Open Thread – Weekend 25 March 2023


Garden in Bloom at Sainte-Addresse, Claude Monet, 1866

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OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 12:01 am

Welcome to the Weekend

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 12:02 am

Mouse at 2% time to charge & go to bed

Colonel Crispin Berka
Colonel Crispin Berka
March 25, 2023 12:04 am

Third “I”.

Colonel Crispin Berka
Colonel Crispin Berka
March 25, 2023 12:08 am

A brain-computer interface that could raise and lower a ball depending on how intensely the user concentrated their mind was sold by Mattel as a toy back in 2009.
One can only imagine how much further the capability of research grade mind-reading technology has advanced in the 14 years since then.

Nelson_Kidd-Players
March 25, 2023 12:10 am

I want a new duck!

Helen
Helen
March 25, 2023 12:16 am

Im worried this voice thing might pass, people softened up for years with global warming and all its begettings, then covid, more softening up, then this whole thing where women have no voice and the endless yarns about how we should not only respect but admire Aboriginal culture to the point where it is totally invented, yep, Im worried.

John H.
John H.
March 25, 2023 12:26 am

Colonel Crispin Berkasays:
March 25, 2023 at 12:08 am
A brain-computer interface that could raise and lower a ball depending on how intensely the user concentrated their mind was sold by Mattel as a toy back in 2009.
One can only imagine how much further the capability of research grade mind-reading technology has advanced in the 14 years since then.

https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/scanning-the-brain-fmri.html

Their results found that, on average, 56 prior test-retest studies did not produce the same readings for each individual from the first to the second test. This was true even when the tests were separated by only a short period of time.

That even the same individual has differing activation patterns is a huge challenge for psychology, psychiatry, and neuroscience. It is a good example of where philosophy wouldn’t go astray. As a clever bod advised me a long time ago: the problem with fMRI studies is that instead of using the technology to develop new models of brain they are interpreting the results in light of their present understanding. Twenty years he had done a meta-analysis and found the same consistency problem now widely recognised. Reviewers didn’t criticize his results, editors wouldn’t publish the study! Ah well, progress one grave at a time.

BTW, they have fixed the software glitch problem.

https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/predicting-behavior-by-scanning-the-brain-does-task-fmri-really-resonate

So don’t worry. Not yet anyway.

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 12:28 am

Happy $3000 AUD/$2000 USD gold day

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 12:34 am

I want a new duck!

The duk takes notes…

H B Bear
H B Bear
March 25, 2023 12:38 am

Didn’t do a lot of touristy type travelling but after a mates wife booted me off to Paris to get me out their kitchen I did make it to Monet’s garden. It is pretty spectacular even though gardening is easier than Perth sand.

Colonel Crispin Berka
Colonel Crispin Berka
March 25, 2023 1:10 am

poor Tom.
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Fr6NCjWXsAA20eI?format=jpg&name=small

Anyone know how the episode went?

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 1:35 am

H B Bearsays:

March 25, 2023 at 12:38 am

Didn’t do a lot of touristy type travelling but after a mates wife booted me off to Paris to get me out their kitchen I did make it to Monet’s garden

I like that one.
The rambling garden and the solid lines of the house behind.
BTW, you do know it’s pronounced “Monn-ay”, right?
Not “Monn-ett”.
And don’t start me on Van Goxxxcchhh.

John H.
John H.
March 25, 2023 1:49 am

Helensays:
March 25, 2023 at 12:16 am
Im worried this voice thing might pass, people softened up for years with global warming and all its begettings, then covid, more softening up, then this whole thing where women have no voice and the endless yarns about how we should not only respect but admire Aboriginal culture to the point where it is totally invented, yep, Im worried.

It will pass. The terrible truth is that unless a good portion of the media, politicians, and corporations choose to support the NO vote, the YES vote is inevitable. I read the nonsense people put up on Quora. The formula is simple. Aboriginal culture is wonderful, without discrimination, and everyone is treated equally. Our culture is the pit of depravity and the cause of all human suffering. We can set them up with traps like this:

Do you think aboriginal culture is highly creative?
Of course it is!
The measure of creativity is how many new things under the sun does a culture create. Western culture, even in the last 50 years, has created more new things than all previous cultures combined.

Being rational isn’t enough. Rat cunning Helen. I’m not saying it will always work but we need to think about rhetorical strategies that leave them pinned and wriggling on the wall. We need to do that again and again and again. It is very difficult to change opinions with rational arguments when those opinions are not the result of rational thought. A friend told me the story about two Roman senators. One a superb logician, the other a wonderful speaker. The latter won the debates.

Barking Toad
Barking Toad
March 25, 2023 2:12 am

That fantastic aboriginal culture.

How do you boil water? What’s a wheel?

That little 5 foot 1 bloke, Charlie Drake, nailed it decades ago.

rickw
rickw
March 25, 2023 3:32 am

Amazing WWII amateur research:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e319AnGgVzU

John H.
John H.
March 25, 2023 4:10 am

The Amazing Benefits Of Benfotiamine – The Nerve Doctors

A synthetic form of thiamine, B1 with much better clinical trial results. She claims it will reduce AGE product formation whereas thiamine won’t. Not sure about that but she’s the doc. AGE products are key aging and inflammatory drivers. High sugar loading creates AGE products. A very quick look at the literature. So many positive and encouraging results. A recent clinical trial found it benefited those with mild cognitive impairment and those with Alzheimer’s. That’s unusual, most trials for those conditions come up negative. Huge benefits for those with diabetes or heading that way.

Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:22 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:23 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:24 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:25 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:27 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:28 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:29 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:31 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:32 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:33 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:34 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:35 am

Chip Bok. Brilliant.

Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:37 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:38 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:39 am
Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 4:40 am
Barking Toad
Barking Toad
March 25, 2023 4:51 am

The things that pass through your mind in the early hours as the dregs of last night’s cheap plonk work its way out of the liver ………

Back in the day …. Hot Pants v Mini-Skirt?

Hot Pants, correctly worn (meaning no fat chicks), could be eye dribbling, bordering on the pornographic side of things. As could the Mini-Skirt (again, no fat chicks).

But the test seemed to be, or so I’m told, was, once a willing lass climbed into the back of the barn doors XC, the Mini-Skirt was a win as against the struggle of peeling off Hot Pants worn as tight as duct tape.

And the furore of The Shrimp wearing her Mini-Skirt at the Cup would now viewed as Nana putting on her frock to go to early Sunday Mass.

rosie
rosie
March 25, 2023 5:59 am
rosie
rosie
March 25, 2023 6:00 am
John H.
John H.
March 25, 2023 6:32 am

rosiesays:
March 25, 2023 at 5:59 am
can’t run, can’t hide

What next? Will they monitor us mowing the lawn to determine if we are sober enough for that?

duncanm
duncanm
March 25, 2023 6:47 am

Who’s into Morris A-series ?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieF3d_YBUh4

Min
Min
March 25, 2023 7:05 am

I went to bed early last night before footy ended and now discover that fans experienced the first of what is going to become more common with state of energy supply Blackouts . This will are up the voters Bring it in !

Min
Min
March 25, 2023 7:07 am

Apologies still in bed typing
Scare the voters Bowen will have a lot to answer for . Bring them on

Miltonf
Miltonf
March 25, 2023 7:14 am

As I have said many times we are governed by a parasitic elite whose empathy with real people and the real economy is zero. They do not see themselves as our elected representatives. It’s all about overseas trips and conferences and treaties. Seeing the garbage in pollimuppet house clapping anal reminded me of foreign afairy pubic parasites clapping TLS from the gallery.

Miltonf
Miltonf
March 25, 2023 7:16 am

These people aren’t just garbage. They are toxic garbage. Toxic to Australia and Australians.

Min
Min
March 25, 2023 7:21 am

Nothing like sitting in the dark at a footy match to contemplate the cause of problems .

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
March 25, 2023 7:38 am

The blackout at the Gabba was caused by one of the big globes in a light tower blowing and the tower shutting down totally. Not grid related it seems unless there was some surge in the supply.

Cassie of Sydney
March 25, 2023 7:43 am

Electoral Groundhog day here in NSW. Predictions for a Labor win. A few thoughts.

1. I ‘m not happy about wall to wall Labor, such a scenario isn’t good for the country but neither are vapid, spineless, Labor lite, “Liberal in name only” governments. Here in NSW today, we’re going to see thousands upon thousands of traditional conservative Liberals cast their vote elsewhere. My sister is going to vote One Nation in the lower house, and she lives in a marginal seat.

2. If Labor or Liberal win, I want them to win with a majority. I don’t want them having to do deals with independents, particularly with the very creepy and very sinister homosexual independent, Alex Greenwich. Basically, for the last four years, we’ve had Matt Grean and Alex Greenwich pulling the strings, and the results have not been pretty.

3. If Labor wins, I truly hope One Nation does well. It will provide a buffer in the upper house against Labor excesses. I’m usually loathe to predict electoral outcomes but my hunch is that One Nation will do well today.

4. Dominic Perrottet, whilst a good treasurer, has been a bad premier, weak, pusillanimous, and spineless, probably because he’s been Kean’s lapdog. On energy and various social issues, this has been disastrous for the state and particularly for the increasingly moribund Liberal Party.

Lastly, here’s a thought to begin your day with, women don’t have dicks, women don’t have cocks, women don’t have pricks, women don’t have shlongs, and women don’t have todgers. And until the Liberal Party finds the courage to stand for us women and fight this insidious trans lunacy, they can go get f*cked.

calli
calli
March 25, 2023 7:52 am

Ten years ago I fronted up to a northwest Sydney polling booth…at the end of a long…long queue of happy, expectant people. It was almost a carnival at atmosphere. The doors to the school hall finally opened in in we filed, a spring in our steps.

We were going to vote out RGR, a federal government of Fabian hacks, green loons and indescribable incompetents so bad they set this country back decades financially. The day was sunny, the future looked hopeful. And we got the result we wanted, for what it was worth.

Today I wake to drizzle and the prospect of putting down the Liberal State government. It has all the delight of putting down the dog. Something you have to do, but want it to be over as fast as possible. I won’t watch the election coverage tonight. I want to grieve in silence and solitude.

Beertruk
Beertruk
March 25, 2023 8:02 am

Top 50…YAY!!! 😉

Min
Min
March 25, 2023 8:06 am

Calli no matter how bad the Libs have been you don’t want what we have got in Vic or even Q. Perhaps the severe drubbing lose Kean and get a few ON s in might shake them up.

Cassie of Sydney
March 25, 2023 8:14 am

“Today I wake to drizzle and the prospect of putting down the Liberal State government. It has all the delight of putting down the dog. Something you have to do, but want it to be over as fast as possible. I won’t watch the election coverage tonight. I want to grieve in silence and solitude.”

I think you’ve said it best, although tonight I’ll be at Rabz’s election party.

calli
calli
March 25, 2023 8:14 am

Min, there’s a meme for that.

Of course. 😀

Plasmamortar
Plasmamortar
March 25, 2023 8:22 am
lotocoti
lotocoti
March 25, 2023 8:23 am

Some SFL electoral strategist will probably be thinking:
Okay, so we’ve lost calli for being too green, but think about all the votes we’ll get from green voters who think the greens are too green but we’re just green enough.

Eyrie
Eyrie
March 25, 2023 8:29 am

Further to Robert Sewell’s observations last night, this piece by Big Serge on Operation Barbarossa is interesting.
https://bigserge.substack.com/p/apocalypse-operation-barbarossa
Barbarossa succeeded in its aims but the problem was the Germans severely underestimated the vast reserves available to the Russians. Operational success but strategic failure.

Barking Toad
Barking Toad
March 25, 2023 8:35 am

Good to start the voting day with a Cassie roar. And agree with Calli – get it over with.

Carn One Nation.

The worst thing though will be seeing dribbling crying New Teeth claiming it validates his Farnham.

calli
calli
March 25, 2023 8:37 am

Something for Dover for today.

lotocoti
lotocoti
March 25, 2023 8:41 am

L’empereur Macron is distracted.
Now is the time for KCIII to raise an army and take back the lost Duchies.

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 8:43 am

Calli no matter how bad the Libs have been you don’t want what we have got in Vic or even Q. Perhaps the severe drubbing lose Kean and get a few ON s in might shake them up.

You mean ‘its different this time’??

