Open Thread – Mon 1 July 2024


Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History, Francisco Goya, 1814

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Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 8:50 pm

Seems to me the herring fishermen ruling will keep agencies on their toes.
They can now be challenged.
That has to be a good thing.
https://www.bbc.com/news/articles/c51ywwrq45qo

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 1, 2024 8:51 pm

Key crossbench senator Lidia Thorpe has hit out at the office of the governor-general as a “waste of money” on the day Sam Mostyn was sworn in to the role as the King’s representative in Australia.
Senator Thorpe told The Australian that “the sooner we become a republic and have a head of power that is our own, the sooner we can start moving forward”.
“And that means a Treaty with First Peoples. The King’s representative shouldn’t be the head of our government,” she said. “How about a blackfulla instead?
“The governor-general role is a waste of money.”

All well and good, Senator – there are a few of us roinecks who think the same way about your Senate seat.

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 8:53 pm

“The governor-general role is a waste of money.”
Whereas a blak president will be an absolute bargain.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 8:54 pm

Rosie
 July 1, 2024 6:57 pm

The teacher was 61 and fell through a skylight. He got up on the roof to retrieve balls.

Not surprisingly, it was newsworthy.

It’s a Catholic school …

It’s a what?!?
m0nster sends his kids to a prahvate school?
Run by the … as he puts it … Rockspiders?

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 1, 2024 8:54 pm

I’m stuffing up all over today – this photo is the Montevideo Maru – the previous was a ship carrying the name in the 1960s.

I blame the Malta sunshine – went out this morning to an aircraft museum and a Commonwealth War Cemetery.

The-ill-fated-Montevideo-Maru.-Picture-supplied-by-KEITH-JACKSON
Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 8:54 pm

Yes 12 Senators from each state sure is a waste of money.

Last edited 20 days ago by Miltonf
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 8:58 pm

JC
 July 1, 2024 8:35 pm

The best I can tell, Victorian gov 10 year bonds are yielding approx 85 basis points over Federal gov bonds.

Vic 5.25% 10 year

Aust gov. 4.40% 10 year.

That doesn’t suggest default is elevated. Certainly there’s risk but not huge.

Is it just possible the real yield should be somewhere between 5.25% and junk bond%, but lenders are factoring in a Federal bail out?

Last edited 20 days ago by Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 9:00 pm

Top Ender
 July 1, 2024 8:54 pm

I’m stuffing up all over today – this photo is the Montevideo Maru – the previous was a ship carrying the name in the 1960s.

Yeah, I noticed that but didn’t want to embarass you.
Really I did.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 9:03 pm

How are these bond rates set? Ratings agencies?

JC
JC
July 1, 2024 9:16 pm

Miltonf

July 1, 2024 9:03 pm

How are these bond rates set? Ratings agencies?

Possibly last trade or the mid of the bid and offer. To be honest, it’s the first time I’ve ever looked for Vic bonds.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 9:19 pm

I didn’t even know they existed JC- I’d heard of Aussie Bonds, my uncle used to invest in them. I know the old NSW Electricity Commission used to issue them too.

Last edited 20 days ago by Miltonf
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 1, 2024 9:26 pm

Rosie at 8:50.
From BBC link.

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organisation, for example, called the ruling “a monumental setback that will harm all Americans and profoundly impact our nation’s environmental safeguards and public health protections”.

“The court has set us on a path towards policy paralysis,” it said.

Obvious scare tactics.
The public health considerations around asbestos are well understood and would draw almost unanimous agreement in Congress, so write explicit legislation around it.
What there might be less consensus on is giving some trumped up EPA Karen the right to declare an intermittent puddle in my yard part of “inland waterways”.

JC
JC
July 1, 2024 9:27 pm

Milton

That’s how they finance the state debt.

Sanchez

Probably. It would be unthinkable that a state would be allowed to default. Australia has never defaulted on debt.

Last edited 20 days ago by JC
JC
JC
July 1, 2024 9:31 pm

Miltonf

July 1, 2024 8:54 pm

Yes 12 Senators from each state sure is a waste of money.

And senators should not be allowed to vote for the PM in the party room.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 9:33 pm

Yeah I suppose it’s just hard to imagine anyone lending money to those incompetents

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 1, 2024 9:38 pm

FMD look at this shit. Shannon Deery:

Victorian MPs must be doing such a good job, they’ve all copped a pay rise.

Together they’ll share in more than $1m in pay rises and extra allowances.

The annual adjustment was expected to be announced last week, so you could cynically chalk up the delay to trying to keep a public backlash at bay.

On Monday the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal announced a 3.5 per cent pay rise for all MPS.

That’s just shy of $7,000 for our 128 MPs — about $890,000 — bringing their base salary well above $200,000 for the first time.

Ministers and the Leader of the Opposition each get an additional $167,313 over the base salary, so they stand to earn another $5,000 on top of that.

Then there’s the extra pay for a whole host of parliamentary positions while any adjustment would also apply to the bevy of allowances MPs can tap into.

All told, we’re looking at well above $1m for the 3.5 per cent adjustment were to come into play.

In determining the increase in wages for our finest representatives, the Victorian Independent Remuneration Tribunal must consider a range of factors.

They include current and projected economic conditions and trends and Victoria’s financial position and fiscal strategy.

It hardly needs repeating, but Victoria’s soaring debt level is hurtling down a one-way street, now tipped to hit $188bn by 2027-28.

It will soon account for a quarter of the state’s total economy.

Between the 2023 and 2024 budgets the government added almost $47m to the state’s debt pile each and every day.

That’s almost $2m an hour every single day of the year.

And because of the government’s inability to tackle debt there have been inevitable and unavoidable consequences.

Like cutting funding to cancer research.

Or demanding hospitals wipe hundreds of millions of dollars from their budgets.

Several flagship election commitments have been shelved and policies stalled amid a budget sold as curbing debt and reining in spending.

They included scrapping the Arden medical precinct, delaying the Melbourne Airport rail, slowing mental health initiatives and putting a raft of community hospital initiatives under review.

The state’s first home buyers scheme was ditched and a trial of sick pay for casual workers was abandoned.

Overall infrastructure spending has been scaled back, from a peak of $24bn to $15.6bn by 2027-28.

The government is, quite literally, running out of money.

And yet despite this, May’s budget showed us that government spending will continue to climb to an estimated $98.2bn over the next 12 months.

That’s $5.4bn more than forecast in last year’s budget.

So Victorians will rightfully question whether now is the time to be boosting the pay of the very people who got us into this mess.

If pay rises were performance based, would we be having this conversation?

In the real world, far removed from Spring St, more Victorians than ever are worrying about how to keep a roof over their heads or heat their homes.

Last week government plans to hike the cost of enacting the wills of loved ones by up to 650 per cent were revealed.

Under the government’s favoured model, the Supreme Court’s probate office will rake in more than 1000 per cent more in fees than it costs to operate.

The cost of the office is already more than covered by the existing fee structure.

But grieving families will contribute an extra $33m the fee hike raises which will then be used to fund other activities of the court.

This after the government cut funding to Court Services Victoria over the next 12 months by almost $20m in last month’s budget.

Buried in the regulatory impact statement outlining the proposal is a comment that gives a good insight into the government’s current thinking.

“Since taxpayers do not necessarily share in the substantial private benefits that Supreme Court users may obtain from accessing the services of the Supreme Court, it is also appropriate that these parties make a direct contribution towards the cost of those services, through the payment of fees,” it says.

User pays, in other words.

Interesting, in the context of billions of dollars being spent on infrastructure projects many Victorians will never use.

Of course our taxes fund all manner of things we never use directly, but there is a broader benefit.

You’d think the adequate funding for the Supreme Court, fell squarely in the realm of key government responsibilities of which there is a benefit to all.

The government appears to be conceding that the court is indeed being underfunded, and some Victorians are being slugged more to address the shortfall.

One wonders where else the government might implement a greater user pays approach.

Or whether they really deserve a pay rise?

Just a sickening state of affairs.

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 1, 2024 9:43 pm

12 Senators from each state sure is a waste of money.

Agreed, but apart from that 12 from Tasmania with a population of 540,000?

I know it was supposed to give the states equality but something should have been put in to ensure some sort of distribution in relation to population.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 9:51 pm

Yes Tas is particularly outrageous.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 1, 2024 9:54 pm

Just a sickening state of affairs.

Toxic parasites trying to destroy the host while feeding of it. The host being productive Australians- farmers, tradesmen, miners- people who actually do stuff and make things.

Last edited 20 days ago by Miltonf
calli
calli
July 1, 2024 9:56 pm

Obama’s tweet supporting Joe Biden was disingenuous.

I’m shocked! James Tiberius Kirk style shocked!

How could such a statesman lie? Impossible!

IMG_1950
Colonel Crispin Berka
Colonel Crispin Berka
July 1, 2024 10:00 pm

I don’t think Weird Al should have agreed to do this.

Deja Vu (But Worse) – Biden vs. Trump ft. “Weird Al” Yankovic
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fNWHbnIn0g

cohenite
July 1, 2024 10:08 pm

Some white supremacy; the 7′ tall black guy kicks in the hotel doors, is offended when a couple of fat maintenance guys look at him until the 5′ Hispanic security guy comes in and belts the shit out of him:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yIb9lZcZKY

Rosie
Rosie
July 1, 2024 10:11 pm
Crossie
Crossie
July 1, 2024 10:12 pm

But no worries, that hideous skank pelosi reckons it’s Trump who’s demented:

I saw that, and while spouting off her accusations Pelosi sounded as deranged and befuddled as Biden, slurring and repeating her words. These people are completely self-unaware.

Indolent
Indolent
July 1, 2024 10:27 pm

@Osint613

### IDF AIRSTRIKE ELIMINATES KEY PALESTINIAN ISLAMIC JIHAD COMMANDER IN TULKAREM

– The IDF confirms an airstrike in the Nur Shams camp in Tulkarem, West Bank, killing a Palestinian Islamic Jihad commander.

– Saeed Jaber, identified by Islamic Jihad as a prominent leader and one of the founders of its local wing in Tulkarem, was targeted.

– Jaber was responsible for several shooting and explosive device attacks against troops and civilians, according to the IDF and Shin Bet.

– He was considered the second in command by IDF sources.

– The targeted home was used by several Islamic Jihad operatives responsible for attacks on the West Bank security barrier, including the town of Bat Hefer.

– The operatives were linked to the killing of Amnon Muchtar in a terror attack in Qalqilya last weekend.

– The home was used for planning terror attacks, building explosive devices, and providing cover for wanted Palestinians, according to the IDF.

Indolent
Indolent
July 1, 2024 10:29 pm

Victor Davis Hanson

The Lies We Have Lived Through

Lysnader
Lysnader
July 1, 2024 10:31 pm

Thought we’d take the kids up to Mt Macedon, late. It was minus 3! Could do with some globull warming!!!

Indolent
Indolent
July 1, 2024 10:50 pm
Lysander
Lysander
July 1, 2024 10:52 pm

Tomorrow we will do a tour of the swamp called the Victorian Parliament; where I once worked as a certified Trotskist.

I’ve always publicly shared here that I worked for several Labor MPs (later LNP when I grew up) but I think my work with Harry Jenkins Jnr was best – whom I (now) consider the last of “rational Labor.” Also shared that I once woke up under the Speaker’s table in the Leg Assembly (it was a big night but not “A La Brucey.).

Tomorrow will be the public tour as I’m not “certified” any more (get it?).

Limited chance for me to respond here; sorry comrades as am busy (on holidays) every day here. And where we are tonight is minus three so even difficult to have a red and a cigar outside…

What sux is I have to be here again in three works for work…ugh…

Muddy
Muddy
July 1, 2024 11:04 pm

The Montevideo Maru being mentioned, we might also spare a thought for the peace of mind of the crew aboard the USS Sturgeon who had to live with the knowledge that they unintentionally were responsible for the death of just over 1,000 allies. How cruel a burden that must have been.

Lysander
Lysander
July 1, 2024 11:17 pm

Final comment before bed: Tis lovely posting at 11pm here.

Since, when posting at 11pm from Perf just about every single Cat has gone to bed and I can’t respond until I get into the office (circa 830am but already 1030 AEST!) ?

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 1, 2024 11:28 pm

Great summary.

