Open Thread – Mon 8 July 2024


Boulevard of Capucines, Claude Monet, 1883

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Pogria
Pogria
July 8, 2024 12:24 am

Woo Hoo! 😀
Nyuk, nyuk, nyuk. What’s up Doc?

Salvatore - Iron Publican
July 8, 2024 12:54 am

Nyuk, nyuk, nyuk. What’s up Doc?

Trump’s morale?

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 8, 2024 1:08 am

Can’t really sleep after that shit news about the khunt burning a house down with kids inside, actively preventing the escape.
If ever there was a case for capital punishment this is it, perfectly described by Knuckle Dragger.
How the phuck on earth did he prevent police from entering? I’m sure the Commish will be on the case when she fronts the media.
It’s another war front with the Left that needs to be won.

KevinM
KevinM
July 8, 2024 1:11 am

An alternative idea to the Panama canal, not quite a dead one because part of it was completed.

Screenshot-2024-07-07-190114
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:00 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:01 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:02 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:03 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:03 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:04 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:05 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:06 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:06 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:07 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:08 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:09 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:09 am
Tintarella di Luna
Tintarella di Luna
July 8, 2024 4:48 am

I haven’t been able to see the Ben Garrison cartoons for days now always get the 404 error now it’s ahppening for Tina Norton too. Hmm Perchance, could it be censorship?

Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 4:53 am

Tinta, Garrison and Norton ‘toons are fine in my browser, so it sounds like a browser issue for you. It might help if you restart your computer.

Tintarella di Luna
Tintarella di Luna
July 8, 2024 5:06 am

Thanks Tom it”s a 1011 error (numbers not my long suit) but I’ll restart

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 8, 2024 5:09 am

Garrison and Norton won’t show up in my Macbook’s Chrome browser, but are fine in Safari.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 8, 2024 5:10 am

I see Macaroon and the left still in control in France. Marine LePen lost 2nd round. How is that?

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 8, 2024 5:11 am

Jeremy Clarkson buys pub; plans new reality TV show selling own beer and produce.

Daily Mail

vr
vr
July 8, 2024 5:52 am

Not Leak, Tom. Thanks for posting the toons.

KevinM
KevinM
July 8, 2024 6:34 am

LOL

450171576_7739881632743784_1600852114492347026_n
Rockdoctor
Rockdoctor
July 8, 2024 6:50 am

Daniel Andrews has engaged one of Australia’s most expensive silks in a bid to keep secret his phone records from the day of a near-fatal 2013 car crash with a teenage cyclist.

From old fred via KD.

My 2c worth this sort of inappropriate behaviour (Perversion of the course of justice I think it is termed) is the tip of the iceberg under Andrews.

There needs to be a full and unconditional RC or Inquiry (like Fitzgerald in Queensland) into Andrews, his Government and the executive branch including PS and Police.

Even if the Oppo Party don’t announce it till after winning an election and get a reliable judge in from overseas in the commonwealth if needed to keep it objective.

Here in Queensland the ghost of Sir Joe is invoked at a drop of a hat to smear conservatives. The stench from the Andrews era dwarfs anything I have ever seen.

The Bungonia Bee
The Bungonia Bee
July 8, 2024 7:01 am

Breaking News from Clickbait Central: popular “escort” reveals that the main reason so many married men come to her for sex is that they aren’t getting enough at home.

The Bungonia Bee
The Bungonia Bee
July 8, 2024 7:02 am

Stupid Frogs look like voting more Left than Right.

The Bungonia Bee
The Bungonia Bee
July 8, 2024 7:05 am

Malcolm says Dutton is “a thug”, revealing again his Keatingesque attention seeking behaviours. The title of Worst PM since McMahon is up for grabs- Malcolm or Albo?

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 8, 2024 7:13 am

Malturd was too busy bathing in the glory of his own magnificence to cause too much damage, Luigi the Unbelievable is so amazed he ever got a chance he’s fiddling with everything in the hope it’ll turn out like his grand vision. Both despicable in their own way but still pretty much run of the mill politicians. None have a vision for Australia that doesn’t mean lining their own pockets first and stuff the rest.

Boambee John
Boambee John
July 8, 2024 7:18 am

A possible solution to the problem of aggressive Islam is to pay people to leave.

Cash in hand to abandon Australian citizenship, leave and sign a pledge never, ever, to return.

Make the penalty for breaking the pledge severe, minimum of ten years hard followed by expulsion.

Cassie of Sydney
July 8, 2024 7:28 am

I think this is the best wrap up of fourteen years of ‘Tory governance’..

‘There was NOTHING conservative about the Conservative Party’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUr8jOSUWgE

Bourne1879
Bourne1879
July 8, 2024 7:33 am

As per Gateway Pundit article Kamala Harris 5 X jabbed husband has Covid. Here’s how one commentator put it :

“Breaking: Man has a cold. They tested him to confirm he has a cold. He took a bunch of shots to prevent said cold. They were useless.”

Cassie of Sydney
July 8, 2024 7:33 am

I’m thinking of buying an air fryer. Who here has one?

Crossie
Crossie
July 8, 2024 7:39 am

Boambee John

 July 8, 2024 7:18 am

A possible solution to the problem of aggressive Islam is to pay people to leave.

Cash in hand to abandon Australian citizenship, leave and sign a pledge never, ever, to return.

Make the penalty for breaking the pledge severe, minimum of ten years hard followed by expulsion.

Muslims better pray that there isn’t a war, holy or otherwise, as they will be treated as the Germans were after WWII when they were expelled from Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia, out of Hungary, Romania and Yugoslavia. Little Fatima Payman and the Farouqi Senator are showing us already that they are not here for asylum but for conquest.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 8, 2024 7:42 am

Newspoll is out, Labor ahead 51:49 2pp. Too much to summarize more than that, but I’ll pull out some paras which are interesting.

Newspoll shows voter support for Coalition lift over Labor in Queensland and NSW for the first time (Sky News, 8 Jul)

The Australian reported the results confirmed the trend that if an election were held Labor would be forced into a minority government with independents with the prospect of losing two seats in NSW and the potential of one in Queensland.

Among young voters, Labor has lost significant support as the 18-34-year-old demographic decidedly left in droves towards the Greens with the primary vote falling three points to 30 per cent.

Among 18-34-year-old voters, the support for the Greens has risen to 27 per cent, which is on par with the support for the Coalition, which poses a near even split among the three parties as issues such as climate change, rental affordability and the cost of living, as well as the war in Gaza mobilising voters within the younger demographic.

The indoctrination is proceeding apace Comrade! You can see why Bandt is playing the antisemitism card: it’s working.

Last edited 14 days ago by Bruce of Newcastle
calli
calli
July 8, 2024 7:43 am

I’m thinking of buying an air fryer. Who here has one?

Commenter Tracey bought one years ago.

We haven’t heard from her since. 😀

Seriously though, my eldest daughter bought a small one for healthy snacks for the teenage boys. A cheapy. It has been so good she’s going to buy a family sized one for larger meals.

Beertruk
Beertruk
July 8, 2024 7:45 am

Today’s Paywallion:

Spare us the ‘far right’ flannel – it’s nothing more than juvenile abuse
 
Nick Cater
8 Jul 2024
 
The UK Telegraph’s Joe Barnes gave a miserable assessment of France’s future under Marine Le Pen on the eve of Sunday’s election. He warned that a victory for Le Pen’s Rassemblement National “would mark the first time the hard right have been in power since the Nazi occupation during the Second World War”.

It was a prime example of a so-called “of course” statement; in other words, a declaration that satisfies the prejudices of the cultural elite and therefore requires no further elaboration. This is just as well for Barnes, who might otherwise be asked to justify comparing Le Pen’s RN with the collaborationist, authoritarian Vichy government that deported tens of thousands of Jews to Hitler’s death camps.

Of course, he will not be asked to resolve the paradox of comparing a conservative party that puts national sovereignty above everything with a treacherous bunch of quislings who collaborated with a foreign power that had invaded French soil. Such inflammatory rhetoric is symptomatic of the confusion we are now seeing emerge from elections in Europe and the US.

Barnes adheres to the conventional explanation that voters have been led astray by the guile of the so-called far right. He assumes the political contest is a battle between competing ideologies from the political left and right. It is far better understood as a clash of visions – using David Goodhart’s vocabulary of the “anywheres” and the “somewheres” – and to describe the deepening cultural and social divide between the cosmopolitan citizens of the world and the pragmatic, patriotic middle classes grounded in family, community and tradition for whom pride in one’s country is a virtue, not a sin.

Playing the Nazi card has become a habit for the “anywheres” who are anxious at the rise of new political leaders able to articulate what the “somewheres” are thinking. The anywheres are clever with words, allowing them to frame debates and determine what can and cannot be said. Perpetuating the arcane distinction between left and right has enabled them to construct a moral spectrum ranging from selfless social justice crusaders to brown-shirted, goose-stepping thugs.

By describing their opponents as right-wing signals to others that their views and behaviours should be frowned upon. Those on the hard right should be very frowned upon, while those on the extreme right are despicable beyond redemption.

It is fitting, then, that these crude but effective labels are being strongly challenged in France, where the left-right analogy was born at the end of the 18th century. The RN will be the largest party in 577-member French parliament with between 175 and 205 seats, according to the latest polling. While it won’t constitute an absolute majority, RN will be undeniably mainstream, making it harder to portray supporters as swivel-eyed lunatics from the political fringes.

Emmanuel Macron’s presidential coalition is likely to finish third behind the Nouveau Front Populaire, an electoral alliance between La France Insoumise (France Unbowed), Le Parti Socialiste, Les Ecologistes, Le Parti Communiste Francais, Generations and Place Publique. This uncomfortable grouping of social justice musketeers is rightly described as Nouveau, since it is barely four weeks old. It was formed after President Macron called a snap election with the sole purpose of combating the rise of RN.

Its very existence is proof the conservative nationalists control the electoral agenda, even if they are denied a fair hearing on France Televisions, the national public television conglomerate, and much of the mainstream press.

You don’t have to be particularly proficient in French to read the body language on shows such as C dans l’air, France 5’s nightly version of Insiders, which, being French, incorporates a cooking segment. Guests have been fulminating all week about the crisis in French democracy, the setback for women’s rights, the persecution of the LGTBQ community, and the race-fuelled hatred and violence that will be unleashed if voters fall for the lies of the extreme right.

The inflated rhetoric has been as counter-productive as the demonisation of Donald Trump, Nigel Farage, Geert Wilders, Giorgia Meloni, Andre Ventura and every other conservative nationalist leader.

The vehemence of their denunciation towards these leaders demands an explanation. Which particular nerve was pressed to elicit such a primordial reaction?

The answer is buried deep beneath the hyperbole in Le Monde. An editorial on Saturday headlined: “Everywhere, always, the far right has ended up adding to the world’s woes.”

Its author, editorial director Jerome Fenoglio, denounces Macron as “irresponsible” for endangering French democracy by calling an election. Fenoglio appears insensitive to the logical contradiction in such a claim. He finally comes to the point in the penultimate paragraph. He says the RN is “diametrically opposed to the co-operation, cross-border solidarity and universalism needed to take the current catastrophe”.

To put it another way, the RN believes French laws should be made in the French parliament, not by the policy quacks in Brussels, the nouveau riche of Silicon Valley or the charlatans in Davos. It believes French people should decide who enters their country and the conditions upon which they are welcomed.

The RN thinks farmers should be allowed to make a living without being crushed by regulation based on half-baked science. It believes veganism and buying an electric vehicle should a matter of choice, not coercion.

The French election and its aftermath are of more than passing relevance to Australia, where the uncompromising vision of the anointed clashes with the principles of national sovereignty and equal worth.

Here too the laptop class displays the utter certainty that Thomas Sowell identified almost 30 years ago as the hallmark of the anointed. Here too, the current catastrophe, if we are to call it that, is the slavish adoption of an international commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050 that has emboldened the political class into thinking decisions must be collectivised to overcome dangers to which the masses are oblivious.

The shift in the landscape is fraught with uncertainty. Yet Australians have reason to hope the revival of nationalism abroad is the long-awaited correction to the internationalisation of politics in which the hypothetical interests of the human race take precedence over the welfare of real people.

