2,054 thoughts on “Open Thread – Weekend 2 April 2022”

  1. Winston Smithsays:
    April 1, 2022 at 11:44 pm
    John H:

    It will be so boring. Beyond the solar system space is so empty, a vast nothingness. Submariners and explorers had plenty to do but on long space flights we’d be better off in hibernation.

    You can hibernate – I will be selecting the crew for the colonisation program on Alpha Centauri. Here is a sample.
    It will not be boring.
    OK Serious hat on…
    The Kuiper Belt will only be useful for a laser highway project
    First we need to mine the crap out of the asteroid belt.

    Winston you’re in big trouble. No gays, trans, disabled in the crew! Off you go then, to the airlock.

    Weird site:
    https://www.kuiperbeltminingcorp.com/

    Darn it I just flew my F4-E into an enemy fortification so I won’t be a pilot on the mission to Mars.


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  2. Darn it I just flew my F4-E into an enemy fortification so I won’t be a pilot on the mission to Mars.

    There is such a thing as too low, John. H.

    What’s yer poison? 😉


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  3. Rex Angersays:
    April 2, 2022 at 12:55 am
    Darn it I just flew my F4-E into an enemy fortification so I won’t be a pilot on the mission to Mars.

    There is such a thing as too low, John. H.

    What’s yer poison?

    Project Wingman. Arcady style fighter game. Not that good, not enough tactical flying just constantly blowing stuff up. Good for what it is but if I wanted fantasy I’d go back to Freespace or try Elite Dangerous. Tempted to load DCS. I think a Russian group created it. Graphics are superb, flight models based on publicly available info, install for free but have to buy various bits and pieces to enjoy it. .


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  4. You don’t do much do you comrade.

    I think that’s quite unreasonable, Struth. In fact, it is both lazy and factually wrong.

    After all, in the space of one wordwall today, you raged that taking up driving your beloved trucks again is all too hard and all too tyrannical and not something you feel like doing, while rather paradoxically proclaiming that

    Freedom and self reliance are strong in my breed.

    You then admitted at the very end of that selfsame wordwall, that you couldn’t destroy all my alleged ‘trolling’ and ‘lunacy.’ That’s a big move from you, Struth, admitting defeat in such a way. 🙂

    And I’ve somehow united your august self and some of the most fractious and toxic posters on the Furniture Store in such mutual hatred of me, that Bird doesn’t even rage about perfidious Js anymore. You all get on with each other incredibly well, all of a sudden.

    So you see, the assertion, You don’t do much do you comrade, is both lazy and factually wrong.

    QED.

    Got any impotent, schoolyard-level sexual crudity or appeal to marital incompleteness to reply with?


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  5. I’ve seen and heard good things about Project Wingman, John. H. A great excuse to scratch an itch. 🙂

    Tempted to load DCS. I think a Russian group created it. Graphics are superb, flight models based on publicly available info, install for free but have to buy various bits and pieces to enjoy it. .

    The game engine is spectacular, but the cost in aircraft modules is impossible.

    A good and relatively very old-school alternative is BMS 4.0, a bottom-to-top revamp and software and visual update of Microprose’s Falcon 4.0.

    It isn’t as pretty and is fairly geo-locked to the Korean Peninsula, but the AI and game engine is pretty good and actually has an interactive simulated war carrying on around you. That your actions directly influence. And for the cost of $30 or $40 from Good Old Games.com and signing up to the BMS forums. There is a lot of learning curve and documentation to swallow, but there is nothing else out there like it.

    If the DCS folks could provide a campaign engine like that to their system (Any of the eras modelled-40s, 70s, 80s, 90s, present day), they will be the last word in combat flight sims. Just nobody’s done it yet.


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  6. Oh that’s right.

    Matrix the sycophant likes Struth because too many coherent words is unmanly.

    Do you fix your A/C units by headbutting them until the ducting fits?


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  7. A good and relatively very old-school alternative is BMS 4.0, a bottom-to-top revamp and software and visual update of Microprose’s Falcon 4.0.

    Hmmm, I have Falcon 4.0 somewhere. The BMS makes it great. Might think about that.

    Grim Reapers has fun with DCS, youtube channel. Their naval battle simulations are entertaining. Growling Sidewinder channel is much more technical, with some fighter pilots taking him on.


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  8. Growling Sidewinder channel is much more technical, with some fighter pilots taking him on.

    I think I’ve seen Growling Sidewinder demonstrating energy dogfighting with the DCS Spitfire, following a rabbit trail from a great little video RickW had linked about the P-40 Kittyhawk’s energy retention and combat performance. Summary was that the P-40 was underrated by postwar historians, and was really a quite competitive little aircraft below 10,000ft, even up to the end of the war. And in 1941-2, was right up there with the current marks of 109 and Spitfire.


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  9. Agree with CK’s article 99% . (1. These injections are not ‘vaccines’ as he calls them. 2. I’ve not seen any evidence that these injections actually reduce the risk of severe illness/death.)

    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/inquirer/our-cowardly-response-to-covid-is-a-lasting-disgrace/news-story/bda2fb9989166075d9fa72ddcf78a777

    Our cowardly response to Covid is a lasting disgrace

    CHRIS KENNY

    PHOTO. Masks on … Scott Morrison, Anthony Albanese and MPs pose for a formal photograph. Picture: NCA NewsWire

    11:00PM APRIL 1, 2022

    The most frightening revelation of the Covid-19 pandemic is that we appear to be managing the decline of our nation.

    Without a dramatic reboot – which is not on offer in this election – we could lose, permanently, many of the characteristics that have made us one of the most successful democracies in history.

    If you want a Pythonesque example of how far we have fallen from the stoic, practical and sensible nation we once were, you only had to watch the start of question time on Wednesday when the Speaker organised an official photograph. “I would direct all members to turn around and face the official photographer – we’re leaving masks on,” he instructed.

    Then, just to emphasise the ­directive and make sure there was no superspreader event, he said it again: “We are leaving masks on.”

    Here, in the seat of government, 150 fully vaccinated people in a cavernous chamber duly donned their masks. Perhaps in years to come, some new technology will see through the masks in this photo so we can tell which politicians were smiling (the idiots) and which were grimacing (the smart, but foolishly compliant).

    More than two years into this pandemic, with 95 per cent of the eligible population fully vaccinated, and almost 70 per cent having received booster shots, we need to procure a government permit, prove our vaccination status and submit to a Covid test in order to cross the state border into Western Australia. Masks are mandatory in airports and on planes, as well as in taxis and on public transport in most states.

    In Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia and Tasmania, people must provide proof of vaccination to enter bars, restaurants and other venues.

    In most states, teachers, police, transport workers and hospital workers cannot work unless they are fully vaccinated.

    This despite all the medical and scientific evidence, along with our lived experience, demonstrating that vaccination, while protecting against serious illness, does not prevent contraction or transmission of the virus.

    Vaccine mandates are less about pandemic control than they are about Covid theatre. This is as illiberal and odious as it is laughable. Police, nurses, teachers, bus drivers and others are kept from their livelihoods for no good reason. And we reject their service for the same.

    In South Australia, under the threat of a legal challenge, vaccine mandates have been scrapped for police, teachers and transport workers. It is past time the other states followed suit.

    We are entitled to ask what sort of a country we have become when we routinely see frightened people wearing masks outdoors in the sunshine, or others donning them theatrically, even on their social media profiles, as a virtue-signal about their faith in overbearing government.

    The media wear as much ­responsibility as the politicians. Unless you have been reading News Corp publications, watching Sky News, or following a handful of sensible columnists in the Nine Media newspapers, you will have been swamped by hysteria and alarmism.

    It has been clear since at least March 2020 – two years ago – that children and healthy young adults have no more to fear from Covid-19 than influenza or a range or other common infections. For children, of course, influenza was and remains a greater threat.

    We have flu jabs, sure, but for the past year we have had Covid-19 vaccines too. And it did not take long to get them into the vulnerable (mainly the elderly).

    When I queried a range of medical experts in the first half of last year why we would not remove restrictions once the elderly were vaccinated, the standard (and, I thought, reasonable) answer was that widespread vaccinations would prevent broader transmission. It was not long before that was self-evidently untrue, but the Covid-zero fixation had taken hold, and lives were put on hold and freedoms were trampled while we waited for ridiculously high vaccination rates across populations where the majority faced no serious threat.

    Yet if you questioned these policies over the past two years, you were placed in the virtual stocks and branded an “anti-vaxxer” or a “granny-killer”. The digital giants censored any dissent about the policy approach, vaccination strategy, treatments trialled by medicos, or the potential origin of the virus from the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

    We involuntarily surrendered our personal liberties, freedom of movement and, in some cases, our livelihoods, yet we were not able to question what was being imposed.

    Parliaments were suspended, cabinets were not consulted, and unelected bureaucrats with narrow expertise were placed in charge without any accountability.

    States closed their borders, the Australian passport became almost worthless because its chief purpose, a guaranteed right to return home, was unilaterally abandoned. And Australians at home were not allowed to leave.

    Our national anthem, and the very purpose of our federation, were rendered ironic. We were neither one nor free. Some of this was forgivable, perhaps, as our early knowledge and defences were pulled together. But our current state of play is ­inexcusable.

