Open Thread – Mon 1 July 2024


Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History, Francisco Goya, 1814

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Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 1, 2024 12:28 am

I just ate half a chook. Now I am hungary again.

—-

Wilderness Cooking:

Juicy Grilled Chicken With Wild Rice For All Our Little Visitors!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJI_0R33aIw

Pete of Perth
Pete of Perth
July 1, 2024 1:30 am

Will Biden last till Tuesday? Sportsbet Joe to win 2024 presidential election $4.50

KevinM
KevinM
July 1, 2024 2:57 am

When universities turned out real engineers.
115 years later and still in use.

Screenshot-2024-06-30-104628
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:00 am
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:01 am
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:02 am
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:02 am
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:03 am
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:04 am
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:05 am
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:06 am
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:07 am
Tom
Tom
July 1, 2024 4:07 am
Bourne1879
Bourne1879
July 1, 2024 5:47 am

Aging Bull. Brilliant.

lotocoti
lotocoti
July 1, 2024 6:19 am
Bourne1879
Bourne1879
July 1, 2024 6:31 am

Daily Mail US has this article up.
Chef who works on $75 MILLION superyacht reveals it costs a staggering $100,000 to stock the fridges – as he shares the most common on-board requests
Refers to the Aussie chef on motor yacht Loon. Recently came across Loon on YouTube and interesting coverage on crew life on board a $70m charter yacht. Captain is Australian Paul Clarke a former Olympian and America’s Cup crewman. The two rotating Head chefs both Aussies and both have their own YouTube videos.

12 passengers and 18 crew. The yacht seems to be well known for its YouTube work which obviously helps in marketing. However you never see the passengers.

Might go back to woodturning videos as more chance I will make a table than spend big bucks on a one week charter.

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 7:12 am

“BREAKING:

Severe defeat for Macron in the French parliamentary election

Le Pen’s National Rally won the first round with 34% of the votes according to the exit poll.”
https://x.com/visegrad24/status/1807485676969136434?t=Y6M9C2X3du-0O5EXBL3YbA&s=19

Cassie of Sydney
July 1, 2024 7:13 am

I’ve had a family death so my postings here will be thin on the ground.

Before I heard my sad family news late last Friday morning, earlier that morning I was in our work kitchen making a cup of tea and a young female work colleague, only 21 years old, was also in the kitchen making toast. She’s a strikingly beautiful young woman, 100% Polynesian background and she is quite religious, she wears a cross around her neck. She turned to me and told me how much she liked the pendant around me neck. I told her it was a “Magen David” or “Star of David” and she nodded and said she knew what it was. I told her I was Jewish and she said she knew I was and then she said to me……..

‘we stand with you”.

Standing in the kitchen, I felt tears well up in me and I turned to her and said….

thank you, I can’t tell you how much that means to us

to which she said that in her church they say prayers for Jews, Israel and the hostages.

Last edited 21 days ago by Cassie of Sydney
Mak Siccar
Mak Siccar
July 1, 2024 7:17 am

Here you go Rosie.

New Brisbane school to focus on classics
Tess Livingstone

The Power family, whose father, James snr, established Campion College, Australia’s first liberal arts tertiary institution, is behind the launch of new school in Brisbane next week.
St John Henry Newman College, initially catering from Prep to Year 3, will be built at Tarragindi, on Brisbane’s southside next year, to open in 2026. One class will be added each year, with a separate campus, later, for secondary school in 2030.
Inaugural chairman and managing director of the Power group of companies, James Power, said expressions of interest from parents were strong. 
The school would be geared to the classical, Western tradition, an emphasis in the early years on direct instruction, numeracy and literacy (including phonics), encouraging reading and no devices in the classroom. When history and geography were introduced the subjects would be taught factually, not laced with ideology.
Kenneth Crowther, a teacher at Toowoomba Christian College, who has been appointed principal and is completing his PhD in Shakespeare said classical schools emphasised on introducing students to the “great books’’ – from Dante to Dostoevsky.
“For the juniors, that’ll be Aesop’s fables, Beatrix Potter, Winnie the Pooh and Wind in the Willows, C.S. Lewis’s Narnia and Tolkien,’’ Mr Crowther said.
In recent years, many parents have been disappointed to find traditional favourites missing in school reading and English lessons.
As a Catholic school, religion will be part of the curriculum, with the priests of the Brisbane Oratory to serve as chaplains.
The establishment of classical schools by communities concerned about education standards has become a major trend in the US.
Australia’s first classical Orthodox school, the St John of Kronstadt Academy, opened on Brisbane’s southside this year for Prep to Year 3 and will also add a grade a year. Its stated aims are “to provide our children with a classical Orthodox curriculum that will nurture the child’s soul, mind and body, develop Orthodox wisdom and virtue and will be steeped in Orthodox faith and liturgical tradition”.
In Melbourne, the principal of St Philip’s Catholic Primary School, Blackburn North, Michelle Worcester and Parish Priest Fr Nicholas Dillon will oversee the transformation of the local Catholic school to a classical model next year and in 2026. The change has the support of Melbourne Archdiocese Catholic Schools authorities and will be first of its kind under the system.
Based on parental interest and inquiries, which have come from as far away as country Victoria, Fr Dillon expects to the school numbers, which have fallen to 29, to double in the first year. 
Similar transformations of schools in the US over the past 40 years had seen small enrolments expand to 300. “Parents are looking for a quality back-to-basics approach and want their children introduced to classical literature and Western civilisation,’’ Fr Dillon said.
St John Henry Newman College will be launched at the Brisbane Oratory on Thursday, July 11. Its patrons include businessman and Brisbane Broncos chairman Karl Morris and retired computer scientist, businessman and former Dean of Bond University business school and author Ashley Goldsworthy.

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 7:25 am

Thankyou Mak.
I hope these schools grow like topsy.

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 7:27 am

Condolences on your loss Cassie.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 1, 2024 7:40 am

In Telehealth news:
[Unlinkable OZ]

Labor MP and general practitioner Mike Freelander said he believed that Mr Biden had Parkinson’s disease and would be unable to complete another four-year term even if he beat Donald Trump.

A fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and a member of the Australian Medical Association, Dr Freelander said Mr Biden displayed a range of symptoms during the debate that were typical of Parkinson’s disease.

“He is expressionless and he hesitates when he talks; he ­hesitates to start talking and his voice is very flat,” he said.

“He doesn’t show much emotion. When he walks, he hesitates; and he doesn’t move much when he walks. He looks stiff. And he is losing concentration; you can see it in the answers to the questions.”

Luckily, a far more expert and considered diagnosis is to hand:

Dr Freelander’s assessment was in contrast to that of Deputy Prime Minister Richard Marles, who said he believed Mr Biden could serve another term.

Goblin Albanese said he had a “terrific” relationship with Mr Biden (although it’s not clear how he would know that) but would work with whoever was elected president in November.

Which will be a comfort in Washington.

Wally Dalí
Wally Dalí
July 1, 2024 7:45 am

Thanks Mac, and Rosie for the prompt.
Tolkein for the juniors sounds like heaven. My kids are blessed with a voracious reading speed, but their paperbacks are mainly junk food, and the school is “studying” the Effing Hunger Games, with dystopian fiction their yera 9 focus. Most of their analysis seems to be watching film adaptations and filling in a “spot the differences” safari sheet. It is, of course, all a lever in the hands of the pinko Gramsci’ite teaching staff to belt the kids with horror tales of rampant capitalism and cruel Christianity. I had assumed that the Australian Curriculum was locked in to this guff, but obviously St John HN college can spurn it.
Just as a curiousity, I wonder what their male-female teacher ratio will be?

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 7:56 am

Why don’t you get hold of the classical education reading list and use it for the home library wali.
It’s not the same as studying at school but it’s a start.

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 7:59 am

Falling Catholic school enrolments in Melbourne’s mid east are in part the result of demographic replacement.
Young families don’t move into suburbs where a family home starts at 1.2 million.
It’s wealthy Chinese and or professional people.

Eyrie
Eyrie
July 1, 2024 8:02 am

For SF reading Cats, I’ve just finished “Theft of Fire” by Devon Eriksen.
Pretty damn good and there will be more in the orbital space series. I’m looking forward to the next one.

Cassie of Sydney
July 1, 2024 8:03 am

St John Henry Newman College

This school is following in the footsteps of Hartford College, a Catholic boys school established here in Sydney’s inner-southern suburbs.

https://hartfordcollege.nsw.edu.au/

Despite being only a few years old, the school is doing fantastically well.

Let’s wait for a future ABC Louse Nilligan hit job on the schools..

thefrollickingmole
thefrollickingmole
July 1, 2024 8:07 am

Goblin Albanese said he had a “terrific” relationship with Mr Biden (although it’s not clear how he would know that) but would work with whoever was elected president in November.

Heres Elbow being subjected to the blowtorch intensity of a Biden meet and greet.

8 months ago.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SEn15H1-8s

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 8:09 am

I’ve heard a rumour that all Catholic primary schools in Melbourne will switch to a Classical curriculum. It’s only a rumour because I couldn’t confirm the source but I liked it.

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 8:15 am

Who doesn’t love a few failed predictions?
Worse than Millerites this lot.
https://x.com/CampbellNewman/status/1807218316693635200?t=hJzcNri3mAyCtXGzh-jIAQ&s=19

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 1, 2024 8:17 am

Newspoll is out.

Newspoll shows voter support for Coalition and Labor drop in favour of Greens as both parties stuck at a nuclear impasse (Sky News, 1 Jul)

Voter support has dropped sharply for the Labor government and the Coalition amid a fiery debate between parties over the nuclear energy question and Opposition leader Peter Dutton’s nomination of seven regional sites for nuclear plants.

A Newspoll commissioned by The Australian released on Sunday showed the primary vote for the Coalition slipped sharply by three points from 36 over the past three weeks.

Meanwhile, Labor dropped a point to 32 per cent.

Both Mr Dutton and Prime Minister Anthony Albanese have returned to near all-time low levels of dissatisfaction, as expressed by voters in the latest poll, with both party leaders deep in negative territory. …

The poll also put the spotlight on Mr Dutton’s nuclear plan and his outline to convert coal-fired power plants with nuclear reactors.

Support for the nuclear plan came in at a total of 42 per cent of voters approving Mr Dutton’s nuclear ambitions and the replacement of coal-fired power plants at the seven locations by 2050.

For detailed numbers RTWT. Support for nuclear seems to be on party lines, plus with men in favour and women not.

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 8:26 am
Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 8:31 am

I’ve heard a rumour that all Catholic primary schools in Melbourne will switch to a Classical curriculum. It’s only a rumour because I couldn’t confirm the source but I liked it.

Don’t Catholic schools have to follow state curricula to retain funding?

Classical subjects could be adopted as extra strands but not replace the state curriculum which is a version of the Australian Curriculum.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 1, 2024 8:33 am

Marine Le Pen’s National Rally party wins first round in French election but faces new alliances next Sunday’s final pollJacquelin Magnay
2 hours ago.
Updated 1 hours ago
52 comments
Marine Le Pen’s National Rally party has almost doubled its vote and leads in the first round of France’s legislative elections.
But her far right party’s support may fall just short of a complete majority, analysts say, with alliances already forming among other left and centrist parties to try and stop the momentum of the National Rally in the second round.
Predictions are that the RN may get up to 280 seats but require 289 to govern in their own right. The polling group Ipsos says the RN could win 230-280 seats, falling short of a majority.

Voters in the far right’s bastion in northern France said on Sunday (June 30) they were hoping for a change from President…
Scoring an estimated 34 per cent of the vote in the first round on Sunday, the National Rally (RN) is in the strongest position going into next Sunday’s second round.
The new alliance of left-wing parties, the Nouveau Front Populaire, reached 28.1 per cent.
The centrist Ensemble party led by the president Emmanuel Macron was third on 20.3 per cent and he immediately called on voters to block the far right in the second round.
The Republicans, a right-wing group, picked up 10 per cent of the vote and has not revealed their preferences at this point.
The top two candidates in each of the 577 districts go through to the second round, as well as some third placed, and even fourth placed candidates depending if they obtain a number of votes greater than 12.5% of those registered. In the coming days there will be horse trading in each of the districts to convince some candidates to withdraw so as to not split the left wing or right wing vote.
However some RN candidates, including Marine Le Pen have already won outright in the first round. She attracted 58 per cent of the vote in Pas de Calais.
Ms Le Pen said: “The French have shown in a vote without ambiguity their will to turn the page on seven years of corrosive power.”
In another district in northern France the Communist Party leader Fabien Roussel has been knocked out in the first round by National Rally candidate, Guillaume Florquin.

damon
damon
July 1, 2024 8:33 am

Prime Minister Richard Marles, who said he believed Mr Biden could serve another term”

What does that mean? Another three or four months lying on a beach in Delaware?

bons
bons
July 1, 2024 8:34 am

How will the St John Henry Newman College circumvent QLD laws that make the Federal communist curriculum compulsory?

Vagabond
Vagabond
July 1, 2024 8:36 am

Dr Faustus
 July 1, 2024 7:40 am

Labor MP and general practitioner Mike Freelander said he believed that Mr Biden had Parkinson’s disease 

He must have read my comment on CL’s blog!