Nick Cater Columnist

Nick Cater is a senior fellow at the Menzies Research Centre and a visiting fellow at the Danube Institute.

 
 

Wally Dalí
Wally Dalí
July 8, 2024 7:50 am

Some savvy wag needs to mock up a meme of Dan Andrews gurning over box of pastries, in the form of $25 000, with three doughnuts forming the zero’s.
“Another $25 000 doughnut day, Dictator Dan?”

calli
calli
July 8, 2024 7:50 am

You can see why Bandt is playing the antisemitism card: it’s working.

Jew hatred always works. It speaks to something deeply wicked in the human psyche. Those who resist it do so actively.

Mention is often made of Ferdinand and Isabella and their great success. It shouldn’t be forgotten that along with the Muslims, they expelled the Jews also.

lotocoti
lotocoti
July 8, 2024 7:53 am
Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 8:00 am

Woops. Johannes Leak. Thanks vr.

calli
calli
July 8, 2024 8:05 am

Wally, he has to avoid male pattern baldness at all costs.

Otherwise…

star-trek-alien-Google-Search
Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 8, 2024 8:07 am

Not Leak, Tom.

Johannes Leak

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 8, 2024 8:08 am

Snap Tom, I should’ve refreshed. Thanks again for all the toons.

Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 8:09 am

No brains to drain, The Greek tragedy that is our education system

Christopher Jolliffe in The Spectator (Australian ed.) 6 July, 2024

It is no secret that our education system has been fast plummeting for twenty years or longer. We regularly produce illiterate and innumerate graduates after thirteen years of expensive compulsory schooling, for whom the primary lessons have been how to manipulate vulnerable systems, how to bend themselves to a certain schema of thinking, and how to jump through bureaucratic hoops. Having said that, these are useful things when it comes to navigating the peculiarities of our present moment, but I would hardly suggest these are essential ingredients in forming a human being who knows what Aristotle called eudaimonia, the highest human good.

Despite all the talk of ‘de-factorying’ education, it is more a machine now than ever, having been entirely captured by the langue de bois, or wooden language, of corporate and bureaucratic newspeak, to say nothing of the complete victory of a certain metapolitical zeitgeist that now seems to dominate everything.

But this is a dead horse to flog: everybody knows the schools were captured long ago, even if the left act alternately smug and innocent about the fact, and conservatives seem to have had the fight neutered out of them a long time ago on this front, even when they’ve ostensibly held power. When the Abbott government tried to change some elements of the Australian curriculum, I seem to recall some skilful filibustering was undertaken by the federal education department, teacher unions, and the states.

I am less interested in the purely ideational elements of the destruction of education, though rest assured, you don’t introduce termites to a building and then expect architectural health. Many of the problems have to do with how things are done, as much as why things are done. Another time, we can look at the blue-haired teachers, and discuss how their consequences have been a disaster for the human race.

Teaching and education have been subject to the same influences that have been floating around for the last few decades, that read like something straight out of Burnham’s The Managerial Revolution. The over-credentialed and under-educated management caste of our educational leaders is composed of people who read managerial textbooks for fun and appear to take them very, very seriously. They are victims of every idea freshly in vogue. If I had a dollar for every time they yapped about ‘data’, I’d be quite wealthy; but then they’d demand I create some kind of spreadsheet to account for it, so I’d rather go without. In short, the soul has gone out of the thing – out of teaching – a profession that seemingly no longer knows what it’s about.

Pick up and attempt to read a book by a mainstream expert of education; say, John Hattie. I’ll give you all those hypothetical dollars if you get past the first chapter. It’s one reason why everybody is trying to leave that profession, and why there is unlikely to be any improvement in sight. But weakness of ethos, leadership, and to be completely frank, brains, is only part of the problem. Our education system has been scuppered by market forces that we unnaturally created in the last couple of decades.

Nonetheless, our best universities continue to rank well against their global peers. This I find baffling. I suspect, though cannot prove, that the attractiveness of Australia as an educational destination has more to do with certain other advantages, beyond receiving a robust education. For families in overseas countries, one in particular, having a son or daughter in overseas education is a toehold out in case things go belly up at home. This particular place tends to go belly up every generation or so, so it’s hard to blame them for that.

We can couple this with the fact that the universities stumbled across a wonderful business model, one that has more or less accepted that thirteen years of compulsory education is no longer enough, and it should be sixteen at a minimum. This ultimately is the legacy of the Dawkins Revolution. Where once a Year 10 certificate was enough, you now need a bachelor’s degree to do, well, anything. Certainly, you’ll need one to enter the middle class. Most university students are buying indulgences, rather than learning very much. Where credentialism, not education, sets the bar, I don’t expect you’ll see much interest in genuine knowledge, especially in the humanities. Which is a shame, because an elite that could grasp a literary reference, or think at all, would be a welcome change.

The real market force that has driven our downward spiral is that we are now content to look elsewhere for expertise if our own system can’t provide it. This we call the brain drain, and we regularly scalp talent from our neighbouring nations. That we create labour shortages through this mass importation, that then requires fresh labour to manage, trapping us in a cycle that has ramped up to the tune of half a million a year, seems a small price to pay. What this will eventually do to the fibre of our nation is anybody’s guess, because experiments of this scale haven’t been attempted before. We are living in a vast utopian experiment, driven by plutocrats on the one hand, who see matters only in terms of financial gain, and ideological zealots on the other, who see carpet-bombing both the past and the proximate as a religious mission.

Consistent with this model, we outsourced our manufacturing long ago. Increasingly it seems we’ve outsourced our education, too, despite appearances that things run the other way. While we might feel very clever importing foreign-educated professionals, the unwelcome side effect has been that the disintegration of our school system has been allowed to continue unabated, because we’ve been insulated from the immediate economic consequences. Thus the schools increasingly seem to function as pubs without beer, providing a valuable social service insofar as they enable women to participate in the workforce, which naturally is far more important than, say, raising their own children.

The real brain drain has happened in our own backyard, as we’ve lost any sense of rigour in our educational standards, as befits a society that has gone soft by every other metric, too.

Our education system has wrapped itself in bureaucratic bandages to manufacture the visage of life and competence, even as literacy and numeracy crater. Graduates of our benighted system might find their futures cleaning the toilets of those foreign-educated professionals who arrived as university students but remained as members of a new, cosmopolitan elite. It would make for something out of a Greek tragedy, supposing they could manage to read one.

No doubt our “education system” goes part of the way to explaining the rising support for the Greens among the young mentioned above.

Last edited 14 days ago by Roger
bons
bons
July 8, 2024 8:11 am

It is more than probable that a furious Macron will now go after the conservatives using German tactics.

All is lost.

Cassie of Sydney
July 8, 2024 8:15 am

Woops. Johannes Leak. Thanks vr.

Oh my, Leak nails the putrid evil that is the fatso NSW Greens senator Faruqi, who thinks we Jews are ‘garbage’ that need to be tossed away in a rubbish bin.

Hitler, Goebbels and the rest of them are smiling in hell.

I repeat….

The Greens are our very own Nazi party.

Anyone who votes for the Greens are voting for Nazis, and they are no different to those Germans who voted for Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party in 1933.

I think the days of being polite are over, finito, finished. We need to call out these Nazis, we need to use plain language. The Greens are Nazis.

Pogria
Pogria
July 8, 2024 8:15 am

I wonder if Australian Military have a sister magazine.

https://ace.mu.nu/archives/Surrender.jfif

Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 8:15 am

“Breaking: Man has a cold. They tested him to confirm he has a cold. He took a bunch of shots to prevent said cold. They were useless.”

The purveyors of the shots did quite well out of it though.

bons
bons
July 8, 2024 8:19 am

I believe that the Newspoll is way off in QLD.

Labor will lose more than one seat to the LNP.

But the Greens will boom in the South East Queensland Victorian Public Service retirement zone. Those defined benefit pensions!

Keep the Muzzies. Boot the Vics.

Indolent
Indolent
July 8, 2024 8:19 am

@EndWokeness

This is insane.

Macron’s party colluded with the far-left socialists in order to block a Le Pen win.

200 candidates dropped out last week, coalescing against the “far-right”.

Well the coup just paid off.

The socialists just won FIRST PLACE.

It looks like France will not be saved.

Pogria
Pogria
July 8, 2024 8:21 am

Cassie,
WE do call out the Greenfilth and the rag head lovers. We need to make it so uncomfortable for all the snouts in the public trough so THEY, will call it out. That, is the effing difficulty.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 8, 2024 8:21 am

Spare us the ‘far right’ flannel – it’s nothing more than juvenile abuse

It’s also massive unrelenting gaslighting and propaganda.

Do you care about your country? You now are “far right” (5 Jul)
by Giulio Meotti

This is the great paradox: the “open society” has resulted in a world increasingly closed to the majority. And the more conflictual this “diversity” is, the more we are forced to love it.

But the residual Western majorities – those who want to continue to live in their own neighborhood, in their own city and in their own nation without these becoming completely alien to them, not in Gretalandia, the strange global village under construction – these residual majorities do not want their countries be razed to the ground to rebuild a civilization that they don’t understand and that, by nose, they don’t like at all.

Mr Meotti covers very similar ground as Nick Cater’s column, but it’s still worth reading. I especially like “Gretalandia” although I’d never want to live in it.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 8, 2024 8:24 am

Dr Faustus
 July 7, 2024 9:54 pm

Daniel Andrews has engaged one of Australia’s most expensive silks in a bid to keep secret his phone records from the day of a near-fatal 2013 car crash with a teenage cyclist.

Without going into any of the factual or legal details, just on the shifty behaviour exhibited, you would have to conclude, Far King Guilty M’Lord

Quite so.
Had he rung 000 and/or a local GP first up, later calls can be explained away.
If he has rung, for example, his Chief of Staff who may or may not have connections in VikPlod, it starts to fray at the edges.
The Chief of Staff then has his phone records put under scrutiny and the daisy chain is pieced together. CoS gets off phone to Hunchback and calls, say, the Area Commander for the Peninsula.
Nek minnit the Plod in the car are forgetting their breath test kit procedure.
As Bear said, “Will the club save him? Will they even try?”
Hunchback thrived on bullying rather than deep personal loyalties. When his ability to bully is gone, the edifice cracks pretty quickly.

Indolent
Indolent
July 8, 2024 8:27 am
Pogria
Pogria
July 8, 2024 8:29 am

Genies have FOUR Rules. Who knew about the fourth one? 😀

comment image

Indolent
Indolent
July 8, 2024 8:38 am

I’m reading a historical/mystery series set in early 19th century during the Napoleonic wars and the similarities are just amazing. The corruption seems endemic.

@robinmonotti

It’s very simple once you are ready to see it. Unfortunately, too many people are not ready.

Indolent
Indolent
July 8, 2024 8:42 am

@robinmonotti

DEPOPULATION: THE FOUNDATIONAL DOCTRINE OF KEIR STARMER’S LABOUR PARTY:

‘British socialism, reports Jonathan Freedland, had dreams almost as vile as those of the Nazis’:

“The trouble began with Charles Darwin. His breakthrough work, The Origin of Species, did not restrict its impact to the academy and laboratories. Instead it transformed the very way mankind understood itself in the 19th century, its message fast spilling over into the realm of political ideas. Suddenly the religious notion that all life was equally sacred was under attack. Human beings were like any other species – some were more evolved than others. The human race could be divided into different categories and classes. Karl Marx acknowledged his debt – dedicating an early edition of Das Kapital to none other than Charles Darwin.

From the beginning, socialism regarded itself as the natural ally, even the political version, of science. Just as biologists sought to understand animals and plants, so scientific socialism would master people… Crucially, these early leftists regarded science as an utterly neutral tool; something could not be scientifically right and morally wrong. In this climate, says Wooldridge, “eugenics became the political correctness of its day”. If you were modern, you believed in it.

The result was a Darwinian commitment to improving the quality of the nation’s genetic stock. Many of the reforms admired by today’s leftists were not, in fact, borne of a benign desire to improve the lot of the poor, but rather to make Britons fitter – to guarantee their survival as one of the globe’s foremost races. Thus the Webbs pushed for free milk in schools not because their hearts bled for undernourished kids, but because they were alarmed by Britain’s performance in the Boer war, where troops had taken a good kicking at the hands of the black man: the Webbs believed a daily dose of calcium would improve the bones and teeth of the future working class.