—-

Mark Dice:

Democrats Problems Getting WORSE! haha!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxLvuQ04oWM

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 1, 2024 11:33 pm

I know it was supposed to give the states equality but something should have been put in to ensure some sort of distribution in relation to population.

Places so small in population as Tasmania shouldn’t really be states – should be amalgamated with another.

Um, Victoria?

As you were!

m0nty
July 1, 2024 11:59 pm

Oh but it could. It most certainly could have been prevented, with a simple philosophy:

Do. Not. Let. 70. Year. Olds. On. Roofs.

With the proviso that I do not have complete information about the exact timeline of events last Thursday, I do know roughly who was where and when. It is a complicated chain of events to piece together. My wife and I happened to be at a parent-teacher interview, and heard the crash outside.

I later witnessed the ambos working on him. I doubt I will ever forget the scene. I can’t stop thinking about it, actually.

A life has been ruined through a stupid accident. I hope no more lives are ruined in the aftermath.

m0nty
July 2, 2024 12:08 am

Still on the teacher tragedy, I know several of you lot want to blame the regulatory state for adding to the trauma of those involved by seeking to lay blame, but duty of care was originally a common law concept, not legislative. I remember learning about Donoghue v Stevenson as many of you would have, the oldsnail in the bottle of ginger beer trick. That was back in 1932.

Regulations of WorkSafe and other such institutions are merely following through on rights originated and developed in common law. This is not part of the culture war. Regular people deserve rights too.

Zatara
Zatara
July 2, 2024 12:18 am
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 12:30 am

Regulations of WorkSafe and other such institutions are merely following through on rights originated and developed in common law. This is not part of the culture war. Regular people deserve rights too.

So they should throw the book at the Principal and the OH&S Committee then?

Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 2, 2024 12:37 am

Some conflict here, which one to run with, this:

A life has been ruined through a stupid accident. I hope no more lives are ruined in the aftermath.

or this:

Regulations of WorkSafe and other such institutions are merely following through on rights originated and developed in common law.

So confusing!

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 12:39 am

Zatara
 July 2, 2024 12:18 am

When Biden has lost Cenk Uygar…

This is a double edged sword.
Not only does Bunter make stacks of dough when the Big Guy is in the Big Chair.
If daddy goes, Bunter’s odds of being convicted of real felonies (as opposed to Trumped up felonies) increase exponentially.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 12:40 am

m0nty
 July 2, 2024 12:35 am

 Reply to  Sancho Panzer

I don’t think any of it was their fault. The deceased man made a poor decision. He knew the risks but chose to ignore them.

According to your old mate: “Shit happens.”

I repeat.
That is not what Industrial Manslaughter laws say.
Those running the school are legally (and now criminally) liable.
Stiff shit for the principal and their Safety Committee but that is Dan’s Law.
They are just going to have to suck it up.
Are you on the Parent’s Committee m0nster?
Maybe you should get a lawyer.

Last edited 20 days ago by Sancho Panzer
Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 2, 2024 12:41 am

He knew the risks but chose to ignore them.

Industrial manslaughter laws allow no such loophole for reckless behaviour.

calli
calli
July 2, 2024 1:27 am

Just saw a chyron on BBC stating that “Trump partially immune from prosecution”.

This story will develop later today, no doubt

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 2, 2024 1:39 am

This’ll work – just tell the beak you can’t appear!

Former Darwin real estate agent Suzi Milgate leaves local court

Realtor Suzi Milgate declared herself unfit to continue legal proceedings as she made a surprising exit from the Darwin Local Court. Read what happened.

Former Darwin real estate agent Suzi Milgate has sensationally walked out of her latest court appearance after declaring herself unfit to carry out legal proceedings.

The realtor was facing charges of aggravated assault and using a carriage service to harass after she allegedly thrust a crepe into then chief minister Natasha Fyles’ face at the Nightcliff Markets in 2023.

The case was listed for a hearing on July 9, however she called for a psychiatric report to be made showing she was unfit for the date.

Prosecutor Deborah Mandie said the form had not been written in affidavit format, nor had it been sworn to.

“On the last occasion the psychiatric issue was raised for the first time and the court allowed some time for Ms Milgate to get the material she needed,” Ms Mandie said.

“I’ve read through it and all I can take from it is that there’s stress and anxiety in relation to this matter. I have no doubt about that.

“The prosecution wants to be accommodating, there’s no interest in running an unfair trial.

“I found out today the only email we were ever given (for the defendant) is no longer in commission, so we’ve given her a hard copy and have found her new email address.”

However, Ms Milgate, representing herself, said she was unfit to continue with the case and left the court without making a further submission.

She was joined in court by several supporters, including Darwin councillor Amye Un.

“I am appearing out of deference to the court, I am not fit to continue with this,” Ms Milgate said.

“I will now leave and would like it written of any decisions made here in my absence.”

Chief Judge Elizabeth Morris warned the defendant that if she left a warrant would have to be issued, to which Ms Milgate reiterated she could not continue with the process.

The realtor then left claiming “there’s no psychiatrics here in Darwin, not even a waiting list, you have to be sent down south”.

Ms Morris did not issue a warrant, however did vacate the upcoming hearing date and instead adjourned her case to the mental health list on July 25.

NT News

KevinM
KevinM
July 2, 2024 3:36 am

This is rather long so scroll if not interested. I am interested in all sort of mysteries including abandoned ships where no reason can be found and the crew vanished, this is one of them and why it’s interesting is that it happened relatively recently, in the 1920s with radio communication common.

Another is the Octavius in the 1700 hundreds, look it up if you feel like it.
There are quite a few more notables.

———————————-

Most of us have heard various legends of ghost ships, chief among them stories like that of the Flying Dutchman.
But far fewer realize that there really were cases of ships found completely abandoned at sea with no obvious indication of what happened to their crew.
Here then is one that is locally famous where I grew up, the Carroll A. Deering an American five-masted schooner launched in 1919 and found run aground with no sign of it’s crew off Cape Hatteras, NC, in January of 1921.

The Deering left Rio in South America on a routine voyage to Norfolk Va on December 2, 1920 commanded by Captain Willis B. Wormell. Wormell had been a last minute recruitment to command the ship since her regular Captain had recently become seriously ill at the start of the previous voyage. When the ship stopped for supplies in Barbados.

Her first Mate a man named McLellan got drunk in town and complained to Captain Hugh Norton of the sailing vessel Snow that he could not discipline the crew without his captain interfering, and that he had to do all the navigation owing to his captain’s poor eyesight.

Later, Captain Norton, his first mate, and another captain were in the Continental Café and heard McLellan say, “I’ll get Captain Wormell before we get to Norfolk, I will.” McLellan was arrested in a drunken state, but on January 9 Wormell forgave him, bailed him out of jail, and set sail for Norfolk.

The ship was next sighted by the lightship off Cape Look Out, NC on January 28, 1921, when the Deering hailed it. The lightship’s keeper, Captain Jacobson, reported that a tall thin man with reddish hair and a foreign accent speaking through a megaphone told him the vessel had lost its anchors in a storm off Cape Fear and asked that the ship’s owners, the G.G. Deering Company, be notified. Jacobson took note of this, but his radio was out, so he was unable to report it.

He also noticed that the crew seemed to be “milling around” on the quarterdeck of the ship, an area where they were usually not allowed. The following afternoon, the crew of another vessel transiting the area spotted the Deering sailing a course that would take it directly onto the Diamond Shoals. They, however, saw no one on the ship’s decks and didn’t attempt to hail the schooner, assuming her crew would spot the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse or the Diamond Shoals Lightship and alter course to avoid wrecking on the shoals.

On January 31, 1921, the Deering was sighted at dawn by surfman C. P. Brady who was on lookout duty at the USCG station at Cape Hatteras. The vessel was hard aground with all sails set on the outer edge of Diamond Shoals. These shoals that extend offshore from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina have been notorious as a common site of shipwrecks for centuries and are part of the notorious Graveyard of the Atlantic. Rescue ships were unable to approach the vessel owing to bad weather. The ship was not boarded until February 4, after being battered by the surf for several days, and it became clear that the schooner had been completely abandoned.

Her steering equipment was found to be damaged, with the wheel shattered, the binnacle box stove in, and the rudder disengaged from its stock. The ship’s log and navigation equipment were gone, along with the crew’s personal effects and the ship’s two lifeboats. In the vessel’s galley it appeared that certain foodstuffs were being prepared for the next day’s meal at the time of the abandonment. Salvage of the Deering was attempted, but found to be impossible and the vessel was declared a hazard to navigation. She was demolished in place using dynamite on March 4 to prevent her from becoming a danger to other vessels.

None of the crew or officers were ever seen or heard from again and what happened to them remains a mystery to this day.

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Tom
Tom
July 2, 2024 4:00 am
Tom
Tom
July 2, 2024 4:01 am
Tom
Tom
July 2, 2024 4:02 am
Tom
Tom
July 2, 2024 4:03 am
Tom
Tom
July 2, 2024 4:03 am
Tom
Tom
July 2, 2024 4:04 am
Tom
Tom
July 2, 2024 4:05 am
Tom
Tom
July 2, 2024 4:06 am
Tom
Tom
July 2, 2024 4:06 am
Beertruk
Beertruk
July 2, 2024 4:46 am

Tim Blair in today’s Tele:

THE LIE THAT JOE’S RUINED MIND COULD JUST NOT HIDE
TIM BLAIR

2 Jul 2024

Reactions to Joe Biden’s catastrophic mental meltdown during last week’s presidential debate fall into three main camps.
 
You’ve got your “no surprises here” team, who’ve been watching the US President decline year by year since before he even took office. Among this bunch, previously smeared as conspiracy theorists, Biden malfunction clips have been shared so frequently that last week’s debacle was just another episode in a long-running series.

Then you’ve got your fake-shocked media, who’ve been downplaying Biden’s hopeless blunders for decades and now have to pretend that their man’s complete collapse, broadcast live to the world, somehow came out of nowhere.

Why, Biden’s always seemed so fit and strong, and he falls down those stairs so healthily!

And lastly, we’ve got the outright reality-deniers who insist that despite his obvious infirmity, at least Biden is at heart a decent fellow who – unlike terrible Trump, curse his wicked cognitive clarity – would never stoop to lie.

Except he would and routinely does, at just about every opportunity. And last week’s debate featured the brazen repeat of a particularly wicked lie upon which Biden’s entire wreckage of a presidency was based.

It all began five years ago, when Biden cited a deadly 2017 conflict in Charlottesville, Virginia, as his primary reason for launching a presidential bid.

Specifically, Biden cited President Trump’s words following that conflict, which was provoked by the proposed removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee. All manner of people were involved, from murderous racial extremists and anti-Semites to local residents and other normals.

“That’s when we heard the words from the president of the United States that stunned the world and shocked the conscience of this nation,” Biden claimed, noting that Trump had said that there were “some very fine people on both sides”.

As Biden framed Trump’s remarks, “both sides” meant white supremacists and their opponents. Trump, Biden continued, “assigned a moral equivalence between those spreading hate and those with the courage to stand against it”.

And so Joe found himself duty bound to defeat the president and reclaim “the soul of the nation”. But lyin’ Biden deliberately left out a key Trump line in 2019 and he left it out again in last week’s debate.

Yes, Trump said that there were “some very fine people on both sides” of the statue removal debate. And just 154 words later, during the same press conference, he said this: “I’m not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned totally – but you had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists, okay?”

Trump specifically excluded white extremists from his “fine people” observation. Biden launched his presidential bid off the back of a lie.

It’s fitting that in last week’s disastrous debate, should it signal the end of Biden’s rule, this destructive and deceitful president again raved about Charlottesville. This time there were more Nazis and less coherence. Let’s go to the transcript:

“What got me involved to run in the first place after my son had died, I decided – in Iraq – because of Iraq, I said, I wasn’t going to run again.”
(We interrupt the president to indicate another lie. Beau Biden did not die in or because of Iraq. He died in an American hospital from brain cancer. Back to the tape.)

“Until I saw what happened in Charlottesville, Virginia, people coming out of the woods carrying swastikas on torches – torches and singing the same anti-Semitic bile they sang when – back in Germany …

“What American president would ever say Nazis coming out of fields, carrying torches, singing the same anti-Semitic bile, carrying swastikas, were fine people?”

