The 43 percent law spells the end of new fossil fuel developments

There was a case last year. Australian Federal Court judge Mordy Bromberg sided with a group of eight female teenagers and their litigation guardian (an eight-six-year-old Catholic nun), intent on stopping a particular mining development in New South Wales. They brought a class action arguing that the federal minister for the environment had a common-law duty of care to young people by protecting them from climate change when considering the approval of new mines. Subsequently the full Federal Court threw out Bromberg’s bizarre ruling.

But what now? Now that a forty-three percent reduction in emissions by 2030 is in law. Some say that it is a toothless measure, without much purpose or point. It can be done without legislation, they say. They’re wrong.

In fact, the legislation spells the end of any new coal or gas developments. It gives the Greens and the Teals what they want without specifically giving them what they want. Something akin to Bromberg’s ruling will soon enough become part of common law. Does this or that fossil-fuel development threaten the achievement of the legislative target, will be the question? And, of course, it will. Activist lawyers will have a field day. Schoolchildren and aged nuns will be lining up. Developers won’t even attempt to fight through the lawfare.

Albo and his Labor mates have done the dirty on Australian voters. Stopping any new fossil fuel developments is their goal but they suspected it wouldn’t go down well in the polls. Thus, the sleight of hand. The duplicitous sleazy deal. Why else would the Greens and Teals be onboard? Anything that Adam Bandt goes along with is bound to be destructive of our way of life. He doesn’t like our way of life.

And then, to boot, there is the penalty in the legislation’s fine print. To wit, a severe public thrashing for Albo and Chris Bowen if the target isn’t met. I’m being fanciful. After all, by 2030 the Liberal Party will have got its act together, moved to the sensible right, won office, and abandoned the climate cult. Now that’s really fanciful.

38 thoughts on “The 43 percent law spells the end of new fossil fuel developments”

  1. Ag is next.

    Anyone who believes this is not aimed at reducing the population rather quickly (the underlying premise that humans are a virus) needs to start thinking a bit harder.


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    25
  2. Found the perfect quote that describes exactly 98% of all our politicians whether in Federal or State government, also covers so-called local councils and includes all bum sitting public servants, teachers, the majority of medics, etc.

    “Ideologies are substitutes for true knowledge, and ideologues are always dangerous when they come to power, because a simple-minded I-know-it-all approach is no match for the complexity of existence.”

    Jordan Peterson.


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    28
  3. Many years ago, I was asked what my advice for the future was … I said ‘buy guns, gold and generators..’
    Was I wrong?

    Yes. The first things they’ll come for are guns, gold and generators.

    The left is already trying to ban small ICE motor equipment, so it’s inevitable they’ll ban generators. And banning gun and gold ownership are common historical events already.


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  4. Our “side” could start by calling carbon emissions/pollution “carbon dioxide, the gas of life” for a start.

    “Plant food” might be another one we could use.


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  5. “…for a start.”

    And also throw their previous predictions back in their face.

    To wit that we have “10 years or it’ll be too late” – which was said in 1988, 1998, 2008 and as at 2020 or so was 12 years; that the “dams will never fill again” – we’ve had at least two times since where Sydney’s Warragamba has had to release water during a flood to “save” itself from overfill; that the Great Barrier Reef, slated for destruction thanks to climate change provoked bleaching events, is now at the highest level of coral coverage ever recorded; that “drought is the new normal” and since we have seen some of the largest floods we have ever recorded (top 10 in many places, if not the largest).

    All we ever see in the MSM is when things go “bad” and the scariest predictions about what it means – we never see nature’s refutation of those predictions. Think Hanrahan: “If this goes on, we’ll all be rooned!”

    Worse – all such predictions are based on at least 5 demonstrably false assumptions:
    1) that technology never advances, and what is not possible today is never possible;
    2) that the imposed solutions will both lower prices AND provide many more and higher paying jobs than are currently required;
    3) that things are getting worse;
    4) that a 30 year trend in climate will continue indefinitely, despite history showing clearly this is not the case;
    5) that reducing energy consumption will result in less environmental damage – I dare you to rank countries by average per capita energy consumption and then show how much environmental protection legislation and environmental damage applies to each.


