Open Thread – Weekend 22 April 2023


Fireworks in the Park, Konstantin Somov, 1907

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shatterzzz
April 23, 2023 7:03 pm

If you like straight forward gangster movies this mafia/union blow-em up /shoot em down set in 1960/70s Cleveland fits the bill .. apparently, based on a true story tho .. most of the NY mafia names are familiar but not the Cleveland thugs …… they, apparently, preferred bombs to guns in Cleveland ..
KILL THE IRISHMAN …
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1416801/Aref_=nv_sr_srsg_0_tt_6_nm_0_q_let%27s%2520kill%2520the%2520irishman

Muddy
Muddy
April 23, 2023 7:04 pm

The only point I’ll make regarding Bruce & B.J.’s debate-to-nowhere is that the censorship regime during the period being discussed was strong; even more so once control was handed over to GHQ SWPA.

H B Bear
H B Bear
April 23, 2023 7:18 pm

Muddy, much like today’s ALPBC. The real information is what is left out.

Muddy
Muddy
April 23, 2023 7:27 pm

G’day Bear, good to see you’re still with us.

rosie
rosie
April 23, 2023 7:34 pm

Good luck Calli.
My angelic looking but wilful almost three year old and the baby are sound asleep.

Razey
Razey
April 23, 2023 7:41 pm

Scab Indian labor. Australia is doomed.

Mad Albo inundates jobs market with “worthless Indian degrees”
https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2023/04/mad-albo-inundates-jobs-market-with-worthless-indian-degrees/

H B Bear
H B Bear
April 23, 2023 7:41 pm

Yeah, sort of.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 7:41 pm

The only point I’ll make regarding Bruce & B.J.’s debate-to-nowhere is that the censorship regime during the period being discussed was strong

Muddy – The debate about hypotheticals is fun, but the official history is probably clean. Gavin Long and his editors had access to a lot of stuff, including the official volumes by the UK and the US. There’s likely plenty that was left out, since the emphasis is a narrative though. It’s good reading but.

mem
mem
April 23, 2023 7:47 pm

My father was in the second world war. For 7 years. Second lot in, last lot out. Did N Guinea as well. I have all his medals. He never talked about it. Except on his death bed about hiding in a ditch and feeling guilty, as he and only one other couldn’t do anything as the Germans pushed women out into the wheat fields then set fire to it. He was later smuggled onto a boat. Only other thing he told me was his best mate in PNG was drowned. Over and out.

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 23, 2023 7:47 pm

Bruce of Newcastlesays:
April 23, 2023 at 6:04 pm
BJ – Both Churchill and Roosevelt absolutely guaranteed the sanctity of the Australian continent. Many promises were made around this guarantee. In this universe none of those debts needed to be drawn upon.

Commitments can be met only if the priority for available resources is high enough. See also: Main fleet to Singapore.

And the “sanctity of the Australian continent” is hardly likely to have covered every tiny outpost on said continent. That “guarantee” did NOT provide massive air defence resources to Darwin, for example.

Enough Bruce. Go write a war game, but there is no point in further discussion here.

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 23, 2023 7:49 pm

Bruce of Newcastlesays:
April 23, 2023 at 6:10 pm
You wrote…poorly, directly linking both Churchill and Roosevelt in the decision to move the 8th Division to Singapore. That happened long before Pearl Harbor.

Um, Churchill was around long before Pearl Harbour.

Look up the meaning of the word “both”.

Ed Case
Ed Case
April 23, 2023 7:50 pm

7th Division?

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
April 23, 2023 7:50 pm

This one’s for nautical Cats. Seems the Department of Veterans Affairs is issuing a medallion to commemorate fifty years since the end of Australia’s participation in the Vietnam War. The medal depicts the fast transport HMAS Sydney – and a couple of the pussers here reckon the bridge structure is depicted on the wrong side of the ship…..

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 23, 2023 7:52 pm

Bruce of Newcastlesays:
April 23, 2023 at 6:35 pm
MacArthur would have made this point, supported by both Blamey and Sturdee (who had pushed to get the 6th and 7th Divisions returned to Australia, rather than going to Burma). What would Curtin have done then? Overruled MacArthur? Not a hope.

BJ – a Labor PM being overruled by a Yank general? Are you kidding?

Go away and read the history again. You clearly have not comprehended the relationship. No MacArthur, minimal Americans in Australia. End of Curtin.

Ed Case
Ed Case
April 23, 2023 7:52 pm

Give up, Cletus.

You’ve been OutBaffleGabbed by a master.

Ed Case
Ed Case
April 23, 2023 8:01 pm

The British and Americans split the Far East.
British got West of Singapore, the Americans got the East.
That meant that when the War in the Pacific kicked off, American Troops would be occupying Australia.

John Curtin didn’t know that, so he did his own deal with the Japs and later had to do a lotta backpedalin’, see his Call To America speech.

The Americans rightly viewed that speech as proof of treachery.

Cassie of Sydney
April 23, 2023 8:01 pm

I see the resident non-expert on everything, from vulcanology to Azerbaijan, is still punching away in the corner.

Rabz
April 23, 2023 8:03 pm

Yeah, sort of.

Nonsense, Bear.

You remember Sydney Bimbos clearly enough, apparently. 🙂

Top Ender
Top Ender
April 23, 2023 8:07 pm

Zulu, haven’t seen the proposed DVA medallion, but only two aircraft carriers in history had the superstructure of the island on the left/port side of the ship. Both Japanese and at the bottom of the Pacific, sunk at Midway.

H B Bear
H B Bear
April 23, 2023 8:11 pm

Zulu, haven’t seen the proposed DVA medallion, but only two aircraft carriers in history had the superstructure of the island on the left/port side of the ship

Bit of an issue. A bit like remembering which way to race when you fly between Sydney and Melbourne.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 8:11 pm

Enough Bruce. Go write a war game

BJ – Gary Grigsby’s Pacific War was a lot of fun, even though the AI was fairly basic. As you would expect for 1992. Marvelous adaptation for the time though. I had a fine time one email game playing the Japs against a Yank, who had the Allies. It didn’t go well for him! He gave up after I took Calcutta.

Go away and read the history again.

Hehe. Done that. Do you want the urls for the volumes I’ve been citing?

End of Curtin.

That would’ve been nice, but we got what we got. To some extent it probably wasn’t that bad a thing since it may’ve ameliorated the union bastardry summat.

Wally Dalí
Wally Dalí
April 23, 2023 8:14 pm

The Melbourne International Conformity Festival
Top marks, Dunnybrush!

Top Ender
Top Ender
April 23, 2023 8:14 pm

Zulu – see https://www.dva.gov.au/recognition/commemorations/commemorative-services/commemorative-services-australia/50th-anniversary

Looks like Sydney is shown steaming towards the viewer, and therefore it does look like the island is on the port side.

Although I note there is a caveat saying the final design may differ from what’s shown.

Muddy
Muddy
April 23, 2023 8:15 pm

HMAS Sydney III.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 8:16 pm

only two aircraft carriers in history had the superstructure of the island on the left/port side of the ship. Both Japanese

The Japs were always very sinister

Muddy
Muddy
April 23, 2023 8:17 pm

Let’s try that again… Sydney III.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 8:20 pm

HMAS Sydney III.

Clearly on the starboard side in the photos at that link.

HMAS Canberra L02 is ditto.

bons
bons
April 23, 2023 8:24 pm

Hip operations are the new Auschwitz.

Muddy
Muddy
April 23, 2023 8:24 pm

Take yer pick (Sydney).
Also.

Rabz
April 23, 2023 8:25 pm
Top Ender
Top Ender
April 23, 2023 8:26 pm

From my book Carrier Attack:

Akagi and Hiryu both – most notably and oddly – had their islands placed to the port, or left, side of the ship. This was related to the constant experimenting which was being carried on in the carrier world at the time of construction. In fact, exactly how an aircraft carrier’s vitals should be arranged would occupy designers for decades more to come.

Sources differ as to the reasoning for the placement: one suggesting it was “an experiment in determining whether this characteristic would improve flight patterns when operating a mixed task force of port-sided and starboard-sided carriers.” Another states that the rationale was as the result of 1930s design studies which showed that “turbulence over the flight deck aft (which affected aircraft during landing) could be reduced by moving the island away from the ship’s exhaust gases.” Yet another suggests: “the island was placed on the starboard side because early (propeller) aircraft turned to the left more easily (an effect of engine torque). Obviously such an aircraft can execute a wave-off to the left more easily, so the island was put to starboard to be out of the way. Another idea was to allow two carriers to operate extremely closely; the left and right islands of a pair allowing maximum visibility as they steamed alongside, but there is no evidence of this from Japanese archives so far.