The contemporary left has a similarly misguided and sentimental view of Marie Stopes’s campaign to bless the women of King’s Cross and the rest of working-class Britain with contraception. The unrosy reality is that Stopes, Mary Stocks and the like were not motivated by a kind of proto-feminism, but rather by the urge to reduce the numbers of the burgeoning lumpenproletariat. This rather awkward fact was exposed earlier this year with the release of a long-suppressed essay by the father of liberal economics, John Maynard Keynes. He endorsed legalised birth control because the working class was too “drunken and ignorant” to be trusted to keep its own numbers down: “To put difficulties in the way of the use of (contraception) checks increases the proportion of the population born from those who from drunkenness or ignorance or extreme lack of prudence are not only incapable of virtue but incapable also of that degree of prudence which is involved in the use of checks.”

Many on the left were members of the upper middle-class or lower aristocracy, convinced their higher intellectual capacities had to be preserved from proletarian infection. One popular idea of the time was to encourage artificial insemination – not to help the infertile, but to impregnate working-class women with the sperm of men with high IQs. Beatrice Webb was sure her genetic material was worth preserving, describing herself as “the cleverest member of one of the cleverest families in the cleverest class of the cleverest nation of the world”. She and her fellow travellers envisaged a world run by an elite made up of people like her, able to determine who could reproduce and who could not. Always fond of gazing into the future, HG Wells pictured a caste of all-powerful super-talented Ubermenschen, who would wear Samurai-style dress, and order the affairs of the planet.

In this context, there was only contempt for ordinary people, who were regarded as “sub-men” to be tended and looked after – via the welfare state – like a bovine herd.”

Wally Dali
Wally Dali
July 8, 2024 8:42 am

I can recall footage of Hunchback Andrews slumming around the public open spaces with a phalanx of blank clad VicPlod fellas- no wamens, how odd!- surrounding him with state-paid muscle.
Sure as sure, he knew he was in for an egging if he didn’t have protection.
Now he’s got a $25000 KC force field to protect himself from court proceedings.
Guilty.

Boambee John
Boambee John
July 8, 2024 8:42 am

Excellent article by Brendan O’Neill at Spiked, detailing the arrogant interventions of Mooslimes and their lefturd allies in the British general election.

Britain is poised on the brink.

Crossie
Crossie
July 8, 2024 8:45 am

Another time, we can look at the blue-haired teachers, and discuss how their consequences have been a disaster for the human race.

Another time blue-rinse haired ladies were considered very conventional and straight laced. The more apt description for today’s teachers is green or pink haired.

Crossie
Crossie
July 8, 2024 8:49 am

I suspect, though cannot prove, that the attractiveness of Australia as an educational destination has more to do with certain other advantages, beyond receiving a robust education. For families in overseas countries, one in particular, having a son or daughter in overseas education is a toehold out in case things go belly up at home. 

There is nothing to suspect here, it is a fact. Over a million Chinese students so far have received permanent residency with their degrees from our universities.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 8:52 am

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 8:28 am – reposted from the old thread.

There you go, all you ex – servicemen. That’s what the Albanese Government thinks of you.
“Nothing is too good for our veterans, and that’s precisely what they’ll get. NOTHING!”

Veterans ‘left behind’ by looming legal service closure
Matthew Denholm
15 hours ago
110 comments
A lauded national legal service helping veterans fight for their entitlements, compensation and rehabilitation is being quietly axed, prompting warnings they will be left to the mercy of legal “sharks”.
The Defence and Veterans Legal Service faces closure because of a federal funding “cliff”, despite a 41,000 backlog of stalled claims and expectations that findings of the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide findings will generate thousands more.
The nationwide service is prized by veterans because its support and guidance is expert, free, confidential and independent of government and military bodies.
However, its funding ends in September.
If the service, also known as DAVLS, is allowed to close, there are fears many veterans will resort to fee-for-service lawyers and advocates, some of whom are described by veterans as “sharks”.
“Applying for compensation can be difficult and veterans often seek legal assistance during that process,” said Katherine McKernan, executive director of National Legal Aid, which set up the service in late 2021.
“Sadly, some law firms charge large amounts for legal support that is freely available from DAVLS … High fees are also being charged by some fee-for-service advocates – non-lawyers who don’t have to cap their fees when helping people to apply for veteran entitlements.
“The compensation claim process is complex and can be stressful, so access to specialist legal help is critical. We are concerned that if the service ends in September, veterans could be left behind without access to free legal help.”
Ms McKernan said the ­expertise of DAVLS’s lawyers and staff would be lost if it disbanded in September.
With the funding cliff approaching, its staff has already halved from about 40 to about 20.
Veteran Billy Starr’s almost 30-year wait for compensation – after being physically injured, bullied, sexually harassed and raped in the army – was resolved only after she obtained assistance from DAVLS.
After discharging in 1994, Ms Starr was never told about entitlements and described her later experience of seeking compensation as “hell”.
“I was so exhausted by the whole process – if DAVLS hadn’t helped me, I would have given up,” the 54-year-old said.
“The outcome they achieved is phenomenal.
“There was a really important human element too. They had genuine care and compassion, and they had my best interests at heart. That is what veterans need.”
Without DAVLS, she feared others seeking justice would fall victim to “sharks”.
“There’s a lot of people making money out of this at the moment,” she said. “There’s a vulnerable group of veterans, so people start to target them because they see that they may not have the capacity to manage an application.
“And then that causes the ­veteran more financial distress – or they just give up.”

Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 9:04 am

Veterans ‘left behind’ by looming legal service closure
Matthew Denholm

Is that the entire article?

Did Denholm not seek out the Minister of Vet Affairs, Matt Keogh, for comment?

There has recently been some streamlining of legislation to make it easier for veterans to apply for their entitlements in line with recommendations of the RC into veteran suicides.

Last edited 14 days ago by Roger
Eyrie
Eyrie
July 8, 2024 9:06 am

In this context, there was only contempt for ordinary people, who were regarded as “sub-men” to be tended and looked after – via the welfare state – like a bovine herd.”

That, cats and kittehs is *exactly* how our political class think of us.

Chris
Chris
July 8, 2024 9:24 am

the Webbs pushed for free milk in schools not because their hearts bled for undernourished kids, but because they were alarmed by Britain’s performance in the Boer war, where troops had taken a good kicking at the hands of the black man: the Webbs believed a daily dose of calcium would improve the bones and teeth of the future working class.

Really? They thought Boers were black men? FMD, who knew?
Dutchmen and French Huguenots everywhere will be interested to learn this.

Last edited 14 days ago by Chris
Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 9:34 am

…they were alarmed by Britain’s performance in the Boer war, where troops had taken a good kicking at the hands of the black man

Eh?

It was “the white man’s war.”

Blacks were used by the Boer’s in secondary roles, not as frontline fighters (the odd exception proving the rule).

The alarm in Britain was raised by the failure of many recruits to pass the general fitness test, meaning they didn’t even get to South Africa.

Crossie
Crossie
July 8, 2024 9:34 am

A lauded national legal service helping veterans fight for their entitlements, compensation and rehabilitation is being quietly axed, prompting warnings they will be left to the mercy of legal “sharks”.

Whats important is that the illegal immigrants have taxpayer funding to fight their extradition orders.

Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 9:35 am

Snap, Chris.

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
July 8, 2024 9:36 am

Socialists leading in France.
This is a surprise in what sense?
The French have been undermining their own democracy since D Day.
Given a choice, the French will choose the badly.

Ceres
Ceres
July 8, 2024 9:47 am

A possible solution to the problem of aggressive Islam is to pay people to leave.”

How about not bringing them here in the first place? Remember what PM Erdogan of Turkey said. “there is no moderate islam. Islam is islam and that’s it”.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 9:48 am

Payman takes aim at Labor whispering campaignStaff writers

Newly independent Senator Fatima Payman has labelled backgrounding by her former colleagues as “bizarre”, after she confided in them that she was taking guidance from God over her decision to quit the Labor Party.

Speaking on Monday after she had returned to her home state of Perth at the weekend, Senator Payman remarked that the move by Labor MPs “set a precedent that is not really constructive for our modern-day Australia that we’re living in” but would not focus on the intervention.

“It’s quite flattering that people still want to talk about me and give … information that I’d given to them in confidence,” she said.

“But I’m really focused on what’s to come, what is going to serve the best interests of Western Australians in my capacity as their independent senator.”

Senator Payman on Thursday defected from Labor and joined the crossbench over her stance in support of Palestinian statehood, a move that sparked heated criticism from Anthony Albanese who claimed the process had been in train for over a month.

Asked if Labor could rely on her for support to pass legislation, Senator Payman was non-committal.

“It will depend on the bills that are brought forward,” Senator Payman said.

“I’ll have to see, have conversations, make sure that I have consultation on the ground with Western Australians and make sure that I’m representing their voice.”

Didn’t Joan of Arc hear voices from God, and look what happened to her…

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 8, 2024 9:51 am

Rockdoctor on Hunchback

Even if the Oppo Party don’t announce it till after winning an election and get a reliable judge in from overseas in the commonwealth if needed to keep it objective.

Here in Queensland the ghost of Sir Joe is invoked at a drop of a hat to smear conservatives. The stench from the Andrews era dwarfs anything I have ever seen.

The chances of Prosciutto actually going on the attack on something like this are approximately zero.
If the roles were reversed, the likes of Andrews and Allen would be kicking the shit out of whoever it was from the Libs, complete with snide remarks across the chamber about “running over kids on bikes”.
But will Prosciutto ask even the most timid question about who might have been involved and if they still have a job in government?
No.
Because “private matter” and “before the courts”.
Well, the matter of corrupt behaviour in public office is not a “private matter” and it is not before the courts (yet) so it should be open slather. And, if they were smart political operatives they would beat the term “cover up” to death to leave a clear impression that something dodgy has gone on.

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
July 8, 2024 9:51 am

The concern in Britain about the fitness of troops was most highlighted in WWI.
The volunteers from Canada, Australia and the US put the Tommy in a poor light. It was an unfair comparison as carnage of the first two years on the war had decimated the fittest in the British army.
Lack of good nutrition does take its toll. The German population were often worse off than the soldiers in the trenches as the British naval blockade had restricted food imports and supplies were directed to the army.

bons
bons
July 8, 2024 9:59 am

Payman is incredibly well rehearsed.

A silly person might believe that there is conspiracy in play.

Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 10:01 am

The alarm in Britain was raised by the failure of many recruits to pass the general fitness test, meaning they didn’t even get to South Africa.

That aside, I don’t think the roots of modern UK Labour are in 19th C. eugenics but in the vision for Britain of the post-war recovery government of Clement Atlee. Thatcher was an admirer of Atlee, dubbing him “all substance, no show.” Alas, the UK Labour Party has long since gone to seed.

Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 10:05 am

A silly person might believe that there is conspiracy in play.

Faruqi has said she was in conversation with Payman for several weeks before her decision to cross the floor.

Labor has been well and truly outplayed here.

H B Bear
H B Bear
July 8, 2024 10:06 am

Le Frogs have le problem. Macron too clever by half.

Oh come on
Oh come on
July 8, 2024 10:10 am

City of Stirling wins national award for its Glendalough to Scarborough trackless tram trial
‘Trackless tram’? Er…isn’t that a bus?

This reminds me of the geniuses who shut down the Perth to Fremantle train line, I think in the early 80s. They initially proposed a new bus service replacement that was revolutionary because it stopped at every bus stop regardless of whether passengers wanted to embark or disembark – just like a train!

The line was reopened a few years later.

Last edited 14 days ago by Oh come on
cohenite
July 8, 2024 10:13 am

Just saw the results in France. The left are the enemy of the West and want it destroyed; their comments are amazing: dead cops don’t vote and native Frenchmen are the enemies of social cohesion. Macron rather than allow Penn to win did this deal with the commies who have appointed a member of antifa as head of national security:

https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2024/07/07/french-elections-communist-socialist-bloc-victorious-after-deal-with-macron-to-stop-populist-le-pen-party-says-exit-poll/

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 10:24 am

A spokeswoman for Veterans’ Affairs and Defence Personnel Minister Matt Keogh said veterans could receive support in making a claim via free advocacy services listed on an Advocate Register. “These accredited advocates have undertaken the advocacy training and development program,” she said.