    Children who have missed months of face-to-face learning are still routinely kept home again because their sibling, parent or friend is infected. Some workplaces are still largely empty as staff who are fully vaccinated (and are bound to be infected sometime) are kept home to prevent ­infections at work. For what purpose? So the HR team can win a company prize?

    The persistent demands for proof of vaccination are mindless and discriminatory because the unvaccinated are no more or less of a threat to others than the vaccinated. The unvaccinated pose a risk only to themselves – and ­unless they are vulnerable, that risk is not high.

    It must be their choice. Otherwise, if we believe our laws can make health choices for others, we need to ban smoking, drinking, doughnuts, motorcycle riding, and rock fishing – just for a start.

    Our self-reliance was already being smothered by a blanket of government largesse. The pandemic has thrown us a doona. This week’s federal budget has shown that fiscal reality is something for our dreams.

    We have sent future generations the bill so we were able to sit out the pandemic in relative comfort. It is the very antithesis of how our forebears sacrificed their adulthoods, and more, in war time to preserve what they had for the young and the yet to be born.

    This time we have panicked children about something that was never a serious threat to them, ­ruining many educations along the way. The impacts of our response, from shutdowns to school closures, disproportionately hurt the disadvantaged.

    Professionals were able to work from home, and supervise their children’s remote schooling on iPads and laptops, while their asset values increased.

    But children in disadvantaged homes might have lost school as a refuge, had few home-learning ­options, or seen parents lose work and struggle to pay the rent.

    For the media/political class, largely on the public payroll and never under threat of unemployment, working from home was a novelty – just check out the social media posts from ABC journalists, who were sadly ignorant about the plight of small business owners, tradies or casual hospitality workers. This helps to explain why the revolt against draconian pandemic measures was not reflected in much of the political debate, and was demonised when it did emerge.

    Another factor was the lack of political differentiation. The ­national cabinet – which I initially welcomed as a unifying innovation – quickly became a forum of the lowest common denominator.

    Morrison had the choice of starting a monumental constitutional battle with the states (he should have) or going along with their varying responses. Only Gladys Berejiklian and Dominic Perrottet in NSW had the courage and sense to push the nation towards the inevitability of living with the virus – lord knows where we would be without them.

    Political oppositions, Liberal and Labor, were too timid to call out the Covid-zero approach, preferring to tarnish incumbents with every infection and death. And the media played the same game, with daily tallies as a macabre KPI.

    Our traditional characteristics of self-reliance, stoicism, selflessness, distrust of authority, commitment to freedom and common sense fell by the wayside. Instead, we became a mollycoddled nation, handing over unlimited power to the very governments we mistrust, in the hope that we could be spared any confrontation with life’s only certainty – mortality.

    Too many of us wanted everything controlled for us, like The Truman Show, only we volunteered for this abomination. And there is so little self-examination and debate – even now in a post-budget and pre-election environment – that it seems we have learned nothing, and would do it all again at the first sign of fever.

    The absurdity was laid bare on Thursday when the courageous Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky was beamed in live from some bunker in besieged Kyiv, ­addressing our political chamber of masked, socially distanced, nanny-staters eager to pay deference to his fight for freedom.

    Zelensky is fighting our fight against tyranny; the one we gave up on in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Syria, the one Obama and Biden hoped might stop in Crimea.

    If Zelensky and his people win, we will gain more in long-term ­security than they will ever gain from our aid. Yet we know if we swapped our leadership for theirs, our stoicism for theirs, Vladimir Putin would be leading a victory parade in Kyiv within days.



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  10. Gateway Pundit:
    According to FOX News reporter Hillary Vaughn, the Biden regime is moving doctors from the Veterans Department to help at the border when the agents are consumed with the half a million illegals ready to storm the open border.
    Vaughn also reported that the Biden Administration is in talks to roll out a smartphone app that will do pre-screening before they show up at a port of entry. Vaughn added, “While that may help them get processed faster it will create a backlog on the other side of the border.”
    This is all pure insanity. The Biden regime has no idea what they are doing. Or worse yet, they do know what they are doing. They know this will destroy the country. Maybe that is their plan? It’s hard to see it any other way.
    link

    My note: it’s easy to just blame politicians for all the things that go wrong. But it’s the complicit and often scheming media who aid and enable them. It’s also the zombie left in all the institutions, from school teachers to school boards and upwards to local government and federal departments, NGOs, non-profits, activists and assorted useful idiots. After half a century of leftism the rot is deep.


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  11. Thanks for the ‘toons, Tom.

    The Ramirez one is a ripper, especially if you are familiar with General William Tecumseh Sherman’s statements about churnalists:

    “I hate newspapermen. They come into camp and pick up their camp rumors and print them as facts. I regard them as spies, which, in truth, they are.”

    “If I had my choice I would kill every reporter in the world, but I am sure we would be getting reports from Hell before breakfast.”

    Seems like a reasonable chap.


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  12. “In recent days, some glimmers of optimism have emerged. Ukraine has put forward serious proposals, which is centered around a commitment to permanent neutrality and an agreement not to seek NATO membership, in exchange for security guarantees. Russia has also reportedly eased up on some of its previous demands, including “denazification” — a likely ruse for regime change — and “demilitarization,” a sign that Ukraine’s battlefield successes so far have pushed the Kremlin to possibly reconsider some of its most maximalist demands.”
    vox on those plodding negotiations


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  13. Motor vehicles have been previously exempt from capital gains tax but Tony Gouger from the Fringe Offset Opportunity Liasion department of the Federal Treasury noted “the responsibility of the Government is to identify every opportunity where Australians are able to turn a profit and clip the ticket on the way through.”

    Geebus!

    No one that makes a few extra bucks are safe.


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  14. They reckon they are going to make 4.2 billion from cgt on cars.
    I wonder if people who make ‘capital’ losses on the sale of second hand cars are going to be able to offset those?


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  15. I wonder if people who make ‘capital’ losses on the sale of second hand cars are going to be able to offset those?

    This sounds to me like the tax on punting.
    Unless you are a declared, not many in real numbers, ‘professional punter’ the tax office leave you alone. The reason is that most punters about98% are losers.

    How is it going to work out with cars? Are you going to get a rebate if your car is sold under the expected price?

    Interesting times.


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  16. rosiesays:
    April 2, 2022 at 7:27 am
    Australian property prices to fall

    having gone up more than 25% in the last year or so, -5% is a correction. Hardly a fall.


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  17. They reckon they are going to make 4.2 billion from cgt on cars.

    Might be right. Just watch the value of 2nd hand cars climb once Albo bans new ICE car sales.

    He might not actually do it, but with Greens controlling the Senate, and his own left-wing agitating for it, it’s not impossible.

    They won’t of course collect and CGT on electrics. Their value drops to zero in only 8 years, when the battery needs replacing.


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  18. The caper with “offering” the “Bushmaster” vehicles to Ukraine seems a little odd, to me.

    The Oz designed vehicle is a “protected” vehicle, NOT an “armoured fighting vehicle”. There IS a difference.

    Only having four wheels mean that if one wheel is wrecked, the vehicle is disabled; and thus a “static target” Note how “serious” wheeled armoured vehicles, like the ancient LAV design or the excellent South African Ratel, have eight and six wheels, respectively. They are also REAR engined.

    Also, given that our core defence “contractor”, Thales, who make the Bushwhacker, is a totally foreign-owned entity, any benefit that actually accrues to Australia will be in a minor blip on the employment stats.

    Australia has long since ceased to be a serious country.


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  19. rosiesays:
    April 2, 2022 at 7:49 am
    They reckon they are going to make 4.2 billion from cgt on cars.
    I wonder if people who make ‘capital’ losses on the sale of second hand cars are going to be able to offset those?

    it is now the 2nd of April – you need to stop.


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  20. Just re-homed my little baby to a nice young lass in Newcastle. The money you can get for a second hand car is unreal. She was chuffed – she knew she was basically getting a “new” car for an enormous discount.

    My new wheels are on order. A six month wait.


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  21. Question for those who think about real world economics. If a party imposed a ceiling on interest rates on owner occupied home loans, like in the 80’s what effects would follow. I was one of the lucky ones with a capped rate at the time but was too busy to look around at the results of the policy. If a party were to institute a similar policy now the cap would of course be much lower, maybe 5%? I assume that new loans would be free to follow the market. So what happens next?


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  22. I wonder if people who make ‘capital’ losses on the sale of second hand cars are going to be able to offset those?
    Good question. Might come in handy down the track.


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  23. This guy needs to be put out to pasture.

    Fauci: Americans Should Be ‘Prepared for Possibility’ Of More COVID-19 Restrictions (1 Apr)

    White House COVID-19 adviser Dr. Anthony Fauci warned about the potential for the reinstatement of COVID-19 restrictions in the United States.

    Americans, he told the BBC on Sunday, “need to be prepared for the possibility” of an uptick in COVID-19 cases, which may lead to further restrictions.

    On second thought, not a pasture. He’d kill all the grass.


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  24. Get the gambling losses thing, slightly different as that’s a hobby versus business income tax issue.
    Capital gains losses slightly different issue, iirc capital losses are quarantined to offset only against capital gains, not normal income.


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  25. @ Rosie:

    “Motor vehicles have been previously exempt from capital gains tax but Tony Gouger from the Fringe Offset Opportunity Liasion department of the Federal Treasury noted “the responsibility of the Government is to identify every opportunity where Australians are able to turn a profit and clip the ticket on the way through.”