Akagi even had a downward-pointing main funnel on the starboard side, showing the type of experiments that had been undertaken to control the flow of heated air and how it might affect aircraft performance. Whatever the rationale, these two ships, despite their different class and ten years of thinking inbetween their construction, spent their lives with their islands to the left. At least their pilots could not get confused and land on the sister ships Kaga and Soryu… landing on the wrong deck indeed something that has happened in the tremendously intricate world of carrier operations. Akagi and Hiryu remain the only two carriers in the history of the marque to have islands to port. But once the starboard side position was established and a few carriers were built in that configuration, it became difficult to change.”

Razey
Razey
April 23, 2023 8:26 pm

Hip operations are the new Auschwitz.

Performed by Indian scab labor with fake medical degrees. -Enjoy-

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 8:27 pm

Muddy – I especially liked this photo at your link. Two Aussie carriers! I didn’t know about HMAS Vengeance until I looked her up just now. How far have we fallen since then, it’s sad.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
April 23, 2023 8:28 pm

Clearly, this has gone on all day. Again.

Boambee – doing God’s work on this. That fact is that Macarthur was King of Australia from the time he set foot in the joint until he left for the Philippines. He controlled everything to do with Australian military policy.

Blamey didn’t ‘manage’ Macarthur. Quite the reverse – that’s why we had no less than six commanders during the Kokoda campaign. Blamey was a genius staff officer to Monash during WWI but declined ever since, to the point his generals considered turfing him. Rowell stopped it, although he loathed Blamey as well.

Public opinion and elections would have gone straight down the shit chute. We were totally dependent on US logistics and manpower for anything larger than two isolated jungle campaigns, and even then we were given a chop out in terms of artillery at Milne Bay, and infantry in the final stages of Kokoda.

Nobody would have cared if the Japs had a) wanted to take Darwin, and/or b) did so. It was and is 3000km away from anything significant and separated from it by shit country. All it would have done would have tied their resources up. And as you say, Macarthur would have claimed it as a strategic win.

Public opinion during WW2 was about winning the war and nothing else. Projecting today’s pissweak Parliamentary arguments – i.e., backing a party above all else – into the cauldron of the 1940s makes no sense in this country, and it didn’t in any other Allied country either after 1939 and until 1946.

I would dearly like to see any evidence that people would have voted differently, let alone protest in the streets, let alone try and turf a wartime PM – flog that he was – had the Sons of Nippon made the mistake of taking a provincial outpost with a telegraph line on the other end of this continent.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
April 23, 2023 8:33 pm

i intend to be standin’ and fallin’ if necessary again this anzac day

Everyone to the Epitaph!*

*One of the great moments in blogging history.

Winston Smith
April 23, 2023 8:34 pm

https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/…/mad-albo-inundates…/
We are no longer a Democracy where the people have a say in the Laws that they are governed under – it is now a Mafia where the government enables market share to its friends.
It’s a Fascist state and the Australian worker is no longer a friend. Something that came as a rude shock to them when the Builders Union Bosses (Which one?) sided with the government against its own members.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 8:38 pm

Blamey didn’t ‘manage’ Macarthur.

LOL. Read the history KD. This is one of the funniest aspects of the whole thing. It was like a koala riding a tyrannosaur. Except sometimes the politics did faintly penetrate the dino’s thick skull. MacArthur was an interesting guy.

The ructions about the 6th & 7th Divs participating in Leyte were especially fun. He was very jealous.

bons
bons
April 23, 2023 8:42 pm

Speaking of carriers, as part of my boy aviator training we were taken onto the floating paddle pop stick, HMAS MELBOURNE, to observe a night flying exercise.
lI was an experience that had to be lived because no description is adequate.
Screaming A4’s suddenly appearing out of the blackness whizzing past the island with apparently no space to spare, followed by what looked in the dark as C130 sized Trackers clattering across a deck that was obviously impossibly too small.
Shadowy figures charging around the darkened deck acting as if they knew what was going on.
The chopper ride out provided an opportunity to seriously reconsider my career choices.
Carrier aviation is insane. They are superior people.

Cassie of Sydney
April 23, 2023 8:42 pm

Public opinion during WW2 was about winning the war and nothing else. Projecting today’s pissweak Parliamentary arguments – i.e., backing a party above all else – into the cauldron of the 1940s makes no sense in this country, and it didn’t in any other Allied country either after 1939 and until 1946.

Yes.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 8:45 pm

Nobody would have cared if the Japs had a) wanted to take Darwin, and/or b) did so.

Except for about 7 million Australian voters…

KD, you’re lack of political antenna is fun. It is a lot like Azimov’s psychohistory – pollies are, to some extent, inevitably driven by the millions of people who voted them into office. Therefore you cannot discount those millions of people if they are made unhappy by small things like an invasion by the much anticipated and feared Yellow Peril.

Muddy
Muddy
April 23, 2023 8:47 pm

At the risk of getting stuck in this vortex of cognitive phlegm, Sir Frederick Shedden had more influence than Sir Thomas Blamey during the period 1942-43 at least.

Cassie of Sydney
April 23, 2023 8:50 pm

And now the passive aggression begins. So predictable.

I caught up with old friends today for a long lovely lunch, the husband is ex-military and a military historian. He had an interesting take on how China will take Taiwan, and how the USA will respond.

He said if it happens, Australia is f*cked.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
April 23, 2023 8:51 pm

I’ve forgotten most of the history I ever leaned, but wasn’t Curtin making plans to re-forge the links with Britain, before he died in 1945?

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
April 23, 2023 8:52 pm

Except for about 7 million Australian voters…
KD, you’re lack of political antenna is fun.

Logistically stupid.
Militarily even more stupid.
In terms of domestic outpost of Empire politics, insignificant.

It’s like arguing with Lidia Thorpe. No concept of reality.

NB: *your*

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
April 23, 2023 8:52 pm

At the risk of getting stuck in this vortex of cognitive phlegm, Sir Frederick Shedden had more influence than Sir Thomas Blamey during the period 1942-43 at least.

Finally.

mem
mem
April 23, 2023 8:56 pm

Ed Casesays:
April 23, 2023 at 7:50 pm
7th Division?
Yes, it rings a bell. In fact it was something like the 7th/ 7th or such.

Muddy
Muddy
April 23, 2023 8:57 pm

Zulu.
The ‘cutting of ties’ was symbolic only. Australia continued to provide food/wool, etc. to the U.K throughout the war (dependent upon shipping availability), and neither the diplomatic nor military connections between us were cut in any sense. Intelligence sharing, for example, increased, and was undertaken in a very cordial manner.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
April 23, 2023 8:58 pm

To all the lovely ladies at the Cat. You know who your are.

Paul van Dyk – Tell Me Why (Official Video)

JC
JC
April 23, 2023 8:59 pm

He had an interesting take on how China will take Taiwan, and how the USA will respond.

He said if it happens, Australia is f*cked.

Can you elaborate a little on both. Sounds interesting.

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 23, 2023 9:00 pm

Ed Casesays:
April 23, 2023 at 7:52 pm
Give up, Cletus.

You’ve been OutBaffleGabbed by a master.

I haven’t been debating with you.

And that’s Cletus the Illustrious to you.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
April 23, 2023 9:01 pm

You know who your are….correction.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 9:02 pm

The Yellow Peril thing seems to’ve been strongest in the 1900-20 period, but almost certainly extended into the forties. A lefty who used to drop by the old Cat, whose tag I think was Testpattern put me onto an interesting SF novel called “The Australian Crisis” by a guy called Charles Kirmess, published in 1909. It hypothesized an invasion by the Japanese…even before WW1. Add it to the citations at the first link and you have a feel for how the people were thinking at the time.

Now include an actual invasion in 1942. The Aussie population would go off.

All hypothesis from me, but hypotheses are fun.

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 23, 2023 9:02 pm

Grandpa Ed Simpson

John Curtin didn’t know that, so he did his own deal with the Japs and later had to do a lotta backpedalin’, see his Call To America speech.

Still waiting for you to provide evidence for the so-called “Curtin deal”.

There is far more substance in Bruce of Ncl’s argument than you have ever offered for yours.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 9:04 pm

NB: *your*

True. People are stupid. In their millions. And can’t spell.

Rabz
April 23, 2023 9:07 pm

had the Sons of Nippon made the mistake of taking a provincial outpost with a telegraph line on the other end of this continent

To paraphrase CL, after taking that provincial outpost, the Nipponese could have marched 100 kms south, apprehended several wallabies and condemned them to some serious gaol languishing.

A military triumph to be sure. Reminiscent of the Germans that scaled Elbrus in late ’42 before it all became very regrettable.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 9:10 pm

At the risk of getting stuck in this vortex of cognitive phlegm, Sir Frederick Shedden had more influence than Sir Thomas Blamey during the period 1942-43 at least.

And? Blamey had the job of keeping MacArthur sweet. He had no other job. Should he not have had a boss?

Blamey was in a similar position to Eisenhower, except the latter had ultimate authority. Blamey only had persuasion and gentle prodding. He did damn well with those blunt tools.

He’d had a similar job in Egypt, which he did with great success, thus being why Canberra gave him the job of tyrannosaur riding.

