Abundant abiotic hydrocarbons and useful idiots


Guest post from our old friend Cardimona.

If industrial chemists were tasked with designing a transport fuel from scratch for maximum energy content, ease of transfer and storage, and minimum weight the result would be the hydrocarbon molecules that we know as petrol and diesel.

Despite years of hypertrophied rhetoric about a transition to electric vehicles being inevitable, the reality remains that EVs are expensive, heavy, slow to charge, short range, and produce far more emissions (if that actually mattered) than do petrol and diesel vehicles.

Wind and solar have proven incapable of producing cheap and abundant electricity, much less the energy needed to mine and refine the extra metals that go into EVs, or even to charge EV batteries.

In fact, wind and solar still can’t produce the types of energy required to replace themselves when they come to the end of their short lives, despite trillions being spent globally on research, development, and operating subsidies.

The entire solar, wind, and EV edifice is constructed with hydrocarbon fuels. Without hydrocarbons, wind, solar, battery (and nuclear) componentry cannot be produced.

Moreover, the entirety of Western civilisation is built on hydrocarbons. Modern civilisation relies completely on hydrocarbons and cannot survive without them.

Nor are hydrocarbons “fossil fuels” that are limited in supply – they are abiotic. All the elements up to iron on the Periodic Table are produced in Earth’s solid plasma core, and elemental hydrogen and carbon are formed into hydrocarbon molecules in the mantle – which is why disused oil wells refill over time.

After water, hydrocarbons are the second most abundant liquid on Earth. As I’ve explained, the Laws of Physics prove that carbon dioxide cannot cause “global warming” or “climate change” – so there’s no reason whatsoever to move away from hydrocarbon fuels.

The sole reason to attempt to achieve a “transition to renewables”, which has eluded the best engineering minds in Germany and California, is political. It is a well-designed hijacking of the mid-range IQ minds found in politics, bureaucracies, and corporate offices to disrupt Western nations.

I use “mid-range IQs” very deliberately because they occupy the centre of the intelligence bell curve: lower IQ individuals can see the climate change-renewables fraud for what it is, as can higher IQ individuals – whether they attended universities or not.

Only the mid-range IQs seem capable of experiencing the mental discomfort caused by cognitive dissonance – believing two conflicting ideas at the same time – and assume that to be the sensation of being “smart”.

These mid-range IQ individuals are the same section of the intelligence bell curve that Joseph Stalin described as “useful idiots”, and who proved capable of destroying the society that they themselves relied on for survival.

History might not repeat, but it does rhyme. Which is why a large section of humanity is facing destruction with the assistance of people who think they are clever but are, in fact, being manipulated by a far smarter and far more evil subset – the Davos-class globalists of the WEF.

37 thoughts on “Abundant abiotic hydrocarbons and useful idiots”

  1. Nor are hydrocarbons “fossil fuels” that are limited in supply – they are abiotic. All the elements up to iron on the Periodic Table are produced in Earth’s solid plasma core, and elemental hydrogen and carbon are formed into hydrocarbon molecules in the mantle – which is why disused oil wells refill over time.

    A surprising revelation to me! I have always been taught that its dead flora (as I’m sure everyone else has).

    It seems that Abiotic hydrocarbons are generated in a Fischer–Tropsch type process, possibly with Iron as a catalyst to generate oil and gas.. https://www.nature.com/articles/srep18382


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  2. Rafe, are you indicating abiogenesis of hydrocarbons?
    Thomas Gold wrote a book on that in the ’80s; it is buried somewhere in my library.

    re fuel energy density:
    I have tried to dig out data re EV’s vs liquid fuels wrt Range vs Mass.
    I read that the Tesla S has a max. range of 600 km with a battery weight of 500 kg.
    My 16y old diesel ute can do that with about 60 litre with a load on board. If the SG of the fuel is around 0.8 then the fuel mass is 48 kg.
    The data for energy use to CO2 is a bit dodgy but by my rough calcs it seemed that EVs and ICE were about the same if the electricity was sourced from 80% coal fired.


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  3. yackman

    I have tried to dig out data re EV’s vs liquid fuels wrt Range vs Mass.

    Energy Density
    Li Ion battery: 1.74–2.83 J/L, 0.59–1.06 MJ/kg
    Diesel: ~38MJ/L, ~43MJ/kg
    Petrol: ~35 MJ/L, ~43MJ/kg

    but don’t forget ICE’s are about 20% efficient at best, and they weigh a lot. Electric motors (and drivetrains) weigh less.