    Did anyone else notice the date on the original article?

    The truly tragic part is that this exercise will generate another “life imitating art”, event with the usual suspects being “inspired” to “do something about it”.

    This will, as ALWAYS, be to the great detriment of the peasantry, as is intended.


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  26. To make it clear, the Drive article about CGT on used car sales was an April Fools Day joke.

    It’s like a conspiracy theory.

    Give it six months to a year. 😀


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  27. Tomorrow is the Hungarian election. C.L. has put up this link on his superb site…it’s well worth reading. I hope he doesn’t mind if I post it here. The US, the EU and the always sinister George Soros loathe Victor Orban, who happens to be that rare thing, a true conservative leader. Thus they seek to oust him…and in order to do so they’re more than happy to cohort with neo-Nazis and far-left groups. This has been known for a while now in regards to Hungary….the US State Department under the Sniffer is deliberately fomenting the Hungarian opposition to Orban.

    https://amgreatness.com/2022/03/31/why-viktor-orban-needs-to-win/

    Both Orban and the Polish PM have a firm understanding of their neighbourhood, perhaps because both reside in the area and know its complicated history. Both refuse to kowtow to US state department machinations…..be over Russia or social policies that the US is desperate to export…such as queer theory and so on.


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  28. I thought the 4.2 billion dollar revenue estimate was pretty amazing.
    Though I do notice even my humbler Mazda cx5 is selling for more second-hand than I paid for it new last year.


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  29. My CX3 was 6 years old but only 33k on the clock, mostly racked up when it was new and I was travelling to Sydney weekly. It hardly ticked over in the last two years.

    I didn’t want to be thrashing around waiting for a buyer to pay top $, just someone who would enjoy and appreciate it. The Beloved did all the negotiations, but I met her yesterday when she picked up the keys and the baby.

    The newie on order is a bit higher in the saddle, mainly because I’ll be transporting my parents here and there and it will be easier for them to get into. I suspect this year will be the one that Dad has to hand in his license.


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  30. To make it clear, the Drive article about CGT on used car sales was an April Fools Day joke.

    Hard to tell these days with the Left now wanting to apply CGT to unrealized paper gains. And I’m serious about the ICE ban, that’s in the green-left canon. The EU is doing it possibly in 2025 just three years away, so are Boris’s wet Tories in 2030 only eight years away. Sure to be ALP policy, although Albo won’t say so until after the election.


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  31. I mentioned the April Fools Day midday limitation here yesterday.

    Didn’t make a scrap of difference. 😀

    It certainly explains all those masks in the chamber – every day is AFD in Canbeera.


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  32. Bruce of Newcastle says:
    April 2, 2022 at 7:57 am
    They reckon they are going to make 4.2 billion from cgt on cars.
    Might be right. Just watch the value of 2nd hand cars climb once Albo bans new ICE car sales.

    “Albo” is not going to ban petrol cars, you deranged nimbus.

    What drugs are you on?

    He might not actually do it, but with Greens controlling the Senate, and his own left-wing agitating for it, it’s not impossible.

    It’s 100% impossible, you dildo.

    They won’t of course collect and CGT on electrics. Their value drops to zero in only 8 years, when the battery needs replacing.

    The value does not drop to zero as the battery pack can be replaced. Should you really be talking about batteries?


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  33. This despite all the medical and scientific evidence, along with our lived experience, demonstrating that vaccination, while protecting against serious illness, does not prevent contraction or transmission of the virus

    The bolded bit is all they have left and it’s utter bollocks.

    Do these idiots ever bother looking a bit further afield than the rocks they exist under?


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  34. Definitely easier to get older /infirm people in and out of a higher car, I’ve been doing a bit of squiring myself though I’ve asked for a step ladder to assist getting in and out of someone’s modified hi lux, that’s quite a climb, though great to drive.


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  35. weet bix and baked beans together at last

    Haha, maybe this story has something to do with that.

    “Fertilizer Is Out Of Control” – US Farmers Ditch Corn For Soy To Save On Costs (1 Apr)

    A Bloomberg survey found that farmers will plant 2 million more acres of soybeans and about 2 million fewer of corn. That’s because soybeans require very little fertilizer versus corn.

    Farmer Tim Gregerson of Omaha, Nebraska, said he’ll plant more soybeans this year because “fertilizer is out of control.” He said fertilizer prices spiked even before the Russian invasion, and it was then he decided to reduce the corn-to-soy ratio to about 50-50 this upcoming growing season.

    On top of soaring fertilizer prices, he told Bloomberg, diesel, tractors, machine parts, feed for livestock, herbicide, and seed costs, and just about everything to do with farming are astronomically higher this year.

    Corn flakes not on the breakfast menu next year, unless you are rich.


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  36. The newie on order is a bit higher in the saddle, mainly because I’ll be transporting my parents here and there and it will be easier for them to get into

    Sorry.
    How is it going to be easier?
    Unless you are talking about wider doors.


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  37. “My note: it’s easy to just blame politicians for all the things that go wrong. But it’s the complicit and often scheming media who aid and enable them. It’s also the zombie left in all the institutions, from school teachers to school boards and upwards to local government and federal departments, NGOs, non-profits, activists and assorted useful idiots. After half a century of leftism the rot is deep.”

    Add to that list the now complicit large corporations.


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  38. The caper with “offering” the “Bushmaster” vehicles to Ukraine seems a little odd, to me.

    I thought the Ukranians were winning and the dreaded Russkies were in full retreat, so why are they needed? It’s not like the Russians are leaving guerrilla or partisan groups behind.


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  39. Regarding very good Chris Kenny article in The Australian below is my rejected post:

    One of your best columns. That people are still losing their jobs over not taking an ineffective vaccine multiple times is simply outrageous.

    Not one union has stood up and said enough is enough.

    This is beyond politics as it affects people on left and right side of politics.

    The health “experts” should not be running our lives and the politicians should not be hiding behind them. Only NSW leaders have made an effort to not restrict freedoms.

    As most of us know the danger from the virus is overwhelmingly for the elderly with co-morbidities ”

    You have to wonder which para did not fit the narrative. Ineffective vaccines?


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  40. Hard to tell these days with the Left now wanting to apply CGT to unrealized paper gains.

    It is just gaslighting.

    People with real jobs can’t fuck around like this. Did they even follow tradition and pull the article at midday?

    “Oh we were only joking about that”
    *We are not joking about the same with unrealised gains in Victoria*
    *Let’s have a medical apartheid police state for two years over a common cold variant*

    What you are seeing is literally the same strategy Putin has with churning out real and fake news.

    It is abusive and shows that the political establishment think we are chattel.


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  41. Dover please ban those with man crushes on John Wick.

    John Wick would love that artwork, if for no other reason that it would remind him of the bloke in JWIII who made him cut his own finger off.


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  42. Yet some of us remain convinced it does significantly reduce the risk of hospitalisation and death.
    Oh well.

    Probably not.

    Even if the vaccines are effective, the cohort of the dead were just so compromised the vaccines likely don’t pass a CBA.

    2500 dead from 2.1 mn cases; look at the age profile and comorbidities.

    The only vaccine with a high enough efficacy rate to actually engender herd immunity (Novavax) was delayed for approval for almost a year.


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  43. Don’t know about wider doors. If the seat is a little lower than “bottom height” the elderly person can reverse, grip the door frame (or the helper’s arms) and sit. Then swivel to get their legs in. Ditto to get out.

    My recently sold car was about 100mm too low, which doesn’t sound much until you’re 90.

    I’m not yet at the ambulance stage of transport!


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  44. Has anyone here ever sold a car for more than they paid for it?

    Having said that, the stupidity and spitefulness of our beloved politicians is infinite.

    Satire one day, reality the next.


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  45. JCsays:
    April 2, 2022 at 8:31 am

    The value does not drop to zero as the battery pack can be replaced.

    right…. but economically it becomes prohibitive.

    Who’s going to plonk a $20+k battery in a devalued car? It’ll be going straight to the wreckers.

    As an example, a 2014/15 Mitsubishi PHEV (hybrid) replacement is of the order of $15k.


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  46. It’s not the dead dot, it’s the ones that didn’t die.
    Australia after two years of semi international isolation isn’t a good example.
    Better to look at the before and after in countries where covid was far more prevalent.
    Iirc Dr Faustus seems to think vaccines made a difference and I trust his judgement.


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  47. John Wick would love that artwork, if for no other reason that it would remind him of the bloke in JWIII who made him cut his own finger off.

    I thought that was the mystery crim in the Reacher flick ?


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  48. Yet some of us remain convinced it does significantly reduce the risk of hospitalisation and death

    Feel free to go on doing so, in spite of all available evidence.

    Reality is a bitch. Good thing we exist in a post truth world.


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  49. I agree with rosie in one respect at least. Australia is a lousy example if you’re looking for “excess deaths”.

    We are never going to know the truth of it. The waters are too muddied with a host of other factors.


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  50. Yet some of us remain convinced it does significantly reduce the risk of hospitalisation and death.
    Oh well.

    A healing crystals stand has appeared at my local shopping centre in the last few weeks. Seems to do brisk business. The placebo effect is pretty powerful.