A short sharp ‘half halt’ and the libs will wake up and come back to their base?

No they wont, *both* sides of politics are the enemies of the people now, albeit 90% of said people are so thoroughly domesticated that they, like pandas, care only if they get their daily dole from big daddy government.

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 8:46 am

Front page of the Oz today:

Amy followed the rules on Covid jabs – was that a fatal mistake?
In the days after her Covid vaccination, Sydney student Amy Sedgwick thought the discomfort in the arches of her feet warranted a trip to the podiatrist. Within nine months, she was dead.

The Overton window is shifting

Miltonf
Miltonf
March 25, 2023 8:47 am

90 percent eh? Where do you get that figure from? Have you ask everyone over 18?

Plasmamortar
Plasmamortar
March 25, 2023 8:48 am

On another note, it will be interesting to see if gold can maintain $3,000 an ounce in the next few weeks.

Currently devaluation here we come!

Especially once Russia and China announce their new gold backed global trade currency in June/July.

Plasmamortar
Plasmamortar
March 25, 2023 8:51 am

Also, while you’re here Dr duk.

I heard through work about a young girl passing away of leukaemia recently, she was 23.

Diagnosed roughly 12 months ago, so I would be guessing post jab.
No previous health issues…

Any thoughts on potential cancer spikes? Especially immune related like this.

will
will
March 25, 2023 8:52 am
flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 8:52 am

90 percent eh? Where do you get that figure from? Have you ask everyone over 18?

How many complied with the jabs, the QR codes, masking etc etc etc? Was it less than 90%?

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 8:59 am

rosiesays:
March 25, 2023 at 5:59 am
can’t run, can’t hide… What next? Will they monitor us mowing the lawn to determine if we are sober enough for that?

The problem with ‘performance based’ road laws is that a certain % of the population are shit drivers even when sober, meaning its simpler to put in place blanket ‘number laws’ – eg you cant go faster than this number, your BAC cant be higher than this number etc etc.

All of which ignores the fundamental fact that, to have a crime you have to have a victim.. Thus criminalising people who exceed either the speed or BAC number without hurting anyone else actually represents enforcement of a ‘precrime’ – punishment for the assumption that they might cause someone else harm later.

In some contexts, traffic law also throws out the need to even prove the person charged actually committed the crime – for example, proving you weren’t the person who parked your car in a no parking zone is not an acceptable defence, because the crime alleged is that you were the *owner* of the vehicle, not the driver.

Did I mention before that ‘presumption of innocence’ is a quaint and outdated concept?

Boambee John
Boambee John
March 25, 2023 8:59 am

Eyriesays:
March 25, 2023 at 8:29 am
Further to Robert Sewell’s observations last night, this piece by Big Serge on Operation Barbarossa is interesting.
https://bigserge.substack.com/p/apocalypse-operation-barbarossa
Barbarossa succeeded in its aims but the problem was the Germans severely underestimated the vast reserves available to the Russians. Operational success but strategic failure.

See also: Schleiffen Plan 1914, Verdun 1916, Kaiserschlacht March 1918, Invasion of Poland 1939, Invasion of France and Belgium 1940, Greece/Crete 1941. Seems to be a Germanic habit.

Even the Franco-Prussian War 1870, just sowed the seeds of later conflict.

Get the strategy correct, and combine with it adequate tactics. There has been some discussion here on possible tactics for Australia to use to defeat a future invasion, but less on strategies to avoid the problem.

shatterzzz
March 25, 2023 9:01 am

Been there, dun that! .. doodled the little sheet and One Nation-ed the biggie ..

Cassie of Sydney
March 25, 2023 9:06 am

“Calli no matter how bad the Libs have been you don’t want what we have got in Vic or even Q. Perhaps the severe drubbing lose Kean and get a few ON s in might shake them up.”

Nup. As Ben Habib said on GB News the other, when talking about the Conservative Party in the UK, and I”ve simply replaced the words “Conservative” and “Sunak” with “Liberal” and “Perrottet”…

“you can’t reward failure with incumbency, going down that road lies massive moral hazards, you inculcate bad behaviour and we’ve had too much of “oh I know we’re awful but the other lot are even worse”. We’ve got to put paid to that, we’re going to boot them out. This lot under Perrottet are not conservative, no one should bemoan the fact that the Liberal Party is going to be thumped in the next election”

shatterzzz
March 25, 2023 9:08 am

Barbarossa succeeded in its aims but the problem was the Germans severely underestimated the vast reserves available to the Russians. Operational success but strategic failure.

The German treatment of the civilian population was a big factor .. they invaded a country where 80% of the people were prepared to welcome them with open arms and proceeded to brutalize, denigrate & slaughter .. the end result was inevitable .. the only thing in question was .. how long it would take ..!

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 9:13 am

Any thoughts on potential cancer spikes? Especially immune related like this.

I believe we all throw off multiple ‘cancer cells’ daily and that clinical cancers (cancers that grow big enough to cause illness) represent a failure of the immune system to deal with them early.

This exactly mirrors what we have come to understand about infectious disease – you dont get the infection because you get exposed to one bug or even a thousand. You get clinical disease only when your immune system fails to deal with the threat.

This is why people with healthy immune systems are less likely to get either cancer or infectious disease, and those with impaired immune systems are more likely. This is one reason why obesity and T2DM are strong risk factors for both cancer and sepsis – they are caused by inflammatory foods (carbs) which impair metabolic health and cause immune suppression.

As an example, take the case of hospital ICUs – virtually every ICU patient gets clinically infected with at least one multi resistant organism (eg golden staph). Yet the staff dont. The staff do periodically swab + for the bugs ( I had MRSA nasal + at least twice, and pseudomonas once). This is because the staff are not critically ill (with impaired immune systems).

There was strong early evidence that the covid injections caused at least temporary suppression of immune function (this resulted in an *increase* in susceptibility to COVID infection immediately after injection – they fudged this by deeming you as ‘unvaxxed’ for the first 2 weeks after injection, neatly transferring this side effect into the unvaxxed column)

There is mounting evidence of both and increase in the incidence of cancer after COVID vax, and the rate of progression of these cancers (aka Turbo Cancers).

A surgeon friend of mine found 6 rapidly progressing, disseminated at diagnosis melanomas last year, where he would normally diagnose 0 or 1. This year he is up to 5 already! I certainly expect the covid shots to increase your risk of cancer.

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 9:16 am

Non-MSM outlets are making a big mistake with clickbait headlines about Trump’s recent ‘truths’

Yesterday, Trump shared a link to an article from the National File, a conservative website. The article’s headline is telling: “Just 10% of Manhattan Residents Voted for Anti-Trump DA in 2021 Election.” It was obvious—at least, to me—that Alvin Bragg does not necessarily have the will of the people at his back as he pursues his vicious, anti-Trump vendetta to prevent the American people from exercising their choice in the coming primaries and the eventual presidential election.

The National File article has as its header image two photos. The first shows Trump, a very talented baseball player in his youth, holding a baseball bat as if to swing it. Judging by the tie Trump is wearing, that photograph dates back to July 17, 2017, when Trump appeared at a “Made in America” event in the White House.

The National File chose to juxtapose the image of Trump holding a bat in 2017 with a picture of Alvin Bragg. That editorial decision makes it seem as if Trump is swinging the bat in Bragg’s direction.

What’s important to emphasize is that the photo comes from The National File and appeared automatically in Trump’s “truth” sharing the article about Bragg’s unpopularity and lack of mandate:

That social media posts with links automatically include source photos is something reporters know or should know.

You wouldn’t guess it, though, from the way the New York Post and the Daily Mail captioned their articles about Trump’s “truth,” with both implying in the caption that Trump created and published the baseball bat montage:

Screengrab from the Daily Mail.

Screengrab from the New York Post.

That’s an editorial decision made by people who know that many readers never get beyond the caption.

I don’t expect better, frankly, from the Daily Mail, which comes from a long British tradition of screaming headlines, but I’m disappointed in the New York Post. After all, it’s the outlet that broke and has stuck with the Hunter Biden hard drive story.

When it comes to the substance of another Trump “truth,” once again, the non-MSM media did no better. Here’s what Trump wrote:

Putting aside Trump’s colorful style, his salient factual points are:

. He was president (true)
. He got more votes than any sitting president in history (true)
. He’s currently the leading Republican candidate for 2024 (true)
. He did not commit a crime (on the available facts, true)

Trump follows those facts with this opinion: Indicting an extremely popular, innocent president runs the risk of inflaming America, bringing with it “death & destruction.”

He’s right. America has already seen how the death of a non-compliant ex-felon with a bad heart hopped up on a fatal dose of illegal substances in 2020 brought tremendous “death & destruction.” In other words, Trump is not making a threat. He’s issuing a warning about the very real possibility that Bragg’s planned indictment will create serious civil unrest.

And having issued his opinion, Trump makes a rhetorical call: Only a tremendously evil person would take the risk Bragg plans to take.

Anyone who reads English can see what Trump was saying. However, two relatively conservative outlets chose to view it differently. Hot Air claims, “Donald Trump issued a thinly veiled threat….” The New York Post editorial board tells Trump, “Stop the threats of violence.” That’s just so disappointing.

For anyone who is not a hard leftist, it’s apparent that the Biden administration is a disaster for America, destroying its economy, erasing its border, damaging America’s position as the world’s reserve currency, unleashing violent crime across the nation, suppressing speech and thought, and that’s just the beginning. It’s apparent, too, that Democrat-run cities and states are equally destructive.

This is the time for conservatives and sane non-leftists to come together and back Trump, whether or not they like him because the attempt to criminalize him is a death blow against America’s entire constitutional system:

shatterzzz
March 25, 2023 9:16 am

Summer has ended .. early .. Fairfield has closed the outdoor (unheated) 50 metres pool for winter .. apparently, temps in the high 20s/low 30s don’t interfere with Council decisions ……!
Logic would have expected it to stay open thru the Easter long weekend but logic & politics aren’t a symbiotic mix out here in “turtle” land …….

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 9:16 am

I think you’ve said it best, although tonight I’ll be at Rabz’s election party.

Say a big “Hi!” to egg_ster and that crazy bint for me.

JC
JC
March 25, 2023 9:17 am

Get the strategy correct, and combine with it adequate tactics. There has been some discussion here on possible tactics for Australia to use to defeat a future invasion, but less on strategies to avoid the problem.

Can someone explain how China (I assume the discussion has been about China) would be able to invade Australia with such massive supply lines and the US as a major ally? The idea is total nonsense.

China has been reluctant to fight a war up until now over Taiwan, which is only 100 miles away from the mainland. 

Australia?

I read recently that the Chinese navy doesn’t have the ability to conduct deep-water activity beyond 1600 miles from its shoreline. Surely we’re not getting back to the idea that the Chinese military is going to use commercial jets by landing at Melbourne airport. This is deranged thinking.

Moreover, China has peaked economically and is going over a cliff demographically.  It’s also economically in a very precarious position.

Miltonf
Miltonf
March 25, 2023 9:19 am

You seem pretty sure it’s 90 percent. Wheres your evidence?

Zipster
March 25, 2023 9:21 am
Beertruk
Beertruk
March 25, 2023 9:22 am

shatterzzzsays:
March 25, 2023 at 9:08 am
Barbarossa succeeded in its aims but the problem was the Germans severely underestimated the vast reserves available to the Russians. Operational success but strategic failure.

The German treatment of the civilian population was a big factor .. they invaded a country where 80% of the people were prepared to welcome them with open arms and proceeded to brutalize, denigrate & slaughter .. the end result was inevitable .. the only thing in question was .. how long it would take..!

Referred to as ‘untermensch’ by the propaganda machine.

Miltonf
Miltonf
March 25, 2023 9:24 am

Oh yes just because people like me got ‘vaxed’ under duress doesn’t mean we’re not pissed off about it

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
March 25, 2023 9:25 am

Hooray, a beautiful Monet French garden at top o’ page.

The stuff of dreams, not nightmares. Thank you, Dover.

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 9:26 am

Dominion’s Weak Case Against Fox

Victory for the plaintiff would severely weaken the First Amendment protection all news media enjoy.