Volunteer, unpaid advocates….

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 8, 2024 10:30 am

The concern in Britain about the fitness of troops was most highlighted in WWI.

Recently there’s been much angst in Israel about conscripting Haredi scholars, which is understandable given the IDF desperately needs more men.

But after Oct 7 thousands of Haredi guys volunteered off their own bat, which was very admirable.

There was a tiny problem though. These guys devote their time to learning the Torah, and so the IDF had to reject something like 90% of them because they had too little bodily strength to meet minimum requirements even for support roles.

It was interesting how defense is downstream of culture like that. With mobile phones and super urbanization in the West we already know the armed forces are having a lot of trouble getting acceptable recruits.

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 8, 2024 10:36 am

Andrew Bolt:

It’s karma. Anthony Albanese is just realising – too late! – the danger of the kind of identity politics he last year tried to ram down our throats, now that it’s threatening his Labor Party.

The Prime Minister last week warned deserting Labor Senator Fatima Payman, now Parliament’s unofficial Member for Gaza, not to form a new Muslim political party.

“I don’t want Australia to go down the road of faith-based political parties because what that will do is undermine social cohesion,” he said.

“It is not in the interest of smaller minority groups to isolate themselves.”

What? Who’s this hypocrite?

I agree: our political parties should be for people of whatever faith, colour or origin, so they’re fighting only for what’s good for us all, as Australians.

We’ll be torn apart if we instead get political parties based on race and religion, promoting communal resentments to demand their own politicians and special handouts for “their community”.

No to this ghettoising. This tribalising.

But that’s exactly what Albanese demanded last year, an Aboriginal-only Voice, a kind of advisory parliament, followed by a treaty over sovereignty. That was his own plan for a “smaller minority group” to “isolate themselves” that would undermine “social cohesion” by demanding not just their own politicians but own parliament.

I can see why the scales have now fallen from Albanese’s eyes, because Britain’s election has just shown us the danger Payman and her Muslim supporters are to Labor, and Australia.

Four Muslim independents got elected to Britain’s parliament on Thursday on a pro-Palestine and anti-Israel platform, with one, Shockat Adam, beating a Labour frontbencher in an electorate with 30 per cent Muslim voters.

“This is for Gaza,” Adam crowed.

Another winner, Adnan Hussain, shouted at cheering Muslims: “We will raise our voice for Gaza! We will continue to fight, until death. Inshallah!”

A fifth independent, former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, expelled from Labour after an anti-semitism scandal, also won with the backing of many Muslim voters in his electorate after campaigning hard on Gaza and against Israel.

Meanwhile, two female Labour candidates, who’d just beaten off pro-Gaza Muslim independents in Birmingham, 30 per cent Muslim, said hardliners had threatened, attacked and intimidated their campaigners, even though one of the MPs is Muslim herself.

Backing the winners was a shadowy group called The Muslim Vote – like the Australian group that’s backed Payman. It’s ecstatic.

“Folks, only through the grace of The Almighty, without whom nothing is possible, you did it,” it said, and warned the main political parties: “Muslims are united, in Muslim-heavy areas your majorities will be under threat.”

Formed just six months, it predicted more success when more of Britain’s 4 million Muslims unite behind it.

Something similar could now come here, and Labor is freaking because it holds 27 of the 29 federal seats with solid Muslim minorities. And here they come: Payman and Australia’s version of The Muslim Vote.

Payman claims she suddenly decided just last week, after praying to Allah, to break with Labor over Gaza and demand the immediate recognition of a Palestinian state that’s today led in one half by the Hamas terrorists who started this war with Israel by slaughtering 1200 Israelis, and led in the other half by terrorist sponsors who’ve banned elections for 18 years.

Yes, that’s how extreme – or dangerously naive – Payman is. And that’s how ethnic politics imports foreign conflicts into our peaceful land.

I doubt I exaggerate by calling Payman the Member for Gaza. She says she’ll fight for Palestinians by now sitting in parliament not as a Labor member but as a …. well, she’s not saying, but join the dots.

Before consulting Allah and quitting Labor, Payman actually talked to Australia’s The Muslim Vote, run by a Sydney Iman. She also met Glenn Druery, whose job is helping small political parties get elected. He’s also met The Muslim Vote.

Payman wouldn’t give a straight answer when asked if she’ll now form a Muslim party, an easier job for a sitting senator: “At this stage, I do not plan to form a party … but stay tuned.”

True, a Muslim party would struggle to defeat a Labor MP, even in the seat of Blaxland, held by Education Minister Jason Clare, where 32 per cent of voters are Muslim. Not all Muslims would back a Muslim party, although with Greens and Teal preferences, who knows? Certainly a Senate seat is possible.

So, yes, worry. And hope that Labor stops promoting identity politics, now that it’s paying the price.

Woefully woeful.
Incredible that Labor are looking into Payman’s citizenship not because of anything else than turning on the hand that feeds her.
Now time for Giles and Chesty Blonde to do the same for every other Islamic adherent. Like the arseholes from ISIS coming back and expecting rosy fields.
Islam really has no place in Western democracy and should be avoided.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 8, 2024 10:41 am

Trawling through the reporting on the Frogue General Election, the best English language synopsis is presented by the NY Times.

Despite many in the French media quacking on about his political cunning, it is very clear that Macron has tipped France into a World of Merde.

New Popular Front (NFP)

26.9% vote, 178 seats

Macron + Allies (Ens.)

22.3% vote, 150 seats

National Rally + Allies (RN)

37.3% vote, 142 seats

While this may look like a rerun of the malapportionment seen in the Brit Elections, the NFP is itself a temporary coalition of Loony Leftists (where the Greens are the grown ups in the Party Room, FFS).

So, Macron’s unpopular party is going to have to try to govern with individual fringe nutters, proposing to do government by decree, with contradictory and insane economic policies cobbled together in the past two weeks.

While the RN speaks for the largest bloc of Frogues (plus another 5% of far right voters).

This will not work well – and the EU is having a little poo at the prospect.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
July 8, 2024 10:51 am

We watched the new Sunday debate show on Sky last nite, hosted by Caleb Bond. Five people, 3 men and 2 women, with the women placed with a man on each side, the women being rather screechy, but it was watchable fun. One of the women, a Liz Storer look-alike, said with regard to marriage that she was happily married with two children to an ‘alpha male’, whom she agreed she allowed to pull her up if she got out of line.

Made me laugh and think of my own Hairy Silverback doing the same to me during Saturday’s supermarket shopping. Mostly if I am with him I sit in the car reading the Cat on my phone while he does his important retirement work pounding the aisles in military fashion gathering only that which is usual and necessary according to his game plan. When I accompany him he is irritated by my meandering gathering of ‘stuff’ which he sees as redundant. We already have carrots, he will sigh re my lack of foresight planning, or he’ll ask why I consider a jar of sauerkraut or some sox and tea towels so necessary on what he tells me is one of his ‘short runs’.

On Saturday I decided to come in with him because I’d forgotten my phone and had nothing to read.

Don’t leave my side and don’t wander away, he instructed me first off. But I did a couple of times, silently sneaking an item or two into his trolley (his very own carefully organised trolley, the hide of me!). So Alpha suddenly turned and snarled: any more of that and I’ll have to send you back to the car. Like a good wife, I knew I had tested the limits, and complied. So I waited till the check out for my coup de grace against his authority. I raced over and picked up a potted purple orchid I’d had my eye on for a while and arrived back with it just as he was paying, which always irritates him to bits. I’ll hang on to it in the car and help you pack the other stuff into bags in the back, I say sweetly

Peace offering. Modern marriage, in which man and woman find ways to show their feelings about who is boss. We always give way … sort of. 🙂

Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 10:51 am

I can see why the scales have now fallen from Albanese’s eyes

I’d suggest to Andrew Bolt that if Albanese is concerned about “faith-based political parties” it’s because they’ll likely present a big problem to the Labor Party.

He’s not a principled statesman but a political pragmatist.

Ceres
Ceres
July 8, 2024 10:53 am

The chances of Prosciutto actually going on the attack on something like this are approximately zero.”.

“Prosciutto” will attack nothing because he stands for nothing except his own ego and perks. Geez I thought Michael O’Brien was a dud but a pleasant dud, Matthew Guy just a windsock, but this bloke takes the cake as the biggest turnoff in not only personal attributes but as a LINO. Get rid of him.

eric hinton
eric hinton
July 8, 2024 10:55 am

Here in Queensland the ghost of Sir Joe is invoked at a drop of a hat to smear conservatives. 

One imagines an aging gentleman could get a little sentimental about old school Country Party corruption.

m0nty
m0nty
July 8, 2024 11:19 am

Another resounding electoral victory for the left in Europe. Macron rolled the dice, he got a collect of sorts so I suppose he will think it a success. Could have been much worse.

Bourne1879
Bourne1879
July 8, 2024 11:23 am

Meanwhile what was WA Muslim MP Anne Ali doing? Considering she is an expert in deradjcalisation.

“Faruqi has said she was in conversation with Payman for several weeks before her decision to cross the floor”.

Arky
July 8, 2024 11:24 am

Until all the “normies” abandon mainstream parties and vote for the newly flourishing anti- globalist, nationalist parties, the slow burn communist revolution will continue.
Meanwhile, in Australia, we’re a decade behind.

Arky
July 8, 2024 11:29 am

The West is sleepwalking into totalitarianism.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 8, 2024 11:30 am

it is very clear that Macron has tipped France into a World of Merde.

Once a socialist forever a socialist.

Macron claiming he is an independent centrist was always a lie. He was a member of the Socialist Party and was Economics Minister under the Socialist Valls/Hollande government.

No wonder then he’s signed up with the far-left, since Hollande now leads the far-left New Popular Front.

French Communist-Socialist Bloc Victorious After Making Deal With Macron to Stop Populist Le Pen Party, Says Exit Poll (7 Jul)

Former socialist President François Hollande said he would not be a candidate to become the next prime minister of France. , saying per Le Figaro: “I am not a candidate to lead the government. We are not there… There are too many painful topics in our country at the level of public services and security.”

The former President of the Republic, who served as the head of state prior to Emmanuel Macron from 2012 to 2017, joined the far-left New Popular Front alliance last month and has been sent back to the National Assembly as a socialist deputy (MP).

Peas in a pod. Macron is a classic Fabian hiding behind his sheep’s clothing.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 8, 2024 11:41 am

Ah Klaus, Klaus, who made you God?

Klaus Schwab Says Humanity Must Be “Forced Into Collaboration” With Globalist Elites (8 Jul)

World Economic Forum founder Klaus Schwab told delegates at a conference in China this week that humanity needs to be “forced into a collaboration” with globalist entities.

Speaking at the WEF’s ‘Annual Meeting of the New Champions’, often dubbed the “Summer Davos,” in China, Schwab stated that in order to drive the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” forward, elites must aggressively drive their agenda home.

Orwell’s boot stamping on a human face forever has Mr Schwab’s foot in it.

Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 11:46 am

World Economic Forum founder Klaus Schwab told delegates at a conference in China this week that humanity needs to be “forced into a collaboration” with globalist entities.

Well, he’d be preaching to the choir addressing that audience.

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 8, 2024 11:51 am

So when is Turtlehead going to be censured for misinformation? Daily Telegraph:

The energy modelling Chris Bowen has used to justify the push for renewables is under fresh scrutiny after claims it failed to include the cost of expensive offshore wind farms and grossly underestimating the efficiency of nuclear power plants.

In a scathing critique of the agency, which was forced to revise its GenCost report after dozens of submissions calling for a review, energy expert Aidan Morrison said the CSIRO based their renewables modelling on a mix of onshore wind and grid scale solar.

This is despite the Albanese government pushing for a number of offshore wind projects including on the south coast of NSW, off Gippsland in Victoria and in Bunbury in Western Australia.

There’s more but this is only the opening parts of the article.
Someone’s lying.