Gabor
Gabor
April 23, 2023 9:10 pm

Formosa or as is now called Taiwan, was only briefly a part of mainland China, in the 1940s IIRC, so the Chinese have no legitimate claim.
Far less in fact than Russia has on Odessa.

Other then this, I couldn’t care a lot as politics go, but feel sorry for the Taiwanese, can’t see how taking Taiwan would affect Aus-Chinese relationship, unless the OZ politicians get uppity about it.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
April 23, 2023 9:11 pm

Steve tricklersays:
April 23, 2023 at 9:01 pm
You know who your are….correction.

To all the lovely ladies at the Cat.

Two mistakes in a row. Worthy of a proverbial flogging.

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 23, 2023 9:12 pm

Muddysays:
April 23, 2023 at 8:47 pm
At the risk of getting stuck in this vortex of cognitive phlegm, Sir Frederick Shedden had more influence than Sir Thomas Blamey during the period 1942-43 at least.

And Shedden understood very, very clearly that Australia needed the US (and therefore MacArthur) much more than the US needed Australia.

As did the Australian electorate.

Dot
Dot
April 23, 2023 9:13 pm

Razey says:
April 23, 2023 at 8:26 pm
Hip operations are the new Auschwitz.
Performed by Indian scab labor with fake medical degrees. -Enjoy-

I doubt orthopedic surgery is done at cut prices. Frauds in this field do not last long.

Also, India has a trust problem but they also have a sophisticated nuclear industry for example and we don’t. The idea of Indian skilled workers being scarce is a function of low trust.

There are some strange comments made on this blog nowadays. How was the original comment made in reference to what?

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 23, 2023 9:16 pm

Top Endersays:

April 23, 2023 at 8:07 pm

Zulu, haven’t seen the proposed DVA medallion, but only two aircraft carriers in history had the superstructure of the island on the left/port side of the ship. Both Japanese and at the bottom of the Pacific, sunk at Midway.

media and pr types love flipping images so they look more balanced or face the right way
usually this mirroring is inconsequential
sometimes it matters

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 9:17 pm

Formosa or as is now called Taiwan, was only briefly a part of mainland China, in the 1940s IIRC, so the Chinese have no legitimate claim.

Actually mainland China was a part of Formosa then, under Chang Kai Shek. Technically.
Free West Taiwan!

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 9:20 pm

And Shedden understood very, very clearly that Australia needed the US (and therefore MacArthur) much more than the US needed Australia.

Yep, that’s why he had a tyrannosaurus rider as his senior underling.
Shedden and Blamey were on the same page 1942-45.

The US somehow produces these guys. Grant, Sherman, Patton, MacArthur. They are not polite but they do achieve, if you can point them in the right direction.

cohenite
April 23, 2023 9:21 pm

The new kennedy is an alarmist fu.kwit:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKUrB5XgTDM

Ed Case
Ed Case
April 23, 2023 9:21 pm

And Shedden understood very, very clearly that Australia needed the US (and therefore MacArthur) much more than the US needed Australia.

As did the Australian electorate.

Very solemn.
And total BullShit.
America was occupying Australia [and New Zealand] whether Australia liked it or not.
The End.

Muddy
Muddy
April 23, 2023 9:22 pm

Normally I’d be all-in for a military history debate, but I sense that the present one has remained alive due to provocation for the sake of it. Good luck with that, folks.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
April 23, 2023 9:24 pm

usually this mirroring is inconsequential
sometimes it matters

like schrodinger
you wouldn’t get it

Rabz
April 23, 2023 9:25 pm

Chang Kai Shek

An individual who has an historical profile of sorts.

China’s role in WW2 was very similar to that of the ‘kraine’s – a massive killing field.

Ask any youngster if they’ve ever heard of CKS and be prepared to be met with the blankest of looks*.

They probably won’t even be aware of Miss Maggie Dodgers.

*Unless they’re Chinese or of that extraction

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 23, 2023 9:32 pm

Bruce of Ncl

The US somehow produces these guys. Grant, Sherman, Patton, MacArthur. They are not polite but they do achieve, if you can point them in the right direction.

The only direction that interested MacArthur was the direction to Manila (not the one in Australia).

Cassie of Sydney
April 23, 2023 9:33 pm

“Can you elaborate a little on both. Sounds interesting.”

Our supply chains will be impacted, badly. He said that the economic deprivations will be worse than what Australia endured during World War I and II. We won’t have any goods coming in or out. We will be completely isolated. He doubts China would bother launching a land invasion of Oz because they don’t need to however they’ll starve us economically. He also said that he doesn’t think China wants to launch a land invasion of Taiwan because of the resources required however they will encircle the island and strangle it, socially, politically and economically, all of which they’re rehearsing now. I asked him what the US will do and if they’ll come to protect us and he laughed cynically. He said the US will concentrate on Taiwan first, we are a poor second. I asked him if nukes will be used and he said it was most likely.

This man doesn’t engage in hyperbole, he was quite matter of fact, and he is a military expert. This conversation was whilst we were sitting at the table after a delicious main meal of Lebanese food. We were eating our pudding, and both his wife and I, who normally never have a problem gobbling up our food, were struggling to swallow our pudding.

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 23, 2023 9:33 pm

Ed Casesays:
April 23, 2023 at 9:21 pm
And Shedden understood very, very clearly that Australia needed the US (and therefore MacArthur) much more than the US needed Australia.

As did the Australian electorate.

Very solemn.
And total BullShit.
America was occupying Australia [and New Zealand] whether Australia liked it or not.
The End.

You’re not a very deep thinker, are you Grandpa Ed Simpson?

Razey
Razey
April 23, 2023 9:35 pm

India has a trust problem

Scabs shouldn’t be allowed in the country.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 23, 2023 9:37 pm

Razeysays:

April 23, 2023 at 9:35 pm

India has a trust problem

Scabs shouldn’t be allowed in the country.

which country
japan india or australia

C.L.
C.L.
April 23, 2023 9:37 pm

Jane Caro: Gadsby and Humphries are comedy equals:

https://twitter.com/JaneCaro/status/1650088108690669568

Cope heroin.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
April 23, 2023 9:40 pm

Thomas Blamey was an obese drunk who whored his way through the country after WWI, and who (after seeking political favours) jumped over Sturdee and Lavarack to get the big chair.

Acquiescing to Macarthur, one of the six commanders he sacked was one of the forgotten greats of Australian military history, Arnold Potts. Potts conducted one of the greatest fighting retreats in the history of this or any country in conditions he described as ‘cannot be appreciated unless seen’.

At Koitaki, and during Blamey’s solitary 48 hour visit to NG (in which he at no time saw anything of the conditions fought in) he addressed the 21st Brigade, still malnourished and wracked with dysentery after the abovementioned fighting retreat:

In an infamous speech to a group of Diggers during the campaign in September 1942, Australian commander General Thomas Blamey told the soldiers they had behaved like “rabbits” by withdrawing up the Kokoda Track.
“It’s the rabbit who runs who gets shot,” Blamey said. “Not the man holding the gun.”

The officers on parade held their men at bay, barely. Blamey sensed the mood and pissed off, as he should have. Blamey’s speech was direct result of Macarthur cracking at him. He didn’t ‘prod’ or ‘guide’ anything. He sacked the commander (again), insulted the fighting men and left.

‘Ride the tyrannosaur’. He did no such thing.

He is well regarded as a flog to this day by the ADF and plenty of people who’ve been in it, despite having the 1RTB or whatever it’s called today named after him.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 9:41 pm

The only direction that interested MacArthur was the direction to Manila (not the one in Australia)

That’s why I mentioned the ructions about the 6th & 7th Divs* participating in Leyte. He really really didn’t like the idea that Aussies might steal his thunder. So off we went to Borneo.

(*Might be 6th & 9th Divs, I can’t remember. Anyway Curtin had Big Mac accepting we would contribute two divisions to the liberation of the Philippines. Then after a while it was down to one division. Then no divisions. Big Mac was a fun guy.)

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
April 23, 2023 9:47 pm

Australia has turned into a low trust country as well. Remember India was civilised when most of us were still barbarians.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
April 23, 2023 9:49 pm

Acquiescing to Macarthur, one of the six commanders he sacked was one of the forgotten greats of Australian military history, Arnold Potts

It wasn’t until 2007, that there was a monument to Potts, dedicated in his home town of Kojonup.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 9:55 pm

Thomas Blamey was an obese drunk who whored his way through the country after WWI, and who (after seeking political favours) jumped over Sturdee and Lavarack to get the big chair.

You’re funny KD. There’re two types of general: those who lead men, and those who gently herd politicians and other prima donnas. One guess which job Blamey had, poor bastard. You need both kinds to fight a war.

Potts was a fine guy from what I read. Of course Blamey rode the tyrannosaur, in a china shop. That was his job. No one else had a hope in hell of managing MacArthur, and Blamey did bloody well with a shitty hand doing so.