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  4. Only the mid-range IQs seem capable of experiencing the mental discomfort caused by cognitive dissonance – believing two conflicting ideas at the same time – and assume that to be the sensation of being “smart”.

    Perfect summary of current global leaders.


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  5. “Abiotic hydrocarbons” – yes. TPTB state that theory as unproven/false/debunked, which is a safe indicator it’s actually true.
    Logically it’s much more plausible oil is abiotic in nature than a goo from the breakdown of plants and animals over millions of years (that latter theory sounds a little crazy really).
    We will never run out of oil.


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  6. thanks Duncam
    see below some figures I found and did not note the reference (apologies)
    the address below has a very good article on fuel energy density which I am surprised was published.
    Lion is about the worst. If an EV has 20% of gross mass as battery then surely all payloads reduce with proportionate freight rate increase at least.

    https://chemaust.raci.org.au/article/june%E2%80%93august-2021/new-fuel-old.html

    ICE EV
    Use litre/100 km 8.5 Kwh/100 km 20

    Diesel CO2/litre 2.7 kg CO2/Kwh (Coal) 1

    CO2/100 km 22.95 20


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  7. ALL Transitions throughout our short History on this Planet have happened without Guv’ment Mandates or Coercion.

    ALL have happened by we The People taking up and adopting the changes – Because it made sense and cents, pennies, funny money, not so funny money and………………….

    – NO wheel to a wheel
    – Horse and Cart to the Horseless Carriage (Motor Vehicles)
    – NO Flying to flying (without wings)

    And there are many other examples.

    This is the first time that a Bunch of Useless IDIOTS have tried it with Taxpayer and Borrowed Money. It won’t Farking Work you IDIOTS.

    And for my very useful Consulting Advice, I would like $20,000,000 in unmarked bank notes and a 1967 Ford Mustang as driven by Steve somebody……………………

    JR


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  8. Natural hydrogen.
    https://www.renewablematter.eu/articles/article/natural-hydrogen-a-geological-curiosity-or-the-primary-energy-source-for-a-low-carbon-future
    ..

    Therefore, large-scale, clean, affordable and natural sources of hydrogen from geological processes are very attractive and might solve several problems simultaneously. However, this field of study is relatively new so we should not pretend to have a perfect understanding of the system. Nevertheless, available data to date converge towards the concept of continuous production (over years) in significant quantities. Since we now know that hydrogen, in industrial quantities, is produced every day by the water-rock interaction, and that it escapes, its production seems to depend only on us; now we have to determine the most promising locations and according to the context either to separate it on the surface in the geothermal flows or to drill and stimulate the reactions. In parallel with this prospecting, an evolution of the mining law to classify native H2 will be necessary since in some countries it does not yet fall into any category allowing to apply for an exploration or production permit. Overall, our latest data and understanding suggest that natural hydrogen is available at globally-relevant volumes with potentially easier and cheaper accessibility and lower emissions, which means it could be the dominant primary energy source we need for a low-carbon future.


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  9. Once you kick off a hydrogen market / distribution network, exploration and extraction will explode (hee hee… heh).
    Can be used in ICE or fuel cells.
    Bypasses all the water melon greenies complaints.
    Loads betterer than stupid EVs.


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  10. m0ntysays:
    September 5, 2022 at 4:17 pm
    Abiotic oil LOL.

    No stupid, wrong idea ever dies on the Cat.

    ROFLMAO, if you want to know about a scientific issue, you should always ask someone who failed Economics 1, and went on to become a j’ismist, and run a fantasy football site.


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  11. So how do we safely (a) access this hydrogen flow and (b) store it so it can be utilised?
    I was crap at chemistry and gave it, and the stress it induced, up at the end of year 11.
    I do seem to remember though that the H2 molecule is so infinitesimally small that leakage is a major issue. And it’s not particularly stable either.

    Please explain how hydrogen fuel cells will work and how the limitations of hydrogen will be managed through the cycle from mining or making it to using it safely. Just the Cliff Notes version…my brain has still not made friends with chemistry.