Bourne1879
Bourne1879
July 8, 2024 11:55 am

Looking through Daily Mail UK headlines and you get:
More power to Unions
Discounted prison time
Recognition of Palestine
EU reps discussing UK return to EU.
Defence Minister in Ukraine

Its time for another Roman invasion of Britain.

132andBush
132andBush
July 8, 2024 12:00 pm

m0nty

July 8, 2024 11:19 am

Another resounding electoral victory for the left in Europe. Macron rolled the dice, he got a collect of sorts so I suppose he will think it a success. Could have been much worse.

All well and good.

What everyone here wants to know is have you come to terms with your negative attitudes to women? Real women.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 8, 2024 12:18 pm

The 28-year-old’s condition is so severe it is unclear if he himself will survive the horrific fire that claimed the lives of three of his children – a 10-month-old baby girl and two boys, aged three and six.

He was taken to hospital under police guard and placed in an induced coma for injuries including burns and smoke inhalation. No charges have been laid.

Ideally, he would be brought out of his induced coma, say every hour, for people to check on his condition. And perhaps to get him out of bed to walk around a bit.

Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 12:19 pm

Its time for another Roman invasion of Britain.

The Romans are otherwise occupied.
There are, however, some swarthy chaps across the channel who feel the tide has just turned in their favour.

Vicki
Vicki
July 8, 2024 12:28 pm

How lovely to see Cheng Lai, who was imprisoned for 3 years in China, as a news anchor on Sky today.

Bazinga
Bazinga
July 8, 2024 12:38 pm

French not angry enough yet. Give it another term

cohenite
July 8, 2024 12:50 pm

According to Candice Owens macron’s missus who raped him when he was 10 or something, is really a bloke:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81ec0BTdAd0

local oaf
July 8, 2024 12:52 pm

Albo: “I don’t want Australia to go down the road of faith-based political parties because what that will do is undermine social cohesion,”

If there was a right wing Christian party threatening to split the Liberal Party, I suspect Albo would be delighted.

BobtheBoozer
BobtheBoozer
July 8, 2024 12:54 pm

Cassie :
Your post of “Screams Before the Silence” has been removed – censored – from my Facebook Site. Interestingly, they claim I am trying to get ‘likes’ for it.
I certainly don’t see it that way, I see it as part of their antiJewish position.

Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 1:04 pm

ROBERT GOTTLIEBSEN (Paywallian):

The positions taken by Opposition leader Peter Dutton and Nationals head David Littleproud on the potential break ups of Bunnings, Woolworths and Coles opens the door on Australia’s emerging new political and business power structure.
Both Dutton and Littleproud see a divestiture threat as akin to an atom bomb.
It is highly unlikely to be used because the threat it poses to large corporates will change their behaviours.
In politics, Dutton is deliberately leading the Liberals into a new era by ending the days when the party were closely aligned with large corporations.
There is still a relationship, but on an increasing number of issues large Australian corporates are becoming the third side of a power triangle where the other two sides are their large shareholders (big superannuation funds) and the ALP/unions.
The power triangle was used to attack the Coalition in the Aboriginal referendum when the large corporations funded the ALP attack on Dutton and Littleproud.
Woolworths, Bunnings’ owner Wesfarmers and Coles were among those who joined the attack on the Coalition.
Large companies will use the triangle to modify the blows of the industrial relations legislation. Medium-sized and smaller enterprises are in more danger.
The Coalition now aims to be the party of “the forgotten” — middle sized and small businesses and their employees — who are suffering cost of living pressures, including those engineered by the power triangle.
While most of the current emphasis has been on potentially breaking the two big supermarkets’ pricing power, the prospect of Bunnings dominating the distribution of both retail and trade building products may generate more future issues.
In the traditional home of capitalism, the United States, the break-up weapon has been used at least twice.
Between 1899 and 1911, John D Rockefeller’s Standard Oil company operated a near monopoly in the American oil industry and was the largest corporation in the US.
The Supreme Court ordered a break-up. However, the remaining Standard Oil New Jersey company (now Exxon) remains powerful.
Until 1982, AT&T had a near monopoly of US telecommunications. The break-up efforts started in 1972 and finally AT&T, realising it was about to lose, proposed a split formula which was accepted by the courts.
In Australia, Bunnings is the nearest to the two US examples.
Just over 30 years ago Bunnings was basically a WA hardware operation with Wesfarmers as its major shareholder.
Bunning is now using the power it derives from its dominance of the retail sector to attack the trade sector.
Bunnings purchased McEwan’s in Melbourne from the administrator for just $48m. McEwan’s senior executives had a plan, which when combined with Wesfarmers capital and Bunnings own plans saw the launch of the now well-known Bunnings large stores.
The major established hardware retailers on the east coast foolishly did not respond to the Bunnings initiative.
But, the Bunnings strategy was right, and it now dominates the do-it-yourself hardware market. It was a superb operation, interrupted only by a failed attempt to do the same thing in the UK.
Woolworths tried to challenge Bunnings in retail but didn’t have Bunnings’ management skills and the ill-fated Woolworths’ thrust propelled Bunnings even faster.
Bunnings is now using the power it derives from its dominance of the retail sector to attack the trade sector.
In addition, one of its weapons is its ability to make its own trusses in most states and offer major builders an attractive total supply contract with low-priced trusses as a lynch pin.
Unless the smaller rivals can match, the builders will have little choice but to accept the Bunnings offer.
The power of this marketing and supply chain operation will over time severely damage or wipe out most of the Bunnings’ competitors in the trade area.
Bunnings will then dominate both sectors and the total Australian building supply industry. This full control of the market, of course, as the US found with Standard Oil and AT&T, is not a healthy situation. Customers and suppliers normally suffer.
The rising power of Bunnings has been brought to the attention of ACCC chief Gina Cass-Gottlieb.
The supermarket sector involves different issues. The base for any potential action will be the current ACCC investigation of the sector.
The nation expects the skills Cass-Gottlieb and her people applied to unpicking Qantas’ ticketing fraud will be applied to analysing the supermarket area.
Here are some of the things I think she will find:
– The gross supermarket margins Coles, Woolworths and others parade to the politicians are not worth a bag of beans. The only way to understand margins is to link stock turnover to the gross margin. The supermarkets use those figures all the time and they can be compared to the rest of the world.
– Cass-Gottlieb will look at the supply chain economics. As I understand it, she will discover insufficient investment has been made in the supply chain, including temperature controls.
This leads to incredible waste which needs to be fixed and the rewards of this investment need to be shared with suppliers — particularly smaller suppliers — and customers.
If Woolworths and Coles don’t lift their supply chain economics and reduce waste, then the argument to split them up will be overwhelming. Dutton believes by having ‘the atom bomb’ in the community armoury, the supermarkets will make the required investment.
– The unfair contract legislation, which has the force of law, is much more powerful than the code of conduct to protect small suppliers. Cass-Gottlieb can show how to use the unfair contract rules to protect smaller farmers and suppliers.
The bottom line with Woolworths and Coles (especially Coles) is action is required to improve their operation to make them world class.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 8, 2024 1:07 pm

Bath tap turn off.

Tourist attraction loses $170k by going cashless (7 Jul)

A popular UK tourist attraction has lost a whopping $170,000 worth of donations after it banned cash.

Visitors to the Roman Baths in Bath have been stopped from throwing money into the historic attraction and are instead asked to make a contactless payment.

But the move has had devastating consequences.

The charity organisation behind the well-known site banned the use of the wishing well in March 2022. In the last financial year, it collected just $17,000 in donations despite welcoming one million visitors in 2023.

Visitors were greeted with a sign that said: “Please do not throw coins in the bath. Tap the Contactless point or use the cash box to make your offering.”

Prior to that it had raked in almost $200,000 from donations when it was fully open between 2018 and 2019 before the pandemic hit, with $170,000 coming from the 1.6m plunge pool that had been turned into a wishing well for visitors.

Chucking a coin into a historical water feature has a tactile and symbolic feeling to it. I’m amused that by going cashless Bath ended up, well, cashless.

John H.
John H.
July 8, 2024 1:15 pm

It is highly unlikely to be used because the threat it poses to large corporates will change their behaviours.

In politics, Dutton is deliberately leading the Liberals into a new era by ending the days when the party were closely aligned with large corporations.

The CEOs know what is going on, have been down this road before, and will not be scared.

Eyrie
Eyrie
July 8, 2024 1:16 pm

The bottom line with Woolworths and Coles (especially Coles) is action is required to improve their operation to make them world class.

Because government meddling always makes things better.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
July 8, 2024 1:19 pm

Umm, says Hairy tentatively, slightly perplexed, are those what you’d call ‘tailored’ pants? as I place something comfortable and marginally denim-ish on our bed for a luncheon occasion. The dress code, he informs me, says ‘ladies – skirts or tailored pants’. Oops, where is it being held again? I ask. The Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron, he replies, waving his good shirt for me to iron. Sydney’s finest. So – a rethink as I drag out a dull but classic pair of grey ‘tailored’ pants, pick out a more ‘classic’ top, and off we go on the ferry, as parking is so bad in Kirribilli near those two harbourside icons of the PM’s Kirribilli House the GG’s Admiralty House. The RSYS is there too, with impossible parking.

At the gates to this Sydney icon we meet up with Toby Young, founder of the British Free Speech Union, one of the editors of the British Spectator, and the guest of honour at the RSYS fundraising luncheon, who is also unsure of the entry procedure. Along then come various stalwarts of the Aussie Spectator, whom we recognise from TV, and we all decide en masse to brave the entry without ringing the bell as required by the forbidding notice. We then descend a pathway to discover the delights of this old Gentlemen’s Retreat. Another group of diners were yachties also having a vintage car display in the grounds, which enhanced the antique ambience. On entry, I note from the Squadron’s Board of Honour that in times past the Commodore was either a Royal of note, or some other British aristo.

The place is a delight. Comfortable as an old British country house, with real log fires blazing in front of lazy sofas in the wide reception gathering area where champagne circulated to ease the mixing before we took our allocated places in the adjacent dining room. From both spaces the forty of us could enjoy the wide harbour scape as the sun appeared briefly from the Sydney drizzle. We are, Rowan Dean, announced in his opening remarks, suitably placed to look directly over to Malcolm Turnbull’s mansion, which set an amusing tone for the three course meal with plentiful wines and the speeches from notables. There was also a goodly break between courses leaving time for moving between tables to chat and meet and opine. Toby Young was hilarious reviewing his checkered career and telling Boris Johnson anecdotes, with appropriate vocal mimicry, Tony Abbott told similar tales out of school, and a very good time was had by all.

The ferry stop was two minutes away. At Circular Quay Hairy said we’re not up to any further ferry trips today, and we walked straight into a taxi home.
Tired but happy, as we used to all write in our school compositions.

Crossie
Crossie
July 8, 2024 1:22 pm

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare

 July 8, 2024 10:51 am

We watched the new Sunday debate show on Sky last nite, hosted by Caleb Bond. Five people, 3 men and 2 women, with the women placed with a man on each side, the women being rather screechy, but it was watchable fun. One of the women, a Liz Storer look-alike,

That was Lucy Zelic, sister of Ned Zelic, former captain of the Socceroos. She used to be a sports reporter at SBS. I can see why she is no longer at SBS, her opinions are too normal. She even said that she is a God-fearing woman, oh my. She fits well at Sky after dark. She agreed a lot with Caroline Marcus in last night’s program, another good sign.

Rosie
Rosie
July 8, 2024 1:59 pm

I’ve never tossed a coin in the Trevi but hasn’t stopped me going back to Rome.
I think I’ve walked past a couple of times with family but not for ages. It’s too hectic and there is so much else to do.
Wasn’t there a controversy about where the money from the Trevi was going a few years ago?

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 2:00 pm

Anyone seen Hillbilly Elegy on Netflix based on JD Vance’s life story?I watched it last night. Decent movie. I hope he’s prez one day.

Last edited 14 days ago by JC
Rockdoctor
Rockdoctor
July 8, 2024 2:13 pm

There has recently been some streamlining of legislation to make it easier for veterans to apply for their entitlements in line with recommendations of the RC into veteran suicides.