Not Trump, that’s for sure, who condemned “neo-Nazis and the white nationalists” from the outset.

Interestingly, just a few days prior to the debate, left-leaning fact-checker site Snopes belatedly turned its attention to the elderly “fine people” hoax.

“No, Trump Did Not Call Neo-Nazis and White Supremacists ‘Very Fine People’,” the site announced, apparently following some seven years of investigation.

Perhaps that post went up as a hint to Biden that he shouldn’t get himself caught in another lie.

If so, Joe didn’t get the memo. Judging by debate footage, he also didn’t get any memos about staring into space, leaving his mouth hang open and rambling about rape.

“Here’s the deal,” Biden said.

“There’s a lot of young women being raped by their in-laws, by their spouses, brothers and sisters, it’s just ridiculous and they can do nothing about, they try to arrest them when they cross state lines.”

The next debate is scheduled for September 10. Don’t bet on it.

Beertruk
Beertruk
July 2, 2024 5:15 am

Today’s Tele:

ASSANGE IS A HORROR SHOW FOR ALBANESE AND OUR ALLIES

JAMES – BROWN
2 Jul 2024
 
Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, Foreign Minister Penny Wong and a gaggle of parliamentary crossbenchers last week celebrated the return to Australia of Julian Assange, a felon who aided and abetted democracy’s enemies.

US ambassador Kevin Rudd and UK high commissioner Steven Smith posed alongside Assange on his flight home. For our US allies who sought for years to bring Assange to justice, it would have been galling.

And even more galling for the men and women of our Australian Defence Force. Around the same time that Chelsea Manning was flirting with Julian Assange and WikiLeaks, I was working in Afghanistan with special forces and intelligence personnel trying to stop terrorist attacks on the capital, Kabul.

The secret network where Manning obtained official files was our main communication line between units working against the Taliban and Islamic extremists.

When Assange posted those files publicly, he exposed our methods, our interests, our priorities, our processes and capabilities. It was like providing a road map for the worst enemies of democracy.
 
WikiLeaks revealed young democracy activists who met with US diplomats. It took away their anonymity and put their lives at risk. Make no mistake, despite the curated words of a US judge in Saipan, lives were ruined or ended by Assange’s reckless indifference.

Though he was awarded a special Walkley, Julian Assange is no journalist. He is no editor. He is at very best a publisher. He is certainly no hero.

When the Howard government secured the release of David Hicks in 2007, there was no high-fiving or hugs. By contrast, Prime Minister Albanese made the deliberate choice to drape himself in Assange.

We can only wonder what the young airmen and airwomen of the Royal Australian Air Force’s 34 VIP Squadron made of such a triumphant homecoming for a traitor.

Prime Minister Albanese couldn’t stand up when Australian navy divers were attacked by China, when academic Yang Hengjun was imprisoned by China, or when journalist Cheng Lei was intimidated by thugs in our own parliament last week. But for a treasonous celebrity with 5.2 million Twitter followers and celebrity lawyers, Prime Minister Albanese gave his all.

How can the men and women of the Australian Defence Force have faith in a commander in chief who celebrates a man who sought to undermine the security of our deployed soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan?

How can our most important ally trust Australia with its most sensitive military secrets, when our national leader cheers someone who works against US security interests?

Prime Minister Albanese stood up for Assange in a way he never has for the men and women of the ADF. That error of judgment will reverberate through Canberra and beyond.

James Brown served in the Australian Defence Force

Hicks should have been left to rot in the slammer where he belongs.

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 5:20 am

Canadian indigenous see Israel as the wronged party despite the-‘palestinians’ were here first narrative that seems to have ‘blak’ activists in Australia arm in arm with islam.
https://x.com/IndigenousCFI/status/1807544168174223787?t=mSy_8cKuQ3mkVuwUT6K7Eg&s=19

Beertruk
Beertruk
July 2, 2024 5:31 am

Meanwhile also in today’s Tele:

GULF WAR HOSTAGES SUE UK GOVT

2 Jul 2024

LONDON: Passengers and crew of a British Airways flight who were taken hostage in Kuwait in 1990 have launched legal action against the UK government and the airline.

People were taken off the Kuala Lumpur-bound plane when it landed in Kuwait on August 2, hours after Iraq’s leader Saddam Hussein had invaded. Some of the 367 passengers and crew spent more than four months in captivity, including as human shields against Western attacks during the first Gulf war.

Ninety-four of them have filed a civil claim at the High Court in London, accusing Britain’s government and BA of “deliberately endangering” civilians, their lawyers said.

“All of the claimants suffered severe physical and psychiatric harm during their ordeal, the consequences of which are still felt today. ”The action claims the government and the airline “knew the invasion had started” but allowed the flight to land.

They did so because the flight was used to “insert a covert special ops team into occupied Kuwait”, the lawyers said.

British government files revealed the UK’s ambassador to Kuwait told London about an invasion before the flight landed but the message was not passed on to BA.

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 5:42 am

In case people didn’t see this at CLs.
I’m at a loss as to why a US president can’t query the validity of an election result.
That isnt unprecedented.
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/ng-interactive/2024/jul/01/supreme-court-decision-trump-immunity-ruling

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 5:49 am

I appreciate that Monty sees a particular incident through a normal person’s eyes.
Now he might empathise with the cat world view of government overreach.
Nah I don’t think so either.
There is probably specific legislation setting out how stray sporting equipment may be retrieved from rooftops, if not the Allen government will quickly rush some through, with severe penalties for non compliance.
May the unfortunate gentleman rest in peace.

Zatara
Zatara
July 2, 2024 5:52 am

“Trump partially immune from prosecution”.

SCOTUS has found that the President is immune from any official acts taken while in office.

The fun part is going to be determining what is official and what is not, which the lower courts will now take a crack at on remand. They will get it wrong of course and it will be back before SCOTUS in a year or two.

Meanwhile, it’s extremely unlikely that Trump will face another court before the election.

Beertruk
Beertruk
July 2, 2024 6:10 am

Ooohh…nice…

In the Paywallion today:

Supreme Court deals blow to Trump’s prosecution, ruling he has broad immunity
JESS BRAVIN
2 Jul 2024

he Supreme Court dealt a major blow to Donald Trump’s prosecution on charges he sought to subvert the 2020 election, ruling 6-3 Monday that former presidents enjoy sweeping immunity for their acts while in office.

The president “may not be prosecuted for exercising his core constitutional powers, and he is entitled, at a minimum, to a presumptive immunity from prosecution for all his official acts,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court, joined in whole or part by Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett.

The court on its own threw out parts of the prosecution’s case against Trump, including on his alleged efforts to use the Justice Department to advance his unsubstantiated claims of election fraud and submit slates of false electors to replace those President Biden won.

The ideologically divided decision didn’t kill the prosecution entirely, with the chief justice saying a president “enjoys no immunity for unofficial acts, and not everything the President does is official.”

Still, for parts of the case that remain, the court added so many new conditions for federal prosecutors that it could be virtually impossible to hold a trial before Election Day – if ever. The chief justice’s opinion erects new hurdles for the prosecution that may be difficult to clear. For example, the court said that, when attempting to distinguish Trump’s official acts from unofficial ones, judges can’t inquire into Trump’s motives. And he said prosecutors can’t use Trump’s official acts as evidence to support claims that he committed a crime with unofficial ones.

The decision effectively gave Trump nearly everything he could have hoped for, a victory the presumptive Republican presidential nominee quickly celebrated.

“Big win for our Constitution and democracy. Proud to be an American!” Trump, using all capital letters, wrote on his social-media platform.

The court’s liberal justices could barely contain their outrage. The decision “makes a mockery of the principle, foundational to our Constitution and system of Government, that no man is above the law,” Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote in dissent, joined by Justices Elena Kagan and Ketanji Brown Jackson.

“With fear for our democracy, I dissent,” she wrote.

The Biden campaign said Monday’s decision “doesn’t change the facts, so let’s be very clear about what happened on Jan. 6: Donald Trump snapped after he lost the 2020 election and encouraged a mob to overthrow the results.” Trump “thinks he’s above the law and is willing to do anything to gain and hold onto power for himself,” the statement said.

The court previously has handed Trump victories in two separate cases stemming from his followers’ Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol, where they sought to stop Congress from certifying Biden’s victory.

On Friday, the court narrowed the scope of an obstruction charge federal prosecutors have filed against Jan. 6 rioters as well as Trump himself. The justices found that the offence was limited to interference with documents and other things required by an official proceeding – not obstructing an actual meeting of Congress. Lower courts will have to sort out the opinion’s impact on the Jan. 6 prosecutions.

That followed the court’s March decision restoring Trump’s eligibility for the Colorado ballot, after that state’s highest court disqualified the Republican candidate under a constitutional provision that bars former officeholders who engaged in insurrection or rebellion from future office. The Supreme Court said that states lacked authority to enforce the Reconstruction-era clause against federal candidates.

While Monday’s decision is sure to colour perceptions of Trump’s potential criminality, it is also bound to affect public opinion of the court. Three Trump appointees sit on the nine-member court, where their votes have cemented historic victories for long-sought conservative goals, from the 2022 decision overruling Roe v. Wade to another ruling Friday that overturned a Reagan-era precedent requiring judicial deference to executive-branch agencies when the law is ambiguous.

But no case to date has put Trump’s personal interests so directly in the hands of the justices he appointed – and from whom he has expected a sympathetic hearing. Moreover, two other justices have familial ties to Trump’s cause – Justice Clarence Thomas’s wife, Ginni Thomas, urged White House officials to take steps to block Biden from taking office; Justice Samuel Alito’s wife, Martha-Ann Alito, flew flags at the couple’s homes like those carried by Jan. 6 rioters, the justice has said.

However iron-clad the legal rationales behind their votes, the justices’ actions cannot avoid being viewed in the context of such connections.

Trump has been indicted in four different cases, two at the federal level by special counsel Jack Smith. The case before the high court involved perhaps the most serious charges: allegations by Smith that Trump participated in an illegal scheme whose aim was to deny Biden the victory he won on Election Day 2020.

Under a Justice Department policy, sitting presidents can’t be prosecuted for violating federal law, while a 1981 Supreme Court precedent held that former presidents can’t be sued by private parties over their official acts while in office. Trump, who denies wrongdoing across the board, argued that similar immunity should insulate him from standing trial for crimes he allegedly committed as president.

By pursuing the immunity argument, Trump derailed, at least temporarily, the spectacle of trial in federal court. The appeal froze the prosecution and forced U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan to scratch a trial that had been scheduled to begin March 4.

At the Supreme Court, Trump’s lawyers argued that without immunity for their official acts, presidents would be hamstrung from taking bold action in the national interest for fear that such decisions could be prosecuted as crimes by subsequent administrations. The special counsel contended that such fears were overblown because of internal safeguards within the Justice Department and the independent check on prosecutorial overreach that grand juries and federal courts provide.

Both sides pointed to the unprecedented nature of the Trump prosecution for support: The ex-president argued that Smith had broken a tradition of not charging former presidents with crimes. The special counsel countered that no president who lost re-election before had broken the law to block the transfer of power.

The charges against Trump, handed up by a federal grand jury in August 2023, include using dishonesty and fraud to obstruct the electoral process and conspiring to deny citizens’ rights to have their votes counted.
Chutkan rejected Trump’s immunity claim in December, a decision upheld in February by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. From the start, however, Trump’s attorneys placed hope in the Supreme Court.

Trump’s team contended that the most serious allegations he faces, including pressuring state officials and Vice President Mike Pence to participate in the scheme to retain power, should be classified as official actions beyond the reach of the law.

At oral arguments in April, justices in the court’s conservative majority said little about the allegations against Trump. The hearing instead focused on speculative risks to future presidents from bad-faith prosecutors who theoretically could bedevil a former chief executive with partisan grudges dressed up as criminal charges.

Should Trump prevail in November, upon return to the White House he could order the federal charges against him withdrawn or attempt to pardon himself for past crimes, ending both the Washington case and separate charges Smith filed in Florida alleging Trump illegally took national-security documents from the White House when leaving office in 2021 and refused to turn them over when requested by federal officials. State proceedings against Trump could also freeze, based on the constitutional supremacy of federal law over those enforced by the states.