I think my favourite Aussie general was Maj Gen Eather, who was lead scout on the road to Lae. His guys weren’t happy and told him rudely to be a general not point man.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
April 23, 2023 9:59 pm

There’re two types of general: those who lead men

Generals.

and those who gently herd politicians and other prima donnas

Flogs. Not generals. They are the Angus Houstons, urging people not to destroy bridges and infrastructure because native ladies might be inconvenienced, and to to ‘kill with compassion and humility’.

‘Gently herd’. Jesus wept. Aspiring ponytailers.

Cassie of Sydney
April 23, 2023 9:59 pm

The passive aggression continues. It’s embarrassing.

The Beer whisperer
The Beer whisperer
April 23, 2023 10:06 pm

Mad Albo inundates jobs market with “worthless Indian degrees”

Is there a bigger enemy of the working class than Albo?

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 23, 2023 10:07 pm

Yeah, KD, Eisenhower wasn’t a general, he was a flog by your definition.
It’s a job that needs doing. Keeping the pollies off the back of the guys.

As I said Blamey learned this in the ME as (very painfully negotiated) 2IC of the theatre, where he had to stroke the egos of several Poms. That went well, our guys were able to do some seriously good stuff in Tobruk, Syria and El Alamein. Sometimes you need someone to grease the wheels.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
April 23, 2023 10:20 pm

They stole my heart: Weary’s granddaughter pleads for thieves to return love letters, medals

Exclusive
By Jamie Walker
Associate Editor
6:59PM April 23, 2023
No Comments

Anzac Day won’t be the same for Diana Dunlop this year, not when there’s an empty place above her heart where her famous grandfather’s medals used to be.

Ms Dunlop, 27, was devastated when thieves broke into her Melbourne home in December and tore out a safe containing two bars of Ernest “Weary” Dunlop’s military decorations and – worse still – hundreds of love letters exchanged between the inspirational World War II army surgeon and her grandmother, Helen.

It was almost certainly an inside job, set up when her part-time cleaner tipped off criminals about the safe, police believe. The gang waited until the young woman and her partner were away to raid the Toorak terrace.
Read Next

So brazen were the thieves, they evidently slept there overnight while taking their time to rip the 350kg strongbox from a hidden wall compartment and make off with it.

“The safe would have been extracted and taken somewhere ­remote to cut it open,” Ms Dunlop said. “It would not be that hard with a cheap anglegrinder and a bit of perseverance … and we know they definitely got into it and got into it quickly.”

That’s because a credit card she had put inside the safe was used and flagged by police. Two laptops and sentimental items belonging to her grandmother were also ­inside, and the couple lost other valuables when the house was ransacked.

“The monetary value of the items was insignificant,” she said. “No doubt the thieves would have thought they were on to something good … a big safe might suggest jewellery, wads of cash and the like. It must have been a disappointment when the door was ­finally cut open.”

None of Weary’s treasures have turned up and Ms Dunlop suspects the robbers had no idea what they were on to.

She is exploring whether her grandfather’s medals can be reissued – but among them were rare awards such as the Most Exalted Order of the White Elephant from the Thai government, recognising his efforts to care for and protect fellow prisoners of war on the Burma railway, the Order of St Michael and St George, Knight Commander of the Order of St John of Jerusalem and other ­official honours bestowed by India, Japan and Sri Lanka.

Thankfully, she retains scanned copies of her grandparents’ affectionate handwritten correspondence, a record of their love that she cherished. Also lost were sketches and makeshift patient records from Sir Ernest’s three years as a Japanese PoW, used to write his celebrated book, The War Diaries of Weary Dunlop. He died a national hero in 1993, aged 85.

“They probably threw the correspondence straight in the bin, which is such a tragedy,” Ms Dunlop said. “I doubt they would have had any idea who my grandfather was and the importance of the records. The letters wouldn’t have been worth anything to them.”

Still, she was relieved to have had her mind put at ease about how she and Lachlan were targeted. The wall-safe was so well disguised that friends who had stayed with them had no inkling of its presence.

But their cleaner, a man she trusted, must have twigged and alerted the criminal gang. While it is understood that a number of suspects have been identified, a spokesperson for Victoria Police said: “There have been no arrests at this stage and sadly no property has been recovered. The investigation is ongoing.”

Ms Dunlop will march on Tuesday, of course, proud as punch to be representing the grandad she never got to meet. But the absence of his medals on her chest will be a poignant reminder of what was taken from the family and the nation – because she saw herself as holding the precious keepsakes in trust for all Australians – casting a shadow over her Anzac Day.

“It really shook us,” she said of the robbery. “It was like an attack … I felt viscerally ill when it happened.”

A $12,000 reward has been ­offered for the return of the stolen items and Ms Dunlop renewed her plea to the thieves to “leave them at a police station, RSL or war memorial – somewhere they will be found – because they’re of no value to you but they are worth a lot to this country’s military history.”

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
April 23, 2023 10:22 pm

Yeah, KD, Eisenhower wasn’t a general, he was a flog by your definition.

Apples and railway sleepers. Still, it’s (in your words):

All hypothesis from me

Yes it is. Rapidly disconnecting from reality, Lidia.

Getting really close to mentioning ‘Titus’ and ‘fun’ in the same sentence here.

Alamak!
Alamak!
April 23, 2023 10:26 pm

Is there a bigger enemy of the working class than Albo?

The manager of Albo’s Sydney property empire, p’raps.

H B Bear
H B Bear
April 23, 2023 10:52 pm

C.L.

Jane Caro: Gadsby and Humphries are comedy equals:

That will take some topping. Although ALPBC 7pm News did their best wit Q&A fave Miriam Margolyes.

Zatara
Zatara
April 23, 2023 10:52 pm

The British and Americans split the Far East.
British got West of Singapore, the Americans got the East.
That meant that when the War in the Pacific kicked off, American Troops would be occupying Australia.

Nope.

The dividing line for defensive responsibilities per the ABC-1 planning agreement was the 180th Meridian with the Commonwealth responsible for the defense of all west of that line with the exclusion of the Philippines.

Mark from Melbourne
Mark from Melbourne
April 23, 2023 11:54 pm

It’s time the business community stepped up and stopped being played for fools by the Labor Party. My door is always open to business leaders and those who employ Australians, but too many business leaders say one thing in private and don’t advocate it publicly.

To be frank, some business leaders need to stop craving popularity on social media by signing up to every social cause, even though they may not believe in it.

Our country deserves an honest debate on energy. The business community should be staring down the extremes of ESG (environmental, social, and governance), proxy voters and industry super funds ­demands on capital and stand up for the national interest.

Seems a reasonable take to me, and about time it was said out loud.

Dot
Dot
April 23, 2023 11:55 pm

Jane Caro: Gadsby and Humphries are comedy equals:

His funeral will be more popular than her shows where she charges admission.

The Beer whisperer
The Beer whisperer
April 24, 2023 1:45 am

C.L.

Jane Caro: Gadsby and Humphries are comedy equals:

Gadsby isn’t even as funny as last week’s prawn salad. Accountants are funnier. Hell, auditors at a funeral are funnier than Gadsby. Leprosy is funnier than Gadsby. Gangrenous anal warts are funnier. My dog shitting on the carpet is funnier.

Caro is a rolled gold, true blue, dinky di, deadset moron.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
April 24, 2023 2:35 am
Steve trickler
Steve trickler
April 24, 2023 2:39 am

Oops…

Kaitlin goes inside the mind of the modern college student

Inside the Mind of a College Student

Gabor
Gabor
April 24, 2023 3:20 am

Steve trickler says:
April 24, 2023 at 2:39 am

Oops…
Kaitlin goes inside the mind of the modern college student
Inside the Mind of a College Student

A complete waste of time debating these morons, she wouldn’t even admit the fetus is in her womb.
Keep saying it’s in her stomach, ready to regurgitate any time she wants to.

Pathetic.

Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:00 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:01 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:03 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:04 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:06 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:07 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:08 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:10 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:12 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:13 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:15 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:17 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:18 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:19 am
Tom
Tom
April 24, 2023 4:21 am
Gabor
Gabor
April 24, 2023 4:59 am

Just saying.

1870.04.22 Lenin was born on this day.
Aleksandr Ulyanov was his brother.

What happened to Aleksandr Ulyanov?
On 8 May, he and his four comrades – Pakhomy Andreyushkin, Vasily Generalov, Vasili Osipanov, and Petr Shevyrev – were hanged at Shlisselburg. Aleksandr’s execution drove his younger brother Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Vladimir Lenin) to pursue the Russian revolutionary struggle ever more fervently.

Miltonf
Miltonf
April 24, 2023 5:34 am

I don’t even know who Gadsby is which is probably fortunate for me.

Anchor What
Anchor What
April 24, 2023 6:21 am

Thanks Tom. Good lot. But I’m going to have to add Ramirez to the Scroll Past list, which is mostly the Poms.

