governing PM.

    Can’t help himself.

    He fights Tories.

    Including imaginary ones like SloMo.


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  99. It’s early days but Elbow is already disappearing in the job. He’s a naturally inconsequential figure.
    The ScoMo exposè commentary by Elbow is ridiculous for a governing PM. You’re in power mate, look like it.

    Just another slimy campus marxist who’s never had a real job. Politics really does attract the worst of the worst.


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  100. KAMALA HARRIS: “Equity as a concept says recognize that everyone has the same capacity, but in order for them to have equal opportunity to reach that capacity, well, we must pay attention to this issue of equity.”

    biden is a moth eaten sock puppet and kamala is a spent condom


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  101. You’ve got to hand it to the woman, first class gibberish without peer.

    That’s the way politicians are supposed to speak in public. Trump doesn’t, so they declare him uncouth.

    Kamala has enormous amounts of couth.


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  102. Also, I think a few of the above names read The Cat, and if they are reading The Cat, perhaps they could note our words about the disgrace that is Dribbler Sheridan.

    Yep. And a few of us subscribers who hang out on Catallaxy are hanging in at the Oz specifically to uptick and add our own views to the often very good comments from the centre right that appear after every Sheriden TDS brain-dump. As far more comments from the right get axed by editors, it is imporant to redress the balance where we can.

    If we all go away then there is no sense of opposition to the drivel we pay for and are scornful about.
    Might as well just watch more Netflix.


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  103. Just another slimy campus marxist who’s never had a real job. Politics really does attract the worst of the worst.

    Wasn’t the only one of the Labor Front bench, who had ever been “on the tools”, Joel Fitzgibbon, who was an auto electrician?


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  104. It’s early days but Elbow is already disappearing in the job. He’s a naturally inconsequential figure.

    Biden was like that, but look at what he did last week. (Cue seventeen of you chorusing in with “he ain’t done nothin”, because of course you weren’t paying attention.)


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  105. My wife pointed out that I was wrong about Kamala being without peer in woke speak gibberish.

    Meghan Markle.

    Make a choice: continue living your life feeling muddled in this abyss of self-misunderstanding, or you find your identity independent of it. You push for colour-blind casting; you draw your own box. You introduce yourself as who you are, not what colour your parents happen to be.

    I stand corrected.


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  106. Zulu

    “Wasn’t the only one of the Labor Front bench, who had ever been “on the tools”, Joel Fitzgibbon, who was an auto electrician?”

    And he sold himself to China, before having an epiphany only after nearly losing his seat to One Nation.


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  107. Biden was like that, but look at what he did last week.

    Wasn’t him that did it.
    He can still sign his name though, just.
    It’s pure elder abuse.

    Good thing he doesn’t live in Canada, he be euthanized.


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  108. m0nty-fa

    “Biden was like that, but look at what he did last week”

    Took his reprobate son on holiday with him? Didn’t know what his AG was up to? Got another “10% for the Big Guy”?

    Pray regale us. It won’t take long.


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  109. Five AFL clubs have been fined for falsifying RAT tests:

    The breaches include:

    – not undertaking a Rapid Antigen Test (RAT) within the period prescribed by the Protocols, and/or

    – not uploading an image (photograph) of a prescribed RAT within the period prescribed by the Protocols; and/or

    – Uploading an image taken of a previous RAT undertaken by that or another person.

    The last is particularly amusing.


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  110. Make a choice: continue living your life feeling muddled in this abyss of self-misunderstanding, or you find your identity independent of it. You push for colour-blind casting; you draw your own box. You introduce yourself as who you are, not what colour your parents happen to be.

    As bad as that is, just imagine her internal monologue.


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  111. Hate to be cynical: what are the odds on Trump copping a stray FBI slug and/or the mid terms abandoned?

    They’ll go for the steal first. It worked last time and they would’ve further developed the organization and equipment since then.

    What the Dems are trying is to get the “win” without causing a Ft Sumter moment. Which is getting tougher and tougher to achieve. We’ll see if they can thread the needle or not.


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  112. What were Newcastle’s footy heroes up to in the toilet cubicle, Bruce? Private Eye might have called it ‘discussing Ugandan affairs’.

    The reference was to the explanation given by a senior member of Idi Amin’s regime and another Ugandan (in this case if the opposite sex) when the UK police found them together in a toilet cubicle in Heathrow. It became one of Private Eye’s suite of euphemisms (like ‘tired and emotional’ for pissed) that helped them evade libel writs.