    I do think on the basis of the data that the vaccines partially protect against serious illness against the Alpha and Delta strains for about 3 months. After that the data shows the degree of protection dives, and goes negative by 8 months (based on the very large Swedish study). Likewise the data shows two doses barely protect against Omicron at all, although a third dose does seem to help. But in view of the potential life threatening side effects, since omicron is on par with the common cold it seems an unnecessary risk to get three shots in order to protect you for three months against a mild disease. On the balance I think I’d buy a crystal instead.


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  51. Duncanm

    I’m not so sure and comparative costing may mean the net zero.
    Why?
    Maintenance. It’s dirt cheap to run an electric motor vs a petrol engine.

    Replacing batteries has been going down in cost since the intro of EVs.


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  52. Seems academic now anyhow.
    The vast majority of people are vaccinated, those deemed high risk are mostly prepared to get booster shots.
    The political issues remain the same.
    Other that LDP in Victoria who is advocating for ending state of emergency powers?
    a more recent lancet article


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  53. We are never going to know the truth of it. The waters are too muddied with a host of other factors.

    Which is a feature of the process.
    Not a bug.

    Never has more data been collected.
    Never has the data been more kept away from the plebs.
    What gets released is deliberately useless.


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  54. Who’s going to plonk a $20+k battery in a devalued car?

    I’ve mentioned in the past some friends of mine whose Prius’s battery died. They looked at the replacement battery cost, then sold the 8 year old car for $200 and bought a new ICE Hyundai with the battery replacement money instead. The Prius had to be towed away because with a dead battery it was a brick despite the petrol engine in it.

    Battery costs are going to skyrocket due to the lag time to get new lithium and cobalt mines going. That’ll last for a long time, or until the green-left is so discredited that EV mandates are overturned. Whereupon the EV market will die in the arse from massive oversupply.


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  55. Has anyone here ever sold a car for more than they paid for it?

    Mitsubishi Gallant, can’t remember the year but got more for it than I paid for as new.


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  56. We’re at Stage 2 now anyway.
    Only people with 3 vaxxes can work at Local Councils.
    Woolworths employees must be vaxxed, so must Coles.
    I’d say, by the end of the year, no unvaxxed will have a job.


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  57. 12 to 42 months now.

    What’s that KD ?

    Until all the people who have had one or more ‘vaccines’ die. Dead. As foretold by the Greatest Australian Hero, St. Ruth of Wordwall. It was originally ‘you will all die in 18 to 48 months’, but in the manner of governments and carbon emission targets – the closer the date got, the more it gets pushed back until they finally say ‘I never said that’*.

    The first twelve month deadline extension was Thursday, I believe.

    *Exhibit A: ‘Death camps all over the country with gas lines to the showers’ became ‘Oh I already dealt with that’ which he hadn’t and now refuses to acknowledge.


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  58. …and why do I need a booster shot with Novavax given I am not immunocompromised.

    Superstition trumps science.

    “Just in case”

    These people are as rational as gambling addicts.


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  59. Hybrids would disguise the effects of battery degradation, since the internal-combustion engine would just kick in more frequently to compensate for the reduced reserve of charge.

    I’m not convinced an EV’s battery reserve shall not tail off in capacity over time like my phone and laptop do.

    Meanwhile my fleet’s average odometer reading is 195,000 km and still going strong. 🙂



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  60. Gaborsays:
    April 2, 2022 at 8:36 am
    The newie on order is a bit higher in the saddle, mainly because I’ll be transporting my parents here and there and it will be easier for them to get into

    Sorry.
    How is it going to be easier?
    Unless you are talking about wider doors.

    Sorry Calli (and in answer to Gabor)

    It’s the getting out that is much easier. Clambering upwards from a low set car is a pain in the spine.


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  61. Brucie

    Will you just shut up with you deranged bullshit? Every major tech innovation has seen the price of the tech drop – not rise as you’re suggesting due to scaling and competition.

    As for resources, the price signal will be enough to entice more exploration are production.

    Every fucking thing you ever say is laced with bias. You’re become a untrustworthy idiot.


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  62. Good Moaning.

    Lets look at our little troll in action.
    First it’s quite a word wall of emotion.
    Illogical emotion.
    “You don’t do much do you comrade”.

    I think that’s quite unreasonable, Struth. In fact, it is both lazy and factually wrong.

    After all, in the space of one wordwall today, you raged that taking up driving your beloved trucks again is all too hard and all too tyrannical and not something you feel like doing, while rather paradoxically proclaiming that

    Freedom and self reliance are strong in my breed.

    You’re here 24/7.
    You’re a lazy, bludging unionist on the railways, as per most of them.
    Highly paid to do next to nothing on the rare days you indeed have shifts to attend and it’s all process work.
    Repetitive.
    There’s only one railway line.
    It’s glorified factory work.
    Except factory workers work.
    You have embarrassed yourself by boo hooing that you were forced to take the jab or …sniff…”I woulda lost me union job” sniff….while simultaneously claiming there are thousands of jobs up for grabs for the unjabbed.
    Knowing nothing about actual transport, as your freight is brought to you, you start dribbling shit about how many truck jobs are going for the unjabbed…which I destroyed.

    By the way, before 2020, everyone here would have been able to see through your bullshit and twisted logic, and the defense of the indefensible, showing just how far even an apparent right wing blog has fallen.
    There are only a few picking you up on your insane ramblings and trolling.
    That’s incredible, and sad.

    You then admitted at the very end of that selfsame wordwall, that you couldn’t destroy all my alleged ‘trolling’ and ‘lunacy.’ That’s a big move from you, Struth, admitting defeat in such a way. ?

    That’s because even though I’m only doing part time work, I still can’t shoot down the 24/7 barrage of bullshit you post as a do nothing railwanker .
    It’s not defeat, because if you were important enough to really respond to all the time I would.
    I just poke you to show your illogical emotional fact twisting to everyone else.
    It will be a laugh to some, and shocking for others to see how far people can fall to delusion once in denial.
    You do yourself enough damage.
    Like Frau Notacare, you are a fine example of a disgusting attitude.

    And I’ve somehow united your august self and some of the most fractious and toxic posters on the Furniture Store in such mutual hatred of me, that Bird doesn’t even rage about perfidious Js anymore. You all get on with each other incredibly well, all of a sudden.

    And that’s the paragraph that made me decide to respond to this cretin.

    Fractious and toxic is not something a fuck knuckle like you gets to describe others as.

    A surrender monkey with no excuse, demonising those making a stand as bludgers and welfare recipients……….fractious and toxic much?
    To me it’s nothing but traitorous, but that’s for others to decide.

    Fractious and toxic hating you….really?

    One, it’s not my problem you aren’t universally loved in the way you seem so desperate to be.
    You brought that on yourself.

    Two, and many here can learn from this next statement, on a truly free blog, a fuckwit like choo choo or an excellent level headed good looking man that women fall for, like me, ….have no right to judge who is and who isn’t able to post on a blog based on the biases of others.
    True freedom.
    A toxic attitude in the times we find ourselves in, is to dismiss reality, and scoff at those speaking obvious truths.
    A little less arrogant ignorance, and a little more research and opening of eyes would be a start in addressing the true toxicity destroying our nation.
    True freedom means I don’t judge whether somebody can post on FREEDOM Australia based on what my opinion of them is.

    Get this fact and get it hard.
    Graeme Bird, SSR, or anyone has a right to speak.
    Do you get that, you petty fucking wanker?
    I live by my values, a concept for another day…..
    You know that old maxim…..I don’t agree with what you are saying but I’ll fight to the death for your right to say it?

    I welcome all, including them, and until bird fucks up with antisemitism (which we all know he will) or people incite violence, they can say what they dam well please, about anything.
    And more power to them.
    Bird makes sense sometimes, but even if he never does, that’ll be only my opinion, and I have no right to silence him and he never will be on a freedom blog…until he goes all Jew hating which is akin to inciting violence on a collective.
    Same rules for everyone.
    That’s how people learn.

    And because it is bulletin board style, little gangs of sneerers can’t hold it hostage, bringing down the whole tone.

    I understand what SSR is doing, and I’d personally take a thousand of her type over do nothing surrender monkeys.
    Yes she gives you too much credit to you, (in my opinion) and thinks some of you must be on the payroll as trolls, when I just see weak minds lost to denialism, but she’s been more clued in than people like KD, who even yesterday, in a shameful display of ignorant denialism, still scoffed about the WEF, even though everything I’ve been saying for years (and so has SSR) was repeated verbatim on Cory Bernardi last night as fact, and if the MSM are talking about it, yet while KD and others are still scoffing, who are the more useless and toxic pricks?

    So you see, the assertion, You don’t do much do you comrade, is both lazy and factually wrong.

    It’s not an assertion, shitfabrains, it’s an observation….based on the appaerently full time employed jabbed still posting here 24/7

    QED.

    Got any impotent, schoolyard-level sexual crudity or appeal to marital incompleteness to reply with?

    Like Ken Worth,….Road warrior etc St Ruth. dole bludger, etc .
    This is truly pathetic statement coming from young two dicks here.
    So, apparently, yes.

    As one of your first emotion word walls.
    1/10……and I can only give that for spelling!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    And if you think I was responding to you and only you with this, you’re a bigger moron than I thought.


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  63. I thought the Ukranians were winning and the dreaded Russkies were in full retreat, so why are they needed? It’s not like the Russians are leaving guerrilla or partisan groups behind.