Anchor What
Anchor What
April 24, 2023 6:23 am

The Great Barrier Reef is in top condition, but as usual the media isn’t telling the public. Full story at Jo Nova.

Jorge
Jorge
April 24, 2023 6:37 am

Media nonsense: Humphries ‘himself to the end, cracking jokes, everybody laughing, surrounded by family.’ Kathy Lette in her usual role as a media tart in frantic search for an unused pun.

Earlier reports spoke of him being in agony. Poor bastard.

His two sons invisible and unmentioned.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 24, 2023 6:38 am

i see titus was off the leash last night
mong

Winston Smith
April 24, 2023 6:46 am

Get Woke, Go Broke: Bed Bath & Beyond Files for Bankruptcy – Company Threw Conservatives Under the Bus and Dropped MyPillow Products

One of America’s most prominent companies filed for bankruptcy today after previously caving to the radical left and dropping MyPillow.

https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2023/04/get-woke-go-broke-bed-bath-beyond-files-for-bankruptcy-company-threw-conservatives-under-the-bus-and-dropped-mypillow-products/?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=the-gateway-pundit&utm_campaign=dailypm&utm_content=2023-04-23

Anchor What
Anchor What
April 24, 2023 6:58 am

Ask any youngster if they’ve ever heard of CKS and be prepared to be met with the blankest of looks

According to the diary of WW2 UK CDFS Alan Brooke the general himself was outclassed by Mrs. CKS, who was a hot babe.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 24, 2023 7:00 am

Nuther bunch of supranational nutters:

World Meteorological Organization Warns Climate Eve of Destruction Is Here (23 Apr)

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) issued a warning of almost Biblical proportions Sunday, noting a planet wracked by “climate change trends” that continued through 2022, driving food insecurity and mass migration along with a host of other maladies for mankind from droughts and floods to famine and heatwaves.

Be nice if WHO, WMO and the UN would just shut up and leave us be. Nothing much is happening.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 24, 2023 7:14 am

blamey was a mong

Winston Smith
April 24, 2023 7:31 am

Bruce O’Newk:

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) issued a warning of almost Biblical proportions Sunday, noting a planet wracked by “climate change trends” that continued through 2022, driving food insecurity and mass migration along with a host of other maladies for mankind from droughts and floods to famine and heatwaves.

Food insecurity is driven mainly by government policies. The same as mass migration.
95% of the worlds current problems arise from either government failure to stop interfering in the marketplace, or past interruptions to market policies not being removed.

calli
calli
April 24, 2023 7:33 am

Both my uncles were in North Africa then PNG. In other words they were active for almost the entire war.

They never really talked about it much. I recall one being not impressed with Blamey. Or MacArthur, for than matter. More impressed with the US Navy who kept the Japanese away from their little sister who was waiting out the war with her father in New Hebrides.

As for Aussie domestic politics, the only memories I have of their opinions was over the unions and wharf strikes compromised supply lines. They called the strikers traitors, living soft while other men fought and died.

None of this is from book larnin’, just from the chile amang ye takin’ notes.

As I said, they didn’t talk about it. When they returned it was all about family and normalcy and forgetting the terrible things they’d endured.

Winston Smith
April 24, 2023 7:36 am

Hysterical young women and calculating old men is the biggest problem facing the world today.

calli
calli
April 24, 2023 7:38 am

I enjoyed sitting in the bleachers watching the armchair generals yesterday. Everyone has a different “take” on history, and there’s no need to get hot under the collar about it.

It all depends on whose books you read, and who you listen to.

Unless you are all very, very old and were there!

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 24, 2023 7:43 am

The Great Barrier Reef is in top condition, but as usual the media isn’t telling the public. Full story at Jo Nova.

In this vein, over at Judy Curry’s:

How the Disinformation Industrial Complex is destroying trust in science (23 Apr)

It’s about Covid not climate but the parallel is obvious. CL has a relevant post up also.

Winston Smith
April 24, 2023 7:45 am

That’s a hell of a hit in the head for a girl.
https://twitter.com/Riley_Gaines_/status/1648892612709953537
I’d like to see an assault charge against the cokinafrok.

lotocoti
lotocoti
April 24, 2023 7:45 am

Blower got it, Morland didn’t.
Ministers must be able to give direct critical feedback on briefings and submissions to senior officials.
Telling some bloated Mandarin to shut their bitching
and get on with their work is bullying.
Apparently.

Crossie
Crossie
April 24, 2023 7:47 am

H B Bear says:
April 23, 2023 at 10:52 pm
C.L.
Jane Caro: Gadsby and Humphries are comedy equals:
That will take some topping. Although ALPBC 7pm News did their best wit Q&A fave Miriam Margolyes.

Another socialist Pom irrelevant at home has come here to tell the colonials what’s what.

The only reason she is even remotely famous is due to her having a role in Harry Potter films, work of the female author whom she now despises.

Cassie of Sydney
April 24, 2023 7:49 am

“Miriam Margolyes.”

Real name is Miriam Gargoyles.

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 24, 2023 7:50 am

Zatarasays:
April 23, 2023 at 10:52 pm
The British and Americans split the Far East.
British got West of Singapore, the Americans got the East.
That meant that when the War in the Pacific kicked off, American Troops would be occupying Australia.

Nope.

The dividing line for defensive responsibilities per the ABC-1 planning agreement was the 180th Meridian with the Commonwealth responsible for the defense of all west of that line with the exclusion of the Philippines.

Grandpa Ed Simpson has again been caught making sh1t up! I am sooooo surprised.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 24, 2023 7:52 am

Someone say Gadsby?

‘No-name’ comedian Hannah Gadsby slammed for helping rename Barry Award (Sky, 23 Apr)

Liberal Party Vice President Teena McQueen has hit out at “no-name” comedian Hannah Gadsby for her contribution to renaming the Melbourne International Comedy Festival’s Barry Award. … “I hope they reinstate that now, which was disgracefully taken out of the festival a couple of years ago,” Ms McQueen told Sky News host Cory Bernardi.

Ouch!

Winston Smith
April 24, 2023 7:52 am

You want to see how utterly stuffed the West is?
Cop This, sunshine – 3 cops beat up and arrest a dad for piercing his son’s ear without a licence!

Cassie of Sydney
April 24, 2023 7:54 am

Tim Blair…

“The Voice’s marketing campaign is even worse than Budweiser’s move with Mulvaney

Budweiser has became Budwoker, signing a ludicrous deal with someone called Dylan Mulvaney, a young man who prances around in dresses on TikTok and describes his journey to girlhood. It won’t be this year’s worst PR move, writes Tim Blair.

Even by America’s tragic beer standards, Budweiser’s Bud Light is a lamentable brew.

Still, it is hugely popular, especially with the blue collar cheap-beer-is-good-beer camp and others amused by the brand’s excellent TV ads. In a beverage market fractured by local and craft breweries, Bud Light sales were holding strong.

Then Budweiser became Budwoker, signing a ludicrous promotional deal last month with someone called Dylan Mulvaney, a 26-year-old man who for the past year has been prancing around in dresses on TikTok and describing his journey to girlhood.

Bud Light drinkers, not surprisingly, did not rejoice in their brand’s new mascot. Sales plummeted.

“I think society flexes its muscles sometimes and reminds manufacturers that the consumer is still in charge,” Missouri bar owner Jeff Fitter told Fox Business following a collapse in Bud Light sales.

“In Bud Light’s effort to be inclusive, they excluded almost everybody else, including their traditional audience.”

But maybe the bumbling, woke-blinded Budweiser executives who approved that suicidal Mulvaney decision aren’t this year’s most maladroit marketing morons.

Maybe there’s another crew that can more effectively stuff up something that by rights should be even easier than selling beer to Americans.

Step forward, Australia’s advocates for a Yes vote on the Voice to parliament. Step forward and receive your due notice for a job that, to date, has been done absolutely abysmally.

Now, to be clear, there is still every possibility that the Yes vote will prevail when our referendum is held later this year on adding the Voice to parliament.

Should be a simple project. Everybody wants a better deal for our Indigenous Australians.

But, if a Yes victory happens, it’ll be despite Yes advocacy rather than because of it. Consider some of the Yes camp’s major marketing mistakes to this point.

In February, usually impressive Indigenous activist Noel Pearson promised Australia that he’d stop talking if Yes didn’t win.

“I will fall silent,” Pearson told the ABC. “That will be the end of it.”

Australians, by and large, would massively prefer it if politicians and the politically-motivated simply shut the hell up. If it means voting No, that’s just how it’ll have to be.

A month or so later, Pearson’s fellow activist Marcia Langton issued a similarly desirable promise in the form of an imagined threat.

“How are they going to ever ask an Indigenous person, a Traditional Owner, for a Welcome to Country?” Langton wondered, in the case of the Voice being voted down.

“How are they ever going to be able to ask me to come and speak at their conference? If they have the temerity to do it, of course the answer is going to be no.”