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  113. Sean Davis
    @seanmdav
    ·
    13h
    Oh, we’re checking signatures again? That’s a thing we’re allowed to do now? I was told that demanding signature verification in super important things like elections was sedition or something. Gee, I wonder what changed?
    Quote Tweet

    Bill Melugin
    @BillFOXLA
    · 14h
    BREAKING: The effort to recall L.A. DA @GeorgeGascon has FAILED to qualify for the ballot. The Registrar-Recorders office announced only 520,050 of the 715k+ signatures it collected were valid. It needed 566,857. Details below. @FoxNews

    It’s not hypocrisy, it’s hierarchy.


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  114. Just listening to Rowan Dean. Absolutely on fire about the vaccine and mandates and playing great sound clips especially from CHO VIC.

    A must listen to and share with your mates.


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  115. The Frollicking Moll:

    The die is cast.
    Either Trump goes to jail and civil war starts bubbling away or he wins the next election and guts every agency involved.
    Including the RINO party members.

    With the rumoured investigation of Giuliani, I think we need to realise the Mid Term elections are going to be corrupted beyond repair.
    It all started with Obama and the politicisation of the apparatus of the Organs.


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  116. Ah yes. Joins the inevitable calls for bipartisanship. Strange, I don’t recall those a couple of years ago.

    From “sit down, boofhead” to “agree or else” in the space of an election night.


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  117. Qld starts journey to establishing a treaty with First Nations people

    Changes could be made to the state’s curriculum, along with major reforms to the health, child protection and criminal justice systems as part of a historic path to treaty between Queensland and its First Nations people.

    Courier Mail. Queensland kids might not be able to read, write or do sums, but they’ll all be first bottle on the “First Nations” and “reconciliation.”


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  118. Queensland kids might not be able to read, write or do sums, but they’ll all be first bottle on the “First Nations” and “reconciliation.”

    This will make Palaszchak about as popular as a turd in a swimming pool.
    In my district anyway.


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  119. The reference was to the explanation given by a senior member of Idi Amin’s regime and another Ugandan (in this case if the opposite sex) when the UK police found them together in a toilet cubicle in Heathrow.

    The original Eye story was about the deeply unlovely Irish journo, Mary Kenny, backing up some Ugandan politician at a political pissup.

    That may well have been bullshit.


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  120. Queensland kids might not be able to read, write or do sums, but they’ll all be first bottle on the “First Nations” and “reconciliation.”

    If only it were that benign.

    They’ll be taught any old bullshit, be given immunity from the law, immunity from children removal no matter how bad they may behave as parents, and be treated like royalty by the mere existence of a single distant relative more than others have.

    Both Victoria and Queensland have preempted the referendum, given radicals the opportunity to fuck up their chances before the referendum even gets out of the starting gate.


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  121. Wodger:

    Elbow says Morrison’s secret ministries were “an attack on our system of government.”

    I’m not sure there was anything sinister about it, but why the secrecy?
    That fact alone has my spidey senses twitching.


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  122. Qld starts journey to establishing a treaty with First Nations people

    Generally speaking, politicians are stupid and arrogant people, largely devoted to political careerism. Unfortunately, aboriginal people, particularly in the communities, are not being well served by their flabby, self-serving dishonesty.

    At some point someone will have to explain what ‘treaty’ means – to the people who actually have to pay for it.


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  123. Federal Minister Tanya Plibersek held secret meetings in WA’s Pilbara region to discuss $4.5 billion project
    Kimberley Caines
    The West Australian
    Tue, 16 August 2022 8:13PM
    Federal Minister Tanya Plibersek has held secret meetings in WA’s Pilbara region as she considers bringing a halt to a $4.5 billion project — signed off by the State’s Environmental Protection Authority nearly a year ago.

    Ms Plibersek flew to Karratha on Tuesday to meet the “parties involved” in a urea project on WA’s Burrup Peninsula after traditional owners asked the Albanese Government to intervene.

    They have called for a stop to the project by Perth chemicals company Perdaman, over heritage concerns.

    The Federal Government put the brakes on the project last month amid fears pollution from the plant would greatly accelerate the degradation of 40,000 year-old rock art.
    WA traditional owners want development of a fertiliser plant stopped to protect Indigenous rock art.

    Ms Plibersek refused to provide details on who she was meeting and declined to let media attend.

    “As has been reported, I have received an application for a section 9 declaration under the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act,” the Environment Minister said in a statement.

    “I am carefully considering the application. I have made no decision.

    “This trip is for me to listen to groups involved in, and potentially affected by, any decision I make. I will not be making further public comment about the matter.”

    The McGowan Government supports the development, insisting the project would play a key role in helping to diversify the WA economy and create local jobs.

    It is expected to produce two million tonnes of fertiliser grade urea each year when operational.

    Perdaman was granted EPA approval last September, subject to a number of conditions, including air emissions having no impact on the weathering of rock art within Murujuga beyond natural rates and for the company to provide a revised greenhouse-gas management plan.