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  6. I have been looking at posts by people in the energy sector on linked in.

    In simple terms, it’s collective insanity. These muppets are consigning their children and future generations to poverty and no one speaks out or voices any commonsense.


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  7. When the kiddies mobile phones cease to work, you’ll see an abrupt change in attitudes.

    I agree with the sentiment, however, at that stage we are all in for a very bumpy ride.


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  8. The question I have is:
    Does the new target of 43% mean that the Renewables Energy Target, the parasitic coal hobbling cross subsidy scheme, now has renewed legs to drive coal to the ground (so to speak)?
    If so, what will subsidise this weather dependent folly next?


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  9. RobK

    If so, what will subsidise this weather dependent folly next?

    Taxpayers indirectly, our “leaders” simply can’t afford to have the true costs appear on electricity bills.


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  10. “After all, by 2030 the Liberal Party will have got its act together, moved to the sensible right, won office, and abandoned the climate cult. Now that’s really fanciful.”

    Ultra fanciful, Duttons already bending leftwards and will continue to do so. I can’t see it changing in eight years.


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  11. Yes. The first things they’ll come for are guns, gold and generators.

    The left is already trying to ban small ICE motor equipment, so it’s inevitable they’ll ban generators. And banning gun and gold ownership are common historical events already.

    They may come for the 3 G’s, but if the chaos has already begun, enforcement would be difficult. Also, after what’s happened over the last 2 years, many people will see a push for what they have left as a red line. They may even have a Putin moment ?

    Next project for myself is a biodiesel plant, so I imagine that will make me a prime target of government in the next few years…


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  12. There’s not much doubt that fossil fuel development is ended. Take BHPs inability to sell the mt Arthur mine, which has all the infrastructure in place and a short run to the port. The move is to be closed and capped. The Gladstone lng plant are mostly short gas – except for shell, which is cashing in as fast as it can.
    There’s very little oil and gas field development except for Qatar, which will bring on the north field and probably cut australia from the China market.
    Virtually every substantial car maker is moving to EV over the next few years.
    Even China, which has a big coal dependency, is now getting a third of its primary energy from renewables – and at current rates they’ll cut coal out of power altogether (because China pays for storage costs that are now mandated with pv and wind).


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  13. Haha Hubris, keep on believing your own propaganda.
    Why don’t you look at coal consumption data?
    China consumes more than the entire rest of the world put together, and is chasing more.
    Adding 300 Mt of extra local production this year and they’re still getting blackouts.
    I’d link the stories but I’m getting 500 errors.


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  14. Even China, which has a big coal dependency, is now getting a third of its primary energy from renewables

    Hunter Biden level crack smoking. The gulf between fossil fuel use and renewables is immense.


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  15. Even China, which has a big coal dependency, is now getting a third of its primary energy from renewables – and at current rates they’ll cut coal out of power altogether

    LOL.
    I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you.
    Very cheap.


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  16. one positive about the coming black-outs, no abc or msm. Not that I watch them now. All the inner city latte sey will also get cheesed off walking 20 flights of stairs to their flat.


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  17. RobKsays:
    August 9, 2022 at 4:05 pm
    The data suggests they have a very long way to go

    It seems that Hubris has been showing an excess of hubris.


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  18. Today India announced it would like to guarantee metallurgical coal supplies for the next ten years.
    Tata Steel needs to buy from Australia or it will have to buy from Russia.
    How long before India and China demand we supply greater quantities of the resource – or else?


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  19. This is all a theatrical prelude to the planned global “population reduction”.

    The IS a planned “allowable loading limit”.

    EVERYBODY else is “surplus”, particularly most of the population of the entire African continent.

    We are dealing with serious loonies who want to kill most of us; the rest they will just enslave.

    It is a DEATH CULT. ALL of it.

    Pertinent; watch to the end:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o74rQmLRqtA


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  20. Winston: China is sharply reducing its pump priming of construction. So it’s steel sector is way over capacity. They are quickly reducing that excess with big consolidation plans. They’re also building first generation hydrogen metallurgy plants.
    It’s a 50:50 bet whether China grows any serious demand versus a decline from here.


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