There you have it, people. No more Welcomes to Country. No more getting yelled at by Marcia Langton. And all we need do to secure these sensational outcomes is vote No.

Peculiar pledges from Pearson and Langton suggest problems with selling the Voice on its merits.

Which is understandable, considering Australians are being asked to endorse a big-dollar, federally-based program of Aboriginal advancement after every previous such program has failed.

Marketing missteps meanwhile continue. Voice campaigner Pat Anderson last week urged a Yes vote because, she claimed, “a No vote will damage Australia’s reputation”.

Oh no! Not our precious reputation – already trashed, so we’ve been repeatedly told, by shutting our borders to bogus boat people and refusing to destroy our economy in the name of climate holiness.

Anyway, who’d want to be friend-zoned like boring New Zealand or pointless Canada? Vote No, Australia, and embrace the wickedness. But wait. The Yes campaign has more.

On the weekend, as this newspaper reported, Yes boosters “launched an online store where supporters can donate and buy merchandise to support the Indigenous Voice to Parliament”.

The Yes23 online store, the report added, will “offer T-shirts, stickers, corflutes, tote bags and badges with Yes branding”.

It all looks like old Optus ads. The Yes campaign aims to restructure parliament, but might only get a few people to change their mobile billing plan.

Here’s another outstanding Yes idea. The campaign will send “up to 10 invitees” into private homes to conduct “kitchen table conversations” about the Voice.

I’m not sure about you, but 10 people around my kitchen table would be a little too snug for comfort.

And there’d be no time left for talk once we’re finished with all the Welcome to Kitchen formalities.”

calli
calli
April 24, 2023 7:56 am

Miriam Gargoyles.

😀

Indolent
Indolent
April 24, 2023 7:58 am

Truly shocking – and he doesn’t hold back.

intheMatrixxx
@intheMatrixxx

Who are the perverts? #SaveTheChildren

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 24, 2023 7:58 am

Anchor Whatsays:
April 24, 2023 at 6:21 am
Thanks Tom. Good lot. But I’m going to have to add Ramirez to the Scroll Past list, which is mostly the Poms.

Morten Morland and Bob Moran are the only Poms worth looking at. Ramirez is very erratic of late, and well below his old standard even on his good days.

Dot
Dot
April 24, 2023 8:01 am

Razey says:
April 23, 2023 at 9:35 pm
India has a trust problem
Scabs shouldn’t be allowed in the country.

Tell me about Indian doctors who LARP as orthopedic specialists and who work for cut rate salaries. In Australia.

GO!!!

Enough of the glowie stupidity.

(Can someone explain “orthopedic surgery is the “new Auschwitz”? This is perplexing to say the least.)

WolfmanOz
April 24, 2023 8:04 am

A got an email early this morning advising me that the author of the blog Pointman’s has recently passed away.

A terrific writer that I’m sure a few Cats here caught up with his posts.

RIP.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 24, 2023 8:05 am
Dot
Dot
April 24, 2023 8:06 am

I have tried to be sympathetic to Blamey but you just can’t be. Too many people under his command and professional historians hold a dim view. I am not aware of other generals really praising him.

The idea he was a politician representing the interests of the Army and getting things done by getting along with politicians is a stretch to say the least. He had plenty of political enemies in Parliament. It’s a miracle he got the Field Marshal promotion. I assume if not for WWII he may have been a forgettable head of the Army retiring at Lt Gen or Maj Gen.

It’s a miracle he didn’t get sacked as GOC and went anywhere after the brothel scandal as Police Commissioner given that was in 1931 (?).

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
April 24, 2023 8:10 am

As I said, they didn’t talk about it. When they returned it was all about family and normalcy and forgetting the terrible things they’d endured.

When the Second World War began, my grandfather and his brother were farming in the Eastern Wheatbelt of Western Australia. They took themselves off, and enlisted, leaving my grandmother to manage two farms and raise five children. She maintained for the rest of her life that she should have been awarded a service medal, as her contribution to the war effort had been equal to that of any soldier.

Cassie of Sydney
April 24, 2023 8:11 am

Maybe, just maybe, Peter Dutton is finding his mojo…

Corporates being played for fools: Dutton
Geoff Chambers

Peter Dutton has warned corporate Australia to stop “being played for fools by the Labor Party” and accused business leaders of chasing popularity by signing up to social causes even if they don’t believe in them.

In a scathing attack on elements of the private sector, the Opposition Leader told The Australian that “too many business leaders say one thing in private and don’t advocate it publicly”.

The Liberal Party leader, who along with deputy Sussan Ley and Treasury spokesman Angus Taylor have traversed the nation meeting small and big business leaders after last year’s election rout, slammed private sector chiefs for “craving popularity on social media”.
“It’s time the business community stepped up and stopped being played for fools by the Labor Party. My door is always open to business leaders and those who employ Australians, but too many business leaders say one thing in private and don’t advocate it publicly,” Mr Dutton said.

“To be frank, some business leaders need to stop craving popularity on social media by signing up to every social cause, even though they may not believe in it.

“Our country deserves an honest debate on energy. The business community should be staring down the extremes of ESG (environmental, social, and governance), proxy voters and industry super funds ­demands on capital and stand up for the national interest.”’

Well said Mr Dutton.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 24, 2023 8:12 am

Dotsays:

April 24, 2023 at 8:01 am

Razey says:

too much drinkin sake by razey san

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
April 24, 2023 8:15 am

In It’s Only Money news:

Push to provide cheaper driving lessons for disadvantaged youth to ensure their safety on ACT roads

Woden Community Services provides the mandatory Pre-Learner Licence Course for vulnerable and disadvantaged young people it has regular contact with.

But without additional funding, the group is unable to “finish the job” and help participants meet the minimum driving hours required.

“The average cost is anywhere from $4,000 to $6,000 per young person to get to their Ps,” WCS youth engagement team leader Joel Artup said.

If I remember correctly, our kids did their 100 hours doing family driving with their mother and I. At the start they had a couple of hours of clutch control practice with me – and at the end a couple (as in, two) of professional lessons to prepare for the test.

Total incremental cost ~$200.

I’d nearly bet that we were not even slightly unusual. Perhaps it’s the pronouns…

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 24, 2023 8:16 am

 It’s a miracle he got the Field Marshal promotion

known brothel creeper

possible flamer

goat photos

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 24, 2023 8:17 am

A got an email early this morning advising me that the author of the blog Pointman’s has recently passed away.

Sad to hear that Wolfman. His family have put up a final message:

The Last Post | Pointman’s (23 Apr)

They are leaving the site up for a while, so if there’re any posts you want to save to webarchive get in and do it soon.

I used to read his for a long time but eventually cut back on how many climate sites I was following. My favourite one of his is this one:

The Climate Wars. | Pointman’s (2012)

Superb, and even more applicable now than it was back then.

Tintarella di Luna
Tintarella di Luna
April 24, 2023 8:18 am

Real name is Miriam Gargoyles.

Outside is inside and vice versa

calli
calli
April 24, 2023 8:19 am

The Who got it Roger.

The history of the song is interesting.

Idiots these days would say that it’s about a girl wanting to be a boy, but it’s about a boy being forced by Mum into being a “girl”. And it’s been going on for a long time.

Winston Smith
April 24, 2023 8:19 am

Cassie of Sydney:

Here’s another outstanding Yes idea. The campaign will send “up to 10 invitees” into private homes to conduct “kitchen table conversations” about the Voice.

That sounds like a wonderful idea. And if I tell them to piss off? Then it sounds suspiciously like a threat.

Indolent
Indolent
April 24, 2023 8:21 am

This is from a speech he made. 6 minutes. Absolutely outstanding.

Tucker Carlson pulls ZERO punches calling the trans movement OUT in EPIC speech

Roger
Roger
April 24, 2023 8:24 am

The Who got it Roger.

They certainly did, calli.

I’d forgotten that one.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
April 24, 2023 8:26 am

Talking to my daughter about all her relatives that went off to war and how none of them were killed. She’s into family history, not me. She tells me my Great Granddad Jim was in the Boer War. I only saw him once when I was a nipper, never said anything, just sat. He was in his late 90’s. Two more of mum’s cousins were in the same battalion as my uncle in North Africa. I feel for the remaining ones few that they are and all the Cats that selflessly gave service only to see the state of Nations run by the feeble minded that have never stood for anything.

Indolent
Indolent
April 24, 2023 8:26 am
Boambee John
Boambee John
April 24, 2023 8:28 am

Sancho Panzersays:
April 24, 2023 at 8:16 am
It’s a miracle he got the Field Marshal promotion

Labor tolerated him until the war was over, then nudged him out. The promotion was by Menzies, probably at least partly to annoy Labor.

In the days when the Liberals were prepared to fight back, even if in a dubious cause.

Mother Lode
Mother Lode
April 24, 2023 8:30 am

In the Sky article Bruce of Newk linked to above:

The Barry Award was named in honour of Australian entertainer Barry Humphries, who helped establish the Melbourne International Comedy Festival.