Dow Jones

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
July 2, 2024 6:28 am

Cohenite: Biden is the liar.

Anyone who knows of Trump’s deep patriotic admiration for the US Military and that it is reciprocated – they love him too – would know that the slur about Trump calling deceased military members “suckers and losers” is a fabrication. Biden has never show any genuine appreciation of the Military, nor they for him. Own goal by Biden.

Re Charlottesville – Trump was giving due regard to the fact that long ago a Civil War had been fought between the north and the south, and that good people were found on both sides. He deplored white supremacists as Nazis. Another lie about Trump by the Biden camp.

Biden’s entry into this debate as he shuffled up to the lectern started with an outright lie about Trump. He declared that Trump told people to use bleach to fight Covid. This is twisting words and context, which is constantly done to Trump by anti-Trumpers. Trump used a layman’s metaphor, that bleach killed pathogens, simply saying that scientists who sought an antidote or vaccine that would kill Covid were also searching for a good killing substance. He did NOT say that bleach would be that substance.

They make up lies about Trump. Then they call that Trump lying.
Their lies about Trump are as believable as their lies about Biden when they claim against all evidence that Biden is fully compos mentis.

It’s Democrat culture. Lying’s ok for the cause. As the IDF, borne of long experience, have always said about the Gazan and other Muslims they deal with – ‘the first thing you have to understand about these people is that they lie’. Taqiya. It’s cultural. Democrat culture is equally compromised.

Zatara
Zatara
July 2, 2024 6:37 am

In EU news: Viktor Orban, the hard-core conservative Prime Minister of Hungary, takes over as President of the EU today (it is filled on a rotational basis).

He vows to “Make Europe Great Again”.

Rockdoctor
Rockdoctor
July 2, 2024 6:57 am

I’m not criticising the principle of OH&S but it has become like government an al consuming behemoth of a blob.

OH&S has gone past the point of ensuring safe workplaces in my view to small change these days and I work in a high risk industry. Most of it is arse covering now for SSE’s & senior management in light of the increasing penalties like fines, industrial manslaughter that I also note has a 2 tier enforcement when it comes to the government. I won’t even mention the wall to wall ads pushing compo by slugs & grubs or other associated pettifoggers on daytime tv.

Big companies can absorb these costs, smaller competitors can’t. Otherwise you would see more protest from the boardrooms about.

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 2, 2024 7:02 am

Who’s Behind This Show?
Read a hard hitting article at American Thinker that lays into the deceit that has been perpetrated on the American people, who are now entitled to be mad as hell and not take it any more!
My question, however, is that since we knew all along, since before the fiasco of 2020, that things were being run badly and the people behind the curtain were not nice, how have all those Americans not noticed until now?
https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2024/07/who_s_behind_this_show.html

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 2, 2024 7:03 am

Ball goes up on the school roof? As a nipper we’d lift the smallest kid on to the prefabs. On the janitors shed, climb up from the toilets then onto the roof. The gym roof, get the long rickety wooden ladder from behind the janitors shed with 4 kids trying to put it up without breaking the windows then get the ball. Never did any kids hurt themselves. One old fart doesn’t look what he’s doing and its all over red rover.

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 2, 2024 7:03 am

High quality trolling from Victor Orban, who has promised to Make Europe Great Again.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
July 2, 2024 7:06 am

We have a leaking flat roof over the room built on to our terrace. The roof has a very poor level of slope. One roofer hasn’t managed to fix the problem and we called another to advise on resetting the whole camber with a new roof. The man who turned up was a spry 72 year old, Hairy’s age. He clambered up the fairly easy internal access to the roof which is on the third floor of our building and said he could use ‘an old roofer’s trick’ to effect a resolution without replacing the whole roof. Ok, we said to his quote, go ahead. It’s a job basically on a flat roof with easy access. We are loathe though to mention another leak, on the front of the building around an Art Deco parapet, for the access there is either on a perilous ladder fixed from our front porch across a three story drop, or he walks right across the roof from the other side in order to get to the job. Both seem like the sort of thing no 72 year old should attempt, so we might give him a miss on that one. We’ll call the first roofer back for that, as although he doesn’t have the same experience and smarts, he’s forty years younger and steadier. My nerves couldn’t cope with the old bloke up there.

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 7:06 am

“And then I said, supposing you brought the light inside the body, which you can do either through the skin or in some other way, and I think you said you’re going to test that, too. It sounds interesting. And then I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in a minute. One minute. And is there a way we can do something like that, by injection inside or almost a cleaning. Because you see it gets in the lungs, and it does a tremendous number on the lungs. So it would be interesting to check that.””
So what?
People use disinfectant to clean wounds, a layman spitballing it might be possible to kill the virus by direct application of something internally is not the shock horror his political opponents claim.
I remember numbers delightedly claiming a death had occurred as the result of this comment. Turned out it was a Garden variety murder.
And who knows what medical technology advances will come up with in the future?
It’s like eating a raw onion, just because someone makes a big deal about something, doesn’t mean it’s a big deal.
It’s narrative creation.
https://www.politico.com/news/2021/04/23/trump-bleach-one-year-484399

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 2, 2024 7:08 am

If Democrats were “panicked” by the debate, the head explosions after the Supreme Court’s immunity judgement will light up the sky.
It’s hard for the left to accept that conservative judges tend to make decisions based on the law rather than “the feelz”. They are already taking frothing bites out of the carpet and ranting about Trump’s Supreme Court.

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 7:15 am

Dems didn’t like Trump speaking off the cuff ‘winding stream of consciousness’ but Biden’s bizzare disconnected incoherent ramblings are just fine.
I’d prefer both candidates were significantly younger because everyone declines as they age, no pretending otherwise. Biden is cooked, Trump is nothing like as bad.
Trump definitely needs a Vivek or a Ron beside him.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 2, 2024 7:39 am

I think Don will wait for next time as he’s still young. Vivek is best choice but maybe better for AG. He’ll go after the demonrats and not give a toss about what they say. Definitely Presidential material.

Cassie of Sydney
July 2, 2024 7:43 am

Last night I happened to view the Marxist Victorian government’s sinister advertisement, where a very ugly cock in frock creep steps into a lift with a solo woman, and the woman walks out due to fear and trepidation at the sight that has just entered into the lift. The advertisement is trying to tell women they should not feel fear, that such a situation is quite normal and worse, women should not trust their intuition. I was gobsmacked at the gaslighting and the scene reminded me of something I’d see way back, the scene from that great Brian De Palma film….

Dressed to Kill

The scene is reversed, where a woman (played by Angie Dickinson) steps into an ‘elevator’ and the cock in frock is already in there. Angie Dickinson’s end is not pleasant.

Boambee John
Boambee John
July 2, 2024 7:46 am

Fascinating to watch mUntyfa reversing course on over the top health and safety regulation by a domineering state, but only when someone he knows will be affected.

Laws for thee, but not for he and his maaaaaates.

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 2, 2024 8:05 am

The usual media suspects wetting themselves over the swing to the right in France. Now it’s enough to oppose illegal immigration and want a strengthening of law and order to be termed “extreme right”.

shatterzzz
July 2, 2024 8:05 am

Moove over Harry Potter the 251s had “wizards” 1st ..
A bit ” fat on a stick does a “sacred” site make .. lotza plastic bottle “bongs” and used needles around this “houso” estate so I’m guessin’ we is also a ‘sacred” estate LOL!

?The fat-smeared stick is] stuck slanting in the ground before a fire, and it is of course placed in such a position that by-and-by it falls down. The wizard has during this time been singing his charm; as it is usually expressed, he ‘sings the man’s name,’ and when the stick falls the charm is complete. The practice still exists.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2024-07-02/gunaikurnai-ritual-fireplaces-sticks-cloggs-cave-archaeology/104034756

shatterzzz
July 2, 2024 8:12 am

This needz a Royal Commission! .. Tasmania Parks & Wildlife mob using slave labour .. FFS!
?Lotza whinge-ing over doing a “jerb” no mention of being paid or free to leave .. SAD!
?FREE THESE SLAVES NOW..!
?https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-07-02/tasmanias-show-caves-cleaned-marakoopa-king-solomons/103987110

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 2, 2024 8:25 am

Daily Telegraph with Clare Armstrong reporting:

Labor’s unwavering antinuclear stance is at odds with left-wing political parties abroad investing in reactors to reach net zero, amid warnings the approach jeopardises Australia’s climate goals.

Pro-nuclear experts say the “rigidity” of the Albanese Government’s nuclear opposition is a risk to Australia’s green transition, as many of Labor’s political counterparts in Europe signal plans to build more reactors to reach net zero emissions by 2050.

UK Labour’s Keir Starmer has described nuclear power as a “critical part” of Britain’s energy mix and has promised to extend the lifetime of existing plants and get new reactors “over the line”.

In its “manifesto” outlining policies for the July 1 general election, Labour has pledged to end the “dithering” on nuclear power and ensure the “long-term security of the sector”.

Construction of additional reactors is currently underway in France and Slovakia, while several other European nations, including Finland, have plans to build more.

Former chief of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) Adi Paterson said the nation’s antinuclear stance had been driven by “completely understandable” historical context, such as opposition to nuclear weapons testing in the Pacific, related ecological concerns and Cold War fears.

But he said this lead to a “radical oversimplification” of the nuclear energy debate, which “crystallised” a “long term rigidity” on the issue within the Left faction of the Labor Party.

“Labor Party insight into nuclear power has been corrupted by the structures they have, because they have isolated the Right and lost touch with the sectors where people make things with machines,” he said.

Mr Paterson said across Europe nations aspiring to have a low carbon grid had accepted the need for nuclear as a source of baseload power to support the net zero transition.

“There is no pathway to net zero with wind and solar … as we can’t scale the batteries to get there,” he said.

Australian Nuclear Association vice president Robert Parker said the UK has always had a more bipartisan position on the technology, but Australia was held back by polarised politics.

“People who are advocating nuclear, are not advocating for it as an absolute, but as an optimum mix with renewables,” he said.

“But in a polar argument that nuance is lost.”

Mr Parker said Labor’s approach in Australia was also impacted by the threat to its inner city electorates from the Greens, who are “fiercely antinuclear”.

A spokesman for Climate Change and Energy Minister Chris Bowen said nuclear power was “too expensive and too slow” for Australia, noting every country in the world with reactors had experienced “massive cost blowouts and delays”.

“Even supporters of nuclear energy in other countries like Bill Gates and the IEA say it is the wrong answer for Australia,” he said.

In the UK, Britain’s first new reactor in a generation, Hinkley Point C, has suffered a cost blowout of 30 per cent to about $62 billion while its delivery time of 2027 has been pushed out to the 2030s.

Construction on new reactors in France and Slovakia has also been hampered by soaring costs and time delays.

Governed by spineless squibs. But you know that.

bons
bons
July 2, 2024 8:29 am

I have just had a roof painted.

No big deal except that it was a big job.

When the job was completed I slung the traditional slab of beer to the painter.

He sat on the step of his van and drank four before climbing behind the wheel with a fifth in his hand.

I was so stunned I forgot to ring the police.

shatterzzz
July 2, 2024 8:30 am

Gotta luv “clickbait” .. I’m guessin’ the “observation” platform ain’t too high up the mountain .. no oxygen aids and enuf energy to start a fight .. LOL!
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13587839/Mount-Everest-Couples-brawl-petty-argument.html

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 8:30 am

“Construction on new reactors in France and Slovakia has also been hampered by soaring costs and time delays.”

Perfect for Australians then.
Just ask Florence.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 2, 2024 8:33 am

More meme goodness:

TWIP Special: Biden’s Monday in Pictures | Power Line

Good grief, it is only mid-day Monday out here on the left coast, but already the Biden memes are stacking up so fast that by Saturday the inventory could well exceed the capacity of our creaky website. Especially with the embarrassment of riches provided today by Vogue magazine. So here’s a special Monday edition of The Week in Pictures, and I don’t rule out a special mid-week edition as we did in the early days of Covid.

That is a certainty now that the Scotus immunity decision has dropped. The sound of head explosions is already resonating around the planet.