The mainstream press has reacted predictably in recent weeks after Fox News’s internal communications and witness depositions were disclosed in Dominion Voting Systems’ defamation lawsuit against the network. Blinded by resentment at Fox’s success as an alternative media voice, many media organizations offered a distorted narrative—largely parroting Dominion’s spin—that the disclosures doom Fox’s legal defense. Commentators from the New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, MSNBC and other outlets, gleeful at the prospect of a Fox setback, cheer on as the defamation case heads toward a trial date.

But the real significance of the disclosures is exactly the opposite of what these media outlets claim.

Two things are clear:

First, if the applicable law is faithfully applied, the facts completely upend Dominion’s defamation claim against Fox. The case should be decided in Fox’s favor, if not at the trial stage, then on appeal.

Second, a ruling against Fox would be a major blow to media freedoms generally, subjecting news outlets to the prospect of outsize liability whenever they report on newsworthy allegations that turn out to be false.

Right after the 2020 election, President Trump and his team repeatedly alleged that Dominion machines had been used in a voting-fraud scheme. Although these allegations weren’t substantiated, as attorney general, I couldn’t immediately discount them. Finding the truth required an investigation, which I authorized. Over the next few weeks we found no substantiation or discrepancies, and based on expert assessments I became increasingly convinced the claims against Dominion were unfounded.

Meanwhile, several Fox News hosts interviewed members of the president’s team—Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell chief among them—about their Dominion claims and whether they had evidence to support them. As the record shows, the hosts presented the claims as unproven allegations and didn’t say they were true. Nonetheless, Dominion is suing Fox News for $1.6 billion in damages (20 times Dominion’s 2018 valuation), claiming that in reporting on the Trump team’s allegations, Fox effectively was promoting them as true.

Emotions seem to have gotten the better of the mainstream media’s judgment. The theory advanced by Dominion is profoundly dangerous to the media industry as whole

Memories are very short and imaginations very limited if the left thinks that only Fox would be vulnerable to lawsuits in a world where defamation liability could be incurred for simply reporting allegations made by others. Does anyone remember the endless false claims of “Russian collusion” that dominated the news from the 2016 presidential election through most of the Trump administration; or the false “Iraqgate” claims with which George H.W. Bush was bombarded during his 1992 re-election campaign; or the lurid allegations, which were given wall-to-wall cable news coverage, that Michael Avenatti made during the Senate confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh?

The press can report on these matters without incurring liability for defamation because existing laws give them wide latitude to do so to encourage uninhibited discourse on matters of public concern. The scope of this legal protection is well-settled, and Fox acted well within it for three reasons. First, it isn’t defamatory for journalists to report on newsworthy allegations made by others, even when those allegations turn out to be false. As long as claims are presented only as allegations and not asserted to be true, legal responsibility for any defamatory content rests with those making the allegations, not the news outlet. If you examine the relevant statements by Fox hosts in context, it is clear the company was simply reporting the allegations, not reporting that those allegations were true.

Second, defamation applies only to false statements of fact, not statements of opinion. Thus, it isn’t defamatory for a journalist to provide commentary—stating an opinion about an allegation—as long as he doesn’t assert that the defamatory aspects of the allegations are true. Thus, in Fox’s case, to the extent hosts made comments suggesting the claims were troubling, or serious, or warranting an investigation, those comments were opinions and can’t serve as the basis for a defamation claim.

Finally, it has long been held that First Amendment considerations require giving media speakers more “breathing space” for protecting unintentional false statements made when reporting on issues of serious public concern or on actions of key players in those controversies. These cases are governed by the “actual malice” standard first enunciated by the Supreme Court in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan (1964). In these circumstances, a media speaker isn’t liable for defamation, even for a false statement of fact, unless he knows when he makes the statement that what he is saying is false or gravely doubts its truth.

What counts is the speaker’s state of mind. Serious doubts that others in the speaker’s organization may have about a statement’s truth can’t be attributed to the speaker. Thus, in Fox’s case, even if Dominion could show that a Fox host who interviewed Mr. Giuliani or Ms. Powell affirmed their allegations as true, none of the evidence marshaled by Dominion establishes that any of those hosts had grave doubts about the allegations and hence acted with “actual malice.” Instead, Dominion’s evidence relates to possible doubts held by other Fox employees, not the hosts, and is therefore irrelevant.

Although some conservatives have expressed a willingness to consider paring back Sullivan’s actual-malice standard in at least some kinds of cases, it plainly wouldn’t make sense to do so here. This case involves reporting on a presidential election—a contest of paramount public concern that has historically featured false allegations. It also involves reporting on a dispute over the integrity of the election. In these contexts, the public interest in fostering a fully informed electorate through robust debate is at its apex. Subjecting the press to potential defamation liability when it reports on these kinds of controversies would chill the flow of information. It would also result in every election being relitigated for monetary damages, in the deepest blue or red state a lawyer can find.

Conservatives shouldn’t try to weaken the actual-malice standard. For the foreseeable future, we will likely be on the wrong side of the culture-setting consensus. Even when accurate, our views are apt to be treated as “misinformation,” as the reaction to the Hunter Biden laptop story aptly demonstrates. There are precious few conservative news outlets as it is. Why make them more vulnerable to the multitude of left-wing plaintiffs’ lawyers?

The left should think twice about cheering for Dominion in this case. While the left has more artillery, it also has more targets for defamation cases as left-wing media outlets far outnumber conservative ones.

According to a Gallup poll, only 34% of Americans believe major news organizations will report “fully, accurately and fairly” on current events.

Errors have been rife. And then there is the lesson of Harry Reid: Deploying the “nuclear option” and eliminating the judicial filibuster led to a conservative supermajority on the Supreme Court.

A weapon unsheathed by one side today can be turned against it the next.

Mr. Barr, who served as U.S. attorney general, 1991-93 and 2019-20, is a distinguished fellow at the Hudson Institute and author of the memoir “One Damn Thing After Another.” The memoir’s publisher, HarperCollins, and the Journal are both owned by News Corp, which shares ownership with Fox Corp.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 9:27 am

Can someone explain how China (I assume the discussion has been about China) would be able to invade Australia with such massive supply lines and the US as a major ally? The idea is total nonsense.

So we shouldn’t bother with the Citizens Assassination Squads?
Or iodine stockpiling?
I like the idea of Citizens Assassination Squads, if for no other reason than I would like to hear Tennis Albo try to say it.

JC
JC
March 25, 2023 9:30 am

I like the idea of Citizens Assassination Squads,

Sitting in twos on those Italian vespas with the dude at the back carrying a rocket launcher. Imagine.

Zipster
March 25, 2023 9:30 am
JC
JC
March 25, 2023 9:33 am

Sanchez

I’ve been away from blogging for a while. Who started this nonsense about a Chinese junk invasion? Who’s responsible? 🙂

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
March 25, 2023 9:34 am

So don’t worry. Not yet anyway.

I sometimes wonder if something extra-cognitive is going on when we all get strange experiences, such as humming a tune and then turning on the radio to find we’re in sync with it; or when people we’re close to are ‘on the same wavelength’ to our own thoughts or when we ‘predict’ something that later happens. Of course, coincidence in the first case and familiarity in the second and wish fulfilment in the third are easy explanations, but still … .

Attapuss for instance almost instinctively seems to read my mind. If I am even thinking of cutting his claws, at that very moment he slinks away and hides. Animals seem to ‘know’ things about earthquakes and can ‘sense’ when things are unusual for them. I know they are trained by very subtle cue taking, but even so ….

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 9:34 am

Sitting in twos on those Italian vespas with the dude at the back carrying a rocket launcher. Imagine.

A camo painted stealth Vespa.
With no lights so we melt into the night.

shatterzzz
March 25, 2023 9:37 am

Can someone explain how China (I assume the discussion has been about China) would be able to invade Australia with such massive supply lines and the US as a major ally? The idea is total nonsense.

Why worry! .. for some obscure reason I can see a Chicom invasion resembing the BAT FLU lockdowns .. a country full of vociferous “Schindler” minded folk .. until push come to shove and we’re queueing up for the ‘camps”.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
March 25, 2023 9:38 am

That little 5 foot 1 bloke, Charlie Drake, nailed it decades ago.

Geoffrey Blainey also nailed it – two cultures came face to face on that day in 1770 – one had never discovered how to boil water, the other had just invented the steam engine.

Boambee John
Boambee John
March 25, 2023 9:38 am

JC

Moreover, China has peaked economically and is going over a cliff demographically. It’s also economically in a very precarious position.

Taking into account your correct (IMO) comments about the tyranny of distance of Australia from China, and the whole sea lanes issue, where China seems much more vulnerable than Australia, what economic strategy would discourage any residual Chinese adventurism in our direction?

calli
calli
March 25, 2023 9:38 am

Well, that’s that. I’ve added my tiny fraction of a millilitre to the Lib green dream.

When an animal has an incurable disease, you do the right thing. Kean and his cronies are the disease.

Whatever happens tomorrow or the next day regarding leadership, we will know if all we have done is kill the host and the disease remains. If it does, there is no prospect of them ever regaining government. In many ways, that is up to the people of Hornsby.

JC
JC
March 25, 2023 9:39 am

Here’s the next bank-shoe to drop and deservedly too.

Deutsche Bank Stock Tumbles. The Banking Panic Isn’t Over.

Deutsche Bank’s shares tumbled, despite policy makers trying to reassure of the sector’s resilience.

.

Deutsche Bank DB –3.11% shares tumbled Friday after the cost of insuring the lender against default rose.

Deutsche Bank (ticker: DB) fell 11.6% in Frankfurt trading. U.S.-listed shares fell 6%. The move followed a spike in the price of the lender’s credit default swaps to a four-year high on Thursday, according to Reuters.

A credit default swap, or CDS, is a financial product that acts like insurance for corporate bonds. A buyer of a CDS pays a fee to hold it, and the seller of the swap makes a payout if the company can’t repay its bonds. Unlike typical insurance products, a CDS buyer doesn’t have to own the corporate bond it corresponds to in order to purchase the CDS or get paid out in a credit event.

Deutsche Bank is Germany’s biggest lender. Other European banks were also down. The Euro Stoxx Banks Index (SX7E) slipped 5%. Germany’s Commerzbank (CBK.Germany) dropped 5.9%. France’s BNP Paribas (BNP.France) retreated 5.8%.

The declines are the latest flare-up of concerns about the health of banks worldwide. The European Central Bank said last week that the sector is resilient as it raised interest rates further, a sentiment echoed by the Federal Reserve and others this week. Last weekend, Swiss regulators stepped in to broker a takeover of Credit Suisse (CS), one of the country’s biggest banks, by its larger rival UBS as confidence deteriorated.

Deutschebank’s market cap has been toying with zero for the past decade or so and it was only a matter of when and not if it was going to go six feet under. No one should be shocked it heads into the abyss because it was only a question of time. The fall doesn’t mean there’s a banking crisis.

Plasmamortar
Plasmamortar
March 25, 2023 9:40 am

US as a major ally?

That’s a dangerous assumption to make….

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 9:42 am

JCsays:

March 25, 2023 at 9:33 am

Sanchez

I’ve been away from blogging for a while. Who started this nonsense about a Chinese junk invasion? Who’s responsible? ?

I dunno.
And Chinah wasn’t specifically mentioned, although the obvious #1 suspect.
Yeah, we were getting the Cardigan Commandos back together again and digging up our AK-16 stash to pick off Chinese big-wigs one by one.
Well we didn’t have to dig anything up actually. The plan was to flood the citizenry with untraceable and unrecorded weaponry so the Chunks couldn’t sieze the gun register and track us … err, them … down.
Not sure where it started.
I blame iodine overdosing.

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 9:49 am

Green revolution coming undone on the rocks of reality in Germany

By Jo Nova

Germany is at the leading edge of the climate wars and the Greens are starting to lose both in polling and policy. Despite the claims that the energy crisis will push everyone into renewables, one year later, the dominant energy source for German electricity is coal, up by eight percentage points to 33% of generation.

While the world is supposedly caught in a renewable rush to 2030, the German government just announced it will build 25 gigawatts of gas powered plants by 2030 so they are there when “when [the] wind and sun do not provide enough”. And this week Germany is doing a backflip on their recent EU deal to ban sales of petrol and gas powered cars by 2035. It appears now they will ban the ban, rather than the car, and Germany has the power in the EU to do that. Though it’s not freedom to buy any car you want, but quixotic car loophole.