The award was renamed in 2019 following calls from previous winners of the Barry who spoke out against the comedian’s controversial comments about transgender people.

So his contribution was so significant they named an award after him, but as soon as he holds a different opinion to them he is written out of their history.

These are the people who preen themselves for their intellectual subtlety and capacity for robust and frank debate so much that they created for themselves ‘The Festival of Dangerous Ideas’ where they can all slap each other on the back for it.

But one wrong idea and Humphries has to be obliterated. Damnatio memoriae.

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 24, 2023 8:30 am

PS, at one stage in the Middle East, his Director General of Medical Services warned Blamey that if he did not moderate his lifestyle (cut back on the booze and big meals, and lose weight), then the DGMS would declare him unfit for service and return him to Australia.

Cassie of Sydney
April 24, 2023 8:32 am

“The Who got it Roger.

The history of the song is interesting.

Idiots these days would say that it’s about a girl wanting to be a boy, but it’s about a boy being forced by Mum into being a “girl”. And it’s been going on for a long time.”

Yep, the conga line of a lot of dysfunction begins with the mother.

Indolent
Indolent
April 24, 2023 8:32 am
Roger
Roger
April 24, 2023 8:35 am

More impressed with the US Navy who kept the Japanese away from their little sister who was waiting out the war with her father in New Hebrides.

Little known fact about Chester Nimitz.

He had his heart set on going to West Point but competition for the places alloted to Texans was fierce. His Congressman did advise him, however, that he had one spot available at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.

Nimitz studied assiduously for the entrance exam, passed with flying colours and later graduated near the top of his class of 100 or so.

This despite never graduating from high school.

Big_Nambas
Big_Nambas
April 24, 2023 8:36 am

Politicians are people who, when they see light at the end of the tunnel, go out and buy some more tunnel. ~John Quinton~

A politician is a fellow who will lay down your life for his country. ~ Tex Guinan~

Politics is the gentle art of getting votes from the poor and campaign funds from the rich, by promising to protect each from the other. ~Oscar Ameringer~

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
April 24, 2023 8:36 am

Roger I wonder if the gender dysphoria boys had nutty mother’s first.

mem
mem
April 24, 2023 8:36 am

“believing in climate holiness,” Tim Blair just coined another beauty. Thanks Tim, I’m going to use that one.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 24, 2023 8:37 am

Mother Lodesays:

April 24, 2023 at 8:30 am

they turned on him for ‘zactly the same thing they named the award after him in the first place

pokin fun at the conventions of the day

Tintarella di Luna
Tintarella di Luna
April 24, 2023 8:38 am

WolfmanOzsays:
April 24, 2023 at 8:04 am
A got an email early this morning advising me that the author of the blog Pointman’s has recently passed away.

That is very sad he certainly wrote well and did enjoy his insights whenever I got the chance to read Pointman’s blog. Thanks for letting people know WolfmanOz

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
April 24, 2023 8:39 am

Ahh, I see calli and Cassie got there first.

Crossie
Crossie
April 24, 2023 8:40 am

Bruce of Newcastle says:
April 24, 2023 at 7:43 am
The Great Barrier Reef is in top condition, but as usual the media isn’t telling the public. Full story at Jo Nova.
In this vein, over at Judy Curry’s:
How the Disinformation Industrial Complex is destroying trust in science (23 Apr)

Somebody remarked yesterday either here or on The Outsiders that science is no longer science, it is politics. How can it be otherwise when the snake oil salesmen insist the science is settled?

These same people sneer at the Catholic Church with regard to Galileo et al yet they are behaving far worse than the Church was supposed to have done. Wouldn’t they be surprised to learn that priest were very much into science?

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 24, 2023 8:41 am

bj earlier
blamey was a fat bastard

prolly why he paid hookers

no chick would voluntary sleep with the tubby

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
April 24, 2023 8:42 am

“To be frank, some business leaders need to stop craving popularity on social media by signing up to every social cause, even though they may not believe in it.

Well said Mr Dutton.

Seconded. The problem is in many cases they really do seem to actually believe it:

THOMAS LIFSON: Decoding the Bud Light disaster as marketing VP Alissa Heinerscheid ‘takes leave of absence’. (23 Apr)

The exact nature of that mistake is what makes this incident so fascinating and meaningful. I believe that the political ramifications are profound.

The first point to make is that nobody at Bud Light or A-B had a clue that many of their customers would take exception to transsexual “influencer” Dylan Mulvaney getting his picture on cans of Bud Light and serving as a marketing agent. The company points out that only a few cans were produced and sent as a gift to Mulvaney, but as soon as pictures were available online of Mulvaney with his visage reproduced on a product that males place in their mouths and swallow, a homosexual connotation became attached to the product in the minds of many males who drink beer.

The reality is that the ruling class in the United States are so full of contempt for what they regard as the lower orders of society that they feel no moral imperative to understand them. The proper reaction to “transphobia” is contempt, because, after all, such retrograde views are “on the wrong side of history” and soon will be extinguished, just as resistance to homosexual “marriage” has vanished from the public sphere.

And that which they don’t understand they demonize. Perhaps if actual history was taught in the universities instead of the current social justice rubbish they might have a clearer understanding, and a feel for the dangers of what can happen when elites get too disconnected, like they are now.

Top Ender
Top Ender
April 24, 2023 8:45 am

A Gold Coast RSL’s traditional Anzac Day dawn march has been scrapped after more than 100 years amid a dispute between the sub-branch and a city leader.

The Southport RSL won’t be organising Tuesday’s commemorations, having been replaced by HCC Entertainment and Productions after area councillor Brooke Patterson told the servicemen that complaints had been made about previous year’s services.

An Indigenous choir performance will go ahead on the day despite Ms Patterson pushing the traditions of Anzac Day, saying it was important “we recognise this is Anzac Day, not NAIDOC week”.

Courier-Mail

Tintarella di Luna
Tintarella di Luna
April 24, 2023 8:47 am

Politicians are people who, when they see light at the end of the tunnel, go out and buy some more tunnel. ~John Quinton~

Perfect quote for spruikers of Yes for the inVoice though the tunnel has always been dark, bleak and never-ending for the poor little children suffering the genocide-by-welfare initiated by ‘Nugget’ Coombes and Cough-up Whitlam and promoted to the nth degree by the leeching grifters and moochers who never want the light to flicker at the end of the tunnel at all.

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 24, 2023 8:48 am

Sancho Panzersays:
April 24, 2023 at 8:41 am
bj earlier
blamey was a fat bastard

George Wooton was fatter, but still a good commander.

Crossie
Crossie
April 24, 2023 8:49 am

An Indigenous choir performance will go ahead on the day despite Ms Patterson pushing the traditions of Anzac Day, saying it was important “we recognise this is Anzac Day, not NAIDOC week”.

Another opportunity to push the Yes vote?

Cassie of Sydney
April 24, 2023 8:52 am

Laurence Fox doesn’t mince words. He’s uploaded this overnight, a warning though, you need a strong stomach….

The History of DRAG QUEEN STORY HOUR

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Yk3PzhQ_5c

Crossie
Crossie
April 24, 2023 8:53 am

And that which they don’t understand they demonize. Perhaps if actual history was taught in the universities instead of the current social justice rubbish they might have a clearer understanding, and a feel for the dangers of what can happen when elites get too disconnected, like they are now.

Bruce, the elites were always disconnected from the general population and the first to adopt any degenerate fads. Those that did not openly do so allowed their children to do it on their behalf. The way I see it, you don’t like what your children are doing stop financing them, make them earn a living and experience what the rest of the society does.

Ed Case
Ed Case
April 24, 2023 8:54 am

Now, to be clear, there is still every possibility that the Yes vote will prevail when our referendum is held later this year on adding the Voice to parliament.

Should be a simple project. Everybody wants a better deal for our Indigenous Australians.

Ol’ Tim [HMV] Blair goes balls out for The Voice, has a few kicks at Pearson and Langton on the way through.

Mother Lode
Mother Lode
April 24, 2023 8:57 am

Peter Dutton has warned corporate Australia to stop “being played for fools by the Labor Party” and accused business leaders of chasing popularity by signing up to social causes even if they don’t believe in them.

“Our country deserves an honest debate on energy. The business community should be staring down the extremes of ESG (environmental, social, and governance), proxy voters and industry super funds ­demands on capital and stand up for the national interest.”’

Whoa!

Hopefully this will include a culling of the low cost/low quality staffers and researchers the Libs seem to employ who think Twitter, Flakebook and TikTok is the vox populi.

Smart to highlight energy too, as I believe it will soon become urgent and he will have called it out first.

It would mean repudiating Morro (no great loss) and Trumble (this I would pay to see – especially if it was done with a cricket bat). He will have to own the fact that the Liberals have been guilty of kowtowing to the demands of social media activists. But that could be cathartic. A rebirth, even. The decline was gradual – just a steadily growing sense of despair. The turn-around could be sudden and inspiring.