Mate tells me the new act is worse than the old compo wise and the Gold Card is gone. In his words they never change anything for the better. In 2026 apparently the 3 acts in force are being reduced to the newest with no grandfathering of the old.

Zulu, my mate said advocates are overwhelmed and vast majority can deal with bureaucracy but when things escalate there aren’t nearly enough who could go all the way to the AAT. Mate had issues with his advocate being slow to answer simple questions, palmed him of to SOP’s when he asked about claims and a couple of other things he was displeased about. RSL backed too, when he looked around other organisations made the RSL look good so he kept with them and did well enough.

My 2c worth, if we fund human trash like NYZQ’s lawyers we should be able to fund lawyers for the vets who are at least worthy…

Crossie
Crossie
July 8, 2024 2:22 pm

Roger

 July 8, 2024 11:46 am

World Economic Forum founder Klaus Schwab told delegates at a conference in China this week that humanity needs to be “forced into a collaboration” with globalist entities.

Well, he’d be preaching to the choir addressing that audience.

This choir consists only of the elites, both Western and Chinese, the ordinary populations of the world have much more in common with each than the elites in our countries. We, the hoi polloi, all want a comfortable and happy family life, a purposeful job and possibility to advance ourselves and our progeny.

The world is currently dividing into two classes, the commoners and the nobles. The middle class is in the process of being erased by stupidities like environmentalism and open borders that are resulting in economic recession and the inflation rate being accompanied by rising interest rates.

This is being done all at once so it is hard to fight on all fronts at the same time while the elites have the means to do what they want.

I thought 2020 was bad and that it couldn’t get any worse and then each subsequent year it did. We need some luck and divine providence, it’s time to pray.

Rosie
Rosie
July 8, 2024 2:25 pm

I’m in not so sunny Canberra with family. Miss 4 has croup, crept down to me last night, fetched her two glasses of water then her temp flared( to 40.5) and I woke mum who took her back to hospital for second night in a row, sneaking over the border to avoid an infinite wait at one of the ACT’s public hospitals. Saw a doc straight away, breathing okay and oxygen saturation fine so home to bed. Finally showing a little improvement, I know some would think it fussing but she’s asthmatic and inclined to chest infections and my philosophy with young children is always to err on the side of caution.
She’s now sitting snuggled into my side watching Arthur and preventing me from getting off the couch.
Things could be worse.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 2:28 pm
billie
billie
July 8, 2024 2:42 pm

Senator Payman “But I’m really focused on what’s to come, what is going to serve the best interests of Western Australians in my capacity as their independent senator.”

That’s a change, as being a Labor Senator she was there to serve the interests of the Labor Party and certainly not the people of WA.

She was happy with that and what, recently discovered what Senators actually do? Suuuure!

She’s perfect for the role though, managed to keep a straight face while bullshytting that she cares ..

Last edited 14 days ago by billie
H B Bear
H B Bear
July 8, 2024 3:01 pm

Teh Paywallian reporting that Chairman Dan being represented by Brittany’s lawyer Zwier. Liar fingerprints all over this.

KevinM
KevinM
July 8, 2024 3:12 pm

Not watching TV, have not seen Bowen for a while, he must be under pressure and not ageing well.

Screenshot-2024-07-08-150813
KevinM
KevinM
July 8, 2024 3:33 pm

BobtheBoozer
July 8, 2024 3:16 pm

Aren’t the records still available at the base station?

I don’t know – I was kept tech frei for about ten years while I was out bush.

Just as the internet is not for ever, despite what we may think, phone companies are not keeping records for ever either. Having said that, deleting messages on your phone is not the answer there is a record kept of all messages on the servers.

For how long I don’t know.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
July 8, 2024 3:41 pm

‘Tis the bleak midwinter right now. All the leaves are gone from the deciduous trees, even the Jacaranda is thinning out already. And the birdies are hungry, hungry. Cold seeps over the top of my warm booties and rests on my knees, my legs. Hairy wanders after me turning off fires in my wake, and so rooms are cold when I return to them. He’s not trying to save electricity, so I don’t know why he does this. Maybe he thinks I’ll leave a scarf to flutter down and create a fire, especially in my study with its open radiator. So silly. I’m not anything like in Joe Biden’s league of needing constant watching. Don’t think I’m getting old, I accuse him. I’m not, he replies. You’ve always been like that. Oh, touche…

I am reading a bodice-ripper lent to me by a friend who picked it out specially for when I need to escape from ‘those serious things you are always reading’. It’s dead sexy, full of panting lovers and heartfelt passions. Winter fare.

Jock
Jock
July 8, 2024 3:47 pm

BBC are creating a “color blind” historical series on the Norman invasion. There will be caribbeans, arabs, chinese etc used to tell the story of the Viking descended Normans invading Anglo Saxon England. The cretins never learn.

Zippster
Zippster
July 8, 2024 4:14 pm

Tesla shorts are copping a hiding

Cassie of Sydney
July 8, 2024 4:18 pm

In politics, Dutton is deliberately leading the Liberals into a new era by ending the days when the party were closely aligned with large corporations.

Perhaps Dutton or one of his advisors reads the Cat? We’ve discussed here before how the Liberals should sideline the large corporates.

When I first read last week the Liberals new policy of ‘Keeping supermarkets in check‘, I was strangely mute about it. It’s a policy aimed at Coles and Woolworths, the two biggest supermarket chains in the country. I felt no desire, no willingness, and no eagerness to jump up and defend either corporate. Yet if such a policy had been unveiled by the Liberals back in say 2010, I would have been appalled. My initial feeling was one of contempt for the two big supermarket corporates, and my contempt for them isn’t due to rising prices, inflation or even the fact that they are duopolies. I think it was JC who wrote here that the profit margins for supermarkets aren’t that high. I’m no economist and economics isn’t my shtick, which is why I avoid economic debates here like the plague. When it comes to economics I have some old fashioned and probably very unfashionable views…but I’m no expert. Yet once upon a time I would have defended both Coles and Woolworths. No more. But you see, my contempt for Coles and Woolworths isn’t due to economics or duopolies. No, it’s due to the fact that both supermarket corporates, along with other big corporates such as Santos, BHP, even department stores such as David Jones, haven’t exactly endeared themselves to ordinary Australians over the last decade. In fact, these corporates taken great pleasure in spitting in out faces. Over the last ten years they have become Increasingly sanctimonious, divisive, political and woke, they refuse to stick to their knitting. Be it on SSM, the Voice, transgenderism, Australia Day, even Anzac Day, these companies have soiled themselves. Just before Easter this year, I strolled through David Jones here in Sydney’s CBD (a store that is now a shell of what it was) and I noticed NO Easter decorations but there were numerous ‘Happy Ramadan’ signs. I was livid and lodged a complaint, and in that complaint I also requested David Jones also put up some Happy Passover signs up. I’m yet to receive a response to my complaint and no Happy Passover signs were put up.
Corporate Islamisation, repulsive, isn’t it?

A few weeks ago I caught up with some other Cats at an IPA function here in Sydney’s CBD. The evening was a discussion between Fred Pawle and Oz cartoonist Johannes Leak. Scott Hargreaves, who now heads the IPA, spoke before Johannes and Fred, and in his opening salvo Scott mentioned the name ‘George Coles’. Coles was, of course, the founder of Coles Supermarkets and……wait for this……one of the founders of the Conservative thinktank, the IPA. Coles was also a great friend of Robert Menzies.

Yes, you read that right.

I have mentioned this before on this blog but it’s worth remembering that once upon a time the IPA received large donations from some of this country’s biggest companies. No more, those donations have dried up over the last decade, and the reason is even more perverse than being just ‘woke’. It appears that some of these corporates have succumbed to bullying from progressive activists and so they’ve withdrawn donations to the conservative thinktank. But the IPA (like Advance) is thriving, thanks to the thousands of ordinary Australians (men and women such as myself, Lizzie and Hairy, Rabz and Rafe) who now donate their hard earned dosh, along with donations from small and medium sized businesses across this country. Of course, Gina Rinehart remains a major donor, I don’t think Gina is the type to succumb to bullies. There are other prominent families and large businesses who remain donors but the IPA is fiscally healthy because of ordinary Australians, that is the lifters of this country, those men and women Bob Menzies talked about in his 1942 speech. And anyway, given how the large corporates, such as Coles, Woolworths, Qantas and so on have darkened their names with their adolescent and puerile progressive activism, as far as I am concerned they now stink and the IPA is better off without these tainted corporates…..along with the Liberal Party of Australia.

The Liberal party should also steer clear of these tainted corporates. It’s time to give them the cold shoulder. I wonder if the Liberals are now awake to the fact that these corporates are no friends of ordinary Australians and they are most certainly no friend to conservative political parties. Could that have been an influence behind their Keeping supermarkets in check? And I hope that the Liberals have not forgotten how, prior to the last election, these corporates cosied up to Labor and allied themselves closely with Albo, particularly with his racist Voice, and they sunk lots of dosh into that disgraceful campaign.
Those corporations deserve to be punished.

But back to a great Australian by the name of George Coles. George must by turning in his grave at the state of Coles today. And to think we have gone from the likes of George Coles to da Voice spruiker Brad Banducci.

It tells us a lot about how far this country has fallen.

Just a random rant….apologies.

Last edited 14 days ago by Cassie of Sydney
KevinM
KevinM
July 8, 2024 5:08 pm

Not everything was hanky-dory and fun during the war years in England. One must wonder what those still alive, if any, thinking of the state of affairs today?

Screenshot-2024-07-08-170330
Roger
Roger
July 8, 2024 5:09 pm

I see WA Premier Roger Cook gave Senator Payman quite a dressing down via the media today.

“Poisonous” was the word he used, reportedly.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 5:33 pm

https://www.michaelsmithnews.com/2024/07/aunty-gucci-is-back.html

Seems she never got the Governor General’s post.

johanna
johanna
July 8, 2024 5:38 pm

Bruce of Newcastle
July 8, 2024 3:35 pm

Reply to  KevinM
“Experts”.
It’s been interesting to watch how the word “experts” has gone from being taken on face value to becoming synonymous with “bullshit artist” in only four years.

Nonsense. I recall writing a comment here (or maybe even at Sinc’s) more than four years ago about the Giant Rolodex of Experts in the bowels at Ultimo. The Rolodex contains the names and contact details of academics, CSIRO and other government employees, and moral entreprenuers in private practice who are guaranteed to agree with TheirABC’s opinions.

We really need some right-wing comics – it’s such a target-rich environment. Plus, a drinking game where people had to take a shot every time theirABC cited ‘experts’ would be fun, but short-lived. Everyone would be paralytic in less time than it takes for a Greens MP to switch on the lights, heating, TV, internet and stove when getting home on a winter’s night.

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 8, 2024 5:43 pm

Spectacular own goal!

Magistrate’s scathing judgment in Straddie land clearing case

A North Stradbroke Island indigenous elder and ranger who is appealing a $20,000 fine for illegal land clearing was slammed by a magistrate who said the act could ‘cheapen’ native title.

Quandamooka man Darren Burns has launched a District Court appeal claiming his native title rights allowed him to knock down a swath of trees on Straddie to build a house for his daughter, and he was exempt from planning laws.

Mr Burns, a Quandamooka ranger on Straddie which is also known by its Indigenous name of Minjerribah, was found guilty in Brisbane Magistrates Court in February of illegally clearing 2900 sqm of “protected vegetation” at Point Lookout in a prosecution brought by Redland City Council.

But in a District Court appeal to be heard next month, lawyers for Mr Burns have contended that magistrate Ross Mack erred in finding that the Quandamooka man was not exercising his “inherent rights” under native title to clear the land.

They have asked the superior court to acquit Mr Burns or order a new trial.

The Courier-Mail has obtained a copy of Mr Mack’s sentencing remarks in which he was scathing of Mr Burns’ actions and flatly rejected his native title arguments.

The magistrate said that some time after 2015, Mr Burns had decided that he should set aside some land on the island so he could build a house for his daughter.

Mr Mack said Mr Burns had “had his eye on the land” – which was elevated with views to the north – for some time and had burnt some trees on the block “to identity to other people that the land was taken and that they should look elsewhere if they wanted to claim the land in the way that he had”.

In 2020, Mr Burns had brought in a contractor to clear the land, leaving only one large bloodwood tree still standing and sparking a police investigation.