    This conflict has been going on for eight years.

    A cease fire agreement now will not be a panacea.


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  64. Bird makes sense sometimes, but even if he never does, that’ll be only my opinion, and I have no right to silence him and he never will be on a freedom blog…until he goes all Jew hating which is akin to inciting violence on a collective.

    But why though Stuth? He hates Jews and you hate people of Italian heritage so why erase his Jew hating comments? Are you being a boganistic dickhead?


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  65. I hope struth is right and all the vaxxed die. I figure it is the only way I will get unbanned at the cafe. At least I will get a seat.


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  66. I’m not convinced an EV’s battery reserve shall not tail off in capacity over time like my phone and laptop do.
    Of course it will. Time and cycles. IIRC Tesla reckons 80% capacity is end of life in the car. I think it goes more rapidly after that from looking at battery cycle life curves.


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  67. Sheesh – quit your nitpicking, peoples. There’s two types of “capital gain” in play here – real and nominal.

    You buy a car for $20,000 and sell it two years later for $21,000.

    Have you made a capital gain if:

    You registered it twice ($1,200)
    You bought a new set of tyres ($400)
    Two years’ insurance ($1,000)
    Petrol costs ($600)
    Serviced twice ($600)

    Nein.

    The costs identified above are conservative, to say the least and zero inflation is assumed. Depreciating assets are no longer my thing, which is why I don’t intend ever buying a car again.

    As least the Strat has appreciated significantly in value (well, nominally).


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  68. …and why do I need a booster shot with Novavax given I am not immunocompromised.

    To demonstrate obedience.
    Plus, why not?
    If you’re cool with Novavax, what’s your beef with a tiny lil’ ol’ Booster?


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  69. JC – I hope someone writes down the iced coffee recipe on their deathbed. I think there is chocolate syrup in there but I’m not sure. And I’ll have to buy a Vitamix.


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  70. Sheesh – quit your nitpicking, peoples. There’s two types of “capital gain” in play here – real and nominal.

    Rabz – It’s not what is real or nominal, it’s what the government will tax you on. One guess.

    I’m also betting Albo will remove the over 12 months CGT reduction, which was originally brought in to “simplify” inflation CGT calcs. Dividend imputation is another one that will be under threat.


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  71. This GeoThermal Energy looks interesting

    ROFL. Flannery’s hot rocks. Good luck with that. Only wave generators have been more useless.


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  72. JC – I was aware of that, funnily enough. I was referring to an individual buying a car and then offloading it at a profit* at a later date.

    If I’ve made a mistake by assuming this blogue isn’t laden with used car salespeople, then pardon me.

    *Real, not nominal


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  73. But why though Stuth? He hates Jews and you hate people of Italian heritage so why erase his Jew hating comments? Are you being a boganistic dickhead?

    Wadda maka you tink, I’ma no lika da wogs, JC?
    I lovea da food and alla dat shit.
    I even once had a woga girlfriend who was a fuckin’ a maniac in a bedroom.

    Sorry, I shouldn’t have got two dicks all upset talking about such things.

    I’m a no hate a you JC.
    I think you fuckin a lost a da plot little fella and it isa because a da jab.
    It’s a really playing on you.

    Don’t worry Nino, there’s plenty more here on this blog in the same boat.
    You’re not the only one to spilla da meatballs outa da spaghetti bowl.


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  74. Depreciating assets are no longer my thing, which is why I don’t intend ever buying a car again.

    That’s how you end up driving a 25yo RAV. The reality is everything you own is going to zero. For most people their house will be the only appreciating asset they will ever own. I did buy a $25 fountain pen in the 80s that was discontinued and sold for hundreds on EBay. It has subsequently been reissued which may have stuffed my plans.


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  75. I’ve not seen much posted at the junk yard for anyone to be proud about.
    Openly admitting to keep your attack dogs on a leash is not exactly open slather free speech either.
    Just another word wall full of unintentional contradictions.
    And I’m pretty sure anyone who wants to watch Gonzomakeslira can find him all by themselves by now.


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  76. Roberts-Smith trial enters ‘Heart of Darkness’ territory
    Deborah Snow
    By Deborah Snow
    April 2, 2022 — 5.00am

    It’s rare for a serving minister of the Crown to be called as a witness in a high-profile court case, let alone face a grilling about his or her dealings, on and off the record, with two of the country’s most prominent journalists.

    Ben Roberts-Smith has accused a serving SAS member of ‘lying’ about a Taliban raid in 2009 when he claimed he saw the war hero execute an Afghan and order the killing of another.

    But if Assistant Defence Minister Andrew Hastie felt exposed this week in the full glare of the Ben Roberts-Smith defamation trial, he didn’t show it. Instead, he cut loose: both about the failure of culture within some parts of the elite SAS, in which he once served as a captain, and about the vital role of public interest journalism in holding institutions to account.

    The up-and-coming Western Australian also offered the court some astonishingly frank commentary on how Australia’s mission in Afghanistan had played out. Parts of it will not sit well with some of his Coalition colleagues.

    Notes taken by veteran investigative journalist Chris Masters and colleague Nick McKenzie, defendants in the case along with Nine’s mastheads the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, provided the catalyst for this line of questioning.

    The notes surfaced after a successful application to produce them by Roberts-Smith’s barrister Arthur Moses, SC.

    “There were days where I felt it was a closed universe, where you can make up your own morality on the grounds you wanted to, and it was a dark and haunting and incredibly unnatural feeling,” the notes recorded Hastie saying, in language reminiscent of Joseph Conrad’s dystopian novel Heart of Darkness.

    Did he say this to Masters, Moses asked.

    Yes, Hastie said, explaining he’d meant it as a reference to Australia’s Afghanistan mission as a whole.

    “We were there at gunpoint imposing our own standards on the Afghan people, trying to build a fledgling judicial system and pretending that, you know, we could police things but essentially making arbitrary judgments about who was good and who was bad,” Hastie told the court.

    Moses read out another excerpt from McKenzie’s notes: “Some guys went up the Congo, the others didn’t.”

    Hastie confirmed this was a direct reference to Conrad’s novel, set in central Africa, and the movie Apocalypse Now, based on the novel but set in Vietnam, which charts the descent into murderous tyranny of rogue army colonel Kurtz.

    What did he mean by saying some soldiers had gone “up the Congo”, Moses asked.

    “That time in the Congo has degraded [Kurtz’s] moral faculties, and he’s now operating according to his own standards,” Hastie replied.

    “I think I said some guys went up the Congo, and I think, yes, [that] could have applied to Mr Roberts-Smith, but I think just generally.”

    Giving a frank insight into his own struggles with the aftermath of wartime experience, he described dreams he’d had where “we have killed one of our own guys and covered it up”. It spoke to “moral trauma”, he said. “I took the dream to be a sort of metaphor for what we had done to ourselves.”

    Hastie told the court there was a “warrior culture” afoot more generally in parts of the storied SAS at the time, and “it was shorn of just-war theory. You know, killing became a sacrament in itself.”

    It was extraordinary testimony, especially coming from a man who now carries partial political responsibility for running Australia’s military.

    But pressed on whether he had told others that Roberts-Smith was a war criminal, Hastie denied doing so: “I said that serious allegations have been levelled and they need to be answered.”

    The media outlets have accused the Victoria Cross recipient of committing or being party to six unlawful killings in Afghanistan, but Roberts-Smith denies all wrongdoing and insists he only killed men lawfully in combat.

    Moses pointed out that by 2018, there was an inquiry under way by the Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force into allegations of war crimes in Afghanistan.

    He put it to Hastie that the primary reason he had engaged with Masters and McKenzie was to “ingratiate” himself with the journalists and further his political ambitions.

    Hastie pushed back, saying that if anything, his involvement and backing for the journalists’ work had been detrimental to his career.

    “I made a judgment call that it was the right thing to do. Not very politically expedient, but the right thing to do.”

    He added that he had felt the Inspector-General’s inquiry was “under serious political pressure” and “if the government fails, the Parliament can’t sort it out, then the media has to help out … I’m saying events have unfolded in this way because we haven’t been accountable.”

    Hastie conceded he’d never himself witnessed any unlawful conduct by Roberts-Smith.

    But his suspicions had been raised, he said, by a “mosaic” of observations he had pieced together after a combat mission to Siah Chow, Afghanistan, in 2012, where Roberts-Smith had been a patrol commander and Hastie an officer on a familiarisation trip.

    Also along on that mission was Person 66, a more junior soldier whom Hastie had known as a happy- go-lucky character back in Perth, but who struck him on that trip as anxious and a changed man.

    Nine’s lawyers have alleged Roberts-Smith instructed Person 66 to kill an unarmed prisoner at Siah Chow that day as part of a “blooding” rite of passage, where a soldier chalks up his first kill.

    Hastie does not claim to have seen this. But he recounted seeing Roberts-Smith’s patrol questioning a group of prisoners and some time later, hearing a radio call saying shots had been fired. When he next saw Roberts-Smith, he told the Federal Court, the elite soldier had walked past him, eyeballed him and said “just another couple of dead c–ts”.

    Hastie says he ultimately formed the view that Person 66 was “blooded” on that day.