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
July 2, 2024 8:34 am

Runnymede 1215
”This charter from henceforth will forfend the aged scaling heights”
Baron Fitzmonty

Roger
Roger
July 2, 2024 8:43 am

True cost of renewables won’t hurt our cities – it’ll punish those we ignore most

Judith Sloan The Australian 2 July, 2024

In 2023, former chief scientist Alan Finkel wrote glowingly about “forests of wind farms carpeting hills and cliffs from sea to sky (and) endless arrays of solar panels disappearing like a mirage into the desert”. For many people, particularly those living in rural and regional areas, this sounded more like a dystopian nightmare than a desirable nirvana. And it still does, as the federal and state governments, aided by self-serving renewable energy investors, seek to override the legitimate rights of landowners and folk living in country areas.

It’s a case of sticks and carrots, with more compulsion than persuasion. There are truncated environmental approvals processes, faux consultations, staged town meetings, ministerial directives. There is talk about obtaining social licence but this is just for show.

Those directly affected by having massive turbines, fields of industrial-scale solar panels and high-voltage transmission lines on their land may be offered an annual annuity for the inconvenience subject to refraining from making any criticism of the installations or renewable energy in general. Affected neighbours may be offered small amounts of compensation, but this is also subject to a gag order. It’s hard to escape the conclusion city folk either don’t know about what has been happening in our regions or don’t care. If similar tactics were imposed on them, there would be an almighty uproar. The fact these imposed renewable energy zones – imposed at the behest of the renewable energy companies themselves – cover largely conservative seats, at federal and state level, is also an important consideration.

Economists have long understood not every private market transaction fully accounts for all the costs and benefits. The difference is referred to external costs and benefits. Of course, in the case of renewable energy investment, it is hardly a case of unfettered private transactions. Investors are given various subsidies, including the ongoing benefits of Renewable Energy Certificates as well as direct subsidies from both state and federal governments. It is an extremely featherbedded industry that would hardly exist absent this favourable treatment.

(The Prime Minister’s constant refrain that renewable energy is the cheapest form of generation is clearly tosh. If this were really the case, unassisted renewable energy would simply drive out all other forms of generation. This is clearly not the case.) The point is that the external costs imposed on rural and regional communities are overwhelmingly ignored when making the case for the expansion of renewable energy. There is no attempt to estimate the size of these external costs. This is the case in the recently released, but highly dubious, Integrated System Plan devised by the Australian Energy Market Operator.

To be sure, there is passing mention of the need to obtain social licence but it’s in the context of foisting wind farms, solar panels and new transmission lines on rural and regional communities irrespective of the preferences of the locals. The “greater good” is to reduce emissions even though the contribution of Australia, let alone any regional area, to lowering global emissions is infinitesimal.

(By the way, the recent AEMO ISP is a terrifying slanted document. It mixes up net present values with today’s capital costs; it treats the costs of all projects, current, committed and anticipated, as sunk; household costs are excluded; its assumptions about the cost of transmission are far too low. The estimated cost of $122bn to achieve net zero has zero credibility. The public should be highly concerned this agency is setting the agenda for our energy future.)

In effect, we simply expect rural and regional communities to take it on the chin, often by pitting neighbour against neighbour. There are multiple stories of communities rend asunder because of the renewable energy caravan coming to town. There is the loss of arable land, the loss of physical amenity, the loss of local flora and fauna, the massive disruption caused during the construction phase. But these issues are dramatically downplayed by the ardent advocates of renewable energy.

A similar story applies to immigration and the failure to account for its external costs, particularly in relation to housing. The proponents of large migrant intakes – and this includes the Labor government and the Coalition, at least in the past – take the view that these external costs can simply be dismissed because the benefits of immigration are so large. Dubious studies are undertaken to assess the net economic benefits of immigration but fail to account for the external costs.

It is ironic that these studies typically show only small positive net economic benefits that are generally only realised after two decades or so. It is clear, however, that the migrants themselves benefit, as do the owners of capital. Think here property developers, big business and educational institutions.

As for the external costs, there is sometimes reference to congestion, pressure on public services, loss of social cohesion and the impact on housing affordability. But it is extremely rare to see any numbers attached to these external costs because they would need to be subtracted from any estimates of the small net benefits.

Just as is the case with renewable energy, the winners from high rates of immigration, particularly the universities, think certain segments of society should simply wear these external costs because of some ill-defined greater good.

Promoting exports is a common rationale as well as bumping up the international rankings of our universities. Bear in mind here that the universities, with their substantial international student enrolments, pay no tax that might otherwise offset some of these external costs.

The link between immigration and the shortage of housing also leads directly to housing policies to which many local residents also object. High-density housing is promoted even if this involves overriding the preferences of those living in the affected areas.

The pejorative term NIMBY is used to undermine the legitimate property rights of homeowners who have purchased property along with an implicit assurance that the nature of the precinct is largely retained. Increasingly, state governments are wont to override the planning responsibilities of local governments in order to promote the type of housing that can cope with a rapidly growing population caused mainly by immigration.

In some instances, state governments have insisted that high-rise apartments are built without any carparking, leading to an explosion of cars being parked on local streets. This is another example of an external cost being imposed on residents who previously enjoyed relatively uncrowded streets.

The big picture here is that optimal government policies always require an assessment of the full costs and benefits including external costs. Increasingly, however, single-minded policies have been guided by a paternalistic view of the paths to the greater good – via promotion of renewable energy, high migrant intakes, high-density housing – with nary a thought for those adversely affected.

Indeed, in some cases, those folk hurt by the policies are denigrated in the name of ramming through bad policies. It’s only when the losers opt to fight back is there a chance of more balanced policy. The revolts we are seeing in some regional and rural areas about the placement of intrusive renewable energy installations and transmission lines may be just the beginning. Politicians may need to take heed.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 8:46 am

My nerves couldn’t cope with the old bloke up there.

Give him a break, Lizzie.
At 72, he’s 12 years younger than you.

Roger
Roger
July 2, 2024 8:47 am

In EU news: Viktor Orban, the hard-core conservative Prime Minister of Hungary, takes over as President of the EU today (it is filled on a rotational basis). He vows to “Make Europe Great Again”.

Biggest investor in Hungary?

The CCP…with strings attached.

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 8:52 am

An ouchy from Elon.
Honestly do people think Trump would turn the US into a dictatorship?
Was political debate always this mediocre?

https://x.com/elonmusk/status/1807761917274214899?t=qIuPOUs78SggPgU0MzixOA&s=19

Last edited 20 days ago by Rosie
Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 8:57 am

I think there’s a little bit of a difference between roofers with decades of experience getting across the tiles to a school teacher who happened to be 61, falling through a skylight which attempting to retrieve balls.
Don’t know whether he tripped and fell and was unlucky enough to fall through the skylight or he stepped on it and it couldn’t hold his weight.
It definitely wasn’t his natural working environment.

Indolent
Indolent
July 2, 2024 8:58 am
Roger
Roger
July 2, 2024 9:05 am

Honestly do people think Trump would turn the US into a dictatorship?

No; they fear he’ll restore the republic.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 9:06 am

Boambee John
 July 2, 2024 7:46 am

Fascinating to watch mUntyfa reversing course on over the top health and safety regulation by a domineering state, but only when someone he knows will be affected.

He hasn’t changed course.
He declares Viktorian Industrial Manslaughter laws as merely an extension of “snail in a ginger beer bottle” common law duty of care.
However, the onus is on the employer to provide a “safe workplace” and he must be omnipotent in predicting all possible hazards and employee behaviours.
Rosie indicated the deceased fell through a skylight. This is possible but I suspect it is more likely he stepped on a sheet of laserlite, which is clear or translucent polycarbonate roofing material. It is the same profile as the metal roofing but lets light through. The key thing is that is not weight bearing. Anyone with “Work at Heights” training would know this and avoid it like the plague.
The fact that an unauthorised and untrained employee got a ladder and climbed onto the roof puts the employer in the frame.
m0nster needs to accept either:-
1. Industrial Manslaughter is shit law; or
2. The school principal belongs in jail.

bons
bons
July 2, 2024 9:10 am

The Chevron Deference applies to every level of goverment in Australia.

There are no constraints upon the arrogant regulators who are confident that only the very rich can challenge their excesses. They also have the Federal Court in their corner.

Abbott made a great fuss about removing a certain number of regulations each year. As usual with Abbott it was a chimera. The PS simply removed a bunch of expired or no longer relevant regulations.

You cannot defeat these people, the only option is to defund them.

132andBush
132andBush
July 2, 2024 9:20 am

It would appear monty does not understand what we’re getting at.

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 2, 2024 9:28 am

The cheapest power option is coal. China knows this, India knows this. We should be refurbishing or even rebuilding coal fired power stations – or nuclear, but not neither.

thefrollickingmole
thefrollickingmole
July 2, 2024 9:30 am

Greatest ads of all time contender.

https://x.com/i/status/1807760173957599342

Mother Lode
Mother Lode
July 2, 2024 9:55 am

Glad to see they incorporated the Wilhelm scream, Frollicking.

Everything is more authentic for that.

johanna
johanna
July 2, 2024 9:57 am

Adam Bandt, keep mouthing off, and alienating normies:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-07-01/adam-bandt-jordon-steele-john-war-memorial/104045836

Australian Greens leader Adam Bandt has refused to answer whether vandalising the Australian War Memorial is a legitimate form of protest.
The Australian National Korean War Memorial, Australian Vietnam Forces National Memorial, and the Australian Army National Memorial were graffitied with pro-Palestine messages on Saturday night.
On Monday Greens senator Jordon Steele-John refused to support a motion from Tasmanian senator Jacqui Lambie to condemn those who desecrated the memorials.
Senator Steele-John said the Greens would not support Senator Lambie’s motion, saying war memorials were “not politically neutral spaces”.
“The Australian Constitution contains no explicit commitment to freedom of speech,” he said.
“If we are to believe that the men and women of the ADF gave their lives in wars and conflicts to defend such freedoms, then you have to engage with the reality that protesting, that painting is a form of speech.”

Please give us his address, so that a few people who have the beloved ‘passionate’ views about something can drop over and spray paint slogans on his house.

According to him, it’s a Constitutional right for anyone to spraypaint anything, anywhere, because ‘free speech.’

As with the sudden concern about pro-Palestinian thugs only when the political class is affected, he needs to experience the ‘free speech’ he is advocating, personally, good and hard.

Hold them to their own rules, folks!

Mother Lode
Mother Lode
July 2, 2024 9:59 am

I know it is bad taste, but…

“He was playing with a ball on the roof…”

I shall see myself out.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 2, 2024 10:04 am

In Austere Scholar news:

Payout, prepping for victory:

“Yesterday, the Prime Minister suspended me indefinitely from the Australian Labor Party caucus,” she said.

“Since then I have lost all contact with my caucus colleagues. I have been removed from caucus meetings, committees, internal group chats and whips bulletins. 

“I have been told to avoid all chamber duties that require a vote including divisions, motions and matters of public interest. I have been exiled.

ALP Grandee, prepping for a different victory:

Senior Labor minister Bill Shorten has hit back at claims senator Fatima Payman has been exiled from the party, saying her colleagues are simply “giving her space” instead.

“I can’t speak for how she’s feeling, that’s up to her, but I can speak towards what I see as the objective conduct of empathetic committed colleagues.

If there was ever a better time for a meteor strike on Canbra…

Digger
Digger
July 2, 2024 10:08 am

Agreed, but apart from that 12 from Tasmania with a population of 540,000?
I know it was supposed to give the states equality but something should have been put in to ensure some sort of distribution in relation to population.

I will draw everyones attention to three pertinent facts. Firstly, Tasmania is Australias second state and at 1 January, 1901 at Federation when the decisions were made this was the distribution of population in the country.

Australia total – 3,726,480.
Of these, New South Wales had 1,356,650,
Victoria 1,163,400,
Queensland 482,400,
South Australia 370,700,
Western Australia 171,030,
Tasmania 182,300.

Finally, every Tasmanian, including me with a 198 year caucasian family footprint in the state has the absolute right to equal representation in the senate.Something has been put in regarding representation by size. The legislation is determined in the House Of Representatives where Tasmania only has 5 seats and NSW has 47. When is enough, enough?