Vagabond
Vagabond
July 1, 2024 8:40 am

Cassie of Sydney
 July 1, 2024 7:13 am
I’ve had a family death so my postings here will be thin on the ground.

Before I heard my sad family news late last Friday morning, earlier that morning I was in our work kitchen making a cup of tea and a young female work colleague, only 21 years old, was also in the kitchen making toast. She’s a strikingly beautiful young woman, 100% Polynesian background and she is quite religious, she wears a cross around her neck. She turned to me and told me how much she liked the pendant around me neck. I told her it was a “Magen David” or “Star of David” and she nodded and said she knew what it was. I told her I was Jewish and she said she knew I was and then she said to me……..

‘we stand with you”.

I wish you long life Cassie.

And regarding your co-worker, I have had several similar conversations, the most recent only yesterday. They helps lift the spirit in these terrible times.

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 8:40 am

Leaders’ mediocrity leaves voters dulled, frustrated

Simon Benson The Australian 30 June, 2024

Anthony Albanese and Peter Dutton are failing to break the gridlock of an electoral contest mired in a bog of mediocrity. With the past three weeks dominated by indulgent spectacle, internal division, depressing economic news and a rerun of the climate wars, it is hardly surprising voters have declared a pox on both houses.

There can be little doubt the Liberal leader has lost skin over his daring nuclear power plan, even if the numbers suggest the battle is still there to be won.

Community opinion for and against is virtually evenly divided, with a rump still sitting on the fence.

The nuclear issue is a far closer-run argument than the one Albanese created over the voice referendum. But it is clearly playing out better among men than women. This may explain some of the fall.

But there is no evidence yet that women are turning off the Coalition in response to this policy, with plenty of other issues occupying voters’ minds.

The Liberal leader may have been anticipating some short-term damage as he seeks to build electoral support. The latest Newspoll will be of concern.

What will frustrate Dutton is that his nuclear power policy hasn’t yet galvanised conservative voters who have parked themselves with the minor right-wing parties since the last election.

The issue has now become hyper-partisan. It is now more sharply divided along party political lines.

When a general proposal for small modular nuclear reactors was first put to voters earlier this year by Newspoll, there was 55 per cent support across the board, and more than 60 per cent support among younger voters.

With the question now branded politically as a nuclear plan by Peter Dutton and the Liberal/Nationals parties, that support has drained away.

This may say less about people’s opinion on nuclear than it does about their natural political bias.

Greens and Labor supporters, and younger voters who were more supportive of nuclear power as a net-zero proposal but who don’t like Dutton or the Coalition, are now more likely to line up against it.

It may be irrational but this is the political reality.

The key factor in this debate now comes down to how this issue plays out in marginal seats.

And there is no sugar-coating the latest Newspoll. It’s a shocker for Dutton.

All the gains the Coalition has made against Labor since the budget flop have been eroded since the policy was announced.

That’s not to say the latest numbers are a lot better for Albanese or Labor. Dutton has managed to maintain the very close contest with Albanese as preferred prime minister.

Labor is now also below its last election result on primary vote, with the Coalition hanging on to a marginal gain.

Albanese has recorded his second-worst dissatisfaction ratings since becoming Prime Minister. Dutton has done the same.

There has been little to be impressed by.

Not that this is unique. The electorate has been in a state of disillusionment for the past 15 years, for one reason or another.

This has been reflected in the view of the leaders on both sides.

The last time both an opposition leader and prime minister were in positive net approval territory heading into an election was in 2008 when John Howard was plus eight and Kevin Rudd was plus 37.

It went downhill from there and stayed there.

When Julia Gillard contested the 2010 election she was at plus one. Tony Abbott was at minus six.

In 2013, Abbott was minus six and Rudd was minus 25.

When Turnbull called the 2016 double-dissolution election, he was at minus seven. Bill Shorten was minus 14. In 2019, Scott Morrison was plus one and Shorten was minus eight.

In May, Morrison went to the election at minus 14 against Albanese’s minus five.

Albanese and Dutton are not only destined to consolidate this trend, but risk driving disenchantment further.

As a consequence, neither leader is able to harvest increased support for their parties.

At a combined 68 per cent of the primary vote, the major parties risk repeating the last election result, which produced the lowest-ever level of support for the major parties at an election.

At best this maintains the status quo but more likely points to a minority Labor government.

After more than two years, the electorate is as equally uninspired.

If Dutton can’t get any traction against the worst government since Whitlam’s he’s not worth his salt as Opposition leader.

Beertruk
Beertruk
July 1, 2024 8:52 am

Today’s Paywallion:

 Green lawfare is now the weapon of choice for activist class
 
Nick Cater
1 Jul 2024

The anti-industry industry has come a long way from its humble origins in the late 1970s, when Bob Brown went to his local St Vincent de Paul and bought himself a suit. The transition from a gaggle of amateur nature lovers to a professional organisation with salaried staff was a giant evolutionary leap for the environmental movement.

It was the precursor to blocking the Franklin Dam and the first tentative steps into politics and the law. Today, green activism in Australia is a quarter-billion-dollar business that employs hundreds of people. Research published this week by the Menzies Research Centre shows the combined revenue of the top 25 green advocacy groups was $275m last year. The revenue has more than doubled from $113m in 2015. The number of staff on their books has increased from 374 to 880.

Ironically, the report finds that the green activist industry is growing faster than the primary industries and resource sectors it targets. Its goal is not to create wealth but to destroy it. It forms part of the NGO-corporate-industrial complex that has discovered how to profit from the war on carbon, aided and abetted by the government through subsidies and regulation.

The environmental juggernaut of today bears little comparison with the green movement that began in Tasmania almost half a century ago. Its focus has changed from conservation to the ideology of climate change. The movement has become remote and insensitive to the natural environment and developed a narrow-minded obsession with carbon emissions from coal and gas combustion.

The big environmental groups are wholly committed to renewable energy and dogmatically opposed to nuclear power. To the extent that we’re able to trace the source of their funding, much of it flows from investors in the renewables sector whose portfolios would be instantly devalued by the entry of nuclear power.

Activist organisations have become so dependent on green corporatism that they are willing to ignore the destruction of broad acres of natural vegetation for the construction of wind turbines, industrial solar plants, energy storage infrastructure and associated transmission lines.

Climate warriors are more likely to be found in the courts these days rather than tied to the front of a bulldozer in the tropical forests of the Upper Burdekin in far north Queensland. Environment Minister Tanya Plibersek’s approval of the Upper Burdekin/Gawara Baya wind development last month came despite a damning report that warned of “unavoidable significant impacts” on the endangered Sharman’s rock wallaby, the koala, the greater glider, the red goshawk and the masked owl.

Nowadays, lawyers perform much of the heavy lifting for climate activism. The MRC’s research found that Australia is the second-largest forum for environmental lawfare after the US. There are more climate lawsuits per capita in Australia than anywhere else in the world, thanks to a rich array of resource sector targets and an obliging legal system.

The bar for launching court actions in Australia is low for those with funds. Every dollar spent by legal activists is a drain on the profits of businesses forced to defend themselves against adventurous and vexatious claims. The biggest cost to the resource sector is not legal fees, punishing as they are. It is the mounting cost of interest on borrowed money that sits idle while the legal process drags on.

The MRC calculates that in past two years $17.48bn in industrial output has been frozen by legal action. Whether investors will see a return on their capital is at the mercy of the courts. The damage is compounded by the damage to the broader economy.

The MRC calculates 29,784 Australian jobs are at risk in cases before the courts. The loss of taxes and mining royalties will make it harder to fund roads, schools and hospitals and support our health and education systems.
The fiscal impact alone would prompt a clear-thinking government to step in and clean up this mess. The Albanese government, however, is anything but hard-headed about anything related to the environment. It refuses to countenance any reform that might give the Greens party an edge in quinoa-chomping enclaves such as the seat of Grayndler, the fate of which is of more than passing interest to our PM.

It gets worse. In an act of fiscal self-harm, the government is subsidising legal activism that eats into the profits it likes to milk. The 2022 budget included $10m in funding for the Environmental Defenders Office and Environmental Justice Australia, the two bodies responsible for most environmental lawfare in Australia.

In 2015, the EDO had 14 staff and a $3m budget. By 2023, it had grown to a team of 105 staff and a budget of $13.3m. It measures success with a perverse set of metrics. Its 2022 annual report boasts of providing 11,587 legal hours and spending 134 days in court.

In January, the EDO’s tactics were heavily criticised by Federal Court Justice Natalie Charlesworth, who reversed an order preventing Santos from building a pipeline allowing the $5.8bn development of the offshore Barossa gas field. She rejected assertions by three Tiwi Islanders that the pipeline posed a risk to intangible underwater heritage, including Crocodile Man song lines and an area of significance for the rainbow serpent Ampiji, and was not “broadly representative” of the beliefs of Tiwi people who would be affected by the pipeline.

Charlesworth found the EDO had engaged in dishonest “coaching” tactics and the misrepresentation of local Indigenous knowledge. Charlesworth dismissed evidence from the EDO’s expert witness about potential impacts on underwater archaeological sites, finding there was a “negligible chance” of a significant impact on tangible cultural heritage. Charlesworth found a cultural mapping exercise undertaken by an expert witness for the applicants and “the related opinions expressed about it are so lacking in integrity that no weight can be placed on them”.

“I am satisfied that this aspect of the case does indeed involve ‘confection’ or ‘construction’, at least in part, and that it cannot be an adapted account of the kind discussed by the anthropologists,” the judgment states.

Yet despite the loss of the case, the activists are winning. The global demand for liquid natural gas has never been higher, and is forecast to continue to rise until the 2040s. Yet oil and gas exploration activities in Australia have been falling significantly over the past two decades. The number of new offshore wells has fallen from over 50 in 2010 wells to just three in 2023. When your aim is to frustrate and delay, there is no such thing as a wasted day in court.

Nick Cater is a senior fellow at the Menzies Research Centre and a visiting fellow at the Danube Institute.

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 8:53 am

Younger Australians think Australia should be more socialist

YouGov

In this survey Australians were asked if they think Australia should be more socialist or capitalist on an eleven-point scale, 0-10. 0-4 indicates a degree of support towards socialism, and 6-10, a degree of support for capitalism. 5 is the neutral option, placed equally between socialism and capitalism.

This poll found that 53% of 18-24-year-olds think Australia should be more socialist, while only 22% think it should be more capitalist; a net support for socialism at +31%.

YouGov’s Director of Public Affairs and Public Data, Paul Smith said, “Australia’s [sic] opinion towards socialism is divided generationally, with young people in favour of more socialism due to their very different experience of entering the workforce after the 2008 financial crisis. They have paid more for homes and education without the secure and well-paying jobs older Australians generally enjoyed, and therefore favour change.”

Let’s shrink the economic pie and make everyone poorer!

bons
bons
July 1, 2024 8:57 am

Unfortunately, the. combination of the commies and public sector unions will once again knock out Le Pen in the second round.

It is just too difficult to get the center-right to turn out. The old line about the conservatives spending Sunday morning preparing lunch, and Sunday afternoon recovering, thus not having time to vote, is pretty accurate.

Given the absolute dominance of Grandes Ecoles indoctrination, there is no way that any of the elite will stray towards the centre. They would consider setting up their lawn chairs to watch the second march of barbarians down the Champs Elysee to be more appropriate than voting for the centre right.

Sad, this is probably their last chance to defeat German pan-european Islamo fascism.

thefrollickingmole
thefrollickingmole
July 1, 2024 8:59 am

Sad to think we have 40+ more years of decline before things get bad enough to see a leader like this.

https://twitter.com/i/status/1807324828954771466

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 1, 2024 9:03 am

Jim Chalmers in the Daily Telegraph to assure you rosy fields await you:

No matter who you are, where you live, what you do for a living or how much you earn, we’re doing what we can to help you with the cost of living.

We recognise that people are under pressure. I see it in my own community and right across the country and we’re doing something about it.

From today, billions of dollars’ worth of relief will begin to roll out to millions of Australians to help ease the cost of living.

Starting today, every taxpayer will get a tax cut, every household will get an energy rebate and a million small businesses will get energy bill relief.

Around 2.6 million workers on modern award minimum wages will get a 3.75 per cent pay increase.

More than two million families will benefit from the latest round of indexation to family tax benefit and other family payments, while pensioners will benefit from indexation of income and asset thresholds.

Australians will soon get access to cheaper medicines, so no one will pay more than $31.60 for a PBS medicine and concession card holders will only pay $7.70.

People will start to accrue more money for their retirement with the superannuation guarantee to increase from 11 per cent to 11.5 per cent.

About 876,000 people on income support payments will get a helping hand with social security deeming rates to be frozen for another year.

And new parents will get an extra two weeks of paid parental leave, with an extra two weeks added each year until they reach 26 weeks total by July 2026.

That’s how you deliver cost of living relief, not with nuclear reactors that will only push up the price of power.

At the same time as we’re rolling out this extra relief, we’re doing our bit in the Budget to fight inflation through responsible economic management which has seen us turn big Liberal deficits into Labor surpluses.