    Perdaman did not respond to a request for comment.

    What’s most relevant to twenty first century Australia – two million tons of fertiliser a year, which won’t have to be imported, or cave paintings, song lines and rock art?


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  124. An inquiry is underway to see what can be done to reverse what it is calling the “collapse in community life”, with public hearings being held in capital cities through August and September.**

    This is from earlier today about the collapse in volunteering and donating to charities. How can there not be a collapse when the people running the charities are all woke? Recently I had to reply to several begging emails that they may get my donations when they stop pushing climate change alarmism considering that their charities have nothing to do with the environment.


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  125. politicians are stupid and arrogant people, largely devoted to political careerism

    These are highlights from the latest NT Independent editorial, which sets out a few examples of Faustus’ statement and delivers a compelling reason why the NT is no different to anywhere else in the country:

    The NT Police force was in “complete crisis”, we heard, with 80 per cent of officers surveyed saying they have no confidence in Police Commissioner Jamie Chalker and the government having no plan to address the serious issues raised despite calls from the Opposition for a public inquiry; the ICAC had launched an investigation into more than 300 government-owned or leased public buildings to determine if they’re safe for occupancy – including schools and hospitals; the corrections and judicial systems were in tatters as Holtze prison overcrowding caused dysfunction and chaos, with severe staff shortages and detainees locked up in isolation not allowed to see their lawyers, which may breach international laws.

    And just when you thought things couldn’t get any worse, we’re confronted by the news on Monday morning that Fire and Rescue Services can’t properly staff fire stations, so decided to close one for the day in the middle of the bush fire season and while a fire ban is in place; the Greater Darwin region’s teachers are taking strike action this week because their EBA negotiations have been going nowhere, which the Chief Minister claimed was only a political stunt to embarrass Labor ahead of a by-election; and that same leader still inexplicably backing the police commissioner and taking us all on another trip through her circular maze of logic to explore the “complexity of the complexities” of making proper decisions in the public interest.

    And again there’s this underlying crime issue, which the government recently revealed at Estimates they have no current plan for addressing.

    There’s more, but it culminates in this most excellent and accurate assessment:

    The worst part of all this might be that it is not political. We strongly doubt that any of this has to do directly with the Australian Labor Party’s policies or general philosophy.

    This is the concerted work of a massive group of incompetent people who just happened to have found each other through a red-shirt cult and for reasons that are still not entirely clear, elected to lead the land and solve our problems, perhaps by people who benefit financially from them remaining in power.

    BAM. Right on the button.


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  126. Probably because it would only come into effect in the event of incapacity of one of the relevant Ministers.

    ..
    Incorrect he used at least one of the ministerial powers to over ride the gas exploration.
    So, no, your premise is wrong.


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  127. Former resources minister Keith Pitt comments after revelations Scott Morrison took over portfolio to kill off gas project
    Former resources minister Keith Pitt has weighed in after it was revealed then-prime minister Scott Morrison intervened in the portfolio to kill off the contentious PEP-11 project.
    https://www.skynews.com.au/australia-news/politics/former-resources-minister-keith-pitt-comments-after-revelations-scott-morrison-took-over-portfolio-to-kill-off-gas-project/news-story/83f929b76548e4f01965fbc41e49bb7a


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  128. Dover, if the reason for dual ministers was so benign, then telling and selling it to the voting public would have been easy.
    But they didn’t. Which prompts us to speculate on the possibly nefarious reasons for becoming an additional Minister in 5 portfolios without notifying Australians.
    Whatever his reasons for taking such unprecedented action, he treated us like fools.


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  129. KAMALA HARRIS: “Equity as a concept says recognize that everyone has the same capacity,

    I prefer George C Scott as General Patton:
    “Don’t ever let anyone feed you any of that “equality” bullshit. Men are not born equal. Anyone who’s ever seen a race or a fight knows that.”


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  130. What was to be the definition of incapacity and was it to be the same in each respective ministerial case and who was to declare incapacity and was Morrison himself beyond being incapacitated.


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    1
  131. Woman sparks uproar by declaring that being fat is not beautiful

    A woman has come under fire after stating that she believes “fat people are not beautiful” and that “being fat is not okay”.

    The anonymous Australian woman was featured in a TikTok video on a channel called Common Ground Convos, a page that says they “ask the important but controversial question, then try to find common ground”.

    On a video captioned “Is it okay to be fat? What do you think?”, the host asks a woman on the street her opinions about obesity.

    “I can’t do fat people. It’s not okay to be fat,” the woman declared.

    Holding up a photograph of plus-size influencer Tess Holliday, the interviewer asks the woman what she thinks.