Mr Mack found that the land contained “essential habitat and remnant vegetation” and rejected Mr Burns’ submission that he was engaging in a “traditional Aboriginal cultural activity” in clearing the site.

“It is crystal clear that the purpose of the clearing was to provide a building site for a house that Mr Burns intended to build,” the magistrate said.

Mr Mack said another submission that Mr Burns was reducing potential fire hazards by removing unhealthy and dangerous trees was “disingenuous”.

“I find as a matter of fact that the clearing of the land conducted on behalf of Mr Burns was conducted for the sole purpose of providing a cleared area upon which he proposed to erect a substantial and permanent house for his daughter,” the magistrate said.

“The land was not cleared (as part of a) traditional land management practice. It was never Mr Burns’ intention to utilise the fallen timber as a resource. The timber was stacked into piles with a view to burning it.

“There is no credible evidence that it was going to be used for or by anyone for any purpose and the notion that the burnt timber would somehow be used to enrich the soil was disingenuous at best and is dismissed as a matter of fact.”

Mr Mack found Mr Burns had not engaged in a traditional Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander cultural activity in clearing the land and he was guilty of the charge of carrying out a prohibited development.

The magistrate said native title was “an important part of our national being … it enriches us as a community and as a society” and “must be protected”.

“And what was, in fact, in my view, a cynical grab for land should not be tolerated, and it needs to be addressed by way of penalty,” he said.

“Because if it’s not, the whole nature of native title is cheapened or reduced somehow because it is – native title is relevant to everyone in Australia.”

Mr Mack said there was a demand for general deterrence in the community, “where if there is a general consensus or notion that Quandamooka people can simply take land for their own personal use in a way that you chose to do, needs to be discouraged”.

He said Mr Burns had cleared a “substantial” parcel of land but did not believe he deserved “anywhere near” the maximum $600,000 penalty, and instead fined him $20,000.

The Redland council has said it respected native title on Minjerribah but had prosecuted Mr Burns “solely to address the unlawful clearing of that land”.

Indolent
Indolent
July 8, 2024 5:44 pm
Top Ender
Top Ender
July 8, 2024 5:53 pm

Meanwhile in military history news, have just come across the names HMS Shakespeare and USS Cisco from WWII.

Eyrie
Eyrie
July 8, 2024 6:08 pm

Anyways, I found taking off and flying was easier than learning to to drive a car.
Landing needed a bit more attention
But the main thing is where are you going?
Navigating is the hardest thing in flying you have to learn.

Landing is the only hard part of aircraft handling. The dirty little secret pilots have is that most fixed wing aircraft fly themselves quite nicely. Only a little guidance is required most of the time. Flying is easy, the thinking that is required can be hard.
I did my private licence in 1994 just before GPS came into common use. Always amazed me when by flying with the directional gyro and the compass and a ground speed guesstimate, that the desired place would turn up over the nose. I had over 2000 hours in gliders by then, most of it cross country and a few hundred in competitions. We navigated by pilotage, using the map and landmarks. Always knew where we were with a couple of exceptions with people I knew (flew over home base on last leg, kept going until lack of thermals caused a landing). GPS with moving map displays has made powered aircraft navigation very easy. In flight connectivity on the iPad or Android device gives real time weather, satellite pictures, BoM radar etc.
Likewise gliders with some gliding specific additions.
If you don’t know why you have a PPL you may like to consider trying sailplanes. As you can already fly the learning process should be relatively painless

calli
calli
July 8, 2024 6:16 pm

James MacPherson delivered a very powerful, well reasoned monologue on Sky this evening.

The subject – religion and its place in politics.

Hopefully it will be available tomorrow for anyone who missed it.

Crossie
Crossie
July 8, 2024 6:17 pm

Watching the news is so haunting when there are now reports of two lots of killings due to domestic violence. I suspect both of these tragic events are also drug-related yet our government is wasting money on an anti-vaping campaign. I have never known of any incident where violence occurred due to nicotine consumption yet smokers and vapers* are demonised while drug addicts have safe injecting rooms provided by taxpayers.

Where are anti-marijuana smoking ads or anti injecting ads? What’s even worse marijuana is legal to grow for personal use. Is tobacco allowed the same leeway?

Even though activists justify safe injecting rooms and methadone clinics as minimising harm for the addicts they do nothing to get them to quit so they remain a danger to their families and community at large.

*I am not a smoker nor a vaper but I can see the incongruence in their treatment.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 8, 2024 6:19 pm

Great hard-hitting analysis as usual Cassie. Coles and Woolworths are odious to say the least. This new schtick of insulting your customers is strange though.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 8, 2024 6:24 pm

and bullying your customers

Arky
July 8, 2024 6:27 pm

It appears that some of these corporates have succumbed to bullying from progressive activists

Until traditionalists start playing the game of well organised campaigns aimed at getting what they want out of corporates the choice for those corporations will stay an easy one: pander to the shitheads who repeatedly show themselves capable of damaging them with bad publicity and ignore the people who won’t do a damn thing to attempt to influence the world they live in, either out of fear or indifference.

Last edited 14 days ago by Arky
Cassie of Sydney
July 8, 2024 6:32 pm

We really need some right-wing comics – it’s such a target-rich environment.

I agree, I don’t know of any here in Oz but the UK and USA have some really good right-wing comics, two excellent and very funny UK right-wing comics are Leo Kearse and Andrew Lawrence.

Father Ted creator Graham Linehan has also swallowed some red pills over the last six years, whilst he probably wouldn’t be comfortable with the label ‘right-wing’, he’s no longer of the left.

cohenite
July 8, 2024 6:33 pm

Tom Slater from Spiked Online opining that muzzies are just like ordinary folk; just getting on with their life, don’t won’t no trouble, minding their own business, obeying the rules, being peace loving citizens.

People are fuking idiots.

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 6:34 pm

The New Popular Front’s economic program includes massive fiscal expenditure and price controls. Yet the markets are shrugging it off after going haywire over Le Pen’s much more modest program. Why is that?

Why indeed.

Simple. Macron will veto (not sign into law) any stupid shit coming from the left. And even though the Right isn’t in any form of coalition, and in fact despise each other, there’s no possibility they’ll vote in unison with the Left and therefore can stop anything from getting to Macron’s desk. However, this isn’t 100% because:

Having said that, the French can’t rely on the National Front not support stupid shit as part of the party platform was to reverse Marcron’s policy of raising the retirement age/benefits from 62 to a massively high 64 years of age.

Last edited 14 days ago by JC
DrBeauGan
DrBeauGan
July 8, 2024 6:40 pm

Tom Slater from Spiked Online opining that muzzies are just like ordinary folk; just getting on with their life, don’t won’t no trouble, minding their own business, obeying the rules, being peace loving citizens.

Largely true. The problem is that somewhere between one tenth of a percent and one percent are homicidal maniacs, and the rest can’t control them. We in the West used to be able to control our loonies, although we lost that ability somewhen.

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 6:41 pm

Let me say this about the National Front. Their respect for the French culture and keeping it intact is beyond question. But their economic policies are fcking dreadful. Perhaps, that’s the reason they didn’t do so well in the second round. Perhaps the French people saw the NF adding value at the EU level, but then took a dive at what a mess they would create with economic policies domestically.

Their economic policies are freaking bizarre.

The Front’s common programme includes scrapping the 2023 French pension reform law, increasing public sector salaries and welfare benefits, raising the minimum wage by 14 percent, and freezing the price of basic food items and energy.

Last edited 13 days ago by JC
Cassie of Sydney
July 8, 2024 6:43 pm

James MacPherson delivered a very powerful, well reasoned monologue on Sky this evening.

I regard James and Liz Storer as two of Sky’s biggest stars.

Cassie of Sydney
July 8, 2024 6:45 pm

Oh and the big American right-wing comic stars is Greg Gutfeld….he’s really funny!

calli
calli
July 8, 2024 6:46 pm

We really need some right-wing comics – it’s such a target-rich environment. 

They don’t even need to be “right wing”.

Just funny. Which means observant of human frailty in all its forms…especially pomposity.

Remember Max Gillies and Rubbery Figures?

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 6:51 pm

I couldn’t understand a word of the Gladiator theme music, so I looked up what language the lyrics were in. I had assumed it was Latin, but the lyrics and language are entirely made up.

Davey Boy
Davey Boy
July 8, 2024 6:58 pm

Posted the link to Leak’s cartoon to my FB feed this morning

(today’s Leak is of Farooki in Hamas headwear, doing some whitewashing over Oct.7)

Have been directly linking (in FB) to his cartoons, regularly for ages, no problem. Leak’s cartoons appear in the MSM.

But today:
came back to FB later, found that my post had been removed for the reason “It looks like you tried to get likes, follows, shares or video views in a misleading way” and “This goes against our Community Standards on spam.”

Looks like FB is now officially in bed with Hamas.

(P.S. not sure why my posts here are going into moderation each time, do I have a bad breath or something)

cohenite
July 8, 2024 7:11 pm

Largely true.

Professor Clive Kessler addressed this issue: are most muzzies nice or not; the short answer is no. The professor, one of the world’s leading experts on islam, divided islam into 3 groups:

1 15% are modern, Westernised and accepting of Western values and laws.

2 Another 15% are actively engaged in imposing sharia on the world, through whatever means, terrorism included, necessary.

3 The remaining 70% implicitly support the second group while not joining in with the methodology of terrorism.

That’s 85% of ALL muslims who believe and want sharia to replace Western values. 85%. That conforms to ALL polls taken of the palestinians after Oct 7 showing a similar % who supported what hamas did.

Kessler’s article here:

Deradicalisation of militant Muslims not a viable option (unsw.edu.au)

As I’ve already mentioned Dr Peter Hammond in his book, Slavery, Terrorism and Islam, outlines how islam takes over host Western nations. What is happening in Australia now conforms to Hammond’s formula.

How Islam progressively takes over countries | God Reports

Anyone who believes a large group of muslims will conform to the Western values of its host nation is deluding themselves.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 8, 2024 7:22 pm

The old perv might pardon himself…

Biden’s Blackmail – American Thinker

Tom
Tom
July 8, 2024 7:22 pm

My God, Andrew Blot is a sanctimonious boor. He’s not a journalist, just arrogant loudmouth ramming his opinions down people’s throats — usually by talking over the people he invites onto his Sky News soapbox.

I bet he didn’t pay for a ticket to see Tucker Carlson on tour because he regards him as celebrity competition.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 8, 2024 7:34 pm

Why do they have two rounds of voting in France? Do you have the same choice the second time?

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 7:41 pm

I think it’s the top two candidates move to the second round, Milt. The idea is that the winning candidate scores over 50%. I think it’s actually a good system.

Miltonf
Miltonf
July 8, 2024 7:47 pm

ok thanks JC

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 8, 2024 7:53 pm

Slowly working through Randy Newman’s catalogue of music. Nearly all new to me.

“When I’m Gone”, Randy Newman (Monk)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htRtFUsnIHY

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 7:56 pm

The reformed bank robber taking his place in South Africa’s cabinetGayton McKenzie, who served seven years in jail, is now the country’s sports and culture minister
Kate Bartlett, Johannesburg
Monday July 08 2024, 12.01am BST, The Times

Africa
South Africa

The most obvious qualification of South Africa’s new sports and culture minister is that he once owned a string of nightclubs.
Yet Gayton McKenzie, a reformed bank robber who served seven years in jail, insists being “a sports fanatic” with an appetite for the arts — he once visited the Louvre in Paris — makes him an ideal fit for the role.
His inclusion in President Ramaphosa’s coalition cabinet followed a month-long haggling with opposition parties to keep the African National Congress in power. McKenzie’s Patriotic Alliance (PA), which campaigned on an anti-immigration ticket that critics denounced as xenophobic and won nine seats in parliament, backed Ramaphosa’s second term.