Okay, so I am getting a little ahead of events, and perhaps even possibility, there. But it also is cathartic.

Black Ball
Black Ball
April 24, 2023 8:58 am

Bolt has 2 pieces. Number 1:

Let’s be honest.

Barry Humphries, Australia’s most brilliant comic, didn’t much like this country.

No wonder. By the end of his life Australia deserved even more of his contempt than it did at the start, having started to cancel even this genius.

Don’t be fooled by the typically Australian pseuds, blow-hards, barbarians and cancel culture cowards Humphries despised who today emote over his death.

Take former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull, who as Australian Republican Movement head pompously accused Humphries in 1998 of “caricaturing and denigrating his own country in a pretty gross and sickening way”.

True, Humphries did take the piss out of Australia, particularly when dressed as Dame Edna, the Housewife Superstar from Moonee Ponds he based on his anxiously pretentious mother, or Sir Les Patterson, the drooling, food-stained and lecherous Minister for the Yartz.

Many Humphries’ characters also savaged our types: sleazy union boss Lance Boyle; Paddington socialist academic Neil Singleton; and Sandy Stone, the sometimes dead RSL member recalling acutely observed details of a suburban life lived in a near-catatonic state.

Yet Turnbull totally missed the point. Humphries wasn’t just achingly funny but mocked us almost as a patriotic service, to save us from the humourless mediocrities now in plague proportions.

But today Turnbull, who’d slimed Humphries as a cultural traitor, puts on the sad face and retweets a post from Prime Minister Anthony Albanese calling Humphries “gifted and a gift”.

Humphries would have smirked. Even funnier, here’s Turnbull sharing a tribute from a prime minister who in January unwittingly reprised Sir Les Patterson by announcing his own Yartz policy at The Esplanade Hotel, as a pretty popster gave the room a bit of a chunk.

Then there’s Phillip Adams, the former ad man who Labor imposed on arts funding bodies which have since promoted the groupthink that’s crippled our culture.

Five years ago Adams tweeted it was his “sad duty” to agree with Hannah Gadsby, the desperately unfunny but critic-proof autistic lesbian comedian, who’d denounced Humphries as “not a comedian” but “irrelevant, inhuman dick biscuit” who “hates vulnerable minorities”.

Yet today Adams inserts himself among more famous mourners, advertising that he’d made “three significant films” with Humphries, who was “the cleverest person I’ve ever met”, and from whom he’d parted just “because of political differences”.

Actually, I suspect Humphries figured Adams for a fraud.

I had my own credentials tested before we bonded over books. Humphries had 30,000+ volumes, and grilled my wife to confirm I knew where every one was in my own library and I didn’t just have them for show.

After all, pricking people’s pomposities was his life’s work. And books – especially from the Decadent period and Edwardian years – were perhaps his greatest obsession and refuge. He’s the only person I’ve met who shared my admiration of Ronald Firbank, a comic British author now being quietly cancelled for improper language.

Speaking of cancel culture: of all the about-faces I’ve read in the past 24 hours the most shameless and telling is from the Melbourne International Comedy Festival, which Humphries co-launched in 1987.

I nearly cried to read the Festival’s tribute: “We are saddened … comic legend … developed a global platform for Australian comedy … legions of fans … wit … biting satire …”

Yes, I nearly cried with laughter at the sheer effrontery.

This same festival four years ago insulted and wounded Humphries by stripping his name from the “Barry” award for best comic, after he called gender reassignment surgery “self-mutilation”, and described transgenderism as “a fashion”.

By now Humphries, who’d staged a show celebrating music banned by the Nazis, was now in open revolt against the closing of the Australian mind.

For decades he’d hidden his attacks by speaking as Edna or Les or Sandy, so audiences never knew if they were laughing at or laughing with.

But he now spoke as Barry Humphries, so our cultural pygmies could no longer laugh off his barbs.

For instance, in 2017 he spoke at the funeral of cartoonist Bill Leak, who had been hounded to his grave by the Human Rights Commission over his biting cartoon about neglect of Aboriginal children – a cartoon many tried to cancel as racist.

Humphries let loose, calling Leak a victim of our “PC jackals” and “low-lifes”, and said the one funeral he’d like to attend “would be the funeral of the Human Rights Commission”.

But now he’ll star at his own. Pray we won’t be burying for good the larrikin laughter Australians once loved – and need.

Black Ball
Black Ball
April 24, 2023 9:02 am

Piece two:

Next week as my plane lands at Amsterdam’s airport, I guarantee I will not hear the kind of thing that drives me nuts with Qantas.

No steward will welcome me on the PA to the lands of the traditional owners – in this case, the Frisii people – and pay tribute to elders past and present.

To elders like, er, me.

Same thing with flying to London last year. There was no message of respect for the traditional owners of Caer Lundein, and tributes to Celtic elders part, present and emerging and their ownership of the land, water and even sky.

Of course not. That would be too – what did we used to call this stuff? – yes, racist.

It would be too inflammatory to all the immigrants there, and insulting to descendants of all those foreigners who made Britain great, including Angles, Saxons, Danes, Romans, Jews, Normans, Huguenots, Indians, West Indians and the rest.

And in The Netherlands, I’d look quite mad railing at all those foreigners who’ve done us Frisii wrong, pushing our ancestors to the far north, Friesland, where they lived poor, with my grandfather born in a hovel later used as a pigsty.

Those damn Batavi. Those rotten Romans. Those Franks. Those Spanish invaders. The French. The Germans.

Start thinking like that, and you’ll feel endless resentments you’d never thought of before. Endless reasons to blame people long dead for things you could fix today if you got off your backside.

So I wonder why Qantas preaches this race politics, which I’ve heard from no other airline in any other country.

Try that in Northern Ireland: “We’ve now landed in Belfast. We pay our respects to the traditional owners, the Gaels.” There’d be a riot.

Who does this race-genuflecting help?

I know who it hurts, and it’s not just the Australians who identify as Aboriginal and would feel almost powerless from all this preaching of victimhood.

It also hurts every Australian not made noble by some Aboriginal ancestor, the young especially.

What country can we now call ours, where we’re not patronised by being welcomed but are the welcomers? Not the intruders but the Indigenous?

Which country, in this newly racist world, can we call our own, without qualification or apology?

Yes, to think in this way could sound almost racist, and certainly dangerous. But I sure didn’t start it, with this retribalising of Australia. I just want it to stop.

Ed Case
Ed Case
April 24, 2023 9:04 am

The reality is that Thomas Blamey was Australia’s greatest soldier, but he wasn’t a ‘Labor Man’.
Chifley shoulda promoted him Field Marshal for winning the War in the Islands and saving Australia, but the facts are that Labor reckoned they’d do alright for themselves in the event of a Jap victory anyway, and if they could give the Japs a head start here and there, so much the better.

Retconning History, it’s the Labor way!

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 24, 2023 9:08 am

field marshal creosote

Dot
Dot
April 24, 2023 9:09 am

The reality is that Thomas Blamey was Australia’s greatest soldier

Sure, he ran the messages back and forth twice for five miles between the New Zealander infantry and Australian artillery at El Alamein.

He ran 20 miles on rough terrain in 1 hour and 45 minutes. Then he sniped 5 German Lt. Colonels, their battalions crumbled after this.

Then he made love to Rita Hayworth and Vivian Leigh until they were both exhausted.

Dot
Dot
April 24, 2023 9:10 am

Just a wafer-thin mint, Field Marshal.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 24, 2023 9:10 am

two votes for field marshal creosote

googlery

titus

Ed Case
Ed Case
April 24, 2023 9:11 am

Thomas Blamey won the MC at Gallipoli, dickhead.

Dot
Dot
April 24, 2023 9:13 am

As most people didn’t boycott all P&G brands, there’s a good chance Americans will boycott Bud Light but keep on buying Rolling Rock.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anheuser-Busch_brands

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
April 24, 2023 9:14 am

blamey killed his x girlfriends cat

Boambee John
Boambee John
April 24, 2023 9:16 am

Ed Casesays:
April 24, 2023 at 9:04 am
The reality is that Thomas Blamey was Australia’s greatest soldier, but he wasn’t a ‘Labor Man’.
Chifley shoulda promoted him Field Marshal for winning the War in the Islands and saving Australia, but the facts are that Labor reckoned they’d do alright for themselves in the event of a Jap victory anyway, and if they could give the Japs a head start here and there, so much the better.

Grandpa Ed Simpson is back on the Happy Baccy.

If he could read, he might have heard of John Monash and Harry Chauvel, both far more successful than Blamey.

Ed Case
Ed Case
April 24, 2023 9:16 am

Andrew Bolt aims a few cheap kicks at the usual nonentities while bignoting himself, another boring chapter of his mission to impersonate Australia’s rarest person, The Conservative.

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