At the same time as we’re rolling out this extra relief, we’re doing our bit in the Budget to fight inflation through responsible economic management which has seen us turn big Liberal deficits into Labor surpluses.

Importantly, Treasury estimates the government’s energy bill relief and additional increase to Commonwealth Rent Assistance will directly reduce inflation by half of a percentage point in 2024–25 and are not expected to add to broader inflationary pressures.

If the Coalition cared at all about easing the cost of living for Australians, they would have voted for cost-of-living relief in the Parliament but instead they voted against it.

Peter Dutton wants Australians to work longer for less, but we take a different approach.

We think that every Australian deserves a bit of help and that’s what we’re delivering.

Our economic plan is all about helping Australians earn more and keep more of what they earn which is why our focus is on growing real wages and easing the cost of living through tax cuts for every taxpayer and energy rebates for every household.

We’re helping every Australian up and down the income scale because we know that every Australian has been impacted by the cost of living.

Whether you’re a truckie, a tradie or a teacher, from Logan to Launceston, Western Sydney to Western Australia, Wentworth to West Footscray – more cost-of-living help is coming your way from today in the form of energy rebates, tax cuts and more.

Only Labor cares about easing the cost of living for Australians and only a Labor government will back Australians with the cost of living relief they deserve, with more on the way starting today.

Well I’m happy! 3.75 percent increase in my wage! Exciting!
Except when that needs to go on power bills. As the next article will describe.

damon
damon
July 1, 2024 9:12 am

I just ate half a chook. Now I am hungary again

So you turned into a country. Just like that.

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 1, 2024 9:12 am

Why the need for worry? Jim Chalmers is helping:

The number of NSW households forced onto hardship plans because they can’t pay their energy bills has risen by 97 per cent since the last federal election — the highest of any state or territory and eclipsing the national increase.

As the Albanese government ramps up its marketing campaign about a suite of cost of living measures coming into place today, the latest hardship figures reveal the untold story.

More than 127,000 households across the country have been forced onto hardship plans by their energy provider with 70,000 of them living in NSW, according to the latest industry figures.

The data does not does not include struggling households in the Northern Territory, Western Australia or Victoria, which have different arrangements for helping struggling customers.

“Every single week since Labor took office, 600 households on average have been plunged into hardship arrangements with their electricity retailer,” coalition energy spokesman Ted O’Brien said.

This has worsened by an average of 50 households per week since the last quarterly report which included data up to the end of December 2023.

The numbers build on another concerning metric for Labor — latest inflation figures that show CPI has jumped again to 4 per cent — that has undermined the government’s messaging that it was bringing the cost of living under control.

Treasurer Jim Chalmers did the TV round on Sunday morning maintaining the government’s policies, which include tax cuts and energy bill relief, will bring inflation under control despite the recent jump in CPI.

From July 1, Australians earning between $30,000 and $200,000 will get a new tax cut ranging from $6.81 to $87.10 a week and every household will get a $300 energy bill discount spread across the next financial year.

“We are confident, but not complacent about inflation in our economy. What we’ve seen in the last couple of years is that inflation has moderated really quite substantially, but it doesn’t always moderate in a straight line,” he said.

“Inflation is still too high, but it’s much lower than what we inherited from the Coalition, and we know that our policies are helping.”

Mr Chalmers acknowledged that Treasury forecasts — which had been more optimistic about inflation returning to the two to three per cent band — were “uncertain”.

“There’s always an element of uncertainty when it comes to forecasts about the economy, but especially right now,” he said.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese claimed Labor was hitting the “sweet spot” between curbing inflation and helping households.

“Our objective here (is) to make sure that we get through the short-term issues which are there for cost of living pressures on families,” he said.

Judo Bank chief economist Warren Hogan said the cost of living benefits would bring down headline inflation — for example the cost of energy to consumers — but do nothing for underlying inflation.

Mr Hogan predicts there will be more interest rate hikes to come in the near future.

“I’m forecasting the headline CPI to be lower than 3 per cent by the end of this year or next year … but information is more like 3.5 per cent of 3-and-a-quarter,” he said.

“(The lowered inflation) is artificial, it’s not real. The inflation is still there.”

Mr Hogan said history showed that the real interest rate has to be “at least another per cent” higher than inflation in order to bring it down.

Right now the cash rate is sitting at 4.35 per cent while inflation is at 4 per cent.

“With rate hikes going for more than two years it shows the level of interest rates isn’t high enough, it’ll need to be higher,” he said.

“The fact is for the last three months we keep getting surprised by the inflation.”

Neutral Bay couple Amber Knight and Troy Wilson have turned to wearing more clothes and using hot water bottles and heat packs to avoid a spike in their energy bills.

“We have an oil heater which is more energy efficient but we mostly try not to use it, we use hot water bottles, heat packs and just put on more clothes,” Ms Knight said.

Mr Wilson added: “I always find myself so cold.”

The couple who rent their two-bedroom apartment said they feel “anxious” in the lead up to lease renewals and have cut back on how often they drive to keep costs in check.

“Having a car is a huge expense. Keeping it on the road costs so much money,” Mr Wilson, 20, said.

“There is not one specific thing that we are feeling because everything adds up.”

Quakers Hill mum-of-three, Iram Siddiqui can’t remember a time when electricity bills were higher than now.

Ms Siddiqui spent years as a stay at home mother, looking after her three children Mariam, 11, Aamir, 8, and Maahir, 6, but was forced to go back to work to help her husband pay the bills.

“There was one income in the family, and because of some health issues I couldn’t work as much,” she said.

“It’s got to the stage where I had to get up on my feet no matter how sick I felt, to be able to help my husband out with the bills because every little bit helps.”

To reduce costs the family changed their heaters to gas, and rug up with jumpers and socks while inside but Ms Siddiqui said with three young children she has to keep the house warm in winter to prevent them from getting sick.

“It’s a juggle because every single thing you do in your life costs money, not just electricity, it’s healthcare for the kids,” she said.

For the Siddiqui family, the Albanese government’s $300 electricity rebate will barely touch the sides.

“Big deal $300 – you’re not going to notice it,” she said.

“It’s just going to make us smile for 30 seconds but it is not going to put a dent in it.”

So who to believe? Old mate on Struggle St or some bloke in the Canberra bubble?
$300 is so laughable that it may as well not be given. To use the standard metric, it’s not even a cup of coffee for the week!

Indolent
Indolent
July 1, 2024 9:15 am
damon
damon
July 1, 2024 9:25 am

Well I’m happy! “

Free stuff! Free stuff for everyone!! There will be no tomorrow.

Boambee John
Boambee John
July 1, 2024 9:27 am

Farmer Gez

Rafe Champion is circulating a Stop Labor’s Towers newsletter by email. Are you connected to this group?

shatterzzz
July 1, 2024 9:29 am

Gotta luv the Oz two tier justice system .. You can guarantee if “joe blow” made this sort of complaint to plod they’d show minimal or no interest beyond a, “We’ll look into it” ..
https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/nurse-accused-of-stalking-and-female-politician-she-met-on-dating-app/ar-BB1paxSY?ocid=hpmsn&cvid=34069feffb1b44988fd6c833c4ae00da&ei=16

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 1, 2024 9:30 am

What will frustrate Dutton is that his nuclear power policy hasn’t yet galvanised conservative voters who have parked themselves with the minor right-wing parties since the last election.

What frustrates me is that, having put together a lo-info policy document on an incredibly complicated matter, Team Dutton has done SFA to backup, explain, and present an adequate knowledge of the issues and outline any realistic ’next steps’ they would be taking next year.

The ‘no follow up’ strongly suggests to me the policy, such as it is, was created by Canbra Bubble political advisors, with no serious input on the myriad practical technicalities.

The result has been a brief display of pathetic Three Eyed Fish theatre – followed by, well, not much.

Despite this damp squib sputtering in the gutter, Newspoll tells us that 55% of the punters are either in favour of, or open to nuclear power generation (60% in the SMH Resolve poll).

If, as increasingly seems likely, Dutton is unable to take advantage and prosecute his headline policy, he has squandered an opportunity to lead and minimise the dreadful energy damage coming down the line – and kicked sensible nuclear debate into the long grass for another generation.

Evidences?

Exhibit 1: Lack of prepared response (in fact surrender by useless Ted O’Brien) to the truly awful CSIRO GenCost Report.

At this stage, the only winners are the grinning Green vermin.

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 9:37 am

What frustrates me is that, having put together a lo-info policy document on an incredibly complicated matter, Team Dutton has done SFA to backup, explain, and present an adequate knowledge of the issues and outline any realistic ’next steps’ they would be taking next year.

They were waiting for the Newspoll results before deciding what to do next.

Diogenes
Diogenes
July 1, 2024 9:38 am

ircumvent QLD laws that make the Federal communist curriculum compulsory?

The English curriculum lays down broad themes for each year. You find a classic that matches the theme instead of whatever garbage other schools find popular

2dogs
2dogs
July 1, 2024 9:51 am

Exhibit 1: Lack of prepared response (in fact surrender by useless Ted O’Brien) to the truly awful CSIRO GenCost Report.

+1

It should have been really easy to knock this on the head. Where is the peer review?

Organise some international criticism? The Left is really good at this this, but now when the Right has a golden opportunity to do the same, it completely drops the ball.

The Right was skewered for arguing that Australia was a special case when it cited the “Australia is only 1% of global emissions statistic”. But here the Left is doing the same thing. If Australia should “show leadership”, well we can really do that on nuclear, e.g. It looks dodgy if we are selling nuclear fuel but won’t use it ourselves; going nuclear would help persuade India to copy us.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 1, 2024 9:51 am

Interesting blogpost from Daniel Greenberg today.

Team Biden Threatens to Keep Cash if He’s Replaced (30 Jun)

Donors looking to get Biden to drop out have emphasized that the money raised needs to transfer over to the new candidate. Team Biden however is warning that it’s not going to happen. Any new candidate will start with “zero dollars.” …

The larger signal is that the Biden campaign won’t cooperate with any transition effort and will not only keep all the money, but fight this process every step of the way, taking the 2024 race hostage. If Dems try to replace Biden, Team Biden will make sure that whoever they replace him with loses.

That’s hardball.

Popcorn futures are up…

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 1, 2024 9:51 am

They were waiting for the Newspoll results before deciding what to do next.

Precisely.

There will be one more informal vote next election in the seat of Brisbane. I’m not going to enrich the LNP by my electoral contribution and see my preference cascade down to re-elect Master Bates.

shatterzzz
July 1, 2024 9:55 am

Labor MP and general practitioner Mike Freelander said he believed that Mr Biden had Parkinson’s disease and would be unable to complete another four-year term even if he beat Donald Trump.

Or, maybe, just maybe at 79 he is feeling his age and has early stage dementia ..
Seems it’s very difficult for some folk & the media to just accept the bloke is showing common symptoms of .. old age ….!

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 9:56 am

The larger signal is that the Biden campaign won’t cooperate with any transition effort and will not only keep all the money…

They’ll also keep all the delegates.

m0nty
m0nty
July 1, 2024 9:56 am

And there is no sugar-coating the latest Newspoll. It’s a shocker for Dutton.

All the gains the Coalition has made against Labor since the budget flop have been eroded since the policy was announced.

Good.

Rabz
July 1, 2024 9:56 am

Dim Chambers contradicting himself (again):

every household will get an energy rebate and a million small businesses will get energy bill relief

That’s how you deliver cost of living relief, not with nuclear reactors that will only push up the price of power

Why are you doling out “energy rebates” if your own insane stone age year zero policies aren’t driving up the cost of energy, you forking dimwit?

Beertruk
Beertruk
July 1, 2024 9:56 am

Weekend (Saturday) Paywallion:

Ideology has no place in sexual assault law reform
 
JANET ALBRECHTSEN
29 Jun 2024
 
Fairness demands one should, at least initially, give Australian Law Reform Commission president Mordecai Bromberg and part-time commissioner Marcia Neave the benefit of the doubt. It’s possible the review of the nation’s sexual assault laws by these former judges at the behest of Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus will be a balanced affair, paying proper regard to the rights of all those dragged into these unhappy events.

However, the early signs are bad. Bromberg and Neave appear to have already nailed their colours to the mast in a way that makes it hard to scramble back to the proper path one might expect from law reform commissioners of neutrality and impartiality.

Bromberg started out by paying lip service to the need for balance when he said the inquiry would focus on “improving both the experience and outcome of victim-survivors without … compro­mising the rights of the accused”.

But look closer at his use of the term “victim-survivor”. Bromberg’s language gives the game away. Using the term favoured by #MeToo activists rather than the more accurate legal description of “complainant” assumes guilt when it has not been proved. It is an ideological phrase, not a legal one. Is it too much to expect that law reform commissioners should be grounded in law, not ideology?

Bromberg went on to put his approach into further doubt, saying that the desires of victim-survivors would take primacy in the inquiry and those desires could be achieved through civil alternatives.

Neave, too, likes the civil system. “There’s no right of silence in the civil justice system,” she said, adding: “There are things in the civil ­justice system you might want to think about.” Let’s hope she is not saying let’s get rid of these pesky rights accused people have in the criminal system. As Australian Lawyers Alliance national criminal justice spokesman Greg Barns SC told this newspaper last month, “any suggestion that the standard of proof be reduced ought to be rejected”.