    “No I can’t look at that, sorry, I can’t,” she said.

    “Would you ever consider that beautiful? Would you ever consider that healthy?” he probed.

    She answered a firm “no” to both, shaking her head.

    “Why are young people being told that beauty is just a social construct?” he continued.

    “That’s bulls–t” she replied.

    “I can’t do fat people. Do you want a fat person waddling, they can’t walk because their thighs are so big?

    “It’s not healthy and it doesn’t look good.

    “Maybe I’m politically incorrect, but I don’t give a s–t.”


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  132. The only update on the talking points is that surrogates are now generally quiet on the fact that the FBI did actually take Trumps passports.

    I find it fascinating that one person can make part of the population lose their minds.
    I’m thinking Pavlov.

    There is nothing in my universe that sets me off the way Trump triggers these guys.
    I wonder what it feels like.


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  133. The Chinese urge caution over the Germans participating in Australian exercises.

    The Munich radio station I listen to online had a report about Exercise Pitch Black on a news bulletin yesterday. My German was good enough to understand that they were talking about the RAAF and military exercises with the Americans, Japanese and South Koreans but not good enough to understand why they were talking about it. This explains it.


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  134. Not sure how to feel about this.
    In the news alert, the WSJ won’t name this all important bill.

    Biden Signs Bill Aimed at Lowering Drug Costs, Boosting Renewable Energy

    President Biden signed into law sweeping legislation to lower prescription drug prices, boost the renewable energy sector and impose new taxes on large corporations. Democrats hope it will improve their prospects heading into November’s midterms.

    Are they refusing to promote the “Inflation Reduction Bill”?
    Or are they trying to smother the idiotic name?


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  135. I’m having trouble reading the Inflation Reduction legislation.
    What passed the House is 273 pages but not in the format of other other ones like the CARES Act (600 odd pages) or the Omnibus bill (2700+ pages).
    Is this because it originated in the Senate?
    Can anyone help?


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    1
  136. The good news for ScoMo is that he doesn’t have to worry about a quid post parliament due to the US subs deal.

    Yes. Unlike Hockey and Sinodinos I don’t think he will be popping up on the Washington cocktail circuit any time soon.


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  137. Five out of my six kids work in gov jobs, education, police and customs, the oldest boy (man) works as an electrician. All of them started work in private businesses but moved to gov jobs over the years. I don’t like it but understand and support their decisions. The pay, conditions and security in gov jobs is amazing.

    When I started work in the 70’s gov jobs were lower paid by a fair margin and the security sort of made up for the loss of income. Now gov jobs are the leaders in all pay and conditions. It shouldn’t be like this but it is.


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  138. I’m struggling to imagine a circumstance where the PM could be sworn in to an already occupied ministry without the relevant minister’s knowledge. If there was a perfectly reasonable explanation, why didn’t he tell them?

    Or…They might be lying about not knowing. Surely the Angus Taylor would have known about the gas exploration cancellation, or at least asked questions when it was shelved.

    What is going on here?


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  139. Don’t worry, ScoMo will be part of some US think tank or at least on their circuit before he knows it.
    All these former PM’s must be devastated that they couldn’t run the Shanghai Shuttle like Hawke did bringing CCP bigwigs to Australia for their medical treatment.
    A favour which they never forgot.


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    1
  140. After Zemin let Josh set up shop in Beijing & Shanghai, Bob & Blanche had a grand ol’ time.
    Effectively a monopoly over all CCP relationships.
    I wonder why Bramston has never written about that part of Labor party history.


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    4
  141. While scary talk about a possible nuclear war gives news sites a bit of clickbait, sober analysis reveals that Australia has abandoned so many key capabilities that we are vulnerable to catastrophes a lot less severe than that.
    We no longer have any heavy industries. Our power system teeters on the brink of collapse. Fuel for planes, cars, trucks and locomotives has to be imported and the buffer stock is only weeks not months. Gas exploration and extraction is mostly verboten. Rail lines are abandoned, overgrown, no longer maintained, while we do have coal and water which used to allow us to run steam locos.
    Food production is difficult to maintain without petrol and diesel. Distribution is impossible without petrol and diesel.
    We live in the age of massive political failure.


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  142. Did Scomo collect multi salaries from his multi ministries role?
    Does Scomo collect multi pensions on his retirement from multi ministries role?
    Does Scomo not collect $200 , not pass go and go straight to jail


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    2
  143. Aboriginal leader Warren Mundine is being bombarded with hundreds of racial threats and abusive messages every day for opposing the Indigenous Voice to Parliament.

    If this is the character of even just some of those supporting The Voice then that in itself is a reason to reject it, for it will be theirs soon enough.


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