To suggest Tasmanian representation should be slashed is tantamount to bullying by size.

thefrollickingmole
thefrollickingmole
July 2, 2024 10:10 am

He declares Viktorian Industrial Manslaughter laws as merely an extension of “snail in a ginger beer bottle” common law duty of care.

Is that similar to the “slug being planted in a food business to cripple competition to the states failing version” law??
?

Eyrie
Eyrie
July 2, 2024 10:13 am

Agreed, but apart from that 12 from Tasmania with a population of 540,000?

Just make Tasmania part of Victoria. Problem solved.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 2, 2024 10:21 am

In Late Stage Gillard Redux news:
PM Anthony Albanese turns down invitation to attend NATO summit in Washington amid escalating regional tension

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has turned down an invitation to meet with world leaders at the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) summit in Washington next week.

The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Defence, Richard Marles, has confirmed he will attend the summit in place of the Prime Minister. 

While there has been no formal explanation as of Tuesday morning, the decision was reportedly made so Mr Albanese could instead focus on domestic policies.

An insider source told the Sydney Morning Herald that NATO was disappointed by the Prime Minister’s apparent refusal to attend.

“It is somewhat disappointing because this gathering of leaders will hopefully send a message that the world’s leading democracies are united,” the anonymous diplomat in Brussels said.

As a NATO partner, Australia was expected to attend the event as senior officials of the organisation have warned in recent months about a new regional threat.

Silly old NATO senior officials; don’t they realise Albanese faces a far more significant regional threat in Canbra.

We are being well serviced by our leaders.

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
July 2, 2024 10:22 am

Beautiful NW Tassie turned into a foreign carpet baggers industrial zone.
https://www.renewableenergyzones.tas.gov.au/
Silent Spring delivered by means of green policy.

m0nty
July 2, 2024 10:29 am

I can confirm that Mr Hogan stepped through a laserlight, not a skylight.

To clarify, I do not begrudge WorkSafe their role, nor the cops, nor the coroner. They are just doing their jobs and, while it adds to the short-term trauma of friends and colleagues to be investigating so soon, of course they are required to do so for very sound reasons.

I am merely expressing empathy with those affected, who would be feeling large amounts of guilt even though morally and logically it is no fault of their own.

As to whether the law in its majesty will eventually find fault with MACS or any of those at the school, I am not an expert on OH&S so I don’t know.

I suspect there is a lot of leeway for application of these regulations. I hope this is the sort of case where they will not go hard, and will stick to issuing more regulations rather than forcing prosecutions.

Cassie of Sydney
July 2, 2024 10:32 am

WorkSafe and the cops will now be joined by the coroner in crawling all over it, adding to the trauma that teachers and school leadership are going through. I suppose that’s their job, I just hope the outcome is that it’s written off as an accident that no one could prevent.

A tragedy. But you see, some ‘accidents’ are preventable.

I remember how four young men died from the Rudd government’s very rushed pink batts fiasco. The deaths of those four young men were 100% preventable. The Royal Commission’s findings were very clear, that the deaths of the four young men who were participating in the Rudd government’s home insulation program would not have occurred if the scheme had been properly designed and implemented.

Cassie of Sydney
July 2, 2024 10:45 am

Stabbing at Sydney University. 14-year old boy arrested.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
July 2, 2024 11:02 am

Re the duplicitious TV ads about welcoming transgender men, last nite on The Late Debate they copped Liz Storer’s full-blown sardonic ire. It was richly deserved. The ads ignored illustrating the real points of conflict – where men invade spaces that are personal for women and also for children, such as change rooms and toilets, or where a large man’s presence is perhaps a threat, as in a lift (the woman’s normal flight response is seen as the problem in the ad), or on a playing field where men introduce a different physical force while seeking ‘sisterhood’.

Bravely, Liz had no hesitation on using the term ‘man’ and the pronoun ‘he’ for the man-in-a-dress in a lift who might inspire a flight response in a woman. She also said such men were ‘delusional’ and she didn’t wish to share their ‘realities’, that she had every right not to share them without being deliberately rude to anyone, ignoring such men unless they invaded her spaces. James Macpherson, protecting the legals of the show, did then say ‘gender dysphoria is real’, but she came back quickly with ‘no need to protect me, Mac, I’ll say what I think and take the consequences’. I hope there are none, but if so she’ll be a fighter they may wish they hadn’t stirred up. Liz is a treasure. Home schooled, in a rural area, and getting through entirely on her looks and her smarts, she a different item to other women in TV. She dresses classically and her make-up highlights her best features. She’s full of fun, quips and conspiratorial winks to camera as she speaks her mind directly, no holds barred.

More please.

Titus Groates
Titus Groates
July 2, 2024 11:09 am

It looks like the USyd stabbing happened down near the entrance near Officeworks alongside the Vetinary building.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 11:13 am

Titus Groates
 July 2, 2024 11:09 am

It looks like the USyd stabbing happened down near the entrance near Officeworks alongside the Vetinary building

Disgruntled child prodigy upset about his equine anatomy grades?

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 11:14 am

Farmer Gez
 July 2, 2024 8:34 am

Runnymede 1215

”This charter from henceforth will forfend the aged scaling heights”

Baron Fitzmonty

Snort, cackle.

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 11:17 am

“Stabbing at Sydney University. 14-year old boy arrested”
Unless he’s a child prodigy I’m guessing not a university student.

Last edited 20 days ago by Rosie
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 11:18 am

So it seems that the power behind the throne in Washington is in the hands of a bitter old dowager queen (he is dead in every practical sense) and a corrupt junkie who has felony convictions for gun crime.
Comforting news.

Eyrie
Eyrie
July 2, 2024 11:23 am

Regarding the trangender “women” TV ads:

Who would want to share a small confined space with a delusional, insane nutcase?

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 11:23 am

If the gentleman stepped through a laserlite, then he had no place on a roof. I figured it had to be a flat version of a ‘skylite’.
Sure grab a ball from a gutter but trip trapping around a roof without checking if the surface could take your weight. No.

H B Bear
H B Bear
July 2, 2024 11:26 am

Dr Jill takes knitting the kangaroo stateside. The worst magazine shoot since getting the architect’s photographers in the day your company suffers a data breach.

johanna
johanna
July 2, 2024 11:28 am

Yet another nail in the coffin of this one-term gubbmint:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-07-01/live-export-ban-passes-federal-parliament/104042980

The federal government’s laws to ban Australia’s live sheep trade have passed parliament, despite last-minute attempts by opponents to postpone the bill’s passage.
The Senate on Monday night voted on the legislation to end the trade by May 2028, after the bill passed the lower house last week.
The phase-out was a 2022 Labor election commitment and has proved popular with animal activist groups.
It has also sparked widespread protests from those concerned about the impact the laws could have on farming communities across Western Australia, which is the only Australian state or territory to continue to export live sheep by sea.
Agriculture Minister Murray Watt told parliament a $107 million transition package would be adequate support for affected farmers.

Anyone in WA who supports or hold a seat for Labor had better watch out:

“Farming communities have been sold out for political gain, and they’re gutted,” he said.
“The government vowed to kill off the jobs of farmers, shearers and truckies in WA. Credit to them, they’ve executed that job with ruthless efficiency.”

Mr Jochinke said the ban was an “ill-informed, vote-grabbing policy”.
“The facts are that unless this ban is reversed, farming communities, animals and Australia’s strategic trade partnerships will all suffer,” he said.
“We now have a dangerously unscientific precedent that will be celebrated tonight by groups who want to shut down Australian livestock production,

This isn’t just about live sheep. This government has just told every farmer in Australia to sleep with one eye open.”

Oh yeah.
?

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 2, 2024 11:29 am

Walking into the shops yesterday there is a cock in a frock walking towards me, I started to laugh. Frock boy doesn’t know what to do. This was a public serpent, he had his pass around his neck. I wished he’d said something so I could tell him green and pink don’t go together with a blue top. Why are mentally deranged people being employed when they should be being treated for delusions.

cohenite
July 2, 2024 11:31 am

Re: the SCOTUS Judgment on immunity, a perfectly reasonable and constitutionally consistent judgment the demorats as usual revert to their base position of fear and threats:

Top House Democrat Issues Troubling Threat to Supreme Court Justices After Trump Immunity Ruling (westernjournal.com)

AOC Says She’ll IMPEACH Supreme Court Justices Over Trump Immunity Ruling. (thenationalpulse.com)

This ruling should (loopholes will be found by the lower demorat courts which the SC has directed to re-adjudicate the cases) end all 4 cases against Trump:

1 Mara-Lago is obvious: as POTUS Trump had the right to deal with classified documents. In addition Jack davies was unconstitutionally appointed.
2 Stormy: the concocted charge against Trump involved alleged election fraud. The election process is part of the public/official acts of POTUS.
3 NY over estimation of value of properties. Again Letitia made this part of the election process.
4 Georgia: apart from fanny’s fuking her employees this was also part of the election process with Trump clearly talking about votes he needed rather than telling people to fraudulently make up new votes.

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 2, 2024 11:33 am

Mike O’Connor in the Courier Mail:

Politicians rejoice in the addiction of the masses to their smartphones and social media’s constant stream of mindless trivia which is slowly reducing the consistency of the national cerebrum to that of porridge.

What happened yesterday is quickly forgotten, the appetite for temporary and immediate sensory stimulation which does not require even the faintest flicker of intelligence insatiable.

I settled in with a glass of vin ordinaire a few days back to watch a television news bulletin. The first five minutes featured video footage of a warehouse fire in which nobody was injured, followed by several minutes of dashcam footage of a two-vehicle collision in which nobody was injured. The latter was replayed several times for the benefit of those who might have dozed off or gone to the kitchen to get more potato chips. Ten minutes into the bulletin and there was still nothing that could remotely be considered as news, but hey – great vision!

Those fortunate few who, in spite of the best efforts of most mass media to destroy their intellects, might recall that a few years ago we went through something called Covid-19.

Civil liberties were trashed, there were draconian lockdown proclamations, government by imperial decree, borders arbitrarily closed, livelihoods destroyed and untold emotional distress inflicted on innocent citizens – surely you must remember.

At least 3561 Queenslanders remember, which is the number of people who recently petitioned state parliament to release the advice chief health officer by Dr John Gerrard and his predecessor Dr Jeannette Young, she of the pearl necklace, provided to then premier Annastacia Palaszczuk that led to the vaccination mandates and movement restrictions.

The petition called on the parliament to direct Premier Steven Miles to release “medical advice used to enforce the Covid-19 mandates that would discriminate people on the basis of their Covid-19 vaccination status, isolate our most vulnerable from their families and force Queenslanders to have Covid-19 vaccinations that appear to have increasingly alarming safety and efficacy statistics”.

This is advice that the premier repeatedly declared, hand on heart, was that upon which she based decisions such as forcing Queensland residents to live in their cars on the Tweed Heads side of the NSW border, refusing permission for grieving families to visit dying relatives and declaring Queensland hospitals were only for Queenslanders. Ah, those were the days!

Given the lengthy time frame over which these restrictions were imposed and the countless media briefings attended by the premier and a sombre faced Dr Young declaring variously that she was “worried,” “very worried” or on one memorable occasion which set this columnist’s heart aflutter, “very, very worried”, you might reasonably think that there would be a mountain of material lying about which related to the advice given to the government.

Apparently not, for according to Health Minister Shannon Fentiman, no such documentation exists. Really?

“Queensland’s chief health officer issued public health directions to manage the spread of Covid-19 throughout the community, including requirements for Covid-19 vaccination. In making these public health directions the chief health officer relied on advice from a variety of sources.

“Specifically, the chief health officer met daily with doctors, epidemiologists, infectious diseases specialists and public health experts about Covid-19 and the extraordinary and emergency measures necessary to protect public health,” she said.

In spite of all these meetings and advice from all these experts, it seems that nobody ever thought to write anything down. How extraordinary.

How wonderful it must be to be blessed with a memory that does not require you to keep a record of the input which was received, according to Minister Fentiman, from “a variety of sources”.

You might also think that sitting up there in vice-regal splendour at 168 Fernberg Rd, Paddington, Dr Young, richly rewarded by the premier for her tireless efforts with the governorship of our fair state, might be able to produce a record of her frank and fearless advice. Alas, not a squeak so far from the big white house on the hill.