    All this seemed to presage high drama this week when Person 66 was due in court the very next day. But it swiftly became apparent that Person 66’s barrister, Jack Tracey, would strongly resist Nine’s efforts to get the former soldier into the witness box.

    No doubt, Tracey argued, the media outlets were keen to draw out the man’s evidence. But the stakes couldn’t be higher for his client.

    What Person 66 would be compelled to testify about was “such a grave form of criminality” that it could place the ex-soldier’s very life and freedom in jeopardy, Tracey argued.

    He noted that the ex-soldier now lived with post-traumatic stress disorder and a psychiatric report had warned that “giving evidence in this proceeding would put him, his wellbeing and, indeed, his life at risk”.

    Nine’s barrister Nicholas Owens, SC, was frank about the media outlets’ goal: “We are seeking to compel this witness to confess to murder.”

    “It is possible for me to win this case without succeeding in proving the murder at Siah Chow,” Owens told the judge. “But it is equally possible that I could win this case by only proving the murder at Siah Chow. It is an independent path home to victory.”

    With the stakes set so high, Justice Anthony Besanko reserved his decision for several hours before ruling that, on balance, the “interests of justice” would not be best served by compelling evidence from the stricken soldier.

    But Owens had two last questions to put to Person 66, knowing he wouldn’t get the answers. While a member of Roberts-Smith’s patrol in 2012, did he shoot a prisoner? And did he do so on the orders of Roberts-Smith?

    To both Person 66 replied, again: “I’m unwilling [to give the evidence], your Honour.”

    Then he was gone, having uttered less than 200 words in the witness box.

    Nine has three more soldier witnesses to call before Roberts-Smith’s legal team begins rolling out its witnesses from the middle of this month.


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  77. A former neighbour of mine still gets around in his 2006 Prius.
    That was just before Christmas.
    He says apart from tyres and wiper blades, everything is as he bought it.
    He drives like an old woman so I’m not sure if that’s a surprise.


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  78. Where did you get the 20k change over cost from. Surely not the incel?

    Here, it appears to be half of what you quoted.

    That’s quoting $10,000 for a dinky 24kW replacement battery. Which is great if you’re driving a Nissan Leaf and planning a weekly shopping trip.

    Less good if you’re driving a modern mass market EV, like the Ioniq, with a entry level 47kW battery.

    The hope for the mass market EV future seems to be the Japanese model: remanufacturing batteries, replacing the dead cells, and bringing the price down with secondhand 2-year-warranty changeover units.

    Kind of like buying retreads was once an option for tyres.


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  79. Stuth

    I still don t understand your aversion to Jew hating at the furniture factory, when you’re putting out your own version of ethnic hatred your parents taught you 40 years ago.

    You should therefore leave Bird alone, you red neck fatmouth.


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  80. There will no doubt be significant unintended consequences from removing the cgt discount.
    If Elbow really wants to set the cat amongst the pigeons he can remove the grandfathering provisions.


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  81. Bruce – the raft of new and higher taxes our imminent labore/greenfilth junta will be falling over themselves to introduce defies the imagination.

    Socialism and islam are the two foulest cancers to have blighted humanity in its regrettable, atrocity and idiocy strewn history – and we’ll never be rid of either of them in our lifetimes.


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  82. Dr F

    I have faith my point will hold. Batteries will get both better and cheaper as there is a ton on money being thrown at the sector.

    Just ignore the two luddites here.. Hallward and the Incel. They’ve been massively wrong for the last five odd years. They go by the stage names of Wrong and Wronger , which is a play on Dumb and Dumber.


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  83. Stop carrying on JC.
    It doesn’t work on this blog.
    It’s filled with silly old pricks like you.
    People who were around when the piss could be taken out of each other.
    Pretending to be all butt hurt doesn’t cut it here.
    People dey know, ‘owa it a used to a be……..we pulls a da piss outa you, you pulla da piss outa us.
    Leave your 2022 bullshit at the gate, victimhood and claiming hate speech as the denialists turn ever more left wing in defense of their actions, …..it will be pointed out.
    And I’ll always esculate.


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  84. Stuth

    Stop the mind reading.

    My point is that it’s very hurtful for bird to be pushing him off the site for the eggsact same transgressions as yours.

    And no, it doesn’t upset me in the least. It’s says more about you, you fatmouth redneck than it does me. Now fuck off as I’m done with you.


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  85. To outdoor pursuits!

    Half your luck, KD. Was hoping to get some gardening* and a run in this morning, but it’s looking highly unlikely (again).

    *Hacking, slashing, pruning and mowing while restraining myself from going mediaeval on that infernal frangipani …


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  86. Bespoke,
    Your link from last night – I only watched for a couple of minutes – it requires approx a 45 min commitment and I don’t know what it is about. If I follow it what do I achieve? Plain English, no rabbit hole stuff please.
    Thank you.


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  87. This conflict has been going on for eight years.

    A cease fire agreement now will not be a panacea.

    Re-reading Samuel P. Huntingdon’s ‘The Clash of Civilisations’ last night when up pops John Mearsheimer, in 1993, predicting a war between Ukraine and Russia over disputed borders.

    Huntingdon counters that the divide will fall further west, on a line demarcating western oriented Catholic Ukrainians and Russian oriented Orthodox Ukrainians.

    Putin is reportedly widely read, and may be familiar with Huntingdon’s thesis, which echoes his own vision of a Greater Russia spanning Eurasia. But between his idea and the reality of implementing it a long shadow is being cast. It seems likely that Russia, like the US, no longer has the vigour or will to engage in imperial ambitions.


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  88. Roberts-Smith trial enters ‘Heart of Darkness’ territory

    ZK2A, it would help when posting that word wall from the SMH that you make clear it was written by the organisation Ben Roberts-Smith is suing.

    The SMH’s “coverage” of the defamation trial’s witness statements amounts to a free-for-all smear of BRS that has gone on for weeks, which may NOT be reflected in the trial outcome.

    Like The Age in Melbourne, everything the SMH publishes has a political purpose and, as a result, the Nine Network has forked out hundreds of thousands of dollars in defamation payouts in the past decade because staff at the former Fairfax are utterly irresponsible in publishing vendettas against people they hate.

    It is not news — it is political activism.

    A serious news organisation would have had the libels spiked (rejected) before they were published.


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  89. infernal frangipani

    Frangipani give hope to Perth gardeners. I remember seeing one in an old South Fremantle house that had been fenced off for demolition. It was flowering it’s head off in the middle of a Perth summer without rain for weeks. It probably still is.


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  90. Alex Antic, Senator for South Australia, explains the horrors of the WEF. In Parliament yesterday.

    Thanks, Gab.

    What a shame that only a few senators turned up to hear Antic’s speech.


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  91. Apparently this is not a April fools story…

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2022/apr/01/sean-penn-calls-for-billionaire-to-step-up-and-buy-aircraft-for-ukraine

    The Hollywood actor Sean Penn has called for a billionaire to come forward and buy two squadrons of F-15 or F-16 aircraft for Ukraine in an unlikely attempt to tip the scales against the Russian invaders in the five-week-old war.

    The actor’s plea for somebody to come and spend $300m on “12 aircraft with better tech than Russian MiGs or SU’s” mirrored a request a couple of hours earlier from Ukraine’s air force for US-made fighters.

    Although the role of arms middleman may be one to which Penn is not obviously suited, he has been engaged in filming a documentary about Ukraine and its charismatic president, Volodymyr Zelenksiy, for months.

    The Oscar-winning star of Milk and Mystic River was in Kyiv on the day the war broke out, pictured in the front row of a press briefing in the capital city, and met a tired-looking president later that day, according to an Instagram story released by Zelenskiy.

    As a humble millionaire surrounded by hundreds of other millionaires in Hollyweird he has to appear to the “those rich bastards over there”to pony up.

    His apparent net worth. 70 Million dollars.
    Cost of one aircraft
    F-15: US $28-30 million
    F16: F-16A/B: US$14.6 million (1998 dollars), F-16C/D: US$18.8 million (1998 dollars)


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    1
  92. I’m not so sure and comparative costing may mean the net zero.
    Why?
    Maintenance. It’s dirt cheap to run an electric motor vs a petrol engine.
    Replacing batteries has been going down in cost since the intro of EVs.

    tesla are quoting a million miles for their new batteries.
    Tesla and the science behind the next-generation, lower-cost, ‘million-mile’ electric-car battery

    new tech is coming online with 15 year lifespan.
    Battery breakthrough doubles lifespan of electric car batteries

    who keeps a car for 15 yrs? don’t answer that.

    the commies will just keep cranking up taxes on ICE cars till you can’t afford to drive one.


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    4
  93. ZK2A, it would help when posting that word wall from the SMH that you make clear it was written by the organisation Ben Roberts-Smith is suing.

    Sorry, my bad.


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    2
  94. JCsays:
    April 2, 2022 at 8:56 am
    Duncanm

    I’m not so sure and comparative costing may mean the net zero.
    Why?
    Maintenance. It’s dirt cheap to run an electric motor vs a petrol engine.

    Replacing batteries has been going down in cost since the intro of EVs.

    maybe – but the traditional concept that the larger components (engine, drivetrain) in the car will last for 15-20 years and 200k+ km must be put aside.

    I see a large potential for aftermarket battery refurb and replacement. OEM price for a new battery will be prohibitive.