“The fact that a rape conviction in criminal law has serious consequences, such as the loss of liberty of the accused person, means it should have the highest standard (of proof),” he said. “We don’t lower the standard simply to ­increase convictions.

“It would be a very, very dangerous precedent, because if we use it in these cases, then why not use it in burglaries, for ­example?”

Barns also warned against removing the right to silence. “Our system of justice for centuries has said it’s for the prosecution to prove its case, and the defendant can’t be compelled, for good reason. The right to silence is sacrosanct in our democracy,” he said.

Equally problematic is that both Bromberg and Neave say they are big believers in the “data”. Bromberg quoted statistical information suggesting only about 13 per cent of rape victims reported their assault. This led him to conclude that “something in the order of perhaps eight or nine perpetrators of 10 are not made accountable at all and are not brought to justice at all”. How does Bromberg know that upwards of 80 per cent of perpetrators are escaping jail? The justice system has not decided on guilt yet. These are alleged perpetrators. Alleged is not a word that can be skipped over so lightly, especially by the president of the ALRC. Or is Bromberg saying skip the trial?
Neave complained “lawyers have historically not used data very well”. What does this mean? Are we to set up quotas under which a set percentage of accused persons are to be presumed guilty? If we do so in sexual assault cases, why not other cases?

As Hanna Legal principal Nick Hanna told this newspaper in May, it’s wrong to think that false allegations of sexual assault don’t happen. “Those of us who work in the criminal justice system, including prosecutors, know this is simply not the case,” he said.

“There are a range of reasons for complainants making false accusations, including mental illness or ulterior motives.”

The evidence is already mounting that while it was once critical to make the legal system more user-friendly and compassionate towards sexual assault complain­ants, the pendulum may have swung too far. We have now had five NSW judges complain innocent men have been hounded by prosecutions for sexual assault so lacking in merit they should never have been brought.

The jury in the prosecution of prominent rugby player Kurtley Beale had only just closed the door on the jury room when they were back to throw the manifestly unfair charge out. Harry Garside, another prominent sportsman, had been smart enough to take his own video proving the assaulting party was his girlfriend not him. NRL player Jarryd Hayne has spent a lengthy period of time in jail, and faced several trials, on charges of which he must be again presumed innocent. Or Mr Jackmain, the pseudonymous appellant who because of overreaching, if well intentioned, laws of evidence was re­fused permission to bring evidence that his complainant had brought 12 false claims of sexual assault against a variety of defendants.

If all this were not enough to make you think the activist pendulum had swung too far, the Chief Justice of the ACT, Lucy McCallum called concerns about a fair trial an “intractable problem”. One hopes this was clumsy language, not ideology.

Thwarted time and again by the good sense of ordinary jurors, along with barristers and brave judges, calling out judicial or legislative overreach, activists never sleep. A new wheeze springs up every day.

Call a scenario that a defendant may seek to rely on to raise doubt a “rape myth” and “trauma-informed” judges will exclude it. Or point to the data – the numbers apparently never lie so we should be paying less attention to the individual merits of individual cases and relying on the iron clad guarantees of the laws of big numbers. Establish specialised courts in which only those lawyers who have been properly indoctrinated in activist doctrine can appear – kangaroo court would be a complimentary name for such a court.

The latest wheeze, one that Neave and Bromberg seem already to favour, is lowering the standard of proof by turning what was once a criminal matter into a civil one. The beauty of this is that a complainant who wins such a trial will be able to use a criminal label – “rapist” – without having to prove it to a criminal standard. And while the complainant in a civil trial won’t get the satisfaction of a prison sentence if successful, they will be eligible for damages that one would expect to be substantial.

One can expect this to spawn a whole new shakedown legal industry – suing high-profile footballers alone may become the life’s work of some lawyers. And any footballer, or indeed any other prominent person, will have little choice but to settle such a claim.

Overblown? This is where the track record of Bromberg and Neave becomes relevant. When Federal Court Justice Mordecai Bromberg was appointed president of the ALRC, inner city leftists would have seen it as a historic opportunity to fuse judicial activism with the capture of institutional policy-making in a perfect storm of revolutionary change.

The ALP branches to which Bromberg belonged will no doubt have been singing round after round of the Internationale, throwing cloth caps in the air and generally celebrating the news. For the rest of us, not so much.

Indeed, we can look forward to what I anticipate will be five years of dismal ALRC recommendations embodying the ideals Bromberg espoused when explaining his motivation for leaving the law and standing for ALP preselection for parliament in 2001: “I’m certainly not doing this for the money. But I am committed to improving the Workplace Relations Act to make it fairer and more equitable and I think I can be more effective doing that in parliament.”

Described by The Age at the time as a long-time member of the Labor Party, Bromberg never made it to parliament, but he did make it to the Federal Court bench where his novel legal approaches attracted headlines in areas from workplace law to climate change. In industrial matters his judgments were, statistically speaking, strikingly pro-union. His radical judgments on casual employment in the Skene and Rossato cases were comprehensively overturned by the High Court.

Bromberg’s judicial creativity was not limited to workplace law matters. In one case, Bromberg created a novel duty of care in a class action brought by children who wanted an order to stop an ­extension project to Whitehaven Coal’s Vickery mine on the basis that it would add to emissions that cause catastrophic harm to the health of all children. This horrified the full Federal Court.

As Justice Jonathan Beach said when overturning Bromberg’s duty of care frolic: “This was a bold step to take, given that trial judges normally only assess, admire or indeed chop down completed forms … it is for the High Court, not us, to engineer new seed varieties for sustainable duties of care.” Bromberg must be cheering his new ­liberation from legal orthodoxy.

Neave too has form in the “reform” of sexual assault laws. In 2004 she presided over a Victorian Law Reform Commission report into sexual offences whose recommendations (including specialist court lists, “training” for judges and lawyers, changes to the committal process, and recommendations to protect complainants during cross examination) would have been cheered by modern commentators like Lucy McCallum. Some of Neave’s suggested reforms may have been sensible but with #MeToo activism ramping up to dangerous levels, one wonders if Neave can be the person to rein in Bromberg’s wilder side. It would be worse than unfortunate if these two spend their time in furious assent, praising each other’s work and wondering how the world will ever cope without their latest “reform” insights.

Frankly, if there is so much as a comma in their report that disappoints Dreyfus and the #MeToo activists, I would be staggered. Pity.

Is it unfair to wonder whether these two former judges, whose CVs don’t mention running criminal trials, are eminently unqualified to be at the helm of a review into reforming the conduct of criminal trials? Is it unfair to ask whether one of their more obvious qualifications seems to be as signed up members of the legal left? Or is this all about politics?

There are many problems with the law and practice relating to sexual assaults that would benefit from a cold, forensic look at the issue from both sides. So why not add people to the review panel who have “lived” experience – to coin a faddish phrase – in criminal trials, be they judges and/or lawyers to ensure that an accused’s fundamental rights are indeed protected. Not in throwaway words, but in reality. Why not include Barns or long-time criminal barrister Steve Whybrow SC, or similarly experienced lawyers?

A genuine contest of ideas at the ALRC would at least make it possible that the review’s recommendations have been tested for the sake of a fair trial for all. A chorus line-up of people clamouring to toss aside our foundation values is dangerous.

JANET ALBRECHTSEN COLUMNIST

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 10:02 am

Why are you doling out “energy rebates” if your own insane stone age year zero policies aren’t driving up the cost of energy, you forking dimwit?

Dim’s energy rebate is like a Colesworths’ special – put the price up 25% one fortnight and two weeks later drop it by 25% and tell the punter he’s getting a bargain.

shatterzzz
July 1, 2024 10:02 am

Notice from the media reports I’ve read on the French elections the media is steering clear of the main problem for Macaroon .. He is still prez until 2027 .. BUT .. the French prez rules/governs thru Parliamentary majority ..
If he loses the “house” he is, for all practical purposes, a “lame duck” occupant for the remainder of his term ..
He gambled, his over-sized ego, on being luvved by the small folk and has lost … BIGGLY .. LOL!

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 1, 2024 10:03 am

2dogs @ 9:51 am

It should have been really easy to knock this [GenCost Report] on the head. Where is the peer review?

The GenCost Report was put out as a consultation draft last year for industry review.

The final version came out with a few clangers corrected – and an entire appendix (Appendix D FAQ) devoted to explaining how stupid the review comments were, why the smooth brains at CSIRO weren’t picking them up, and just get forked anyway.

m0nty
m0nty
July 1, 2024 10:06 am

The ‘no follow up’ strongly suggests to me the policy, such as it is, was created by Canbra Bubble political advisors, with no serious input on the myriad practical technicalities.

I doubt it was political advisers, as even the least competent among them could see massive flaws of Dutton’s strategy, or lack thereof.

Much more likely is that Rolls Royce’s marketing department is running LNP nuke policy. “I see no method at all,” as a wise man once said.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 1, 2024 10:07 am

Tragic story behind this Landcruiser packed with Aussie’s entire belongings parked outside a men’s shelter as housing crisis hits breaking pointDaily Mail.

The owner of the Landcruiser was found dead in said Landcruiser – it’s going to be handed over to his closest relatives…..

Beertruk
Beertruk
July 1, 2024 10:08 am

Dover,

Janet Albrechtsen Paywallion article in moderation for approval.

Cheers
Regards

Beertruk

shatterzzz
July 1, 2024 10:11 am

 the school is “studying” the Effing Hunger Games, with dystopian fiction their yera 9 focus. 

Don’t knock the books if they read them .. One of my grandaughter’s, miss, just turned 13, never been much of a scholar or reader coupla weeks ago picked up a copy of MAZE RUNNER and didn’t put it down until finished .. Found out it was book 1 of 5 so bought her the other 4 and she is over the moon ….
If they start reading .. encourage ’em .. so what if they start with the “pulp” .. Hopefully it getz ’em interested and into the ‘reading” habit ..
Too easy to be distracted by their phones & laptops these dayz …… FFS!

Last edited 21 days ago by shatterzzz
Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 10:11 am

“The BBC’s Nick Robinson said that Conservatives think of Reform leader Nigel Farage as ‘a kind of Sunday roast with all the trimmings’ while Prime Minister Rishi Sunak is ‘a quinoa salad.’

The latest YouGov UK poll on 25 June has Labour leading at 36 percent, followed by Conservatives 18, Reform 17, and Liberal Democrats 15. Based on these, their modeling projects Labour winning 425 of Parliament’s 650 seats (65.4 percent), Conservatives 108 (16.6), Reform 5 (0.8), and Liberal Democrats 67 (10.3). Thus Labour with about one-third of votes would win almost two-thirds of seats; the Conservatives, level-pegging with Reform in votes, would win 22 times as many seats; Reform would win less than one-third of its vote share in seats; and the LibDems, with only four-fifths of the Reform share of votes, would have thirteen times as many seats.

The UK distortions reflect the quirks of the first-past-the-post electoral system used in elections for the mother of parliaments. The Australian electoral system in combination with the institutionalised practice of preference flows produces its own significant distortions. In the May 2022 elections, Labor won 77 of the 151 seats with 32.6/52.1 percent primary/two-party preferred votes, and the Coalition won 58 seats with 35.7/47.9 percent votes. The last Newspoll on 9th June had the Coalition’s primary vote at 39 and Labor at 33 percent, with the two-party preferred vote tied 50-50. Although one cannot make linear extrapolations, under the UK system the Coalition would have won the last election and would be on track for a landslide victory next year.”

Ramesh Thakur, The Crisis of Democracy and the New Right

Last edited 21 days ago by Roger
Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 1, 2024 10:24 am

Monty is getting increasingly out of step with the voters.

Pew Research: How Americans View National, Local and Personal Energy Choices (29 Jun)

Among the major findings:

There’s been a decline in the breadth of support for wind and solar power. The shares who favor expanding solar and wind power farms are down 12 percentage points and 11 points, respectively, since 2020, driven by sharp drops in support among Republicans.

Interest in buying an electric vehicle (EV) is lower than a year ago. Today, 29% of Americans say they would consider an EV for their next purchase, down from 38% in 2023.

Seeing that the MSM has been furiously gaslighting everyone for a couple decades now, it is interesting that the mk. 1 punter is wising up to their lies. The now collapsed snow job they used to prop up Biden will have more and more people likewise questioning the MSM.

Indolent
Indolent
July 1, 2024 10:38 am
shatterzzz
July 1, 2024 10:38 am

Don’t understand lotza folks attitudes to these energy rebates the gummint is handing out .. As an OAP the last one (with one quarter to go) @ $125 quarter reduced my, usual, bills from 3 figures ($150/$180) down to well under $100 .. this next one tho not as large @ $75 quarter will still keep ’em down .. Pity they aren’t discounting the gas as well (I’ve gas heating & water) which, now, hovers between $140 & $200quarter the year round ..
I know it’s gummint policy that keeps ’em high and higher but something back is better than nuttin’ ..
Tho it won’t affect my, never ever Labor/Greens, vote even if that’s the, obvious, intention .. LOL!