It’s still a mess of awful, subsidized craziness in a futile quest to control the clouds — but there are signs it is getting less crazy.

Thanks to NetZeroWatch for the links:

Indolent
Indolent
March 25, 2023 9:49 am

If they get their way, we’ll be back to using washboards soon.

Biden admin cracks down on air conditioners as war on appliances continues

Eyrie
Eyrie
March 25, 2023 9:52 am

what economic strategy would discourage any residual Chinese adventurism in our direction?
Neuter our Greens, fire at least 50% of the Canberra public service and those of the States. Tear up read and green tape laws.
Become filthy rich by developing this country so we can afford to be armed to the teeth.
Not going to happen.
Australia will gradually slide into an Argentina like state, if we are lucky, Venezuela if if aren’t. But don’t worry, everybody will be equally poor except for the political class.

JC
JC
March 25, 2023 9:53 am

Taking into account your correct (IMO) comments about the tyranny of distance of Australia from China, and the whole sea lanes issue, where China seems much more vulnerable than Australia, what economic strategy would discourage any residual Chinese adventurism in our direction?

B John,  To choke the living daylights out of China, John, the US does not need to confront Chinese naval assets anywhere near the mainland. All it has to do is control the waterways around the Persian Gulf in order to prevent oil from getting to them. China doesn’t have the capability to protect oil shipments from getting there.

Also, if you look at a map, waterways from the Gulf to China are extremely narrow and hugely vulnerable.

Then there is the qualitative thing about a navy that can’t really be added easily. I’m no expert, but I believe that running a large navy has a huge cultural component. The United States has around a century of experience operating large carriers. Time and experience are the only ways. The same also applies to operating the rest of a large navy.
China would be so battered that it would have no idea what hit it.
If they resort to nuclear war, it would be a different matter. We’d lose major cities, but China would be sent back to the Stone Age.

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 9:53 am

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene’s bill to audit Ukraine aid is racing toward a House vote

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene’s legislation to force a full audit on the billions of taxpayer dollars spent on U.S. military and humanitarian aid for Ukraine has survived a key vote, putting it one step closer to a floor vote in the House.

The Georgia Republican’s resolution cleared the House Foreign Affairs Committee in a 26-19 vote amid growing calls by Republican lawmakers for more scrutiny over the unprecedented assistance to Kyiv.

Congress has approved more than $113 billion in economic aid and military assistance for Ukraine since the Russian invasion in February 2022.

Conservative lawmakers say there has not been enough accountability over how the money has been dispensed, despite the Pentagon and State Department outlining plans to track the flood of weapons and assistance provided to Ukraine.

“Our country is run by stupid warmongers that are so clueless and disconnected with what the American people want that they are literally leading us into World War III,” said Ms. Greene said last month when introducing the measure. “That’s why I’m introducing a resolution to find out exactly where our money is going.”

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
March 25, 2023 9:54 am

A friend told me the story about two Roman senators. One a superb logician, the other a wonderful speaker. The latter won the debates.

It’s not quite the same thing, but it is fascinating to see the Trump/DeSantis head-on starting to emerge.

DeSantis plays to his strength as a man who can keep his team on the same page, true leadership. In his interview with Piers Morgan he was very adept, enjoying his Trump generated nicknames, signalling himself as ‘a winner’, and most particularly, slating Trump for enduring too much of Fauci. I wouldn’t have put up with that, indicates DeSantis. ‘I would have fired him’. And you know he would have too.

Trump plays to his undoubted successes in policy, to his pure rally-rousing patriotism and long-term ability with withstand the Democrat slings and arrows, and to always come out fighting.

Laura Ingraham had one of her ‘Ingraham Angle’ presentations on her advice to each of them individually. Forget 2020, she advised Trump. And aim wider than Florida, she told DeSantis.

It’s the economy, stupid, she told them both. Get a plan and sell it hard.

I’m still conflicted, but lean towards DeSantis. Hairy is a Trump man through and through.
Is this something to do with the difference between men and women? Or just us?

JC
JC
March 25, 2023 9:54 am

Eyrie says:
March 25, 2023 at 9:52 am

what economic strategy would discourage any residual Chinese adventurism in our direction?
Neuter our Greens, fire at least 50% of the Canberra public service and those of the States. Tear up read and green tape laws.
Become filthy rich by developing this country so we can afford to be armed to the teeth.
Not going to happen.
Australia will gradually slide into an Argentina like state, if we are lucky, Venezuela if if aren’t. But don’t worry, everybody will be equally poor except for the political class.

Gee, someone has stolen Eyrie nameplate. He actually said something normal.

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 9:55 am

And in more baffling news:

https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2023/03/cdc-says-1-in-36-children-now-identified-with-autism-spectrum-disorder/

Autism has increased from less than 1/1000 (ie most schools had NO cases) to 1/36 over the last few decades (ie one in every second class) at the same time as the child vax sched has been heavily expanded.

And these are not just quirky kids who prefer dinosaur books to football, a lot of these are seriously damaged, seriously disabled, seriously disruptive kids.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 9:59 am

Hey, Lizzie, what is the go with the Vic Cat catch-up over Easter?

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 10:02 am

Vaccines don’t work, masks don’t work: Everything government told us about COVID-19 was wrong

Remember when the federal government told you masks were effective against COVID-19?

Yeah, they’re not.

Remember when the government told you vaccines will keep you from getting the virus?

Yeah, they don’t.

And remember when the federal government told you COVID didn’t come from a lab in Wuhan, China? Well, it did. Who says? The federal government.

The narrative laid out by the administrations of both former President Donald Trump and President Biden has rapidly fallen apart in the past couple of weeks.

The New York Times published a piece last week headlined “The Mask Mandates Did Nothing. Will Any Lessons Be Learned?” It was penned by Bret Stephens, an opinion columnist with the Times who won a Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 2013.

“The most rigorous and comprehensive analysis of scientific studies conducted on the efficacy of masks for reducing the spread of respiratory illnesses — including Covid-19 — was published late last month. Its conclusions, said Tom Jefferson, the Oxford epidemiologist who is its lead author, were unambiguous.”

“‘There is just no evidence that they’ — masks — ‘make any difference,’ he told the journalist Maryanne Demasi. ‘Full stop.’”

“But, wait, hold on. What about N-95 masks, as opposed to lower-quality surgical or cloth masks? ‘Makes no difference — none of it,’ said Jefferson.”

Hang on. Study after study in the early days of the pandemic asserted that masks worked, which prompted lawmakers at every level of government to enact mask mandates. But Mr. Jefferson says those studies were “non-randomized” and “flawed.”

So that raises the question: What about Mr. Jefferson’s study? Yeah, no. He and 11 colleagues conducted 78 randomized controlled trials with a total of 610,872 participants in numerous countries.

“Mask mandates were a fool’s errand from the start,” Mr. Stephens wrote. “They may have created a false sense of safety — and thus permission to resume semi-normal life. They did almost nothing to advance safety itself. The Cochrane report ought to be the final nail in this particular coffin.”

Also this week, researchers examined the efficacy of local COVID-19 vaccine mandates implemented across the United States in 2021 and found they didn’t work.

“These mandates imposed severe restrictions on the lives of many citizens and business owners,” the researchers said in a study conducted by George Mason University’s Mercatus Center. “Yet, we find no evidence that the mandates were effective in their intended goals of reducing COVID-19 cases and deaths.”

The researchers evaluated the District of Columbia, New York, Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago, New Orleans, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Seattle.

“We find no evidence that the announcement or implementation of indoor vaccine mandates in the cities listed had any significant effect on vaccine uptake, COVID-19 cases, or COVID-19 deaths, and this is largely consistent for all US cities that implemented the mandate,” the researchers wrote.

When COVID-19 arrived on our shores in early 2020, leaders of big cities — almost invariably Democrats — enacted major lockdowns, forcing businesses to close and shutting down entertainment and sports venues. They also ordered everyone to wear masks. When vaccines were created, those leaders issued mandates requiring millions to take them.

For instance, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney, a Democrat, said in August 2021 that science shows mask and vaccine mandates would slow the spread.

But researchers found no evidence to back that up.

From the Comments

– Do you get this?This is not about your health or about “science” — it is about controlling the population and normalizing a government-imposed regimen on you and your children.And, it’s about getting you to comply with whatever they tell you — even if it 1000% wrong.

Note: Fauci was never elected, yet the media/Democrats gave him power over every American in blue states for two years.He cost you your job, your children their education.Questioning him got you alienated, fired from your job.And, he was wrong….

Which is why they are after Trump — Trump encourages to think for yourself; he stands in the way of the leftist globalist takeover and systematic destruction of America.

This is not about justice; it’s about taking control of Americans.

Big_Nambas
Big_Nambas
March 25, 2023 10:02 am

Pauline really nails it in this cartoon, so close to the truth that it hurts.

https://youtu.be/RvUkRf7XV2I

Diogenes
Diogenes
March 25, 2023 10:02 am

and the whole sea lanes issue, w

There is a saying that you prepare to fight the next war as if it were going to be the last one.

China is making overt moves as if it were following the WW2 Japanese strategy when it comes to closing sea lanes to Australia, especially by extending its influence over the Solomon Islands.

If the Japs won at Guadalcanal, Australia and French Polynesia would have become much harder to supply by sea from the US.

Who knows how an invasion would be played out now.

There is already a large potential 5th column in Australia. With modern planes you only need 2-4 to move a battalion of infantry with a cargo plane to move its heavier equipment. With missiles at the Chinese ports in the Solomons they not have to have physical PLAN ships in the area to interdict the sea lanes.

And this is just the kinetic stuff, with cyberwar who can predict the Chinese capability, what they will target or the effects. Could you imagine the state of Laura Border if they shut down Toll/Linfox computers and supermarkets could not be stocked. It will make the toilet paper run of 2019 look like a spat between 2 babies… Could you imagine the impact if they knocked out all the traffic control centres and main railway signal control centres? The mobile networks?

And amongst the chaos, the 5th column begins it work.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 10:03 am

It’s Earth Hour tonight.
Light ’em up!!

JC
JC
March 25, 2023 10:06 am

Here’s a world map.
comment image

China is in a war with the US.

Can someone explain how China would be able to access oil from the Mid East against the challenge of the US navy? I think geographically it’s rooted to hell and back. Perhaps this vulnerability is what stops the Chinese from attacking Taiwan. The moment they attacked, they wouldn’t know if the US forcibly embargoed their oil imports. Not just their oil imports but also food. Remember, the Chinese navy can’t operate beyond 1600 naut. miles from the mainland.

Xi talks big, but he’s a f…ing moron if he tries any shit.

JC
JC
March 25, 2023 10:07 am

Diogenes

And the US would allow them to close off sea lanes? Are you kidding?

Black Ball
Black Ball
March 25, 2023 10:07 am

Is Trump behind bars yet?

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 10:09 am

Can someone explain how China (I assume the discussion has been about China) would be able to invade Australia with such massive supply lines and the US as a major ally? The idea is total nonsense.

The Chinese have shown they have the patience to play a long game, and to wage ‘unconventional war’. For example, it is more likely they will take Taiwan by blockade than invasion. Similarly, they have ‘occupied’ much of Africa and the Pacific diplomatically (including, now, the Solomons) rather than kinetically.

It has been pretty obvious over the last few years that the ‘Chinese model’ (citizen surveillance, social scoring, censorship and media control) has made great inroads into the West also – Dictator Dan in Victoria, Trudeau in Canada and ol Horseface in NZ were open adopters.

At the risk of resurrecting Sun Tsu, recall that he said ‘To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill’.

m0nty
m0nty
March 25, 2023 10:09 am

Good day for Labor governments from sea to shining sea.

calli
calli
March 25, 2023 10:09 am

He’s a teetotaller, Black Ball.

Black Ball
Black Ball
March 25, 2023 10:13 am

Phuck off monty

calli
calli
March 25, 2023 10:13 am

Careful not to dissolve in the gloatation tank, m0nty. There is a safe time limit to such things.

JC
JC
March 25, 2023 10:14 am

China reminds me of Iraq from the 1st Gulf war. Millions of men under arms, humongous military hardware bought with billions of dollars with oil money from the Soviet Union and it was over in a week or two.

Anyone recall this famous pic?