In return, he had originally demanded the role of home affairs minister for his deputy and said youth unemployment could be halved by the mass deportation of illegal immigrants. He himself wanted to be police minister, where his experience as a gangster would help him tackle crime, he said.
Now, he has settled for sports, arts and culture in a 32-strong cabinet that was expanded for Ramaphosa to meet competing interests from factions in the ANC and ten other parties.
The cabinet is bigger than those of many developed countries, including the US, Britain and Germany. Analysts said the cabinet size, plus 43 deputy ministers, risked the administration becoming too unwieldy to deliver policies and was a waste of public funds.
Cabinet ministers earn an annual salary of 2.5 million rand (£110,000) and have perks that include ministerial homes in the capitals Pretoria and Cape Town.

McKenzie, 50, said he would be donating his salary to charity. In his unlikely career trajectory from South Africa’s ganglands to government, the PA leader built a fortune.
He has described growing up poor in a gang-infested neighbourhood under apartheid. He was in and out of jail in his teens before being sentenced to 17 years when he was about 20 years old — a fate he welcomed. “Where we grew up, for a gangster going to jail was a badge of honour,” he said. “You’ve made your bones. It’s like the Ivy League.”
But behind bars, he vowed to reform and after serving part of a sentence for bank robbery, he got his first proper job with a security company. He became a motivational speaker at high schools, published books about his life and ventured into business with Kenny Kunene, a former cell mate, which included nightclubs and mining. McKenzie, with Kunene as his deputy, set up the PA in 2013 to serve his “coloured” community, which is concentrated in the Western Cape province where, during the election, it won support from the main opposition, Democratic Alliance.
Until last year, McKenzie was mayor of a municipality in the province where he was accused of failing to account for 3 million rand (£127,000) raised at a gala dinner to pay for local improvements. He is co-operating with the investigation and has denied any wrongdoing.
After being sworn in to the cabinet by South Africa’s chief justice, McKenzie joked that the “last time a judge asked me to sit, it was for ten years”.
McKenzie also wants to champion the arts among young people. “Where we grew up, if you are an artist… then they look at you as a sissy,” he said.

billie
billie
July 8, 2024 7:59 pm

Crossie
What’s even worse marijuana is legal to grow for personal use. Is tobacco allowed the same leeway?

No, it is not, not in Australia, there are some lax laws in the ACT (of course), but those are in breach of Federal law at any rate.

Dude, do not try to grow da cally weed or you will be in trouble.

shatterzzz
July 8, 2024 8:09 pm

Shout out to whoever posted the review for HORIZON, yesterday .. just finished watching all 3 hrs .. excellent western and only part one of four .. roll on the rest …! Lotza cowboys/indians violence and graphic but very well dun .. Costner plays his laidback cowboy style sooo well .. 12/10
If your into cowboys you won’t be disappointed ……!

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt17505010/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0_tt_8_nm_0_in_0_q_horizon

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 8:19 pm

Numbers Bob – remember him?- is back, over on Michael Smith…

m0nty
m0nty
July 8, 2024 8:38 pm

It is a mystery how Cranky reconciles her jeremiad against corporate support of the right with the LNP continually toadying to Gina Rinehart who owns Hancock Prosecting, one of the top-tier Australian corporates.

Either you are a grassroots organisation who blocks donations from all but hard-scrabbling third-generation shopkeepers, or you trouser wads of dosh from billionaires to lay their astroturf. There is no hybrid model.

m0nty
m0nty
July 8, 2024 8:46 pm

Also a bit mystified by JC’s comments on the National Front. The French decided they didn’t like NF’s wacky economic policies so they switched their vote to… the communists??

The French system enables tactical voting. The first vote has a lot of signalling attached to the results, because people know it’s unlikely to be the only round. When the second one comes, voters get serious and vote against the worst option – which in this case is the fascists.

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 8:52 pm

Fatboy

What constitutes the right and so-called far right hold the majority of seats.

The French have veered Right, not left. Don’t be under misapprehension because the Guardian is giddy that the Front didn’t win as many seats as they expected.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 8, 2024 8:55 pm

Everything is a mystery to you mutley.

Cassie of Sydney
July 8, 2024 8:56 pm

The Garage Nazi appears.

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 9:03 pm

Fatboy

The deficit is close to 6% of GDP and France has the Euro, which means they have no control of monetary policy. There is no alternative to austerity.

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 9:13 pm

Some of their economic policies suck and some are unworkable within the framework of the EU.

One thing really impressed me about the old gal, Le Pen. She was supposed to meet with some big time religious muzzo and they demanded she wear a headscarf. She said
no and took off.

That’s the spirit. Never bow to these arseholes.

John H.
John H.
July 8, 2024 9:14 pm

Crossie

What’s even worse marijuana is legal to grow for personal use. Is tobacco allowed the same leeway?

Because nicotine is much more addictive and continually smoked throughout the day leading to greater lung damage and cardiovascular risk. Those risks still apply to cannabis smoking but at much lower rates. The trend now is toward consumables. Therein lies great risk because I suspect consumables have the lab developed cannabinoids like HU211 and Win ???, drugs with potencies x100 of the plant cannabinoids. That helps explain the increased numbers of cannabis intoxication being reported in the USA.

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 9:40 pm

That simply doesn’t answer why the markets poo-poo NF but act nonchalant about NPF.

I explained it to you earlier. Macron has to sign off on the legislation. He’s not going to go with crazy leftwing stuff. Which markets are pooing?

You are mixing up the Fronts.

Lol, possibly. I read some time ago, that “the Front” supported reverting back to the old retirement age. It must have been the Left.

Last edited 13 days ago by JC
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 9:40 pm

Anyway, all the best to you mob. I’m having a single malt – or three – and reading Clive Egleton’s novel “A Piece of Resistance.”

Britain, in the 1970’s under Soviet occupation, and for those who accepted the armistice, and the occupation, and decided to work for a “better society”, and for those – the Resistance – for who there was never any question of compromise…

John H.
John H.
July 8, 2024 9:45 pm

Arky

 July 8, 2024 9:40 pm

 Reply to  John H.

leading to greater lung damage and cardiovascular risk. 

US cigarette use peaked in 1954.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2018/07/26/poll-u-s-smoking-rate-falls-to-historic-low-infographic/

Since 1954 the rate of increase in US life expectancy has decreased, until recent years, while smoking is now around a third of what it was in 1954, life expectancy is actually now decreasing.

That is exactly my point. Despite huge declines in smoking life expectancy is decreasing. The diet issue is leading to spikes in obesity, diabetes, NAFLD, cancer onset at younger ages, and will eventually be reflected in increased rates of dementia.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 9:59 pm

The Brittany Higgins and David Sharaz ‘strategy’ to burn down the HouseEllie Dudley
less than a minute ago

Anthony Albanese’s closest confidantes, Katy Gallagher and Penny Wong, were drip-fed false information by David Sharaz and Brittany Higgins as part of a larger plan to destroy the career of Liberal senator Linda Reynolds and take down the Morrison government, explosive court documents allege.
Mr Sharaz also organised meetings between Ms Higgins and Labor members of parliament to discuss her rape allegations, the documents say, including then opposition leader Mr Albanese and Tanya Plibersek, as well as former Liberal prime minister Malcolm Turnbull and former Labor prime minister Kevin Rudd.

The extraordinary claims form part of Senator Reynolds’ case against Ms Higgins in the Western Australian Supreme Court, where she is suing her former employee over a series of social media posts she says defamed her.
Senator Reynolds claims the Instagram, Twitter and Threads posts falsely alleged she had “harassed” Ms Higgins, and mishandled the allegations of rape against former Liberal staffer Bruce Lehrmann by failing to provide her with any support.
The case is set down for trial on August 2, following multiple failed mediation talks.
Senator Gallagher came under intense scrutiny last year over when she was first made aware of Ms Higgins’ rape claim, but denied allegations she misled parliament in refuting any advance knowledge of the assault allegations.
The Australian understands amended documents have been filed to the court since the statement of claim was uploaded on June 4. While the substance of Senator Reynolds’ allegations have not changed, her case has been updated to include a claim of tortious conspiracy.
It is understood Ms Higgins is defending the claims.
In a statement of claim, obtained by The Australian, Senator Reynolds alleges Ms Higgins “acted maliciously” in creating the social media posts, as part of a larger plan orchestrated by Ms Higgins and Mr Sharaz to harm the Coalition.
“They were published in furtherance of a plan by the defendant and Mr Sharaz to use the defendant’s allegations of a rape and the political cover-up … as a weapon to inflict immediate political damage upon the plaintiff and the then government,” the statement of claim reads.

Part of that plan, Senator Reynolds alleges, included “aggressive questions” asked by Senator Gallagher and Senator Wong in question time in early 2021, which were centred on false information provided by Mr Sharaz and Ms Higgins.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 8, 2024 10:02 pm

The Higgins ‘plan’ to burn down the HouseKaty Gallagher and Penny Wong were drip-fed false information by David Sharaz and Brittany Higgins as part of a larger plan to destroy the career of Linda Reynolds and take down the Morrison government, explosive court documents allege.

Comment, from the Oz, waiting for approval.

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 10:08 pm

Dover

Where are you getting the idea the French markets are pooing?

The CAC 40 index is at close to the all time high minus about 3%.

https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/%5EFCHI/

Last edited 13 days ago by JC
John H.
John H.
July 8, 2024 10:29 pm

We really need some right-wing comics – it’s such a target-rich environment. 

Making a living as a comic is extremely difficult. In Australia impossible because the “creative industries” here are completely dominated by the Left and the market is too small. The smartest thing a right wing comedian can do is go overseas.

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 10:29 pm

But it doesn’t explain their reaction to NF’s first round result compared to the NPF’s second round result.

You can’t always have an answer for market movements. Oftentimes they move and can’t explain it, unlike “Pilko”.

If Macron mitigates both why pretend the former is a problem while the latter isn’t?

Human bias and the fact that most people are assigned opinions by the media.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 8, 2024 10:29 pm

John H.
 July 8, 2024 9:14 pm

Crossie

What’s even worse marijuana is legal to grow for personal use. Is tobacco allowed the same leeway?
Because nicotine is much more addictive and continually smoked throughout the day leading to greater lung damage and cardiovascular risk. 

—-

It’s pyrazines they add to tobacco that make smoking addictive. Egg plant for example is chock a block full of nicotine with a host of other vegetables.

Check out this clip.

DR. BRYAN ARDIS | Nicotine Can Cure Many Diseases and Sicknesses. The Difference Between Nicotine and Tobacco. | Flyover Clip
https://rumble.com/v4tflje-dr.-bryan-ardis-nicotine-can-cure-many-diseases-and-sicknesses.-the-differe.html

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 10:54 pm

Dover, there’s another thing to think about when figuring why the markets are treating the two fronts differently.

A Le Pen win may have upset the market because of the expectation that her policies would trigger societal upheaval. In plainer, more general terms, markets could have been concerned about towel heads going apeshit and causing chaos.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 8, 2024 11:00 pm

John H.
 July 8, 2024 10:51 pm

Reply to  Steve trickler

—–

Fair enough. Ardis is not one to b*llshit though.

JC
JC
July 8, 2024 11:02 pm

Come on now. You’re pretending we haven’t already seen behind the curtain.

  1. quantify your concern. Numbers .
  2. Did the French market move more or independently of other EU markets?
Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 8, 2024 11:20 pm

John H.
July 8, 2024 11:11 pm

He was at the forefront in exposing to the world the synthetic venoms in the C-19 shots and to take nicotine to negate the jabs effects. All has been vidicated.

Champion.

m0nty
m0nty
July 8, 2024 11:26 pm

The reason markets reacted with revulsion to the prospect of NF gaining power but didn’t when the commies palled up with Macron to win is this:

Macron can’t control right-wing fascists, but he has the commies on a leash. For now, at least.

If the commies rose further and looked like taking over from Macron, then you might see an adverse reaction from the markets. That would take years to play out though. For the moment, Macron won his gamble and the status quo largely endures.

H B Bear
H B Bear
July 8, 2024 11:39 pm

The Brittany Blob rolls on. WA the place to be.

m0nty
m0nty
July 8, 2024 11:50 pm

If Britain had France’s two-round voting system, would you have seen the Tories and Reform collaborating to deny Labour a victory?

Doubtful, because that would have meant Reform barely running at all in the second round. I don’t think Farage would have accepted that.

Black Ball
Black Ball
July 8, 2024 11:50 pm

Phuck orf monty you sweet, sweet khunt face.

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