Indolent
Indolent
July 1, 2024 10:38 am
Indolent
Indolent
July 1, 2024 10:41 am
GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 1, 2024 10:48 am

Until young people realise they have to pay by way of work socialism will always be attractive. Take the levies, charges, subsidies, rebates, multiple levels of government doing and charging for the same things and whatever, out of the system so people can see what the tax rate is, then and only then will they realise they are being ripped off by government. They should be able to see it already but hey what would I know. I found out years ago the harder I worked the luckier I got.

Last edited 21 days ago by GreyRanga
Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 10:48 am

Don’t understand lotza folks attitudes to these energy rebates the gummint is handing out ..

Doesn’t do much for a family with children, shaterzzz.

Essentially, government policy is robbing them to pay the ruinables subsidy grifters and then giving them back a pittance and saying they should be grateful.

Last edited 21 days ago by Roger
Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 1, 2024 10:50 am

damon
 July 1, 2024 9:12 am

“I just ate half a chook. Now I am hungary again
So you turned into a country. Just like that.

(: Hungry.

I was going to edit that but the time expired.

mizaris
mizaris
July 1, 2024 10:53 am

And again…

20240701_085231
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 11:08 am

Stranded on the dead fred …
I am not a huge fan of Jon Stewart, but his take on the debate was hilarious.
(Sorry can’t link, but should be easy to find).
He goes to a few grabs of “experts” declaring, in advance, what Biden needed to do to be successful in the debate:-
“No physical or verbal stumbles”
“Not have a senior moment”
“No brain freezes”
And finally, the lowest bar setting of all …
“Remain upright”.
Cut back to an incredulous Stewart:-
“To be President all he has to do is … remain upright? I could be mistaken but I believe that is also the qualification to be a scarecrow.”

Cassie of Sydney
July 1, 2024 11:31 am

The pervert apologist has just uploaded this wee bit sanctimonious puke…

I am, indeed, out of step with people voting for a man convicted of fraud over a six-figure hush money payout to a porn star.

I am, indeed, out of step with people who vote for a political party no different to the National Socialist Party of 1920s, 1930s and 1940s Germany.

I am, indeed, out of step with people who vote for politicians who mouth genocidal calls for the elimination of Jews and the destruction of the sole Jewish state on the planet.

I am, indeed, out of step with those people who join in the weekly Jew hate protests across the West, screaming, screeching and shouting abuse of Jews.

I am, indeed, out of step with people who side with the murderers, rapists and kidnappers of October 7 2023.

I am, indeed, out of step with people who turn up to Jewish suburbs, on the Sabbath and other holidays, just like what happened in Caulfield last November, like what happened in LA last weekend, and shout, scream and screech abuse at Jews and attack them physically.

I am, indeed, out of step with people who use and justify violence against their political enemies, like the writer of the above puke words has done many times here on these pages. After all, his favourite line is “punch a Nazi”……except those Nazis and men and women such as myself. And indeed, remember how only last year our resident hypocrite advocated violence against women who refuse to buckle to the nonsense that is gender ideology, and please do recall how he thought the violence in that Auckland Park in March 2023 was hilarious.

Finally, I am, indeed, out of step with a person who was quite willing to join in the pile on of an innocent man, called him a ‘rock spider’ and has never ever retracted that LIE.

Last edited 21 days ago by Cassie of Sydney
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 11:34 am

Labor MP and general practitioner Mike Freelander said he believed that Mr Biden had Parkinson’s disease and would be unable to complete another four-year term even if he beat Donald Trump.

Utter bullshit.
This is part of a narrative that he is physically afflicted but mentally alert.
Therefore OK to complete this term at least.
He didn’t (and hasn’t) exhibited the almost universal common symptom of Parkinson’s sufferers, which is tremors, particularly in the hands.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 1, 2024 11:52 am

ABC’s embarrassing blunder as news host confuses Albo’s fiancée Jodie Haydon for Australia’s new Governor-General Sam Mostyn
Daily Mail.

SHUT! IT! DOWN!

FIRE! THEM! ALL!

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 11:53 am

Roger
 July 1, 2024 8:53 am

Younger Australians think Australia should be more socialist

I had a quick read of the blurb.
It is alternately described as a “poll” and a “survey”.
I think it is the latter, drawing on those who subscribe to YouGov, so subject to self-selection bias.
And, of course, those plumping for socialism see themselves as the beneficiaries, without examining the history which tells us that the real beneficiaries comprise about 0.05% of the population.

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 12:00 pm

ABC’s embarrassing blunder as news host confuses Albo’s fiancée Jodie Haydon for Australia’s new Governor-General Sam Mostyn

Understandable.

They’re all cut from the same cloth.

mem
mem
July 1, 2024 12:03 pm

Re the painting chosen to lead this thread, I’ve been contemplating the title Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History, Francisco Goya, 1814 and applying its message to contemporary events and issues. Let’s take the climate change scam and ask, how long will us humans need to wait until the truth is revealed? Or is it all in the hands of the gods? And then just now, watching the clip of the new president of Argentina (posted up thread), wondered if in time, he will be seen by the Argentinians as a god.

Crossie
Crossie
July 1, 2024 12:03 pm

The big environmental groups are wholly committed to renewable energy and dogmatically opposed to nuclear power. To the extent that we’re able to trace the source of their funding, much of it flows from investors in the renewables sector whose portfolios would be instantly devalued by the entry of nuclear power.

Always look at who gains. If this had anything to do with environmental concerns there would be no mountains of wind turbines or fields of solar panels, we would have a nuclear power station near every larger population centre. That there is nobody prepared to invest in nuclear energy is a clear indicator that it is much cheaper than the proceeds from building the renewables infrastructure. Therefore, renewables can never be cheaper, never mind that they are not fit for purpose.

billie
billie
July 1, 2024 12:06 pm

The English curriculum lays down broad themes for each year. You find a classic that matches the theme instead of whatever garbage other schools find popular

Don’t most teachers just go to Cool Australia and download what the rest of their mob does?

I mean, it is easy to do that and not do any work, while spending their time demanding more money

We pay so much for so little

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 12:08 pm

Donors looking to get Biden to drop out have emphasized that the money raised needs to transfer over to the new candidate. Team Biden however is warning that it’s not going to happen. Any new candidate will start with “zero dollars.” …

It isn’t Biden’s money.
Legally he would have to run as an independent to justify keeping the money.
It would only take a couple of large donors going to Court to tip the Biden cart over and force return or transfer of donations.

The larger signal is that the Biden campaign won’t cooperate with any transition effort and will not only keep all the money, but fight this process every step of the way, taking the 2024 race hostage. If Dems try to replace Biden, Team Biden will make sure that whoever they replace him with loses.

All noise.
The two things a 40 year old in the Biden camp knows are:-
1. By the time he/she is 42 Jill and the Sniffer will be in the dustbin of history with zero influence; and
2. The capacity for the Dimocrats to wreak vengeance on people who rock the boat knows no bounds.

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 12:15 pm

I think it is the latter, drawing on those who subscribe to YouGov, so subject to self-selection bias.

No doubt.

But it’s one of a number of such recent polls which are probably picking up on a trend among urban millennials (is that the right term?).

As I’ve commented a few times here, if people don’t feel they have a stake in society they will opt for an alternative that holds that promise out, however illusory. The falling primary vote for the Uniparty also reflects this, I believe.

Last edited 21 days ago by Roger
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 12:25 pm

WRT to the Chevron decision, in practical terms, what happens 8:00 am Monday morning in the US?
Various Swamp Agencies have 30 years of layered regulations which are now invalid. I’ll bet most of their in-house lawyers couldn’t tell you off the cuff which regs are rooted in legislation and which were fabricated out of thin air by some over-zealous bureaucrat in the 1990’s.
Presumably aggrieved citizens everywhere will be immediately taking actions which were prohibited last Friday with a middle finger extended to the relevant agency.
I predict a few individual bureaucrats and even whole agencies will do their very best Hiroo Onoda impression and keep fighting the war.

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 12:25 pm

It isn’t Biden’s money.

Legally he would have to run as an independent to justify keeping the money.

Well, he can’t spend it on personal items, but it is his campaign’s money.

He doesn’t have to hand it over if he somehow loses the nomination but he can use it for any number of political purposes or even donate it to charity.

cohenite
July 1, 2024 12:30 pm

Much more likely is that Rolls Royce’s marketing department is running LNP nuke policy. “I see no method at all,” as a wise man once said.

Dickless, Westinghouse is building nuclear Trucks and Gates and Buffet are building natrium reactors.

Anyway we know who is running the renewables market: turdball, holmes a kunt, the filth and the unions via industry supper.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 12:38 pm

He doesn’t have to hand it over if he somehow loses the nomination but he can use it for any number of political purposes or even donate it to charity.

I think it would be legally fraught to pass the money to “another political purpose” or even a charity.
Big donors, particularly those connected to the Dimocrat machine (which Jill and the Sniffer will shortly not be part of) will litigate.
They clearly gave to a Presidential campaign. The only question would be, did they give to a Democrat campaign or a Biden campaign. Even if it is decided they gave to a Biden campaign I think legally Biden would have to run as an independent and use the money on that campaign.
Doctor Jill would have to consider (Joe isn’t capable of considering anything) if she wants to go down in history as the person who handed Trump the White House.
Ruth Madoff : “I am the most unpopular woman in New York!”
Dr Jill : “Hold my Prosecco!”

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 12:40 pm

Roger, I think there will be a lot of careful reading of the Dimocrat donation conditions over coming days.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 1, 2024 12:43 pm

Condolences Cassie. I hope they lived a long and fruitful life. Not too much pain at the end.

John H.
John H.
July 1, 2024 12:46 pm

Roger

 July 1, 2024 12:15 pm

I think it is the latter, drawing on those who subscribe to YouGov, so subject to self-selection bias.

No doubt.

But it’s one of a number of such recent polls which are probably picking up on a trend among urban millennials (is that the right term?).

As I’ve commented a few times here, if people don’t feel they have a stake in society they will opt for an alternative that holds that promise out, however illusory. The falling primary vote for the Uniparty also reflects this, I believe.

The trend is there. It isn’t just people feeling they don’t have a stake in society it is also people feeling government doesn’t care about them. Both major parties spit out the same tired old cliches. The collapse in the primary vote should be a good sign but the situation is not yet dire enough. Mugs will still think this is a binary issue and fail to recognize that it is a systemic issue. It just might be true, at the end of the decade we might be up for a 4th turning.

Last edited 21 days ago by John H.
Muddy
Muddy
July 1, 2024 12:48 pm

Hypothetical.

Imagine a Mexican cartel – or a terrorist group assisted by a cartel – breaching the Mexican-U.S. southern border, murdering any number of civilians of a nearby border town, and abducting back over the border X number of U.S. civilians as hostages.

What might be the response from the various stakeholders? Would this situation – the holding of civilian hostages in a foreign country – still exist after 9 months?

Just wondering.
Nothing to see here, move along.

Kneel
Kneel
July 1, 2024 12:48 pm

“Well, he can’t spend it on personal items, but it is his campaign’s money.”

Unlikely.
Big donors get around the limit on campaign donations by donating to a PAC.
The PAC decides where the money goes.
Who controls the PAC controls the $.

cohenite
July 1, 2024 12:49 pm

Talkback on radio has been slimed with Trump is a liar feedback about the debate because the perverted corpse said Trump had said US soldiers were suckers and losers.

In fact the corpse was repeating an old claim that former President Donald Trump once called fallen soldiers suckers and losers. Apparently Trump had said this because he did not want to visit the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery — which is home to the graves of Americans who fought and died in World War I — for two reasons, according to The Atlantic: He feared the rain would dishevel his hair, and because he did not believe it important to honor American war dead. This was according to four anonymous people with first hand knowledge of the discussion that day.

Trump, in turn, denied saying it, accused Biden of making up the quote, and demanded an apology. 

It wasn’t the first time Biden had made this claim. It was tweeted from his X account in October 2023.

Biden also said he ran for POTUS because Trump had said both sides had very fine people: President Joe Biden repeated the claim that former President Donald Trump said there were good people on both sides during the deadly Charlottesville rally in 2017 despite Snopes recently acknowledging the claim is false.

I said I wasn’t going to run again until I saw it happen in Charlottesville, Virginia, Biden said on the CNN debate stage on Thursday night.
 
But as Snopes belatedly pointed out Trump specifically condemned the white nationalists and nazis: he was talking specifically about the statues of historical people: people for and against removing them.

The suckers and losers comment is a lie. The Atlantic is run by steve jobs’ widow Laurene Jobs who hates Trump; the Atlantic has been the source of many of the lies against Trump: they published the suckers and losers claim in 2020 just before POTUS election when it would have maximum effect: they quoted anonymous sources; there was no evidence, no records, nothing; the Atlantic alleged Trump’s former chief of staff, General John Kelly said it; he denied this, Pompeo, John Bolton, both not fans of Trump, also denied it happened.

The irony is biden said Trump was a disgrace when he said suckers and losers because biden’s son Beau had died in combat in Iraq in 2015; in fact he died in the US in a hospital from a brain cancer. Or maybe he was eaten by cannibals.