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  12. Megan:
    There is a seep in Mali already in use:

    Mali
    Several conference presentations were dedicated to the Mali case study, where natural hydrogen was first discovered in 1987 during the drilling of ~100-metre-deep water wells for the village of Bourakébougo (Denis Briere, Chapman Petroleum Engineering Ltd., Canada). However, it was only in 2012 that Hydroma Inc. began drilling and testing for hydrogen in a controlled environment and discovered that the gas emitted by the reservoir was 98% hydrogen. Over the ten-day production test, reservoir pressure was largely maintained, implying that the source is renewable. The reservoir pressure has now been maintained for nine years and this supply of natural hydrogen led to the first production of electricity in the village.

    ..

    Please explain how hydrogen fuel cells will work

    https://www.toyota.com.au/mirai
    ..

    I do seem to remember though that the H2 molecule is so infinitesimally small that leakage is a major issue

    ..
    It couldn’t be that bad:

    Early Zeppelins used rubberized cotton for the gasbags, but most later craft used goldbeater’s skin, made from the intestines of cattle.[7]

    If you can store it in cows guts and fly across the Atlantic.
    ..
    https://smallcaps.com.au/hydrogen-stocks-asx-ultimate-guide/
    ..
    https://www.energynewsbulletin.net/hydrogen/news/1422923/one-third-of-south-australia-pegged-for-native-hydrogen-exploration%C2%A0
    ..


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  13. If industrial chemists were tasked with designing a transport fuel from scratch for maximum energy content, ease of transfer and storage, and minimum weight the result would be the hydrocarbon molecules that we know as petrol and diesel.

    This is certainly what came of the current attempt to make aviation carbon neutral. Effectively, the only workable solution on the table is “sustainable aviation fuels”. Which means we put the exact same chemicals into planes as fuel, they just have to find a way to make that same stuff in a carbon neutral way (e.g. converting biogas).

    There is no substitute.


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  14. “Abiotic hydrocarbons”

    Russian petro-chemists and assorted rock-doctors have been publishing stuff on “abiogenesis” of petroleum for a couple of decades at least.

    This seems to have been treated by some a a “heresy” / “Lysenkoism.

    Yes, you can make liquid (and gaseous) fuels from coal. Yes, it is possible on a huge scale. Germany WW2, for example. But you burn a LOT of coal running the plants that produce the liquids fuels.

    Yes, in some parts of the world, Pennsylvania, for starters, there are coal mines and oil wells fairly close to each other. HOWEVER, the local geology is “interesting”, to say the least. The two products are NEVER found in the same rock formation.

    Continental subduction may be one source of the “makin’s” for petroleum. Vast swathes of oceanic seabed rammed down towards the Mantle; the “big cooker”. And Jules Verne isn’t talking.


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  15. WhT I do not understand is how long before economies collapse.
    Re hydrogen, is the pressure around 100 psi rather than 1017 psi for petroleum . Making hydrogen volatile like fat passing into my intestine.
    With Megan I could not get into chem as it’s so boring. – how it’s taught.
    Please be gentle with me.
    BTW how long to replenish exhausted oil wells.


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  16. elemental hydrogen and carbon are formed into hydrocarbon molecules in the mantle – which is why disused oil wells refill over time.

    The Russians posited this decades ago. But the ship had already sailed. Oblivion, here we come!


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  17. These mid-range IQ individuals are the same section of the intelligence bell curve that Joseph Stalin described as “useful idiots”, and who proved capable of destroying the society that they themselves relied on for survival.

    Mid-range IQers are intellectual wannabes.


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  18. All the elements up to iron on the Periodic Table are produced in Earth’s solid plasma core, and elemental hydrogen and carbon are formed into hydrocarbon molecules in the mantle

    I don’t have an argument against abiotic oil, there seem to be 2 pathways in the formation of oil. It’s also likely the main food source of many varieties of bacteria and extremophiles, hence the need to use biocides in petroleum fuels. Surprised the heck out of me when I found out this was required by a lubrication engineered I used to know. I recall that Gold also mentioned that earth’s biomass is mostly contained below ground. A rich food source is the petroleum that is being generated among other things.
    But I’m curious about the quoted statement above.
    What perks my curiosity is your statement advocating the generation of elements within earths “plasma” core. My understanding of nuclear physics stated that this is only possible within the cores of stars burning a progression of hydrogen and then the ash of higher atomic weights as the lower atomic weight fuels are used.
    I’m curious why and where you have obtained the assertion of the Earth’s core being a plasma that’s capable of fusion processes without the chemistry, temperatures and pressures required for atomic nucleo-synthesis?
    I sort of recall that the Earth’s cores are a mix of liquid and solid nickel iron.
    It’s one theory that’s new to me.