Highway of death

That’s what the Chinese navy would look like if you can imagine similar devastation at sea. Xi deserves a decent kicking too.

Black Ball
Black Ball
March 25, 2023 10:14 am

When are you off to read books to kids you clown?

Dot
Dot
March 25, 2023 10:15 am

monty

We’re actually hoping for a bloodbath for sitting members here in NSW.

I couldn’t vote Labor, because I don’t want to pay overpaid teachers and nurses anymore.

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 10:18 am

Russian submarines excel as the Russian army flails

By Tom Rogan, National Security Writer & Online Editor March 24

The newest generation of Russian submarine forces are well trained and operate advanced boats. As I noted this week , these forces offer great value to China’s People’s Liberation Army. Training with and learning from the Russians, the PLA significantly improves its readiness to fight the U.S. Navy.

In turn, even as the U.S. military must far more heavily focus its key air and naval war-fighting capabilities on China, it must also bear close attention to Russia.

WHY CHINA PROPS UP PUTIN

Yes, Russian ground forces might be facing attritional annihilation in Ukraine . Still, Russian submarine forces pose an increasingly potent threat. As the U.S. Naval Institute reports , the commander of U.S. military forces responsible for defending North America testified to that effect on Thursday. Gen. Glen VanHerck told Congress that Russia is probably one to two years away from being able to maintain persistent Yasen-class submarine deployments in both the Pacific and the Atlantic. It’s a good bet that the only dependent factor here is whether or not Russia can construct the next two boats of the Yasen class on schedule by the end of 2024. Russia currently has four Yasen-class submarines in service.

The concerns posed by the Yasens are twofold.

First, these boats are unusually quiet and thus more able to evade U.S. and NATO detection efforts. As I reported during the June 2021 G-7 summit, there were indications that a Yasen submarine was even operating off the coast of the summit location. Regardless, the Yasen reflects highly successful Russian domestic innovation, possible intellectual property theft from U.S. submarine contractors, and the effective deployment of research funds without significant diversion for corruption. That bears note in light of the catastrophic corruption in the Russian ground forces.

Second, the Yasen is loaded for effective war. It can carry the Zircon hypersonic vehicle, which can be loaded with either conventional or nuclear warheads in both land and naval attack roles. The Zircon would highly complicate any U.S. missile defense effort. The Yasen also carries the Kalibr land and naval attack cruise missile. When the newest variant of this missile is introduced, it will provide Russia means of launching a long-range, heavy-yield nuclear strike.

Taken together, the Yasen’s stealth and strike profile enable its employment in a prospective first-strike surprise attack role. Were a Yasen class able to sneak up to the U.S. East Coast, for example, it might be able to launch a nuclear attack against Washington with a very short warning time.

Were the U.S. president and vice president in close proximity, a decapitation strike might succeed. In that scenario, U.S. second-strike options would be greatly degraded. The U.S. might even lose a Third World War.

There’s another factor in play here. Namely, that the Yasen poses additional strain on already overstretched U.S. Navy submarine forces.

The means of deterring and defeating Yasen incursions rests heavily with the U.S. Navy’s attack submarine force. The problem is that the U.S. does not have enough attack submarines and is not building enough new ones nearly fast enough . Considering that U.S. submarines would be crucial to contesting a Chinese invasion of Taiwan, something that may well occur before this decade is out, this overstretch concern is significant. At a minimum, Vladimir Putin’s Yasen-class submarines give him means of holding some U.S. submarine forces in the Atlantic during any U.S.-China war (although the United Kingdom and French navies could potentially surge forces to fill the U.S. gap).

Put another way, the Yasen offers yet another example as to why Biden’s fiscal 2024 defense request is ultimately unserious . But this is a bipartisan issue. Consider the insane demands of members of Congress such as House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Kay Granger (R-TX), for example, who wants to force the Navy to waste money on made-for-the-PLA coral reefs rather than ships that can actually fight our enemies.

We have a problem.

JC
JC
March 25, 2023 10:20 am

The Chinese have shown they have the patience to play a long game,

The long game thing is a myth Duk. There’s no long game. If they really had a long game thing going, they would have avoided their demographic cliff.
The long game bullshit came out of the meetings between Kissinger and his counterpart.

There was a misunderstanding. Kissinger asked him what he thought about the French Revolution and the Chinese dude thought he was talking about the 1968 Paris riots. Kissenger was asking about the big one. Long game is just crap. Chinese are human like the rest of us.

H B Bear
H B Bear
March 25, 2023 10:21 am

Chris Kenny puts forward his application for the Prof van Wrongselen School of Wrongology in the weekend’s Paywallian.

Dot
Dot
March 25, 2023 10:23 am

Interesting data from failed web searches, maybe for Dr Duk and John H.

Found on Pub Med that promethazine (“Phenergan”) has possible use as a drug against colorectal cancer.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34560542/

Bar Beach Swimmer
March 25, 2023 10:25 am

Thanks, Tom.

Leak & Knight 1 both top notch.

On the Knight one, that could easily have been Albanese on the picnic rug referring to the Voice referendum.

The Ramirez one reminded me of the mind control scene in the original Manchurian Candidate – one minute the ladies from the CWA and the next a Chinese agent.

Dot
Dot
March 25, 2023 10:25 am

Great, now we’re meant to be afraid of non existent Russian subs built in China. Was this written by defence industry shills?

m0nty
m0nty
March 25, 2023 10:28 am

I couldn’t vote Labor, because I don’t want to pay overpaid teachers and nurses anymore.

Teachers and nurses work harder than wildly overpaid lawyers and economists.

m0nty
m0nty
March 25, 2023 10:30 am

Interview with the parent who got a principal kicked out of a Florida school over showing students pictures of Michaelangelo’s David.

Boambee John
Boambee John
March 25, 2023 10:30 am

B John, To choke the living daylights out of China, John, the US does not need to confront Chinese naval assets anywhere near the mainland. All it has to do is control the waterways around the Persian Gulf in order to prevent oil from getting to them. China doesn’t have the capability to protect oil shipments from getting there.

Also Strait of Malacca, Sunda Strait, Lombok Strait?

Then there is the qualitative thing about a navy that can’t really be added easily. I’m no expert, but I believe that running a large navy has a huge cultural component. The United States has around a century of experience operating large carriers. Time and experience are the only ways. The same also applies to operating the rest of a large navy.

The Soviet Union started to try navy “catch up” in the 1960s under Gorshkov. They were still trying when the Berlin Wall fell 20 years later. China has been trying now for around 20 years. But the Chinese seem to have been more successful with Anti-Access/Area Denial systems. That forces the USN back a bit from the coast, but is it enough? Probably not while China needs oil from the Gulf.

One economic strategy that might be successful is to buy the whole Taiwanese microprocessor business, factories, designers and all, and ship it elsewhere. This would reduce any Chinese gain from invading Taiwan. Your thoughts?

Dot
Dot
March 25, 2023 10:30 am

They work harder!

Sure monty, it’s something you can really measure too.

What should nurses and teachers be paid?

A nice round figure to the nearest thousand dollars please.

Black Ball
Black Ball
March 25, 2023 10:30 am

James Morrow:

Emotional blackmail.

It sounds harsh, but there is no other term for Anthony Albanese’s announcement of the final wording of the proposed Aboriginal Voice to parliament.

We now know that he has chosen to pursue a radical model for the voice, one which will be able to proactively make representations not just to parliament but the entire Commonwealth.

Yet on Thursday he stood up before the press gallery to tell voters that if they do not vote “yes”, people might feel bad.

It wasn’t just the Prime Minister’s sniffly, emotional performance that gave the game away. It was his words, too.

“We will feel better about ourselves if we get this done. We will just feel better,” he said.

If that wasn’t enough, he said if we didn’t vote yes other countries might feel bad, too: “The truth is that Australia will be seen as a better nation as well by the rest of the world.” (FMD)

Sorry, PM, but the rest of the world does not have to live with the consequences of dividing the nation by race and bolting a whole new bureaucracy onto a government that already takes advice from hundreds of other agencies, with billions of dollars to spend between them, helping Aboriginal Australians.

Had he gone with a more minimal model, one which talked only to parliament, and whose advice could not be leveraged by activists in the courts, Mr Albanese might have had a shot with this.

Yet now even some of the voice’s biggest supporters aren’t so sure.

Constitutional scholar Greg Craven, a major advocate for the Voice, was forced to admit that the wording “takes the problems that people have identified with the preceding drafting and multiplies (them)”.

That being the case, Peter Dutton should have no trouble saying that as much as the Liberals want to close the gap, they must vote “no” on the voice.

Frank
Frank
March 25, 2023 10:32 am

I like the idea of Citizens Assassination Squads, if for no other reason than I would like to hear Tennis Albo try to say it.

You evil bastard. All those sibilants bubbling their way through the lake of saliva… stand back!

Shy Ted
Shy Ted
March 25, 2023 10:33 am
Roger
Roger
March 25, 2023 10:35 am

Being reported that Pesutto was advised – evidently he can’t think for himself – that Moira Deeming had provided the moment during which the Liberals could prove to Victorians they were a centrist party that could govern rather than a party preoccupied with fringe issues.

As with all leftist parties, there is no principle they won’t trample on in the quest for power.

Ed Case
Ed Case
March 25, 2023 10:35 am

Referred to as ‘untermensch’ by the propaganda machine.

Yeah, the Allied propaganda machine.
The leaders of Germany were aware that Classical Germany had been formed by people of Slavic descent as well as Germans and Celts.
Croatia is a Slavic Country, it was an Ally, Ukrainians also fought in Elite German units.

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 10:36 am

Can someone explain how China would be able to access oil from the Mid East against the challenge of the US navy? I think geographically it’s rooted to hell and back. Perhaps this vulnerability is what stops the Chinese from attacking Taiwan.

1) This is a major force behind the ‘belt and road’ initiative, which opens ground based lines of communication and trade between China, the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

2) The Chinese have a long long time frame – they have the patience to wait until they finish the above, if they deem it necessary, before moving on Taiwan.

3) Unlike China, the US, Europe and the rest of the West has only short time frames – they are well down the path to the suicide of the empire, with failing economies and societies – their will and ability to wage war with China is falling rapidly, whilst China’s military power is rising.

4) China (and Russia) are both developing hypersonic ‘carrier killer’ missiles. In the terminal phase, they accelerate to Mach 10 (over 3000 m/s) and there is currently nothing to stop them. If successful (and the Ruskies are already using their Kinzals in Ukraine) , these may mark the end of the carrier era in the same way as aircraft ended the battleship era.

m0nty
m0nty
March 25, 2023 10:37 am

I see Posie Parker has not even spoken at her Auckland rally since two thousand counter protestors showed up to shout her down. Not even the presence of skull-masked goons in support of the TERFs helped them.

Johnny Rotten
March 25, 2023 10:37 am

Izabella Kaminska is senior finance editor at POLITICO Europe.

“Over the span of 10 days, the global financial system was once again shaken.

The time frame between the collapse of Californian lender Silicon Valley Bank, America’s 16th largest bank, and that of the 167-year-old lender Credit Suisse was approximately just that — 10 days.

And as we witness the fallout, so far it appears contained. Stock markets are up, bank stocks seem stabilized and government bonds are in high demand. Officials reassure ad nauseam that the financial system remains strong and stable.

But the truth is, even if so, what happened in this period of time has changed the financial system forever — and worryingly, most people haven’t even noticed.

Governments and central banks would have you believe that in both cases, private sector solutions were found to resolve the failures. No taxpayer funds were used.

But that is likely not true.

In the United States, growing calls from the country’s top billionaires and hedge fund bosses to guarantee the full extent of customer deposits would, if acted on, deliver a backstop that must be underwritten by public funds. That’s the case even if costs are distributed among whatever healthy banks remain later. The sums involved are eye-watering — by some measures up to $17 trillion of unfunded liabilities.

If the rule is passed — and all indications are that it will be — this would finally make the implicit explicit: that the financial system was never really rescued following the 2008 financial crisis but merely put on life-support. And that has now failed, which means socialization of the losses beckons.

Over in Europe, things are potentially worse. This time, it wasn’t the storming of the Winter Palace Hotel in Gstadt that seized the means of financing but something far more mundane: an untidy bank resolution for Credit Suisse, which relies far too heavily for comfort on Swiss National Bank (SNB) guarantees.