Biden is the liar

Kneel
Kneel
July 1, 2024 12:53 pm

“Biden is the liar”

Always was. Always will be.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 1, 2024 1:16 pm

WRT to the Chevron decision, in practical terms, what happens 8:00 am Monday morning in the US?

Nothing much. The alphabet agencies are fully captured. What will happen is they will fight it tooth and nail through the courts system, particularly via friendly lefty judges.

For example the practice of “sue and settle” has been going on for nearly 20 years now. By that the USEPA has enshrined in case law a whole pile of legal wheezes which lets them control anything and everything. For the Planet! All that stuff is subject to overturning, but they will use taxpayers’ money to lawfare all of that defensively for about the next thousand years.

But the Scotus decision is nice. At least there’s that.

m0nty
m0nty
July 1, 2024 1:28 pm

The 70-year-old relief teacher I mentioned the other day who fell off the roof at my kids’ school passed away from his injuries yesterday. He had a wife, kids and grandkids, and was a 40-year friend and mentor to our current principal. Tragic for all concerned.

WorkSafe and the cops will now be joined by the coroner in crawling all over it, adding to the trauma that teachers and school leadership are going through. I suppose that’s their job, I just hope the outcome is that it’s written off as an accident that no one could prevent.

John H.
John H.
July 1, 2024 1:31 pm

Muddy

 July 1, 2024 12:48 pm

Hypothetical.

Imagine a Mexican cartel – or a terrorist group assisted by a cartel – breaching the Mexican-U.S. southern border, murdering any number of civilians of a nearby border town, and abducting back over the border X number of U.S. civilians as hostages.

What might be the response from the various stakeholders? Would this situation – the holding of civilian hostages in a foreign country – still exist after 9 months?

Just wondering.

Nothing to see here, move along.

The US would love that because it justifies going into Mexico and demolishing the cartels. It has already been suggested they be deemed terrorist organisations allowing that to happen and the Mexican government might kick up a public fuss but privately be pleased because in parts of the country the cartels are a de facto government. That is, the USA would do exactly what Israel is doing.

Last edited 21 days ago by John H.
m0nty
m0nty
July 1, 2024 1:31 pm

Well, he can’t spend it on personal items, but it is his campaign’s money.

Relax, according to Cats he can totally use that money to pay off a porn star for unprotected sex. MAGA!

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 1:40 pm

The irony is biden said Trump was a disgrace when he said suckers and losers because biden’s son Beau had died in combat in Iraq in 2015; in fact he died in the US in a hospital from a brain cancer. Or maybe he was eaten by cannibals.

He didn’t actually say Biden Minor was killed in Iraq during the debate, but was quite happy to leave the implication hanging in the air like the smell of a leaking Depends. Or maybe the silly old fart just doesn’t know anymore.
The point was though, his attempt to raise that and go the full “How dare you!” with Trump fell flat. Apart from the most Rustadon Dimocrat, I think most would see that as a cynical attempt to exploit his dead son.

Biden is the liar

Quite so.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 1:46 pm

WorkSafe and the cops will now be joined by the coroner in crawling all over it, adding to the trauma that teachers and school leadership are going through. 

And, just like that, m0nster discovers the regulatory apparatus of the state cumbersome and unnecessary.
From the story so far, it seems pretty clear that the school principal should be charged with Industrial Manslaughter and jailed.

Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 1, 2024 1:53 pm

From the story so far, it seems pretty clear that the school principal should be charged with Industrial Manslaughter and jailed.

The principal is guilty as charged. Also jailed should be the district/area superintendent of schools, and the Head of the Education Dept.

Those three are guilty as can be of industrial manslaughter & should already be in custody.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 1:56 pm

Re the relief teacher who does his own stunts.
Questions which will be asked:-
1. “Was the ladder in use the property of the school?”
2. “If not, how did it make it onto school premises?”
3. “What were the procedures for use of ladders? Specifically, was the ladder placed in a gutter-guide or similar? Was there a designated spotter footing the ladder?”
4. “Irrespective of the answers to Q3, was the deceased trained in work-at-heights procedures. Was any other person involved in the incident similarly trained?”
5. (The Zinger) “Can we please see your plant and equipment register, including maintenance and inspection reports on the ladder?”

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 2:10 pm

m0nty
 July 1, 2024 1:31 pm

Well, he can’t spend it on personal items, but it is his campaign’s money.

Relax, according to Cats he can totally use that money to pay off …

… people who have evidence (via his inept junkie son) that he takes bribes.
In any case, how do you think the campaign is going m0nster (whose ever campaign it is right now)?

thefrollickingmole
thefrollickingmole
July 1, 2024 2:15 pm

Whats the difference between “Germany will be Judenrein” and “Palestine from the river to the sea”?
Opportunity?
Both are barely coded calls for the destruction of the jewish people.

And our ALP and people who consider themselves “good” are now chanting it openly.
?

mongs-monging-mongingly
Zippster
Zippster
July 1, 2024 2:33 pm

With all the monster power required to run AI data centers all this talk of “renewabullsh!ts” is already quietly disappearing up its own butt. someone hand luigi and smutley up to date talking points please

Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 1, 2024 2:44 pm

5. (The Zinger) “Can we please see your plant and equipment register, including maintenance and inspection reports on the ladder?”

These maintenance & inspection records must show the qualifications of both the inspector & those of the authorised & accredited safety equipment technician who carried out maintenance on the ladder.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 1, 2024 2:52 pm

Funny as. Cody is a cracker.

God knows how much money that jet engine cost?

All in good fun Ladies and Gents.

—-

WhistlinDiesel:
Flying My Jet Engine Merry-Go-Round Until It Explodes (13G FORCES)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJTgFgd01ns

bons
bons
July 1, 2024 3:03 pm

Holy snapping St Albaneses.

I have just completed my annual review to determine how much is in the giveaway pot for next year.

An object lesson in cost of living impacts.

After non-discretionaries like the grandkids education funds and Advance Australia, it is going to be lean pickings for some previous recipients.

Independently, I decided to no longer join any political parties. Membership provides no influence. “Outside pissing in” is a more relevant contemporary strategy. If you want to lend a hand at election time, it can be done without the frustrations inherent to membership.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 1, 2024 3:07 pm

Flying My Jet Engine Merry-Go-Round Until It Explodes

Chinese people do that sort of thing too…

Chinese rocket static-fire test results in unintended launch and huge explosion (30 Jun, via Instapundit)

Bit like the jet engine…the bolts holding it on failed or something. The kaboom when it lands is very kaboomy. I hope there wasn’t anyone on ground zero.

They’re still using nitrogen tetroxide and hydrazine, which give the red colour to the fumes. Really nasty if you happen to be nearby when something like this occurs, basically you are in the middle of a cloud of hot nitric acid.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 1, 2024 3:24 pm

Reading a very good history of the Guadalcanal – Solomons Campaign from March to October 1943 “Dark Waters, Starry Skies” by Jeffrey Cox

Following the torpedoing of the “Centaur” – an Australian hospital ship, designated by the Red Cross and so marked and illuminated, in May 1, 1943, John Curtin announced that an immediate, strongly worded, protest would be addressed to the Japanese Government. (Page 220.)

That’ll show them, eh, John?

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 3:33 pm

There is also an extensive section in Victorian OH&S legislation covering the dangers of stepping on rakes.

Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 1, 2024 3:39 pm

Only by jailing, & consequent loss of any hope of returning to the public service, people like that school principal who killed the volunteer on the roof, will there be any chance of reversing some of the worst legislation.

The principal, & every person above them on the education totem pole, should be jailed, criminal conviction recorded, & upon release have to find employment in the private sector (i.e. picking fruit or something) for the rest of their life.

The more of those bastards who can be jailed, the better.

The public service has to pay the penalties equally as do private sector.
This is lifesaving legislation, must apply to all equally. Lives are at stake.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 1, 2024 3:54 pm

This should get you thinking. Don’t rush to judgement.

Trippy stuff from MLB … good findings. Horse and cart above, yet this was below.

Check it out.

——

My Lunch Break:

Exposing Chicago’s Tunnel System?

There are thousands of miles of underground structures under Chicago? Today, we find documents from the public records, presentations, and even found someone who has just been inside this tunnel system. We share what they found with all of you right now. Do you really think these tunnels are all just for a phone cable? It’s time to think logically. Are you ready to take this research further than ever before today? Are you ready for one of my personal favorite Episodes to this point? Here we go.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6ns_pLRlG

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 1, 2024 3:55 pm

https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2024/07/be-afraid.html

……..Labor speculation that Fatima Payman will start her own political party….

Bourne1879
Bourne1879
July 1, 2024 3:56 pm

I see via Michael Smith news that Senator Payman may set up her own party.
So her Dad flees Afghanistan and now she is a Senator she wants to represent Muslims and not Australians in general.
She is the poster child for why Australia should be careful who it lets in.

Eyrie
Eyrie
July 1, 2024 3:58 pm

They’re still using nitrogen tetroxide and hydrazine, which give the red colour to the fumes. 

Apparently not. LOX and kerosene.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tianlong-3

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 4:04 pm

A couple of Fall from Heights Case Studies from my time in Gold Plated Power Distribution and Transmission.
1. Quite large liney (not m0nster large but XXXXOS) goes out to a small domestic job, falls off ladder (about a metre) and breaks his hip. He is incapacitated, hasn’t got his phone and isn’t discovered for many hours on a freezing night. “Management not providing a safe workplace!” screams the Union Rep. This went on for a week until a very alert management type asked the question, “Hey, but where was the other bloke on the crew?”. The Unions had insisted on two man crews in the previous EBA, because safety.
But it turns out the practice was to continue one man operations but with two logging on and getting paid.
The missing second crew member? The local depot shop steward.
2. Another chap takes a ride on an Elevated Work Platform (EWP) to a fixed platform on a transmission tower. In making the transition from the EWP to the fixed platform he slipped and fell. Now, the rule is they are supposed to have their fall arrest harness clipped in at all times, to either the EWP or the tower. Again, Union Rep screaming “Management Responsibility” but, when asked why the bloke didn’t clip himself on before climbing out of the EWP bucket, all that came back was a lame “He doesn’t have to”.
Apparently this became practice in the old SEC days because a couple of old hands didn’t like harnesses, but wasn’t documented anywhere. Even to a lay person the most perilous part of the exercise would be getting to and from the EWP and fixed platform.
But, no.
And according to the Union Rep, if someone attempts suicide by doing something stupid, it is still the responsibility of management 200 kilometres away.
This is now legislated.
Legislation that no doubt m0nster cheered through at the time, because it would “Stick it to da Man”.
But now?
“Snot fair. It might be applied to someone I know who doesn’t deserve it”.

Last edited 21 days ago by Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 4:06 pm

Dover I just posted something which has been declared spam.
It contains no links or no cut and pastes.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 4:22 pm

What will absolutely shock m0nster’s school principal is the amount of detailed information of maintenance, inspection and certification required for what we might regard as everyday handyman items.
Ladders, wheelbarrows, cordless drills with 240v chargers, you name it, they will be looking for the paper trail.
The first question will be why a ladder was on the school grounds in the first place because I will bet London to a housebrick that no-one on staff will have “Work at Heights” certification.
Sad to say, m0nster, your principal buddy is in a world of pain.

Rockdoctor
Rockdoctor
July 1, 2024 4:51 pm

wow o wowee.

We now letting immigrants in with TB:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13586645/Manpreet-Kaur-dead-plane-Australia-India-Qantas.html

A colleague had an Asian GF that was denied a visa because she had TB, this was 20 years ago though and things may have changed…

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 5:09 pm

A colleague had an Asian GF that was denied a visa because she had TB, this was 20 years ago though and things may have changed…

Yes, a lot has changed.

30 years ago we couldn’t get my widowed father-in-law a visa because he had diabetes, even though we could offer a surety, he would have had cash to invest from the sale of his house and he had a British overseas civil service pension and would have purchased health insurance.

Immigration officials these days would barely bat an eyelid at a penniless Punjabi peasant with diabetes emigrating.

Last edited 21 days ago by Roger
Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 5:12 pm

Malicious incompetence- the canbra way BIRM.

Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 1, 2024 5:14 pm

What will absolutely shock m0nster’s school principal is the amount of detailed information of maintenance, inspection and certification required for what we might regard as everyday handyman items.

To become qualified to ‘tag & test’ electrical cords, a task actually simpler than testing the voltage on a farm electric fence, more than one hour of the course is devoted to looking at pictures of ladders to learn which positions & ladders are ‘unsafe’ – then sitting a written exam on same, exam results have to submitted to big fella gubbermint.

Other ‘safety hazards’ are handled separately, in a series of ‘safety’ modules.

(This is to tag & test your own electric jug & office cords in a pub. To be ‘qualified’ to test cords that do not belong to you, requires extra ‘study’ of an extra Two TAFE modules)

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
July 1, 2024 5:14 pm

https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/1ae2349fb66b324bdcc63cba67105a29?s=64&d=identicon&r=g
Boambee John
 July 1, 2024 9:27 am

Farmer Gez
Rafe Champion is circulating a Stop Labor’s Towers newsletter by email. Are you connected to this group?

Certainly am.