You might also wonder why, if the government was only following the medical advice which seems to have magically disappeared, it felt the need to spend $500,000 on polling to assess how its actions were affecting its popularity and whether rather than acting on medical advice, Palaszczuk’s actions were driven purely and simply by political considerations with scant regard for the cost in human suffering.

The truth is out there somewhere, but will it ever surface?

Like the call for transparency will ever be heard. FMD

Vicki
Vicki
July 2, 2024 11:35 am

Re this discussion on the decline of memory instigated by the image of poor Joe:

Noticing annoying occasions of being unable to recall names, I did a bit of research into memory decline associated within Covid. Wow! There is an enormous amount of respect research affirming the role of that insidious spike protein. The decline is not confined to those vaccinated – but to the unvaccinated ( yours truly) who nevertheless had contracted Covid 19 at one stage. Whether the latter declines in time – as many Long Covid symptoms do, is unknown at this stage.

cohenite
July 2, 2024 11:36 am

Bravely, Liz had no hesitation on using the term ‘man’ and the pronoun ‘he’ for the man-in-a-dress in a lift who might inspire a flight response in a woman. She also said such men were ‘delusional’ and she didn’t wish to share their ‘realities’, that she had every right not to share them without being deliberately rude to anyone, ignoring such men unless they invaded her spaces. James Macpherson, protecting the legals of the show, did then say ‘gender dysphoria is real’, but she came back quickly with ‘no need to protect me, Mac, I’ll say what I think and take the consequences’.

They fired Latham and Jones for less. 

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 11:37 am

Rosie
 July 2, 2024 11:23 am

If the gentleman stepped through a laserlite, then he had no place on a roof.

Quite so.
Without knowing for sure, I guessed laserlite roofing might be involved.
The fact that he went through one of those tells you he had zero knowledge of roofing materials.
Did he just ignore the signage saying sections of the roof shouldn’t be walked on?
Because they would have had signs up, right, m0nster?
It would be gross negligence not to.
Look, Worksafe might not put the boots in here, which actually makes these laws even worse, in that they are not applied equally.

Last edited 20 days ago by Sancho Panzer
Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 11:38 am

One of those Victorian ads (which I saw on twitter) was a bloke built like a tank being silently welcomed on to the football field by a lanky six foot female from the same team.
They missed showing the opposition making themselves scarce.
Needless to say not much love from commentors

Rosie
Rosie
July 2, 2024 11:42 am

As for a 17 yo Chinese sports person dropping dead.
Can be pretty confident it wasn’t from an mRNA vaccine. China used sinovax.
Athletes suffering cardiac arrest is not a post 2020 phenomenon.
Not to mention China has a little bit of a history with the doping of athletes.

cohenite
July 2, 2024 11:55 am

Rosie
 July 2, 2024 11:17 am

“Stabbing at Sydney University. 14-year old boy arrested”
Unless he’s a child prodigy I’m guessing not a university student.

In islam he is a prodigy.

thefrollickingmole
thefrollickingmole
July 2, 2024 12:02 pm

More popcorn waiter.
And a new bottle of your finest tears…

https://x.com/WallStreetSilv/status/1807951464326660335/photo/1

Kamel-Toe rumbling its her turn, or “her people” will burn the joint down.

thefrollickingmole
thefrollickingmole
July 2, 2024 12:05 pm

This chap is my spirit animal.

https://x.com/i/status/1807795462415466779

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
July 2, 2024 12:07 pm

Cold and dry at the ranch – 15 days out of 30 dawned with a frost in June. The first two days of July no different.
I’m well and truly over feeding sheep every second day.

thefrollickingmole
thefrollickingmole
July 2, 2024 12:08 pm

One heartbeat away…

https://x.com/i/status/1807892433856074152

One.

hzhousewife
hzhousewife
July 2, 2024 12:15 pm

Wow. Biden cranky about the US Supreme Court. Does he not realise that should his opinion hold sway, there may be plenty of good solid Americans willing to prosecute him for the manner in which he withdrew from Afghanistan.

johanna
johanna
July 2, 2024 12:22 pm

“Specifically, the chief health officer met daily with doctors, epidemiologists, infectious diseases specialists and public health experts about Covid-19 and the extraordinary and emergency measures necessary to protect public health,” she said.
In spite of all these meetings and advice from all these experts, it seems that nobody ever thought to write anything down. How extraordinary.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 2, 2024 12:24 pm

Gez, use a bigger spoon.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 2, 2024 12:29 pm

On roof fall:

When there’s a workplace death involved, WorkSafe (or other inspectorates) will always go gangbusters: coroner’s hearing and contested compensation/insurance claims hang off their work.

Doubtless there will be a chain of failures leading up to the accident – one that everyone will nod wisely over. There nearly always is.

Industrial manslaughter actually involves pretty poor behaviour – gross negligence, wilful misconduct, and reckless indifference stuff.

If the school has (and implements) a reasonable site safety management plan (which you would expect for insurance purposes, if nothing else) and old mate was properly inducted, the Principal will likely be criticised for avoidable failures, but be very unlikely to face the huge personal penalties.

Unless, of course, someone did something stupid like instructing or approving old mate’s unfortunate adventure.

Not professional advice.

Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 2, 2024 12:41 pm

This isn’t just about live sheep. This government has just told every farmer in Australia to sleep with one eye open.”

Correction: Every business operator.

Figures
Figures
July 2, 2024 12:41 pm

Has Monty explained to us all that the Supreme Court decision on immunity is a demonstration of the rule of law and only conspiracy theorists would question esteemed judges?

That’s what he and every leftist has said about Merchan’s trial and the weirdo who falsely accused Trump of assaulting her so I assume he would say the same thing for decisions by the Supreme Court.

What say you M0nty? Do you believe in the rule of law?

BobtheBoozer
BobtheBoozer
July 2, 2024 12:42 pm

There’s some interesting stuff about the actual crash. It certainly looks like Dodgy Dan is lying about something.

Vicki
Vicki
July 2, 2024 12:48 pm

Because the topic of Covid and the government response has been raised. I will post what I think is the most comprehensive public analysis of the significance of both the government response to Covid and the mRNA vaccination program. This is the report and details (both recorded and printed) of the conference of the Australian Medical Practitioners Society (AMPS) held earlier this year in Sydney. If it is still possible, the evidence presented is deeply shocking.

https://amps.redunion.com.au/covid_revisited

Rufus T Firefly
Rufus T Firefly
July 2, 2024 12:56 pm

I see the outgoing Secretary General of NATO Inc, (the Norwegian tailor), made a speech outlining who is responsible for the war in Ukraine.

Yes, as we all suspected, it is, ……., China, of course.

In his next sentence, he states that NATO Inc should be expanded to the Far East and “ring-in” countries like South Korea, Japan, Australia and New Zealand.

Gotta keep the grift going and the current NATO Inc nations are starting to tire of throwing their cash down the ‘elensky real estate hole, so, new suckers, ……., I mean members, must be found, to “pay up”.

Klaus Schwab’s adopted son Rutte, takes over from the Norse joke soon, so he will no doubt be “marking out” his territory presently.
Can’t wait for that one!

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 1:03 pm

Industrial manslaughter actually involves pretty poor behaviour – gross negligence, wilful misconduct, and reckless indifference stuff.

The trouble is, those words have common use meanings and legal meanings, but the definition as applied in OH&S law can be … variable.

Cassie of Sydney
July 2, 2024 1:09 pm

Industrial manslaughter actually involves pretty poor behaviour – gross negligence, wilful misconduct, and reckless indifference stuff.

Indeed, like the Rudd government’s pink batts scheme.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 1:15 pm

Dementia Joe declaring that the SCOTUS decision giving Trump immunity for acts carried out in his capacity as President sets “a dangerous precedent”.
I think he really means “a useful precedent”.

Zatara
Zatara
July 2, 2024 1:32 pm

Does anyone else watch this meme show series?

YOU LAUGH YOU LOSE #213

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 2, 2024 1:33 pm

The trouble is, those words have common use meanings and legal meanings, but the definition as applied in OH&S law can be … variable.

Industrial manslaughter is a relatively new concept (outside Queensland) – although there is plenty of precedent in law about what these naughty terms mean.

The trouble is that too few people running exposed businesses have enough, or any, understanding of what the common use meanings are, far less what they mean in the context of OH&S.

I had a case where I asked for a contractor’s SMP to check that we could bridge it with our own: “Yeah, no worries, I’ll flick it to you.”

What I received was a single page statement – the sort of thing you see, framed, on the wall in reception – along the lines of ‘The Managing Director of xxxx affirms that no injury at work is acceptable’.

Except the xxxx was in the name of another (and completely unrelated) company altogether.

Gross negligence?
Reckless indifference?
NFI?

Not sure.

Rorschach
Rorschach
July 2, 2024 1:37 pm

With all this handwringing re the SCOTUS decision, no one is mentioning that there actually is a constitutional way to remove / censure a President that has overstepped their responsibilities:

Article II, Section 4 provides: The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors

Puts the power to elected, publicly accountable members of Congress to do so, totally avoiding the potentially frivolous activist nuisance lawsuits.

And on the hyperbolic “the President can legally kill American citizens that he does not like” … sure: Indeed, Obama did it a couple of times!

https://www.aclu.org/press-releases/obama-administration-claims-unchecked-authority-kill-americans-outside-combat-zones

Bourne1879
Bourne1879
July 2, 2024 1:50 pm

This is one of the comments made under the Courier Mail article about Covid policies in Qld and no records

“Fentiman is lying. I was secretariat for many meetings with Dr Young and believe me there are hundreds of minutes with discussions and assumptions made by her. A right to information application to the many department meetings she attended would soon be exposed”

You would like to think the Courier Mail would be contacting the person who made the comment for further details. Somehow I doubt it.

One thing that is apparent to me after numerous rejected comments in past few years is that any negative comments about current CHO won’t be allowed. He is an actual virus expert and clearly knew early on it was the elderly at risk and that after the first two jabs they were not working as advertised. However he was happy to watch healthy no risk people lose their jobs and careers for something that was not working.
What was also apparent was that for 2 years the state was being run by CHOs whose only concern was the virus and encouraging Vax uptake. No consideration for other impacts such as jobs, mental health, business failures etc.
Never forget.

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 2, 2024 1:54 pm

Andrew Dillon must be watching a different game to the rest of us:

AFL chief executive Andrew Dillon believes the standard of umpiring is as good as it has ever been.

Amid widespread criticism of the quality of officiating this season, off the back of contentious decisions and mid-season interpretation tweaks, Dillon defended the whistleblowers.

“I think it’s as good as it’s ever been, the umpiring,” Dillon said.

“We’re in the second year of a four-umpire system so we’re on a journey with that system.

“There’s always been a focus on umpiring, it’s been around since I’ve been around, and it will continue to be but because the competition is so tight, maybe there’s an increased focus.

“It’s an incredibly tough game to umpire and we’ve got elite decision-makers.

“They’re continuing to work on their craft.”

Dillon said the league was not moving away from explaining umpiring decisions, but did not want to be up every Monday.

“If there’s umpiring decisions at the end of games and there’s a real focus on them then we will be up,” he said.

Anyone who watched the Geelong v Essendon game would disagree with Dillon’s assertion. Indeed not only that game, but the whole season has been littered with rubbish calls.
Umpires aren’t above criticism.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 2, 2024 1:55 pm

Dutton announces support for powers to split major supermarkets

The Coalition supports putting in powers that could split the major supermarkets, Opposition Leader Peter Dutton has just announced in Canberra.

Lie down with the Greens; get up covered in snot.

billie
billie
July 2, 2024 2:10 pm

The laserlight/skylight sheets in a warehouse I know of here in the deep south (Melbourne) have wire matrix under them, about 15cm a side.

I don’t know if it is there for stop someone falling through, or to stop the skylight collapsing into the warehouse from hail or whatever weather event.

There are several signs on the roof warning of the danger of the skylights.

No one goes up there unless they absolutely have to, it is dead scary it is so high …not to mention the rust areas.

If you fell from up there, it is a 10m drop.