As one former top British central banker told POLITICO, “They could have used bail-in; it would have worked; and banking would become part of a capitalist market economy” — a reference to the loss-absorbing processes regulators came up with after 2008 to ensure bank failures didn’t have to draw on public resources ever again. “The only stable equilibrium is one where bank resolution works, or socialism,” he added.

But the resolution didn’t work. And investors are belatedly realizing this.

Key to this reality is that Credit Suisse was a bank considered to be in good condition and solvent by all regulatory measures. As one bank analyst told POLITICO, going by the assets, you would never have seen the problem coming. Even the SNB and financial markets regulator FINMA said so as recently as last week.

The SVB Private logo is displayed on an ATM outside of a Silicon Valley Bank branch in Santa Monica, California | Patrick Fallon/AFP via Getty images
So were the regulators lying? Or is the accounting somehow fundamentally broken?

What we know for sure is that markets questioned the numbers, and this was evidenced by a run on the bank’s deposits, equity and bonds. And the discrepancy poses a big problem going forward, as it knocks trust in the accounting of all similarly assessed banks, which, thanks to international accounting standards, means pretty much all of them.

Credit Suisse’s sale to domestic rival UBS at cents on the dollar of what regulators claim the underlying assets are worth presents another problem too. If similar assets are lurking in UBS’ own balance sheet — and chances are that is the case, as the assets in question are probably government bonds — they might have to be written down to a similar degree. This is probably why UBS needed the guarantee from the SNB to be doubled to 100 billion Swiss francs to do the deal.

In light of this, Switzerland now faces an even larger issue: If UBS were to become stressed — and it very well could due to this discrepancy — there’s no private sector pathway for resolution left. The country now only has one major bank and, thus, only two possible pathways to deal with a failure — nationalization or acquisition by a foreign buyer with enough cash to keep the valuation of all the consolidated assets at a price that brings everything back to par. And there are few of those in the Western hemisphere.

With a full foreign acquisition off the table due to global discord, this leaves only an unthinkable solution for the home of Swiss private banking — the dawn of a type of finance more commonly seen in communist countries, where banks are directed by the state to allocate funds to activities they prioritize. Combined with a central bank digital currency, this would reduce banks to mere proxies of the state, with uncertain consequences for efficient capital allocation and inflation.

How things would unfold from then on is unclear. The only thing we can be sure of is that nothing in banking, or capitalism, may ever be the same again.”

https://www.politico.eu/article/10-days-that-shook-the-financial-world-silicon-valley-bank-credit-suisse/

Roger
Roger
March 25, 2023 10:42 am

“The truth is that Australia will be seen as a better nation as well by the rest of the world.”

Makes you pine for the good old days when lefties deplored the cultural cringe.

Diogenes
Diogenes
March 25, 2023 10:43 am

And the US would allow them to close off sea lanes? Are you kidding?

JC,
You missed the point of my post. That is assuming the Chinese will invade as per the WW2 strategy, closing off sea lanes is bad thinking. They are overtly preparing for this, but what what are they doing that is hidden?

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 10:43 am

Guns vs. butter

“Guns vs. butter” has been a perennial feature of standard macroeconomics textbooks for decades. The phrase purports to illustrate the concept of “opportunity cost,” which economists define as the highest-valued alternative foregone by choosing one course of action over another. It is a simple way of showing that given a finite stock of resources represented by a “production possibilities curve,” one must make trade-offs. By consuming more of one good, a decision-maker can consume less of another. The highest-valued good that is given up is the opportunity cost.

The guns vs. butter concept has long been a staple of electoral politics as well. Do we need to spend more on defense? If so, what is the opportunity cost in terms of social goods foregone (in other words, the “butter”)? The term gained prominence during the presidency of Lyndon Johnson when his administration confronted the challenge of funding his “Great Society” programs while conducting the Cold War in general and the Vietnam War in particular.

The idea of guns vs. butter was graphically described by President Dwight Eisenhower in his 1953 Chance for Peace speech:

“Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.”

Its most recent iteration, of course, is the debate over support for Ukraine.

Over the past year, the United States has provided nearly $47 billion in military assistance to Kyiv. President Volodymyr Zelensky has continually asked for more, and indeed, some are inclined to issue him a blank check. But what is the opportunity cost of that aid? Opponents of a blank check to Ukraine point to the recent train derailment in East Palestine, Ohio, to argue that the funds that go to Ukraine might be put to better use in upgrading our own transportation infrastructure.

Of course, the issue is much more complex than a simple trade-off between spending on national security and domestic needs. For one thing, as a nation, we long ago chose to prioritize social spending over national security at the federal level. The federal budget comprises three categories: 1) nondiscretionary spending, which includes entitlements such as Social Security and Medicare, 2) discretionary spending, which includes defense spending, and 3) interest on the national debt.

The first category is not appropriated by Congress. By law, anyone who meets the criteria established by the legislation is entitled to the benefit. This category accounts for about two-thirds of federal spending. The second category must be authorized and appropriated on an annual basis and accounts for about a third of the federal budget. Interest on the debt accounts for about 10%. While defense accounts for around 60% of discretionary spending, it is still far less than what the government spends on entitlements.

The real trade-offs between defense and nondefense spending take place within the category of discretionary spending. Other components of this category include education, housing, transportation, and veterans’ benefits. Thus, arguably a dollar spent on defense comes at the expense of education. Of course, there are legitimate questions about whether the federal government should be spending funds on education and housing, expenditures that were once regarded as the responsibility of the states. The Constitution obligates the national government to “provide for the common defense.” There is no mention of providing funds for housing and education.

The real opportunity cost of military assistance to Ukraine does not exist in the area of domestic spending but in other areas of military spending.

By supplying weapon systems to Ukraine, we have depleted our own stockpiles of weapons, such as the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System and air defense systems. This has created problems for the U.S., especially in the Indo-Pacific region, where we face our primary strategic challenge from China.

For example, the Japanese newspaper Nikkei reported in early October that some parts of planned joint drills between Japan’s ground forces and U.S. Marines were canceled due to a lack of shells for the HIMARS launching systems. Some defense analysts argue that President Joe Biden’s most recent defense budget does not spend enough on the Indo-Pacific region in light of the challenge posed by China.

In the end, the decision to provide military assistance to Ukraine must be based on sound strategic thinking. But debates over more aid to Ukraine all too often lack a coherent strategic context. At a minimum, such a coherent strategic vision would couch the debate over more aid in terms of U.S. interests in Ukraine and how they relate to broader global U.S. interests, especially in the Indo-Pacific region.

But U.S. policymakers have repeatedly failed to articulate our strategic objectives in Ukraine.

Although Ukraine has the right to appeal to the U.S. for assistance in repelling Russian aggression, American citizens have a legitimate expectation that Ukrainian interests do not come at the expense of U.S. interests. Giving Ukraine a blank check, as some wish us to do, is the very opposite of a prudent U.S. foreign policy.

“Guns vs. butter” has an emotional appeal, but assistance to Ukraine must be examined in the cold light of sound strategic reasoning.

Mackubin Owens is a senior fellow of the Foreign Policy Research Institute and a national security fellow at the Clements Center for National Security at the University of Texas, Austin.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 10:44 am

JCsays:

March 25, 2023 at 10:14 am

China reminds me of Iraq from the 1st Gulf war. Millions of men under arms, humongous military hardware bought with billions of dollars with oil money from the Soviet Union and it was over in a week or two.

Who can forget the “Elite Republican Guard”?
We were assured by Our ABC and their fellow travellers in the US that the initial push might go well, but when the GIs came up against the battle-hardened “Elite Republican Guard” things would be different.
And they were.
The Elite Republican Guard made a slightly different high pitched screeching sound as they turned and ran.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 10:46 am

Franksays:

March 25, 2023 at 10:32 am

I like the idea of Citizens Assassination Squads, if for no other reason than I would like to hear Tennis Albo try to say it.

You evil bastard. All those sibilants bubbling their way through the lake of saliva… stand back!

I love how Johannes Leak always includes the torrent of saliva in his Tennis Albo cartoons.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
March 25, 2023 10:47 am

Sancho, you have to get in touch directly with Mater for details of a catch-up on Easter Saturday in Bendigo, Vic. Dover can provide his contact details.

Mater has taken the initiative of arranging a meet up when I said here we are in Bendigo over Easter for the Ring Cycle Opera. Very nice of him. Probably only a small group as it’s Easter, a busy time, but all Cats down that way would be welcome. I don’t have any further details on time and place as yet, but we are free all of the Saturday.

flyingduk
flyingduk
March 25, 2023 10:48 am

The long game thing is a myth Duk

The Chinese waited 200 years to get Hong Kong back.

cohenite
March 25, 2023 10:49 am

For those who think joe is the dumb one:

JILL BIDEN: “It’s been really warm ’cause of global warming in the United States.”

Comments are good.

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 10:50 am

Nancy Pelosi calls out San Francisco archbishop who barred her from communion: ‘His problem, not mine’

The San Francisco archbishop said Pelosi wouldn’t be allowed to receive communion unless she agreed to ‘repudiate her advocacy’ for abortion

Major Elvis Newton
Major Elvis Newton
March 25, 2023 10:53 am

Memo to Australian media and chattering class:

Can we please stop with the disingenuous emotive rhetoric and accept that what is being proposed, in all its stunning “just trust us” lack of detail, is the most profoundly divisive and racially charged policy and legal apparatus in Australian history.

It is as divisive as the White Australia policy and no element of modern Australian society will be left untouched by the mechanics of this proposed ‘voice’.

Any attempt to recast Albanese’s feel good version is nothing short of bureaucratic trickery that will seek to hide the treachery within and below the surface.

This constitutional amendment should be damned for its audacity and discarded immediately.

shatterzzz
March 25, 2023 10:54 am

Luigi .. on the nose with kids ..

https://twitter.com/i/status/1639146539150094336

H B Bear
H B Bear
March 25, 2023 10:55 am

The San Francisco archbishop said Pelosi wouldn’t be allowed to receive communion unless she agreed to ‘repudiate her advocacy’ for abortion

You suspect it’s just a stepping stone on the way to eternal damnation. Eternal, that’s a long time.

bons
bons
March 25, 2023 10:55 am

As we observe the death of the Liberal Party today, every SFL member and apparatchic should be forced to kneel before the grave of Menzies and howl for forgiveness.

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 10:56 am

Biden energy secretary defends praising China on climate change spending in fiery hearing exchange

Reschenthaler accused Granholm of ignoring Chinese human rights abuses, but Granholm insisted she was being taken out of context

“Secretary, on March 10, 2023, you said, “We can all learn from what China is doing” — obviously about the environment,” Reschenthaler said in the hearing. “At the time you made that comment, were you aware that 30 percent of the world’s CO2 emissions came from China?”

“Oh, yes,” Granholm answered.

Granholm claimed earlier this month that Americans can “learn from what China is doing” in combating climate change.

During an interview at the annual SXSW conference in Austin, Texas, Granholm sang the praises of China for its efforts to reduce climate change, claiming that the country is actually “very sensitive” about the issue, more so than the United States.

Reschenthaler continued pressing the energy secretary on the extent of China’s emissions, the continued construction of coal power plants in the country, and its Paris Climate Accord-sanctioned ability to increase emissions until 2030.

China recently hit its coal-production record last year. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, “55% of China’s energy” now comes from coal, “compared to 11% in the U.S.”

Granholm repeatedly clarified that she was aware of statistics on China’s impact on the global environment.

“Knowing that you knew all that when you made the comment, would you like to retract your praise for China?” Reschenthaler asked.

“No, my praise for China was on what they are doing to invest in clean energy, even as they are the world’s largest emitter,” Granholm told the Pennsylvania representative.

She added, “They are also the largest investor in clean energy technologies — they invest four times more than the United States.”

Reschenthaler went on to complain about comments Granholm had made in October 2019, in which she said the U.S. does not have the “moral authority” to criticize Chinese climate policies.

Roger
Roger
March 25, 2023 10:57 am

Nancy Pelosi calls out San Francisco archbishop who barred her from communion: ‘His problem, not mine’

“Devout Catholic” Nacy Pelosi regards abortion as a form of birth control.

Johnny Rotten
March 25, 2023 10:58 am

That forces the USN back a bit from the coast, but is it enough? Probably not while China needs oil from the Gulf.