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 1, 2024 5:18 pm

Chris Kenny decries the use of Glastonbury Music Festival by “activists” in favour of something or other for Palis. He mentioned the October 7th music festival and the atrocities visited on young people there.
What might also be mentioned is that music is banned altogether in “extreme right” regimes of an Islamic flavour, like the Taliban.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 5:20 pm

Boambee John
 July 1, 2024 4:41 pm

 Reply to  Sancho Panzer

The only way that leftards will come to their senses is for them to feel the pain of the regulatory state.

Except they won’t.
This will go the way of Chairman Dan’s hotel quarantine case. This would have been right in the sweet spot for a slam dunk prosecution using Stairman’s own legislation. But, after lots of foot dragging and obsfucation, we finally find that Worksafe “accidentally” used inadmissible evidence from the hotel quarantine enquiry in preparing their brief.
Case dismissed.
This will go the same way. The union network will busy themselves and the investigating officer will be leant on.
But there should be some fun to be had before that.
Imagine the slack-jawed Biden looks when Worksafe asks to speak to the OH&S committee who have spent the last two years at OH&S meetings tut-tutting about “safe spaces for trans colleagues”. The closest they will have got to a physical safety issue was trying to get 4WDs banned from drop off/pick up.
As for the principal, his protestations of “didn’t even know we had a ladder” and even “I had warned him before” won’t cut it.
But the club will cover for him.
This legislation is only for fat cats running Satanic Mills Sweatshops Inc.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 5:23 pm

A couple of years ago I did the course to get the white card/yellow card to be an owner builder.
FMD.
What.
A.
Racket.

Last edited 21 days ago by Sancho Panzer
Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 1, 2024 5:31 pm

Dear Cassie,
Those of us who grew up in the Christian tradition, whether we remained regular churchgoers or not, have always had such admiration for Israel and the Jewish people wherever they live. They have been a huge “value-add” for Australia and many other countries.
If we haven’t been to Israel ourselves, we know family and friends who have. It has always been known that The Holy Land was where both Jewish and Christian faiths had their base.

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
July 1, 2024 5:48 pm

A good afternoon on the chainsaw, cold and cloudy but calm.
New chain, dressed bar and plenty of good clean boughs lying under old Box trees from a storm two years ago.
Watching Tim Blair by a roaring fire with a bowl of my wife’s excellent pea & ham soup.

calli
calli
July 1, 2024 5:48 pm

I love the title of the painting, Dover.

Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History.

Amen to that, provided “history” is recorded by truthful people. Of course, real History is something quite different. Recorded by an indelible pen on an eternal manuscript.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 1, 2024 5:50 pm

Poor me, I am a victim!

‘I have been exiled’: Fatima Payman to abstain from ‘everything’ following suspension (Sky News, 1 Jul)

Ms Payman issued a statement saying she has lost contact with her caucus colleagues following her suspension and believes some members are “attempting to intimidate” her into resigning from the Senate.

This is such awful suffering. She should seek solace somewhere welcoming, like in Gaza or Yemen.

johanna
johanna
July 1, 2024 5:50 pm

Apparently, missing out on an acting role is now an excuse for beating and strangling your girlfriend:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-07-01/orpheus-pledger-former-home-and-away-star-assault-guilty-court/104043188

He took up his most prominent role on Home and Away in 2016 before his character was killed off in 2019.
Mr MacCuspie said the actor’s mental health had declined shortly afterwards, after he missed out on a role in the major U.S. show The 100.
“He was expecting to fly over for the show but at the very last minute that role fell through,” Mr MacCuspie said.
“In many ways that was the first barrier he’d faced in his career … It was destabilising event for him.”
The loss triggered the recreational use of methylamphetamine, which his lawyer conceded contributed to his offending.
The court heard Pledger had attacked the victim on previous occasions, but she had not given a statement to police out of concern for his mental health.

Well, how stupid can you get?

Darling, if he’s attacked you once, he’ll do it again, if you let him. Which you did.

What are the odds he’ll get a lettuce leaf, being as how he’s a tortured artist and all?

🙁

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
July 1, 2024 5:53 pm

Continuing on with the Fall From Heights theme:

It is never great when someone dies falling off stuff. In this particular case, mUnter in his economic, journalistic and Work Safety experience opined thusly:

I just hope the outcome is that it’s written off as an accident that no one could prevent

Oh but it could. It most certainly could have been prevented, with a simple philosophy:

Do. Not. Let. 70. Year. Olds. On. Roofs.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 1, 2024 5:53 pm

Sad to say, m0nster, your principal buddy is in a world of pain.

Not skiting about this one at all, but one of the most painful parts will be the way everyone, from inspectorate, through coroner, to the inevitable barristers will have the invincible superpower of 20:20 hindsight.

What started off as an ‘I’ll just…’ exploit attracts pursed lips, raised eyebrows, and solemn shaking of the head from those thoroughly acquainted with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (or other) and equipped with the wisdom of expert advice and leisurely hindsight.

Last edited 21 days ago by Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 1, 2024 5:59 pm

Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History.

A deep philosophical thought crossed my mind this morning: Why do Truth and History have their norks out?

There must be a message I’m missing.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 1, 2024 6:13 pm

Sheik Charkawi’s bid to dump Labor to field ‘teal-like’ campaign-backed federal candidatesAlexi Demetriadi
3 hours ago.
Updated 3 minutes ago

30 comments
A Muslim teal-style campaign to oust the ALP in Sydney and Melbourne is seeking candidates as Anthony Albanese’s suspension of Fatima Payman from the Labor caucus exacerbates a rift between the party and the ­Islamic community.
The suspension of the senator for crossing the floor to vote with the Greens on Palestine statehood, and her warning that she’d do it again, has alienated Labor from its historically loyal Muslim voter base, which is mobilising to make that clear at the next election.
The Muslim Vote – a formal campaign bidding to oust Labor incumbents in seats with high Muslim populations – has opened applications for prospective candidates, including in the electorates of Education Minister Jason Clare and Workplace Relations Minister Tony Burke.
Any candidates running as part of the Muslim Vote platform are likely to be campaign-affiliated independents, backed with resources, volunteers and funding, similar to Climate 200’s support of independent teal candidates, albeit not to the same extent.
The Australian revealed in April that Labor powerbrokers feared abandonment by Muslim voters across southwest Sydney and inner-city Melbourne over its Gaza war stance and, in June, how the campaign was spearheaded by Islamic leader Sheik Wesam Charkawi.
On Sunday, Sheik Charkawi published a “candidate call out”, encouraging people to put themselves forward to run with the Muslim Vote’s backing. “Have you thought about truly speaking for your community? Now is the time,” he wrote.
The sheik has also started expanding the campaign’s reach and pool of canvassers. The group is also now accepting ­donations, which will go toward “local and national campaigns, mobilisation, rallies, event ­material, and direct lobbying”.
Although its vocal pro-Palestine stance will be a campaign tenet, it will also run on housing, the cost of living, and facilities that cater to the community, looking long-term to create “grassroots political infrastructure”. It also provides a data resource of the Muslim population in its target electorates, and rates the Labor incumbent on their Palestine voting record.

caveman
caveman
July 1, 2024 6:13 pm

Sam Mostyn new Govenor General , another grifter wants to change things…how about just do your f##kn job.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 6:14 pm

Rockdoctor replying earlier …

Worst I did, managed to get some stitches from trying to open a window that was stuck from paining the frames. The whole window shattered when I gave a shove and a shard of glass did it’s work. Couple hours in the emergency room at Seymour hospital for my sins.

A not uncommon injury.
Don’t worry about Worksafe.
Someone near and dear might have Plod on their tail.
A mate did exactly that recently and copped a lot of Q&A in ED about exactly what happened.
When he returned to have the stitches out, the ED doc indicated that he checked the story with others in the building trade who told him it happens a bit.
Why?
Because the doc thought the injuries looked very much like defensive knife wounds he had seen before.

Diogenes
Diogenes
July 1, 2024 6:17 pm

What will absolutely shock m0nster’s school principal is the amount of detailed information of maintenance, inspection and certification required for what we might regard as everyday handyman items.

The Principal will be very aware. Having spent some time teaching in manual arts workshops I can attest to the reams of paperwork required, that the Principal has to endorse. Then there are the regular audits. Listening to the Home ekkies it is just as bad in the kitchens.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 6:23 pm

Knuckle Dragger
 July 1, 2024 5:53 pm

Continuing on with the Fall From Heights theme:

It is never great when someone dies falling off stuff. In this particular case, mUnter in his economic, journalistic and Work Safety experience opined thusly:

I just hope the outcome is that it’s written off as an accident that no one could prevent

What m0nster doesn’t understand is that the law isn’t written that way.
Even if it was unable to be prevented, and the employee does something complete stupid, the onus rests with The Bosses to, well, prevent it.
It is a perfect law in Lefty world because it junks presumption of innocence because … fighting Torries.
Of course, the club will squeeze the principal and teachers out of this tight corner, but they will have a “valuable teachable moment” on the way through.

132andBush
132andBush
July 1, 2024 6:26 pm

It’s possible that monty is culpable for that teachers’ death by fact his children go to the school.

Certainly by the logic he has used in the past.

calli
calli
July 1, 2024 6:34 pm

And a big thank you for putting me on to Project Gutenberg for downloads of old books. I spent many happy hours reacquainting myself with the writing of one “Currer Bell” (tee hee).

Next cab off the rank will be a near relation, “Ellis Bell”. Comments up thread about the reintroduction of classics into the curriculum reminded me. I toiled over a long assignment on the subject of “those unquiet slumbers in that quiet earth” aeons ago in the 5th Form.

Off to explore Trieste. Just an afternoon here then a sampling of the Italian railways over to Mestre. My first impression of the place is favourable – clean and tidy with actual foot-worthy, fit for purpose footpaths. It’s stinken hot though – walked from the dock to the hotel (around 800m) and oozed through the front door.

132andBush
132andBush
July 1, 2024 6:39 pm

What m0nster doesn’t understand is that the law isn’t written that way.

Even if it was unable to be prevented, and the employee does something complete stupid, the onus rests with The Bosses to, well, prevent it.

Like when you spend half an hour before knock off making sure all safety bunting, fences, covers and whatever else is needed are in place on the worksite.
Then overnight a trespasser (thief) falls in a trench and busts a leg, if one little bit of bunting, or fence, or cover or whatever was not quite right, you are the one in trouble. Or at least in as much trouble as the thief.

Roger
Roger
July 1, 2024 6:51 pm

[The Muslim Vote] also provides a data resource of the Muslim population in its target electorates, and rates the Labor incumbent on their Palestine voting record.

They’ll be demanding a treaty next.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
July 1, 2024 6:51 pm

Cracker night in the Northern Territory!

For the last week or so, every dodgy brother in the NT – having got hold of a licence to sell fireworks, and also having spent the last month trucking them in by the container load, sold out. Every second joint in D-Town converts itself to a Fireworks R Us warehouse.

You can buy the things in packages from a pineapple to three or more gorillas, and – legally, at least, although it never works out that way – you can go BOOM with them between 6.00 and 11.00 p.m. tonight.

There’s no restriction on where you can let them off. In parks, on ovals, in your front yard, on the street, from your front window, nothing.

It is now almost 6.20 p.m., and it has begun.

Tomorrow morning there will be blown-off fingers, burnt eye sockets, missing hands, the lot.

Brilliant. Just brilliant.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 1, 2024 6:53 pm

Victoria’s Treaty Authority moves aheadJames Dowling
Victoria’s Treaty Authority has opened the door for negotiations between the state government and Indigenous communities.

The state body oversees treaty negotiations and administers a database, launched today, that tracks the recognised areas eligible for coverage under the negotiations.

It is a first for Australia and a cornerstone of the state’s reconciliation efforts following the defeated Indigenous Voice to parliament referendum last year.

Treaty applications lodged through the database will be negotiated by government representatives and members of the First Peoples’ Assembly, a democratically elected body of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

A statewide treaty negotiation between the Allan government and the First Peoples’ Assembly is slated for later this year. Treaty measures, while unique to individual communities, would generally allow communities to manage themselves to a greater extent and pass down policies to address community issues.

The First Peoples’ Assembly also set up the Yoorrook Justice Commission, the country’s first Indigenous truth-telling commission that aims to chart damages and injustices against First Nations communities.

The assembly has been criticised in the past for the high wages of its members, which is on par with senior public servants. This was tipped to be $380,000 a year in December 2023.

Color me suspicious, but I just see this in the next stage in the cunning plan to render Australia ungovernable, should the peasantry have the nerve to elect a Coalition Government.

Would any treaty, signed between a State and its citizens, stand up in the High Court?

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 6:57 pm

The teacher was 61 and fell through a skylight. He got up on the roof to retrieve balls.
Not surprisingly, it was newsworthy.
It’s a Catholic school so no doubt worksafe will go hard.

Pogria
Pogria
July 1, 2024 6:58 pm

About ten years ago, I wanted to buy some 1080 because we had a lot of foxes and I didn’t have a gun licence, and the former Mr Pog was a dreadful shot.
So, I did my research, forked over three hundred dollars for a two day course, and duly received my AG CHEM CERT, which, supposedly, guaranteed me the right to buy 1080.