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 2, 2024 2:10 pm

Greg Sheridan on Sky said that Gretchen Whitmer is the best of the Dem governors!
Is that despite her being rather scary? Is it because she’s ahead on points compared to the poison dwarf in NY?

billie
billie
July 2, 2024 2:11 pm

test

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 2, 2024 2:12 pm

Leftists keep saying “Joe beat Trump in 2020”.
People who only watch lefty MSM in America might go along with or even believe that, but we know that Joe did nothing to earn more votes than Obama!
Where those votes came from is something only the brave will discuss openly, given the nature of the current regime.

Zatara
Zatara
July 2, 2024 2:28 pm
Mother Lode
Mother Lode
July 2, 2024 2:28 pm

Leftists keep saying “Joe beat Trump in 2020”.

Also the people who, right up until last Thursday, believed Biden was lucid and possessed of all his wits.

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
July 2, 2024 3:11 pm

GreyRanga
 July 2, 2024 12:24 pm

Gez, use a bigger spoon.

That sort of humour would get you shot in a decent country.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
July 2, 2024 3:11 pm

If you’re walking on a roof walk where the trusses are underneath

Except if the trusses are made of laserlight.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 3:14 pm

dover0beach
 July 2, 2024 1:50 pm

If you’re walking on a roof walk where the trusses are underneath.

Again, like tap dancing on laserlite, you don’t know what you don’t know.
I’ll bet if I said that to the average school teacher, I’d get the head tilt with a sceptical “how would you know where the roof framing is?”.
Err … follow the heads of the tek screws or roofing nails.
Quite apart from the risk of falling through, walking off the framing buckles the sheets and can compromise the weather tight performance of the roof.

Barking Toad
Barking Toad
July 2, 2024 3:16 pm

From Black Ball @01:54pm……

AFL chief executive Andrew Dillon believes the standard of umpiring is as good as it has ever been.
Amid widespread criticism of the quality of officiating this season, off the back of contentious decisions and mid-season interpretation tweaks, Dillon defended the whistleblowers.
“I think it’s as good as it’s ever been, the umpiring,” Dillon said.

In other words, shithouse.

Having four umpires has just made it worse. Potentially 4 different interpretations.

And doncha just love it when an umpire at the other end of the ground,100 metres away, blows the whistle for a free that the umpire on the spot, 25 metres away, didn’t call. Some just lurve the “look at me” moment.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 3:20 pm

Anyone who watched the Geelong v Essendon game would disagree with Dillon’s assertion. Indeed not only that game, but the whole season has been littered with rubbish calls.

It has been poor all season, but the third quarter of that game was a perfectly condensed summary of the problem.
Three obvious blunders have been pointed out, but there was a series of almost identical pairs of events in quick succession where one was called a free, and it’s identical sibling wasn’t.
One thing I have noticed is the delay in blowing the whistle for obvious frees on occasions. I have no doubt umpires are being coached at the quarter breaks and through the ear piece.
The question is, who is giving directions?

calli
calli
July 2, 2024 3:26 pm

Like a lot of polycarbonate products, Laserlite deteriorates over time, getting brittle. Battens won’t make a shred of difference holding a man’s weight. Rafters will.

I wonder if it was a Gillardian Building Da Edumacation Fucha roof? Great expense and a budget build.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 3:28 pm

Knuckle Dragger
 July 2, 2024 3:11 pm

If you’re walking on a roof walk where the trusses are underneath

Except if the trusses are made of laserlight.

Well, yeah.
Obviously.
As I said yesterday, you could have a sinkhole with boiling lava in the playground, and school OH&S committees would still spend 93.1% of their time talking about “safe spaces for trans teachers and students”.
The other 9.98%* would be spent trying to ban 4WDs from pick up/drop off.

* I was educated at a Victorian High School.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 3:36 pm

Barking Toad

And doncha just love it when an umpire at the other end of the ground,100 metres away, blows the whistle for a free that the umpire on the spot, 25 metres away, didn’t call. Some just lurve the “look at me” moment.

I heard someone from the AFL explaining the four umpire thing before it was introduced.
Apparently one umpire might be the “push in the back” specialist so they would adjudicate all of those. Another would be “high tackle” specialist, etc etc.
What could possibly go wrong?

calli
calli
July 2, 2024 3:37 pm

From what I’m reading here, he was retrieving balls. This indicates a flat roof. My suspicion is using maximum spans for the roofing material, assuming no one would ever get up there. Dumb, if so, it being a school and children being children.

calli
calli
July 2, 2024 3:42 pm

I’m enjoying the moral panic over the Supreme’s decision re immunity. BBC is chook’s bum mouths all round, plus Furious Looks.

The indignation! Why, Presidents might be able to get away with anything, including using the courts against their political opponents!

The Dumb is strong at the BEEB.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 2, 2024 3:42 pm

m0nster at 10:29 articulating the lefty answer to everything:-

I suspect there is a lot of leeway for application of these regulations. I hope this is the sort of case where they will not go hard, and will stick to issuing more regulations rather than forcing prosecutions.

Yes, folks.
The answer is … more regulations.
Like what?
Banning ball sports in schools?
Having specialist squads of ball retrieval consultants?

Last edited 20 days ago by Sancho Panzer
Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 2, 2024 3:54 pm

I’m enjoying the moral panic over the Supreme’s decision re immunity.

Social media is alive with lefties who’ve suddenly become fierce opponents of judicial activism.
As funny as monty’s bath of cold water re industrial manslaughter.

calli
calli
July 2, 2024 3:58 pm

On Trieste…a really nice place. Clean, tidy, respectable (apart from the hideous canal, which needs a good flush out to sea).

Something for everyone – lovely architecture, really good non-chain clothing stores, even Roman ruins (an amphitheater and forum). And mostly flat as a tack for easy walking. And very easy for the evening crowd in high heels, dressed to impress as in Verona. Even the yummy mummies pushing prams. Many…many babies and young children, groups of giggling girls arm in arm, older ladies in well-cut dresses. An Italy that is long gone elsewhere.

I’m having breakfast in a hotel that was once something else. Vestiges of an older time remain, including a group of marble arches still sporting their bronze door pins. It must have been an arcade at one time. For what purpose?

Catching the interurban in an hour or so. Should be fun wrangling our mass of luggage onto the train. Nine weeks is a long time to be away.

Bungonia Bee
Bungonia Bee
July 2, 2024 3:58 pm

A member of parliament pleading she doesn’t know enough about nuclear!
She wants to know costs, she wants to know what “the rest of the world is doing”!!!
Rebekha-ha-ha Sharkie should not be in parliament if she’s that ignorant.
The rest of the world is laughing.

Last edited 20 days ago by Bungonia Bee
Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 2, 2024 4:01 pm

I hope this is the sort of case where they will not go hard, and will stick to issuing more regulations rather than forcing prosecutions.

Nope. Prosecutions have to be robust, with severe judicial penalties, significant prison terms and brutal financial penalties.

Only when the public servants & “people like us” are being pauperized & jailed, will there be any hope of the overreach being reined in.

The more hapless public servants jailed & losing their retirement super via judicial penalty, the better.

Cassie of Sydney
July 2, 2024 4:07 pm

They fired Latham and Jones for less. 

True, but that was when Sky was, in the case of Latham and then later Cameron, under daily siege from leftist scum targeting advertisers, and then during Covid, when Jones upset the powers that be because he refused to buckle to the Covid nonsense and hysteria, he called out the absurdity of lockdowns, masks and vaccine mandates. I think Sky has since found some spine and I also think that more and more advertisers are refusing to crumble before hysterical leftist scum.

Further to what Lizzie said above, I also watched Liz Storer’s superlative smackdown last night. Storer was superb, she didn’t flinch, she spoke the plain truth, and it is high time others also stood up and spoke the truth, that plain truth being that just because a cock puts on a frock and a wig doesn’t make that cock a woman, and that cock needs to stay out of female bathrooms, changerooms and sporting competitions.

calli
calli
July 2, 2024 4:10 pm

Ha! Just popped over to The Lad’s. He has a thread up about MSNBC talking points which are exactly the same as what the BEEB is peddling.

No doubt at all that the media, wherever they are on the globe, are in cahoots over Biden.

https://thecurrencylad.com/2024/07/02/msnbc-executive-producer-draws-our-attention-to-a-scenario/

Eyrie
Eyrie
July 2, 2024 4:10 pm

The federal Coalition will announce tough new laws to threaten supermarket giants Coles and Woolworths for keeping prices too high as it escalates its attack on Labor’s handling of the inflation outbreak.

You utter flog, Dutton. The current inflation outbreak was caused by the Coalition’s (Frydchickenburger’s) dumping of money for the Covid response.
Truly this is a Fascist country.

Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 2, 2024 4:38 pm

The federal Coalition will announce tough new laws to threaten supermarket giants Coles and Woolworths for keeping prices too high as it escalates its attack on Labor’s handling of the inflation outbreak.

Dutton is on the right track, this will focus the mind of Big Supamarket onto sticking to their knitting, instead of going feral re supporting The Voice, opposing Israel, opposing nuclear power, etc.

Roger
Roger
July 2, 2024 4:45 pm

You utter flog, Dutton. The current inflation outbreak was caused by the Coalition’s (Frydchickenburger’s) dumping of money for the Covid response.

“No traction on nuclear, Pete.”

“Right…Plan B: Colesworths.”

While I think the supermarket duopoly is deserving of strict scrutiny, let’s not pretend anything our politicians say is actually about the problem they purport to be addressing.

The actual problem is always polling, no matter what they say.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 2, 2024 4:49 pm

In Good Governance news:

EXCLUSIVE: 6 News understands Fatima Payman and ‘preference whisperer’ Glenn Druery have had informal discussions in recent days

It’s understood members of the Muslim community have also recently reached out to Druery

Looking increasingly like The Muslim Vote may be about to have its first parliamentary representative.

The next Federal election signals a shift. We will no longer accept being taken for granted. Australian Muslims are a powerful, united force of nearly 1 million acting in unison.

The Muslim Vote helps ensure that Muslim interests are well-represented in Australian politics.

Time to get some Islamic issues front and centre into Australian politics. Apart from the political and physical destruction of Israel, it’s not immediately clear what these might be. Nor in what way the long suffering Australian Muslim community is being taken for granted in multiculti Oz.

I’m sure we’ll find out.

Brilliant work, Labor.

JC
JC
July 2, 2024 4:49 pm

Roger

Is there any evidence the supers have been gouging or is it simply a case of prices going up and they’re passing it through?

Cassie of Sydney
July 2, 2024 4:59 pm

Australian Muslims are a powerful, united force of nearly 1 million acting in unison.

What a depressing reality.

Turnip
Turnip
July 2, 2024 5:01 pm

Moved into a large block of units recently, where the electricity is individually metered and gas hot water is also individually metered, but gas for cooktop is a set fee.
Electricity usage has halved but the first hot water bill came through at $200 for 90 days so overall cost is double what all electric was.

Rough calcs= 10 showers per week, 3 x dishwasher…plus ????

I’m paying about 90cents per shower!

JC
JC
July 2, 2024 5:02 pm

Coles, in the last annual report showed sales of $41.5 billion and a net profit of $1.1 billion. That’s 2.6%. Wafer thin.

https://www.colesgroup.com.au/FormBuilder/_Resource/_module/ir5sKeTxxEOndzdh00hWJw/file/Annual_Report.pdf

John H.
John H.
July 2, 2024 5:06 pm

Roger

 July 2, 2024 4:45 pm

You utter flog, Dutton. The current inflation outbreak was caused by the Coalition’s (Frydchickenburger’s) dumping of money for the Covid response.

“No traction on nuclear, Pete.”

“Right…Plan B: Colesworths.”

While I think the supermarket duopoly is deserving of strict scrutiny, let’s not pretend anything our politicians say is actually about the problem they purport to be addressing.

The actual problem is always polling, no matter what they say.

Yep. We’ve been down this road before. Investigations found no gouging. Dutton and Co must know that. For the big two profit vs turnover is small. Dutton needs to be more careful, recent polling suggests that nuclear button did not boost support and tricks like this won’t help. Neither party has a solution to cost of living. It is a problem across the OECD.

Last edited 20 days ago by John H.
Roger
Roger
July 2, 2024 5:08 pm

Time to get some Islamic issues front and centre into Australian politics. 

Won’t be long before we’ve got a Hindu party and a Sikh party and maybe a Chinese nationalist party too.

Welcome to the new sectarianism, Australia.

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