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    1
  95. Zipstersays:
    April 2, 2022 at 10:01 am
    ..
    who keeps a car for 15 yrs? don’t answer that.

    My 20yo , 350k suby is doing very nicely, thank-you.

    The peak of ICE tech, imho. Fuel injection and ECU’s perfected, but prior to CANbus and electrickery took over the cockpit and everything else (failure points that can’t be readily fixed).


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    1
  96. Zip

    I have 150 k on one car and ~ 105,000 on the sports. I cannot bring myself to junk them as they’re worth nothing compared to how much I paid for them. It’s that sum that makes me reluctant to replace them. Also, one of them is a 530 wagon and BMW is no longer importing the 5 series wagon. I haven’t found wagon I like.


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    2
  97. the commies will just keep cranking up taxes on ICE cars till you can’t afford to drive one

    Increasingly emissions regulations are set by the lowest common denominator (read most Green loon). A number of motorbikes have disappeared from our market because Japanese manufacturers have decided it is uneconomic to re-engineer and re-tool to meet Euro5 standards.


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    4
  98. Zipstersays:
    April 2, 2022 at 10:01 am
    I’m not so sure and comparative costing may mean the net zero.
    Why?
    Maintenance. It’s dirt cheap to run an electric motor vs a petrol engine.
    Replacing batteries has been going down in cost since the intro of EVs.

    tesla are quoting a million miles for their new batteries.

    in reality, you only really need about 250k lifespan.

    By that point, the rest of the car is falling apart and needs significant work to keep roadworthy.
    Suspension is shot (shocks, rubber bushes), plastics are usually falling apart and can’t be replaced, and the typical owner wants the newest, shiniest thing on the block. Your typical owner will not pony up for that. The handy enthusiast (an ever shrinking proportion of the population) may DIY.


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    1
  99. A comment on a gruinaid article… a good one..

    The old line on threesomes comes to mind: if I wanted to disappoint two people at once I’d go out to dinner with my parents..


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    1
  100. “Like The Age in Melbourne, everything the SMH publishes has a political purpose and, as a result, the Nine Network has forked out hundreds of thousands of dollars in defamation payouts in the past decade because staff at the former Fairfax are utterly irresponsible in publishing vendettas against people they hate.

    It is not news — it is political activism.”

    Correct. And it’s the same at their ABC. Editorial supervision has been chucked out the window because the Maoists/Marxists are running the joints. These activist “journalists” think that…

    1. their only role is to attack anyone on the centre, centre-right, right-wing, even using lies. Example – Pell and Porter;
    2. they’re above the law. I doubt they’re taught at UTS and other media schools that there are laws re defamation.

    These people are so imbued with unchecked Alinskiest progressivism that their arrogance is now out of control. Example – Louse Nilligan.


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  101. My 20yo , 350k suby is doing very nicely, thank-you.

    I knew a bloke who ran a Subaru Brumby with 500K on the clock, original motor.

    He’s since passed from this world, but the Brumby might still be going somwhere!


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    2
  102. A serious news organisation would have had the libels spiked (rejected) before they were published.

    Dear me, Tom, move with the times. Consider:

    Star reporter hands in copy at a rag that has substituted the ancient wisdom of the back bench for pimply ‘producers’ who, even if sufficiently astute to spot a defo trap, are so far down the editorial food chain that caution will stay their tongues. Who, at the start of their career, wants to acquire a reputation for being troublesome?

    Thus does crap written in the ink of bias go straight from reporter’s notebook to the front page.

    The editor has a role here, you say.

    Yes, indeed. As the Hockey libel trial demonstrated, the editor did indeed have a role. In that case encouraging his underlings to go Hockey even harder.


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  103. This seems an abuse of the court and a vile overreach of the law.

    The bloke I might add is a turd, but jail??
    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2022/apr/01/salford-alan-moher-jailed-refusing-wife-caroline-get-jewish-religious-divorce

    The owner of a property company has been jailed for 18 months for controlling or coercive behaviour after refusing to grant his wife a religious divorce.

    Alan Moher, 57, from Salford, separated from his wife, Caroline, in 2016 after 21 years, with the pair later being granted a divorce in a family court in 2019. But she is unable to remarry in a synagogue without a “get” – a document that formally recognises the end of marriage in the Orthodox Jewish faith.

    Southwark crown court heard Moher withheld the document in order to prevent Caroline from remarrying. The prosecutor Anthony Metzer QC told how the defendant offered his then wife £700,000 in the civil divorce with the get or £780,000 without it.

    He told the court that, in August 2015, she was “so worn down” by the “psychological and emotional abuse” she had suffered that she attempted to kill herself. Metzer said: “He replied: ‘What colour do you want your gravestone?’”

    Judge Martin Beddoe handed Moher an 18-month sentence and ordered him to pay £11,000 in costs after hearing a guilty plea.


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  104. Soobies were the original choice for cheap surf hippies. It was rare to pull up to a dirt 4WD car park in the 80s and not see one. Unstoppable.


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    3
  105. Question.
    In assessing real or nominal value of your used car, why isn’t a value ascribed to the value you derived from the two years of use?
    Perhaps using the costs of alternative transport?


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    1
  106. BTW, this week, on 7 April 2022, is a marvellous anniversary, it will have been two years since an innocent man was released from prison after the High Court overturned his conviction…. 7-0.

    This noble and saintly man had the decency to say, upon his release, that he ‘holds no ill will to his accuser’.

    I do.


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  107. Jew hating

    Is on my list of no pandering, no excuse that they a broken or they have said unrelated things I agreed with.

    They only deserve ridicule and contempt. The end.


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    2
  108. Scrollin’, scrollin’, scrollin’,
    Keep that finger scrollin’
    Riiiiight byyyy.
    Don’t try to understand it,
    That word wall isn’t worth it,
    Just keep that finger scrollin’,
    Riiiiight byyyy.

    I’ll leave the Troubador Truckie to identify the relevant tune.


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    4
  109. Stuth

    Stop the mind reading.

    My point is that it’s very hurtful for bird to be pushing him off the site for the eggsact same transgressions as yours.

    And no, it doesn’t upset me in the least. It’s says more about you, you fatmouth redneck than it does me. Now fuck off as I’m done with you.

    I’m a take a da pissa outa you and you claim it’s a da same as anti semitism.

    Nothing wrong upstairs with you these days, JC.
    FMD.
    Are you getting a booster?
    Have you read the CDC report they had to release that showed all the Neurological side effects of the jab.
    Seriously, get it checked out.
    You’re very nice to people’s face it seems little fella, and yet once on here you’re ten foot tall and bullet proof.
    Total fine until you became non compos mentis.

    Get yourself checked out.


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    6
  110. Bar Beach Swimmersays:
    April 2, 2022 at 9:52 am
    Bespoke,
    Your link from last night – I only watched for a couple of minutes – it requires approx a 45 min commitment and I don’t know what it is about. If I follow it what do I achieve? Plain English, no rabbit hole stuff please.
    Thank you.

    The one about Openwrt?


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    1
  111. “The bloke I might add is a turd, but jail??
    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2022/apr/01/salford-alan-moher-jailed-refusing-wife-caroline-get-jewish-religious-divorce

    As someone who knows Jewish law, I find that rather interesting that a secular court is doing what a Jewish religious court would do. In Jewish law there are provisions for a man who refuses to give his wife a divorce to be beaten or jailed. There are quite a few men in Israel who are in prison for refusing to give their wives a divorce. Most of these men are Sephardic or Mizrachim, that is descendants of Jews who came from Middle Eastern countries, they’d rather die in prison than give their wives freedom.

    A recent case was a man who had returned to Kabul to live rather than give his wife in Israel a divorce. He’s on record saying that he’d prefer to live and die under the Taliban than give his wife a divorce. Last I heard about him was that last August, when Kabul fell, a Jewish relief organisation had got him out of Kabul, I don’t know where he is now but one thing is for sure, he’ll never give his wife a divorce.


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    7
  112. rosiesays:
    April 2, 2022 at 10:22 am
    Question.
    In assessing real or nominal value of your used car, why isn’t a value ascribed to the value you derived from the two years of use?
    Perhaps using the costs of alternative transport?

    Rabid lefties (BIRM) have for yonks wanted to do that to the family home, to enable income taxing the “imputed rent” value. Don’t encourage the pricks.


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    3
  113. There are quite a few men in Israel who are in prison for refusing to give their wives a divorce.

    Thanks Cassie, i was vaguely aware it was frowned on by Religious authorities, but didnt know there were penalties that could be imposed.

    And yes, the main weirdness seems to be a secular court involving itself in a religious matter.
    The civil divorce has been and done.
    Its the religious side they are saying they can involve themselves in because its causing distress to the lady.


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    6
  114. Question.
    In assessing real or nominal value of your used car, why isn’t a value ascribed to the value you derived from the two years of use?
    Perhaps using the costs of alternative transport?

    rosie, that is a very good question on cars used for transport (vs those used for prestige,show or fun/sport). Cars are incredibly valuable despite their costs which is why they became so popular.


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    2
  115. Up getting my coffee, there is a Chinese dad here with four well behaved under fives. Unusual.
    To my horror though the Chinese mum who lets, effectively encourages her one year old to scream constantly has just arrived.
    Bother.
    It’s already started.