And that is why Xi was in Moscow and after that Russian Oil by pipeline over land. I understand that there is one oil pipeline and another to be built.

shatterzzz
March 25, 2023 11:00 am

Autism has increased from less than 1/1000 (ie most schools had NO cases) to 1/36 over the last few decades (ie one in every second class) at the same time as the child vax sched has been heavily expanded.

Autism is like a lot of other “ailments” .. once it gained recognition as eligible for the “rorters” the numbers increase accordingly …..

Zipster
March 25, 2023 11:00 am

Russia has issued its biggest ever warning over Ukraine’s ‘Retake Crimea’ ambition. Moscow says an attempt to capture Crimea could be met with a nuclear response. Dmitry Medvedev, the Deputy Chief of the Russian Security Council, said that Moscow would be justified in using any means necessary if Kyiv tries to threaten the existence of the Russian state, of which Crimea is part.’ The dangerous deterrent for the Ukrainian administration comes just days after a series of drone attacks in Russia’s Crimean peninsula.

lunatics taking small steps to WW3

H B Bear
H B Bear
March 25, 2023 11:00 am

As we observe the death of the Liberal Party today …

As good a reason as any to put the champagne on ice.

Roger
Roger
March 25, 2023 11:01 am

Can we please stop with the disingenuous emotive rhetoric…

Disingenuous emotive rhetoric is the political currency of the day.

Roger
Roger
March 25, 2023 11:03 am

The Chinese waited 200 years to get Hong Kong back.

Not that they had much choice.

Bar Beach Swimmer
March 25, 2023 11:03 am

On whether Australians will go down the path of voting yes in the referendum.

One pre-condition is necessary for that to happen: both sides of politics must support the change. If Dutton caves, and I don’t think he will, a major hurdle for Albanese has been cleared.

If not, and Dutton and the Opposition as a whole – yes, there most likely still will be some SFLs who continue to spruik the Yes case – continue to question the huge minefield that the voice will create, and finally come down against it, then it isn’t a given.

Also, there are significant people outside the parliament who are questioning how this will work, which is not helping the government. As an example, whatever your personal opinion of John Howard, there still are many Australians whose memory of his time in power harkens back to a better time in this country, economically, civilly and socially – they see him as perhaps the last adult leader the country had, so his opinion resonates. Last week on Sky he voiced what many think: he is not supporting the change.

On the mindset of the electorate. Australians hate the idea that someone is viewed (and believes) they are better than the rest. To Aussies, we see ourselves as all the same, legally. This crap about the oldest continuous culture will appeal to the luvvies at the ABC but not to people whose difficulty with the cost of living see more special treatment being funnelled to people already well – more than well – supported. As a result, Luigi is not on firm ground if all he continues to talk about outside and inside the Parliament is the voice, while power prices, groceries and transport costs continue to rise.

Major “Aboriginal voices” such as Jacinta Price and Warren Mundine on the No side also do not help the argument for change. Nor does the stupidity of Lidia Thorpe getting herself on the teev almost every night behaving as a looney “indigenous sovcit” trying to walk over the rights of every other citizen. Many would have seen her attempt to trounce the oath of office at her swearing-in in the Senate. Not a good look for reconciliation, there.

Finally, appealing with tears and “hand-on-heart-this-is-right-thing-to-do” argument to an electorate that had their rights abused by their own governments during the pandemic has meant that we are even more sceptical of the political class doing the right thing by us than we were four short years ago.

It’s going down.

John H.
John H.
March 25, 2023 11:04 am

Boambee Johnsays:
March 25, 2023 at 10:30 am
B John, To choke the living daylights out of China, John, the US does not need to confront Chinese naval assets anywhere near the mainland. All it has to do is control the waterways around the Persian Gulf in order to prevent oil from getting to them. China doesn’t have the capability to protect oil shipments from getting there.

Also Strait of Malacca, Sunda Strait, Lombok Strait?

Then there is the qualitative thing about a navy that can’t really be added easily. I’m no expert, but I believe that running a large navy has a huge cultural component. The United States has around a century of experience operating large carriers. Time and experience are the only ways. The same also applies to operating the rest of a large navy.

The Soviet Union started to try navy “catch up” in the 1960s under Gorshkov. They were still trying when the Berlin Wall fell 20 years later. China has been trying now for around 20 years. But the Chinese seem to have been more successful with Anti-Access/Area Denial systems. That forces the USN back a bit from the coast, but is it enough? Probably not while China needs oil from the Gulf.

One economic strategy that might be successful is to buy the whole Taiwanese microprocessor business, factories, designers and all, and ship it elsewhere. This would reduce any Chinese gain from invading Taiwan. Your thoughts?

India has militarized the Andaman Islands. That creates huge problems for anyone wishing to control the Malacca Strait.

China has a naval port in Pakistan that is connected by the belt and road to China but all the bods argue it is unrealistic to ship huge quantities that way. It does have other military installations in north Africa but there is the US fleet consider(is it still there?)

India is also setting up military port and airport in the Seychelles. The US also has the Diego Garcia facility and aircraft with sufficient range to present a serious threat to shipping. The BIB Lancers operating from there or Darwin will be a huge problem for China, especially now that the USA has very long range stealthy cruise missiles that those bombers can carry in good quantities.

Microprocessors: TSMC has long since signed contracts to build fab plants in the USA. China’s fab plants are 20 years behind. Any invasion will result in the immediate destruction of plants in Taiwan. It will far better for China to use cyberwarfare to crack that nut and undoubtedly are desperately trying to do that.

PS: reports suggest the new Russian subs are top notch and present a very serious threat to US naval assets. But all this is based on publicly available information. Who knows!?

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 11:05 am

American Amish 13% Strike again

Frontier Airlines passenger dragged from plane, allegedly biting police

An unruly passenger was placed under arrest after being escorted from a Frontier Airlines flight and scratched, bit, the police officers

A Texas woman got into an altercation with another passenger on a Frontier Airlines flight from Miami, Florida to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania which led to her being forcefully removed from the aircraft allegedly kicking, scratching and biting police officers.

From the Comments

– Pat, I solved the puzzle without even looking at the picture or name! Do I score extra points?

– Remember that song “Welcome to the Jungle” from Guns’ and Roses? We are living deep in the Amazon jungle now y’all!

– Can you spell “thuglette?”

– This is why they are not liked, respected or treated as equals. It’s not because of some invisible systemic bias.

– They choose to not be equal. They choose to not step up for themselves no matter how hard everyone cheers them on. But that has to stay everyone else’s fault for reasons that make no sense.

– I think this would be a wonderful opportunity to pause for a moment and give thanks for the great contributions of the black community to our society. Their peaceful and generous nature makes them ideal neighbors, lending testimony to their exceptional family values and parenting skills unrivaled by any other culture. Their child-rearing practices and skills mixed with their unparalleled work ethic are second to none. Their rational and logical thought toward circumstances coupled with their innate capability to de-escalate situations is to be envied and coveted. Their commitment to academic excellence enriches our schools and serves as an example to all who hope to achieve prominence as a people. Real estate values are fueled by the mix of African-Americans into an area due to their caring and respectful nature of these communities, an example of all they have achieved through their enthusiasm for self-improvement, hard work and a self-reliant nature. Without their industrious and creative drive, we would be poorer as a nation.

– You’re going to need a shop vac to pick up all of that dripping sarcasm.

Zipster
March 25, 2023 11:10 am
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
March 25, 2023 11:14 am

Geoffrey Blainey also nailed it – two cultures came face to face on that day in 1770 – one had never discovered how to boil water, the other had just invented the steam engine.

I am nearly finished reading Carl Lumboltz’s ‘Among Cannibals – 4 years travels in Australia’, travels taken 1882 on and published in 1889. It was put up by some Cat not long ago, here.

It is full of some nineteenth century attitudes, but it is still a fairly honest account of the contact period in western Queensland. What is really sad is that one gets of picture of a degraded human culture caught in a time-warp encountering a sudden introduction of new wants (sugar and tobacco especially), isolated from the world in a difficult environment for aeons, where a full belly is the acme of all endeavours and human emotions not fed into more productive streams give rise to a continual violence within and between tribes, and especially towards women.

Penile sub-incision is discussed as a means of contraception recognised by the tribes, which is interesting, as anthropologists tend to stress more the ritual aspects of it. Similarly with cannibalism, which this author does not doubt was a significant food source as well as having ritual meaning. Food was everything. The stories of the settlers giving left over bits of intestines, hearts and lungs from a meat slaughter at the station to eagerly waiting aborigines, who ate them half-raw (sometimes not waiting and eating these remnants completely raw at site) after a brief charring on the fire, were painful to read. These people in traditional life, certainly in this area, lived constantly on the edge of starvation. They even gratefully sought out the hide of the slaughtered beasts, and ate that, and the interior of hoofs and bones as well.

It’s so sad that the old missions and cattle stations, which used aboriginal skills of the men and assisted the women into a new form of peaceful living, were not used in a more foundational manner to implement the culture changes that had to come in the twentieth century. Getting rid of these ground-up institutional attachments arising from the contact period rather than making them more fit to modernity, and putting nothing useful in their place, was a retrograde step. So was telling aboriginal people to over-value their traditional ways and to encourage them to refuse ‘assimilation’. Assimilation was the best thing they had going for themselves.

John H.
John H.
March 25, 2023 11:14 am

Dotsays:
March 25, 2023 at 10:23 am
Interesting data from failed web searches, maybe for Dr Duk and John H.

Found on Pub Med that promethazine (“Phenergan”) has possible use as a drug against colorectal cancer.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34560542/

There are a huge number of cell culture studies indicating agent 42 can kill cancer cells.

There are plenty of things that can inhibit the P13 pathway. It is a major component in intracellular metabolism. The big problem is getting enough to cancer cells without killing the patient. That is being addressed in some very clever ways. The details escape me but there are attempts to deliver toxic payloads specifically to cancer cells.

BTW colorectal cancer is increasing, even in the young. No obvious explanation but bad diets, gut dysbiosis, and obesity are obvious candidates.

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
March 25, 2023 11:17 am

Frontier Airlines passenger dragged from plane, allegedly biting police

More From the Comments

– Hey everybody. Go to YouTube search and type in David Attenborough Pavement Ape.

You need to sign-in as over 18m but 1 min 36 secs worth it

– I am still in pain 4 hours after first watching this masterpiece

– Someone play this video on a giant screen in every city of America

– laughed so hard I cried ! I had to sign-in, great video

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
March 25, 2023 11:20 am

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Bearesays:

March 25, 2023 at 10:47 am

Sancho, you have to get in touch directly with Mater for details of a catch-up on Easter Saturday in Bendigo, Vic. Dover can provide his contact details.

Not sure of movements for Easter but will do if the planets align.

Roger
Roger
March 25, 2023 11:24 am

Assimilation was the best thing they had going for themselves.

And yet successful, assimilated aboriginals like Linda Burney and Stan Grant won’t concede that. Ideology based on historical grievances trumps a pragmatism that would bring about a bright future for indigenous folk.

rickw
rickw
March 25, 2023 11:24 am

I’ve been away from blogging for a while. Who started this nonsense about a Chinese junk invasion? Who’s responsible?

Jim Molan.

John H.
John H.
March 25, 2023 11:26 am

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Bearesays:
March 25, 2023 at 11:14 am
Geoffrey Blainey also nailed it – two cultures came face to face on that day in 1770 – one had never discovered how to boil water, the other had just invented the steam engine.

I am nearly finished reading Carl Lumboltz’s ‘Among Cannibals – 4 years travels in Australia’, travels taken 1882 on and published in 1889. It was put up by some Cat not long ago, here.

It is full of some nineteenth century attitudes, but it is still a fairly honest account of the contact period in western Queensland. What is really sad is that one gets of picture of a degraded human culture caught in a time-warp encountering a sudden introduction of new wants (sugar and tobacco especially), isolated from the world in a difficult environment for aeons, where a full belly is the acme of all endeavours and human emotions not fed into more productive streams give rise to a continual violence within and between tribes, and especially towards women.

Compare and contrast. The English had an entirely different attitude towards the Maori, which arrived in NZ circa 1,000AD. Compared to the Aus aborigines, a very advanced culture, probably still very misogynistic, but extensive trade links, a commonality of language allowing for a more unified front against the English, very good guerilla warfare tactics, and a geography that suited their military strategies.