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  19. All oil is ultimately abiotic. If you go back to the formation of the Earth from the primordial cloud (seeded from a supernova) there were organic compounds (contain carbon atoms) including methane.
    The only question is whether it gets cycled through living organisms on the way to be found.
    Fuel cells have been around longer than IC engines. They are still a bust.
    Electric motors aren’t all that light and larger ones like in cars are quite complex. Check out some of Sandy Munro’s vids on Youtube. We aren’t dealing with a kid’s toy run by a Mabuchi motor. For starters as the motor gets larger the ratio of surface area for heat rejection to volume(power) gets smaller and the motor needs a liquid heat transfer medium. It all gets quite complex including the thermal control of the battery temperature. Not nearly ready for prime time.


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  20. From all the comments above it would appear we need a precise on the matter. No where near my field of endeavour but any takers?

    As always Rafe, spot on. First time in history it’s good to be old, so we will never see the depths to which this madness will plummet.


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  21. Abiotic oil LOL.
    No stupid, wrong idea ever dies on the Cat.

    Haha Monty, that’s so funny.

    I personally know of a project where a certain mineral is recovered by flotation from a magmatic ore. They have to have a prefloat stage to remove the 2-3% of crude oil tar that’s in the ore. This is solidified magma that came straight up from the mantle via a hot spot – not from remelted subducted ocean floor rocks. It’s abiotic since it never was anywhere near the Earth’s crust before it was erupted.

    Having said that crude oil deposits are certainly a mix of both abiotic and biotic, since subducted ocean floor has a lot of carbonaceous material from dead sea flora and fauna. Under heat and pressure the carbohydrates split into hydrocarbons and CO2. Interestingly this process seems to be catalysed by NaCl, which is entrained in the subducted sediments from sea water.

    (Btw I wonder where all the hydrocarbon seas on Titan came from? Dead aliens?)


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  22. There are plenty of places in the world where hydrocarbons leak to the surface and in some cases zip off into the atmosphere. Are the zero morons expecting us to waste it?


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  23. Hydrocarbons are with us pretty much forever – so much of what we use on a daily basis is derived from or uses them for energy production . Net zero and renewables are insanity . Hydrogen as a fuel is also insanity – it has to be seriously pure for fuel cells and using it in IC engines is a waste considering the energy required to produce and transport it . The other issue with hydrogen is the pressure required to store meaningful amounts , it’s tendency to leak, and it’s habit of making metals brittle . If we run out of hydrocarbons I will just have to hitch unicorns to my vehicle…..


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  24. This machine has to move 500 tons of refined soil/mineral to create a lithium car battery. It consumes 450 litres of fuel in 12 hours of work.
    Lithium is refined from the mineral using sulphuric acid. A lithium mine is estimated at 75 loads of sulphuric acid per day.
    An open mine will consume billions of litres of groundwater, pollute aquifers and produce mountains of toxic waste. According to Lithium Americas citing The New York Times estimates, a mine will use 12,200 liters of water per second to produce 66,000 tons of lithium carbonate per year.
    When the source of lithium is an alkaline brine lake, the standard lithium extraction technique is to evaporate the brine water. Lithium chloride turns into hydroxide salt or carbonate and is or is passed through an evaporation stage.
    An electric car battery, say a Tesla, is made of 11 pounds of lithium, 27 pounds of nickel, 19 pounds of manganese, 13 pounds of cobalt, 90 pounds of copper, and 181 pounds of aluminum, steel and plastic, with an average of 385 pounds of mine Raux, what. and they were to be mined and treated on a battery that simply stores the electricity.. Electricity produced by oil, gas, coal, nuclear power or water and a tiny fraction of wind and solar..
    Europe’s largest lithium mine will be in Spain: the Las Navas settlement, and will be able to extract 1.2 million tonnes of material annually, which will result in 30,000 tonnes of lithium sulfate usable for road batteries Electric Towers.
    After analyzing the data, we can assure that manufacturing an electric car is 70% more polluted than a petrol car.
    So we wonder why the climate change alarm only concerns combustion vehicles?


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