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    1
  116. JC says:
    April 2, 2022 at 9:07 am
    Brucie

    Will you just shut up with you deranged bullshit

    ..
    More rude crap.
    Shut your fucking pie hole.
    Mr “I don’t need to know naffing”.


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    14
  117. Rabid lefties (BIRM) have for yonks wanted to do that to the family home, to enable income taxing the “imputed rent” value. Don’t encourage the pricks.

    Last week I posted a report about NYC authorities imposing ever greater regulatory and financial measures on landlords in the poorer parts of the city. When one landlord protested to his Democrat state rep – a rabid lefty – saying they’d make keeping his building impossible, she implied that was the goal. These aren’t white landlords, by and large, but aspirational blacks and Asians.


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    5
  118. That was an interesting article, Roger.
    It actually discourages building maintenance.
    And of course public housing in the US has always been a roaring success.


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  119. rosie says:
    April 2, 2022 at 9:07 am

    I agree with Murray Walters

    Interesting that Teachers are the top of Kerryn’s list of precious, endangered people being threatened by evil children.

    Not about saving granny now, we gotta save the comrades first!


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    6
  120. JCsays:
    April 2, 2022 at 10:08 am
    Zip

    I have 150 k on one car and ~ 105,000 on the sports. I cannot bring myself to junk them as they’re worth nothing compared to how much I paid for them. It’s that sum that makes me reluctant to replace them. Also, one of them is a 530 wagon and BMW is no longer importing the 5 series wagon. I haven’t found wagon I like.

    I told you the other night I’d give you $20k for the 530. I may go up to $21 if we have lunch with Monty, I’ll pay, just to see the two of you together. I’m a sucker for punishment.


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    8
  121. That was an interesting article, Roger.
    It actually discourages building maintenance.

    So then they fine the landlord for not maintaining the building.

    As one said, it’s cheaper for him not to let out some of his apartments that need renos.

    And they wonder that they’ve got a housing shortage.


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    9
  122. I thought it very interesting that as well as from Murray, Phelps got a serve from Tim Soutphommasane.
    No we don’t get medical treatments to solely benefit others.


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    2
  123. the commies will just keep cranking up taxes on ICE cars till you can’t afford to drive one

    If that doesn’t happen quickly enough they’ll simply legislate them out of existence.

    Just not for themselves, of course.


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    3
  124. “And yes, the main weirdness seems to be a secular court involving itself in a religious matter.
    The civil divorce has been and done.
    Its the religious side they are saying they can involve themselves in because its causing distress to the lady.”

    It sets a bad precedent. Religious law and civil law must be kept separate. I know that here Oz, in order to get a Get from a Rabbinical court, you must first have finalised your civil divorce. The various Beth Dins here in Oz won’t even entertain getting involved until that’s done. I only know of one Australian man who refused to give his wife a divorce……..he racked off to NZ and some Rabbis followed him there. I don’t know what ensued.


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    5
  125. I haven’t the foggiest bespoke.
    All I know is outside in light drizzle is the better option.
    Next week I’ll be bringing my granddaughter up here for a coffee. She better not have discovered screaming or we’ll be going home faster than you can say Jack Robinson.


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  126. Soooo, eventually stopped raining, out here in Fairfield, and down to the shed to do some cleanup .. bloody thing locked and can’t find or recall where I put the key .. 30 minutes searching and gave up .. out with the drill and drilled the rivets around the clasp/lock thru .. soon as I opened the door remembered when I was last in & where the key must be! …….
    Yep! .. bottom of the washing machine .. left it in the pocket when I threw the garden shorts in with the rest of the wash earlier in the week .. senior’s moment’s coming faster these days .. LOL!


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    16
  127. Good little article on Jimmy Saville by the chap who was apparently (according to the investigations) the only man who reported Savile assaulting someone..
    Despite everyone knowing he was a kiddy molesting neophiliac pervert.

    https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2022/apr/01/the-day-i-thwarted-jimmy-savile-mark-lawson-on-trying-to-stop-britains-worst-sex-offender
    I struggle to write the next paragraph but Smith, in her section 5: 262, records what happened with the pellucid neutrality of legal prose:

    He said “hello” to everyone except C23. Then he stood beside her, grabbed her round the waist with his right hand, put his legs round her left thigh (so that her leg was between his two legs) and rubbed his crotch up and down. So far as C23 can remember, he did not say anything. She felt that he was giving a performance. Fortunately Mr Lawson saw what was happening, came over and distracted Savile, then positioned himself between Savile and C23. The interview took place.

    There is one detail Smith omits for the proper reason that it is experienced by a witness not a victim. When I block Savile, he is furious, thwarted. His strength is extraordinary for a man four months away from 80 but I have enough height and heft to hold him off, though not without briefly feeling his erection against my leg. (Many have suggested that his favoured baggy leisure wear was doubly calculated for easy removal and to advertise his arousal to his prey without doubt.) Let me be clear that this experience is nothing at all compared to the impacts on his victims, but it is a weird memory to have and gives me some tiny insight into the suffering he inflicted.


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    4
  128. On our home front, extreme nuisance. A little travelogue.

    After $5k worth of turbo-charger repairs on the Q5 we were taking it up to Brisbane for a week and all the way up towards Newcastle the driving was horrendous, with He Who Drives being impatient and me being a flinching passenger as he ferociously overtook a double tanker in the rain, ‘easily’ (he claims defensively) beating an upcoming car to the job. Another flinch from me followed, and then another, which makes him cross. At least we agree he needs a break. Will Hungry Jack’s at Hexham do? he asks and so in we go. As we drive in, he says in that serious quiet tone of voice, I have something to tell you. I think I am in for a lecture, but he simply says that light’s on again and the turbo is failing. So?

    We call our car man back home and he says nurse it back here carefully and he’ll see what computer says, so we drive all the way homewards in pelting rain, making plans to get an evening flight, cancel the hotel booking at Coffs, hire a car in Brissie, or alternatively, restart our journey tomorrow if car man finds it’s all a loose wire or we opt to drive up tomorrow using another vehicle that also may be unfit for the drive. As well as seeing our grandies, I had a meeting on Sunday in Brisbane with a family lineage elder I’ve discovered who has amazing details on family history and our little church; so I really wanted to keep our meet-up date.

    It wasn’t a loose wire, computer said no to any driving, and in the event we decided to cancel the trip entirely. Some days are like that, where cancellation, the fourth option of those discussed in the turbo-challenged car coming home, suddenly seems the best option. A trip to Newc for an indigestible burger lunch at HJ’s seemed poor reward for all that marital disharmony on the way. Our car man has always advised a Mercedes when we turn this Audi over and we are beginning to agree with him.

    I sent home cat-minding son with thanx, and awoke this morning to find the NBN has crashed; currently I’m on my phone hotspot. Sometimes the gods are not necessarily angry, just mildly annoyed, for no rhyme or reason, as is their wont.


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  129. …the Federal Treasury noted “the responsibility of the Government is to identify every opportunity where Australians are able to turn a profit and clip the ticket on the way through.”

    Just about everything that’s wrong with this country crystallised in one sentence.


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    6
  130. You’d think the authors of this article could have done a little web search.
    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/06/30/tesla-and-the-science-of-low-cost-next-gen-ev-million-mile-battery.html
    LiFePo4 cells are hardly new. Lots safer than Li-ion but only HALF the energy density although power density can be be greater (suitable for high discharge rates) and better calendar and cycle life. Lower cost materials than Li-ion but how far do you want to drive your electric car?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_iron_phosphate_battery


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    3
  131. Our car man has always advised a Mercedes when we turn this Audi over and we are beginning to agree with him.

    More gratuitous advice: Try a Lexus before doing so.


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    5
  132. They Will Force You to Own an Electric Car | @Pat Gray Unleashed

    No, they will make it impossible for you to own any car at all. Public transport or bicycles are good enough for the plebes.


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    6
  133. LiFePo4 cells are hardly new. Lots safer than Li-ion but only HALF the energy density although power density can be be greater (suitable for high discharge rates) and better calendar and cycle life. Lower cost materials than Li-ion but how far do you want to drive your electric car?

    ..
    Much lighter per amp hour, though, aren’t they?


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    2
  134. Government to impose capital gains tax on used car sales

    The exemption from CGT has resulted in the wealthy investing large sums in vintage and veteran cars, and multi-car garages to store them in.

    It was one of the few assets, other than primary residence, to enjoy tax free status.

    It will affect only the wealthy few, so the average mong doesn’t care, but I can see lots of cash sales in the future.


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    5
  135. Indolent says:
    April 2, 2022 at 11:05 am

    They Will Force You to Own an Electric Car | @Pat Gray Unleashed

    No, they will make it impossible for you to own any car at all. Public transport or bicycles are good enough for the plebes.

    Wrong! “you will own nothing and be happy about it”


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    6
  136. More rude crap.
    Shut your fucking pie hole.

    No, fuck off you worthless slob. You Thought leader.

    How long before you pull another sickie and pretend you’re gone forever? Lol.


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    6
  137. Soooo, eventually stopped raining, out here in Fairfield…

    Lol at your tale of woe too, Shatterzzz.
    This weather is beginning to get to us all. As I recall it did in 1956 and again in the 1980’s.
    I don’t recall much about the weather in the 60’s and 70’s, but I doubt if La Nina was asleep.
    East coast lows probably happened then too but I was busy enjoying myself not noticing.


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    2

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