The English respected the Maori and with good reason. Apart from the military aspect the Maori quickly adopted technologies from the English, including agriculture and language. Early accounts of the Australian aborigines describe the aborigines as among the most primitive of peoples they had encountered. Not sure but I think even Darwin considered the aborigines to be like the Feugians, who weren’t stuck down in nether regions of South America as a lifestyle choice.

Cultural and genetic isolation doesn’t work out well for humans.

Angus Black
Angus Black
March 25, 2023 11:27 am

Lovely painting, Dover.

It seems so easy to love and appreciate the impressionists today that you wonder how it could possibly have taken until quite long after Monet’s death for real enthusiasm to build.

I can see that the more radical(?) post-impressionists might have taken time to invade the consciousness of the people, startlingly lovely as we find them today. The impressionists, though, just seem immediately comfortable.

Anyway, today’s is especially lovely. Thanks for the reminder.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
March 25, 2023 11:30 am

In this book, there is btw, absolutely no indication of the Bruce Pascoe lifestyles. Clearly small local hordes moved around a limited territory and fought each other while coming together occasionally for ceremonial (and polygamous wife gaining) fighting. Lumboltz is categoric that there was no housing apart from bark wind shelters, people slept in the open around fires, small animals such as rats, lizards and snakes formed most of the diet, supplemented by whatever women gathered or dug up as roots. An occasional wallaby kill was a treat, shared mostly amongst the men. Infanticide and cannibalism were rife, although even at this early stage of contact it was known to be disapproved of by settlers. Thus there was much dissembling about it from the tribes to whites even though it continued on.

John H.
John H.
March 25, 2023 11:31 am

Major Elvis Newtonsays:
March 25, 2023 at 10:53 am
Memo to Australian media and chattering class:

Can we please stop with the disingenuous emotive rhetoric and accept that what is being proposed, in all its stunning “just trust us” lack of detail, is the most profoundly divisive and racially charged policy and legal apparatus in Australian history.

It is as divisive as the White Australia policy and no element of modern Australian society will be left untouched by the mechanics of this proposed ‘voice’.

Any attempt to recast Albanese’s feel good version is nothing short of bureaucratic trickery that will seek to hide the treachery within and below the surface.

This constitutional amendment should be damned for its audacity and discarded immediately.

Feel good is how modern politics is done. It isn’t about good policy it is about heart strings and vacuous rhetoric, although I admit the possibility thus has it ever been and I’m only just waking up to that shocking fact.

Crossie
Crossie
March 25, 2023 11:33 am

Just came back from voting, I did my duty. I was pleased that One Nation had a candidate so I could vote for him and the I put the Liberal incumbent in the second place. That way One Nation will get funding based on first choice while Tanya Davies, the Liberal incumbent, will get the second preference. She is one of just a handful Liberal MPs who resisted Gladys and Alex Greenwich during the abortion and euthanasia debacles and deserves the preference.

Crossie
Crossie
March 25, 2023 11:36 am

Somebody asked whether sausage sizzles were still available at polling booths. Sausage and onion rolls were available at my polling booth but I had just had breakfast so didn’t buy one.

Vicki
Vicki
March 25, 2023 11:36 am

Lizzie – I think that was a very fair & sensitive assessment of that early contact. Many modern educated and urbanised Aborigines find such an understanding too painful. This leads to all sorts of absurd claims.

Crossie
Crossie
March 25, 2023 11:37 am

For the upper house I voted for One Nation above the line. Hope they get in quite a few of their candidates.

Cassie of Sydney
March 25, 2023 11:40 am

“I see Posie Parker has not even spoken at her Auckland rally since two thousand counter protestors showed up to shout her down. Not even the presence of skull-masked goons in support of the TERFs helped them.”

I see the Jew hating misogynist pervert apologist is for all women and girls being physically and verbally threatened and silenced. Does his wife know he’s a pervert apologist?

Tom
Tom
March 25, 2023 11:40 am

It’s so sad that the old missions and cattle stations, which used aboriginal skills of the men and assisted the women into a new form of peaceful living, were not used in a more foundational manner to implement the culture changes that had to come in the twentieth century.

Splendid post, Lizzie at 11.14am.

It reminds that the news media is supposed to be a bulwark against public ignorance but, on issue after issue, it behaves like a radical political party that will do whatever it takes to bring down our civilisation, including lying about our history and especially the behaviour of our ancestors when they encountered Australian Aborigines.

Most journalists are not like normal people, don’t think like them or vote like them.

Most journalists hate our civilisation and its institutions like democracy and want to bring them down.

Crossie
Crossie
March 25, 2023 11:42 am

H B Bear says:
March 25, 2023 at 10:21 am
Chris Kenny puts forward his application for the Prof van Wrongselen School of Wrongology in the weekend’s Paywallian.

He seems to be suffering from political schizophrenia, one minute he is quite sensible about the current political situation and then he goes off spruiking for the Voice in his head.

Cassie of Sydney
March 25, 2023 11:44 am

If Labor wins in NSW today (and I suspect they will), watch ICAC go to sleep, just like it did for sixteen years under Carr, Iemma, Rees and the Skank of Scotland Island.

mizaris
mizaris
March 25, 2023 11:49 am

Feel good is how modern politics is done. It isn’t about good policy it is about heart strings and vacuous rhetoric, although I admit the possibility thus has it ever been and I’m only just waking up to that shocking fact

.

The Castle has a lot to answer for.

Crossie
Crossie
March 25, 2023 11:50 am

Constitutional scholar Greg Craven, a major advocate for the Voice, was forced to admit that the wording “takes the problems that people have identified with the preceding drafting and multiplies (them)”.

That being the case, Peter Dutton should have no trouble saying that as much as the Liberals want to close the gap, they must vote “no” on the voice.

I don’t think Dutton has the guts to go against the media whom he wishes to impress.

John H.
John H.
March 25, 2023 11:51 am

Bar Beach Swimmersays:
March 25, 2023 at 11:03 am
On whether Australians will go down the path of voting yes in the referendum.

One pre-condition is necessary for that to happen: both sides of politics must support the change. If Dutton caves, and I don’t think he will, a major hurdle for Albanese has been cleared.

If not, and Dutton and the Opposition as a whole – yes, there most likely still will be some SFLs who continue to spruik the Yes case – continue to question the huge minefield that the voice will create, and finally come down against it, then it isn’t a given.

Also, there are significant people outside the parliament who are questioning how this will work, which is not helping the government. As an example, whatever your personal opinion of John Howard, there still are many Australians whose memory of his time in power harkens back to a better time in this country, economically, civilly and socially – they see him as perhaps the last adult leader the country had, so his opinion resonates. Last week on Sky he voiced what many think: he is not supporting the change.

On the mindset of the electorate. Australians hate the idea that someone is viewed (and believes) they are better than the rest. To Aussies, we see ourselves as all the same, legally. This crap about the oldest continuous culture will appeal to the luvvies at the ABC but not to people whose difficulty with the cost of living see more special treatment being funnelled to people already well – more than well – supported. As a result, Luigi is not on firm ground if all he continues to talk about outside and inside the Parliament is the voice, while power prices, groceries and transport costs continue to rise.

Major “Aboriginal voices” such as Jacinta Price and Warren Mundine on the No side also do not help the argument for change. Nor does the stupidity of Lidia Thorpe getting herself on the teev almost every night behaving as a looney “indigenous sovcit” trying to walk over the rights of every other citizen. Many would have seen her attempt to trounce the oath of office at her swearing-in in the Senate. Not a good look for reconciliation, there.

Finally, appealing with tears and “hand-on-heart-this-is-right-thing-to-do” argument to an electorate that had their rights abused by their own governments during the pandemic has meant that we are even more sceptical of the political class doing the right thing by us than we were four short years ago.

It’s going down.

Only a small portion of the public has learnt the lessons of the govt control during the pandemic. There are European countries where that message has resonated much more strongly(eg. recent comments by the German health minister).

I’d love to agree with you but you are recapitulating the mistake conservatives make all too often. They did it with SSM and they are going to do it here. It isn’t about logic, it is about the feelz. Without the combined support of a large segment of the MSM , the support of at least one major political party, and the support of some major corporations, the NO vote is going down. I write this not knowing a single person in favour of the YES vote. Another big problem is that the young rely on social media and increasingly ignore the MSM. Their vote is crucial, probably the deciding factor in the vote. If we can’t access social media and the all the putrid posturing that goes on there, we lose a huge proportion of the young vote(under 35 is young in my world!).

Aim for the heart not the head.

Crossie
Crossie
March 25, 2023 11:52 am

Roger says:
March 25, 2023 at 10:42 am
“The truth is that Australia will be seen as a better nation as well by the rest of the world.”
Makes you pine for the good old days when lefties deplored the cultural cringe.

Wasn’t it mostly lefties who exhibited cultural cringe?

rickw
rickw
March 25, 2023 11:52 am

(this resulted in an *increase* in susceptibility to COVID infection immediately after injection – they fudged this by deeming you as ‘unvaxxed’ for the first 2 weeks after injection, neatly transferring this side effect into the unvaxxed column)

Managed to not catch COVID during an outbreak at home. COVID within 10 days of the second vax.

H B Bear
H B Bear
March 25, 2023 11:54 am

Crossie at 11:42 – it’s a bit hard to fathom. He played quite a prominent role in spiking the Hindmarsh Island fraud. The Voice falls short of fraud – but not by much. Certainly a lot of the arguments advanced in support would clear that hurdle.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
March 25, 2023 11:54 am

Cultural and genetic isolation doesn’t work out well for humans.

Yes. Romanticising and encouraging it as a genetic inheritance (however diluted) does no favours to those more traditional remnants of this world who are still outside of mainstream Australian society due to failed past policies in the more remote areas (Nugget Coombs’ shameful legacy).

The urban aboriginal aristocracy have to romanticise aboriginal traditions in fake ways in order to garner the sorts of money-raising sympathies that will end up giving us the Voice.

I am all for recognising the true human success of aboriginal people who managed to survive and develop a set of myths and gerontocratic rule that enabled survival while isolated on an unproductive and mostly bleak continent. That they irrevocably damaged the original ecology, well, that’s what they did to survive. This was done all over the world wherever humans roamed or settled.

Some of their hunter-gatherer technologies were on a par with those of other hunter-gatherer cultures, including the ancient hunter-gatherer cultures of Africa and then Europe. I respect all of these cultures as a ‘type’ from which humanity gradually struggled by shared knowledge to where we are today. Without the rudimentary cultures of the hunter-gatherers, we would be here at all; eaten long ago by lions on the African savannahs, as a non-surviving type of ape that never became Sapiens.
That is their true value. And for Aust Abs, it is time to move on.

johanna
johanna
March 25, 2023 11:56 am

calli, the analogy of putting down an old, sick dog is compelling.

In my electorate, formerly that of Barilaro, the Nats candidate and current member is a woman who, while not totally wet, is certainly very damp around the edges. On the plus side, she has been very active and visible since stepping in a year or so ago. I think she’ll romp in.

Roger
Roger
March 25, 2023 11:57 am

Constitutional scholar Greg Craven, a major advocate for the Voice, was forced to admit that the wording “takes the problems that people have identified with the preceding drafting and multiplies (them)”.

The question Greg now needs to ask himself is, do the people responsible see this not as a problem but as a feature?

Cassie of Sydney
March 25, 2023 11:57 am

“It reminds that the news media is supposed to be a bulwark against public ignorance but, on issue after issue, it behaves like a radical political party that will do whatever it takes to bring down our civilisation, including lying about our history and especially the behaviour of our ancestors when they encountered Australian Aborigines”

Indeed. And exemplified by the media’s smearing and lies about Kellie-Jay, Moira and women such as myself, since the very strange appearance of Nazis at the Let Women Speak rally last Saturday. Nazis, I might add, that were ushered through by Victorian police.

But that’s fine, because it’s now time to throw it back. I look forward to the next anti-Israel protest, protests that various Labor and Green scum love to attend, and when they stand before crowds baying genocidal Jew hatred and waving banners such as “push them in the ovens” and “Israel is a Nazi state”, and banners with the Swastika superimposed over the Star of David, it’s time to apply the same standards to them.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
March 25, 2023 11:57 am

wouldn’t be here

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