I fronted at my local Pastures Protection Office and flashed my card.

Hang on, I was told. We have to check out your property. Huh? I have my CARD!

Nope, we have to send someone out to inspect your property. Okay.

Because one neighbours’ house was about 250 metres from my fence, and even though said neighbour did NOT own a dog, I was not allowed to buy 1080. #@%&$%*** Rip off!

During the two day course, the instructor only mentioned that you had to inform neighbours to keep their dogs safe and to post signs that Fox Bait is being used.

Good quality snail pellets mixed into cheap cat food works pretty well I discovered through trial and error.

Effing ex couldn’t hit a marauding pig dog at twenty feet with a double barrel. sigh…

JC
JC
July 1, 2024 6:58 pm

Regular consumers, seeya later.

Electricity will become the new currency.

Tech Industry Wants to Lock Up Nuclear Power for AI

Largest tech companies are looking to buy nuclear power directly from plants, which could sap the grid of critical resources

Tech companies scouring the country for electricity supplies have zeroed in on a key target: America’s nuclear-power plants.

The owners of roughly a third of U.S. nuclear-power plants are in talks with tech companies to provide electricity to new data centers needed to meet the demands of an artificial-intelligence boom. 

Among them, Amazon Web Services is nearing a deal for electricity supplied directly from a nuclear plant on the East Coast with Constellation Energy CEG the largest owner of U.S. nuclear-power plants, according to people familiar with the matter. In a separate deal in March, the Amazon.com AMZN subsidiary purchased a nuclear-powered data center in Pennsylvania for $650 million.

The discussions have the potential to remove stable power generation from the grid while reliability concerns are rising across much of the U.S. and new kinds of electricity users—including AI, manufacturing and transportation—are significantly increasing the demand for electricity in pockets of the country. 

Nuclear-powered data centers would match the grid’s highest-reliability workhorse with a wealthy customer that wants 24-7 carbon-free power, likely speeding the addition of data centers needed in the global AI race.

But instead of adding new green energy to meet their soaring power needs, tech companies would be effectively diverting existing electricity resources. That could raise prices for other customers and hold back emission-cutting goals. 

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 6:59 pm

Allen pushes on with her poisonous, divisive marxist agenda while she runs out of other people’s money.

Zippster
Zippster
July 1, 2024 7:00 pm
Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 7:04 pm

Looks like marxist identity politics is backfiring bigly on the ALP. Hope so anyway.

Pogria
Pogria
July 1, 2024 7:10 pm

Cattle dog. 😀

comment image

cohenite
July 1, 2024 7:12 pm

Bolta back and sticking his size tens up the smug arse of payman. What a disgusting POS she is. Rescued from the muzzie shithole of afghanistan where if she had stayed she would have had 5 kids by now and been genitally mutilated. She is the worst type of hypocrite: the Western muslim who uses and enjoys every advantage the West has over islam to advocate for islam.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 7:13 pm

It’s hard to figure out what’s really going on with Vicco gubmint finances, but I’ve heard stories about pubes being sacked, nurses being told to do cleaning instead of cleaners, the gubmint trying to sell off stuff like births deaths and marriages and vehicle registrations.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 7:16 pm

I think there’s no doubt we’re heading for a Cain-Kirner debacle but only worse this time around.

Pogria
Pogria
July 1, 2024 7:16 pm

While I am posting about dogs, I miss my Billy every damn day even though it has been five years.

comment image

billie
billie
July 1, 2024 7:24 pm

Ms Payman issued a statement saying she has lost contact with her caucus colleagues following her suspension and believes some members are “attempting to intimidate” her into resigning from the Senate.

ha ha ha .. poor little thing!

Why are you all so intolerant?!

Called it

Now she can sashay off to be a Green or Teal or .. form a Muslim (political party, because let’s face it, that will be the only safe place won’t it?) Can’t wait to see their goals!

Which means we can have:

LGMT .. Labor Greens Muslims Teals .. gorgeous

Labor Party must be beside themselves, they created this, and it has escaped. They thought they were harnessing the Muslim vote and now this happens a complete loss of control.

So Frankensteinish.

Ah the irony .. which reminds me, it’s Shadenfreud time, just the one glass though.

Last edited 20 days ago by billie
caveman
caveman
July 1, 2024 7:28 pm

Gutfeld show is a cracker

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 1, 2024 7:29 pm

The cheapest power is coal, and the microparticles given off by burning it can help the planet to cool – see Jo Nova’s report on shipping smoke.
But of course the ideologically driven pollies and some ignorant ones have us signed on to useless alternatives. We used to have reliable and affordable coal fired power that enabled all industries that needed it to be competitive. Kiss goodbye to industries in the West, which is the real plot, as real as using Joe Brandon for the past four years.
We always knew Joe wasn’t up to the job, but the dem machinations and the complicit media made it a long-running Broadway/Beltway show. Closure is imminent.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 7:31 pm

Well yeah the party seems to over for the old perv and Dr Jill but doesn’t look as if they’ll go quietly.

Pogria
Pogria
July 1, 2024 7:32 pm

billie,
this is what I have to say to Labor regarding Flat Fatima;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUXHB5U-Vl4

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 7:36 pm

Rosie
 July 1, 2024 6:57 pm

The teacher was 61 and fell through a skylight. He got up on the roof to retrieve balls.

Not surprisingly, it was newsworthy.

It’s a Catholic school so no doubt worksafe will go hard.

Certainly a higher chance of them putting the boots in as against a government school.
My main point to m0nster is that he is all in to far-left extremist legislation like “Torrie fighting” Industrial Manslaughter laws … until it might rebound on someone he knows.

KevinM
KevinM
July 1, 2024 7:42 pm

I think it’s apposite at this time of elections in France to remind us how times have changed.

Instead of uniting there is division and racial tension.

——————————

In the bustling streets of Paris in the year 1945, a French woman named Marie embarked on a journey that would soon become a story whispered among the locals.
With her trusty baguette tucked under her arm and six bottles of wine clinking in her basket, Marie set out to navigate the post-war city.

Amidst the rubble and remnants of a turbulent time, Marie’s spirit remained unyielding. The war had taken its toll on the city, but the resilience of its people refused to waver. Marie, with her baguette as a symbol of strength and survival, was determined to bring a taste of normalcy back to Paris.

As she walked through the narrow cobblestone streets, Marie encountered fellow Parisians who had endured the hardships of war. With a warm smile and a kind word, she shared her baguette and a glass of wine with those she met along the way. In the midst of despair, Marie’s simple acts of generosity served as a reminder that humanity could still find solace in the simplest of pleasures.

Word of Marie’s baguette and wine offerings spread throughout the city, and soon, people from all walks of life sought her out. The aroma of freshly baked bread and the clinking of wine bottles became a beacon of hope for a community yearning for healing.

With each passing day, the atmosphere in Paris began to shift. The war had scarred the city, but Marie’s baguette and wine became a symbol of unity and resilience. The streets once filled with anguish and sorrow now echoed with laughter and shared moments of joy.
Marie’s act of kindness and her baguette became a legend in the city of love. The story of the French woman with her baguette and six bottles of wine spread far and wide, inspiring others to find their own ways to heal and rebuild.

Even after the scars of war had faded, Marie continued her tradition, sharing her baguette and wine with those in need. Her generosity became a symbol of the indomitable spirit of the people of Paris, a testament to their ability to rise above adversity.

And so, the story of Marie, the French woman with her baguette and six bottles of wine, Paris, 1945, lives on as a reminder that even in the darkest of times, love, kindness, and the simple pleasures of life have the power to heal and unite.

449110336_122137645154256948_8441659536672240676_n
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 7:45 pm

Miltonf
 July 1, 2024 7:13 pm

It’s hard to figure out what’s really going on with Vicco gubmint finances

What is weird is they are putting the squeeze on hospital budgets, whilst simultaneously ticking off a pay rise for nurses of 28.5% over four years.
What is the hidden agenda?
Forcing more private patients into public hospitals to balance the budget without overtly declaring it as policy (knowing it will push out public patient waiting lists)?
I honestly doubt there is a plan, apart from just making the budget numbers add up, knowing they will never hit them, and keeping the CFMEU cash spigot open.

cohenite
July 1, 2024 7:49 pm

More insight from Bolta re: the attack by the muzzies on the Canberra War Memorial. He says it was not a protest in favour of the pallis but a protest against Australia and the West. And that distinction was not recognised or conceded by either rub and tug or Duttie.

Bolta was also uncritical of Trump in his general amazement at how dead the perverted corpse was in the debate. If he keeps this up I might have to forgive his past snottiness about Trump.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 7:50 pm

caveman
 July 1, 2024 7:28 pm

Gutfeld show is a cracker

Any particular episode?

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 7:52 pm

Yes kick the can down the road for as long as they can get away with it.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 7:58 pm

He says it was not a protest in favour of the pallis but a protest against Australia and the West. 

Very true. The assault on the west has become much more violent and blatant in the last 5 or so years. BLM, antifa etc. A lot of it coming from the UN and their agents infesting Unis and gubmint departments around the world. Attacking Israel is just a starting point of course.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 8:01 pm

Miltonf
 July 1, 2024 7:52 pm

Yes kick the can down the road for as long as they can get away with it.

It’s a perfect shit-storm.
The Dan Xi-Man cabal don’t give a shit about fiscal responsibility because “Doing Important Projects” (don’t look at the price tag, just shovel money at it).
The lenders don’t care because they reckon the Feds will pick up the tab.
If and when that happens the shit show will be epic.
National Cabinet will be a cage fight.

Muddy
Muddy
July 1, 2024 8:03 pm

Montevideo Maru.
Eighty-two years ago today* the Japanese pre-war passenger liner the Montevideo Maru was torpedoed by an American submarine off the north-west coast of Luzon. It sank very quickly and took with it about 1,050 men, including Australian soldiers from Lark Force and several hundred citizen PoWs. It was the largest loss at sea that Australia has ever suffered, to my knowledge.

The Montevideo Maru was rediscovered last year, and prior to then, had been known to only a small group of Lark Force and PoW relatives, and diehard historians.

Among the Lark Force men were approximately 150 members of No. 1 Australian Independent Company, half of which had been based at Kavieng on New Ireland to protect the RAAF Advanced Operational Base there. The remainder of the Coy had been dispersed between Manus, Vila in the New Hebrides, Buka (Bougainville), and Tulagi in the Southern Solomons. The dispersed sections and platoons escaped back to Australia eventually, but the roughly half-company at Kavieng was captured aboard a schooner they had purchased and endeavoured to sail to Rabaul, hoping the latter was still holding out against the invasion fleet they had witnessed. The officers of this half-company were separated and sent to Japan by a separate vessel, but about 140 or so of the other ranks drowned in darkness when the Montevideo Maru was sunk en route to Hainan.

The only unit history of No. 1 Ind. Coy. – ‘We Were the First’ by A. ‘Sandy’ McNab – is long out of print, but it’s a decent read if you can get hold of a library copy.

The Buka section of the company survived on Bougainville for many months, and among other tasks, sigs from this section assisted the famous Coastwatchers Mason and Read, who provided vital intel to the Americans on Guadalcanal. Without the NO. 1 Coy sigs, Mason and Read would have achieved little.

The First Reinforcements (1 platoon in strength: approx 69) for No. 1 Ind Coy were unable to reach their parent unit, so were sent to Papua and then became the first unit to trek the then-primitive Bulldog Track to the Bulolo Valley where Kanga Force was holding out with meagre resources against the Japanese navy at Salamaua and Lae. Some of No. 1 Reinft Pl were absorbed into No. 5 Ind Coy, and some joined ANGAU or other units.

Eric Feldt wrote of No. 1 Coy at Kavieng in his famous post-war book The Coastwatchers, but included information that was not factually correct and quite defamatory against No. 1 Coy. This lead to the threat of legal action against Feldt and his publisher, but the former published an apology in the press, and the offending segments were excluded from future reprints.

Last edited 20 days ago by Muddy
Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 8:08 pm

The lenders don’t care because they reckon the Feds will pick up the tab.

Ok interesting- what a humiliation though and I thought the Commonwealth games default was bad. Shameful actually.

bons
bons
July 1, 2024 8:18 pm

Are we not all loving Labor’s pains over their muzzie girl pissing on them for their stupidity.

Oh! They were being so clever putting in a first gen Afgan barbarian and believing that she would be so so grateful for her support by idiot democrats that she would ignore her father’s instructions to destroy her useful idiots.

Like the urban blackfellas, the arrogant muzzies are destroying the Labor carcass. Good stuff.

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 1, 2024 8:34 pm

A photo of the ill-fated Montevideo Maru, sunk 80 years ago today.

Montevideo-Maru
JC
JC
July 1, 2024 8:35 pm

The best I can tell, Victorian gov 10 year bonds are yielding approx 85 basis points over Federal gov bonds.

Vic 5.25% 10 year
Aust gov. 4.40% 10 year.

That doesn’t suggest default is elevated. Certainly there’s risk but not huge.

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 1, 2024 8:41 pm

Sorry, my bad – 82 years ago.

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 1, 2024 8:42 pm
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