1,910 thoughts on “Open Thread – Tues 14 June 2022”

  1. Roger

    The transmission capacity wanting is that which links solar and wind to the grid.

    I remember a giant kerfuffle about ten years ago, when a new high voltage transmission line was proposed somewhere in north east NSW. Shrieks of “Unnecessary”, “gold plated” “health dangers” and such like from the usual lefty “activists”. It was eventually cancelled.

    Now the usual lefty “activists” are shrieking for a complete network of transmission lines criss-crossing Australia.


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  2. Matrix:

    Do lifts, in apartment highrise, have power backup?

    no, not always.

    some do and some dont

    My idea of entertainment – 7 Greenies trapped in an inner city dogbox lift designed for 5.
    …and with no coms.
    *shriek!* “My mobile isn’t working!”
    OMG OMG!


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  3. Bespoke – The washing machine and tractor jokes are very entertaining.
    But to understand them you’d’ve had to’ve seen the washing machine and tractor photos.
    Which for odd reasons known only to Vlad do not appear on Russian feeds. It’s a mystery.

    I have no side in this fratricidal conflict. I wish they’d stop, but I can’t see it happening anytime soon.


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  4. I don’t think we need to go cartoon-like binary so everyone is either a total hero or total villain.

    Neither Blot nor Sheridan are villains. They’re just a bit dumb.


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  5. I really think he is so prissy he objects to Trump simply because Trump is crude.

    And that thing in the White House is not? And the means by which he got there?

    Bolt sees what he wants to see. Tonight Seven News had a piece on Trump’s “lies” about a stolen election. It is now established truth and part of history. The grotesque behaviour surrounding the election is now in the dustbin. Memoryholed like the Jan 6ers rotting in prison.

    Try that on for crude.


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  6. When I was growing up at the end of the 40’s and into the early 50s rhubarb and blackberries were our main desserts.
    The rhubarb plants on either side of our outside back tap thrived with no more than than the spray from washing our hands.
    The blackberries had to be collected by us kids with out rakes and billycans.
    Many friends were made as we went about this almost daily job.


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  7. The grotesque behaviour surrounding the election is now in the dustbin. Memoryholed like the Jan 6ers rotting in prison.

    certainly almost entirely the case here in Oz with our trash meja- may be not in the US. Whether or not the evil will be undone remains to be seen.


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  8. I seriously don’t watch TV- it’s a load of shit. I must admit it’s been a big disappointment to me that the internet hasn’t put these dinosaurs out of business.


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  9. It’s impossible to exaggerate about the evil, spite, malice, ignorance and incompetence of the meja. Know nothings who set themselves up as experts on everything.


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  10. I haven’t yet found anything from the Russian side that’s remotely funny.

    That’s because the vatniks absolutely believe all of it that they’re told. And they aren’t able (or allowed) to see the behaviour of their own troops that prompts the sardonic Ukranian humour.

    There can be no humour in zealotry- That means you’re thinking and picking holes in the Narrative.

    Just like the way our various species of leftist over here think…


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  11. I went to a matinee performance of Spring and Port Wine with Warren Mitchell in Sydney in 1967.
    In the foyer at half time we were standing next to Johnny O’Keffe with his parents.


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  12. It’s impossible to exaggerate about the evil, spite, malice, ignorance and incompetence of the meja. Know nothings who set themselves up as experts on everything.

    Well said!


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  13. Stupidest Women in Australia, part 8 (the Hun):

    A judge has sympathised with a former financial officer who defrauded the Mulwala Water Ski Club for $1.1m after she claimed she fell victim to two online dating scams.

    Kaye Leanne Ferguson, 59, was sentenced to a three-year intensive corrections order in Albury District Court on Tuesday after earlier pleading guilty to three sequences of dishonestly obtaining financial advantage by deception.

    How do you fork out over a million in someone else’s cash to internet people? Aha:

    Ms Ferguson was first scammed by a man in June 2020. The court heard the man blackmailed her into transferring him $130,000 of her own funds, threatening to reveal explicit photos of her to her children if she didn’t.

    $130K? Piss off. That could be anyone’s genitalia. And then, six months later:

    Ms Ferguson later met a second man, William David Rodavan — an engineer from Melton living in Melbourne who travelled overseas frequently.

    While on a phone call in November, Ms Ferguson heard a loud noise and Mr Rodavan hung up, calling back days later claiming he had been involved in an explosion that killed several of his employees.

    Mr Rodavan told Ms Ferguson he needed money to pay the families of the people who died, resulting in Ms Ferguson transferring $225,000 of her own funds.

    Having exhausted all personal funds, Ms Ferguson took the club’s money on 27 occasions.

    $130K and a box shot says the two blokes are the same person.


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  14. A judge has sympathised with a former financial officer who defrauded the Mulwala Water Ski Club for $1.1m after she claimed she fell victim to two online dating scams

    If she were man, she’d be underock and key, and a dry and awkward statement of facts and damning details would have been released to all Members of the Club amd probably reprinted in the local paper.

    Theft is theft.


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  15. The moonlight tonight is bright as day, the bare frangipani casting crisp shadows cast on the lawn. Everything cold and pewter, all shades of grey. A small puddle left by the sprinklers looks like a mirror set in the front path.


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  16. Federal politicians score biggest pay rise in a decade

    Under the 2.75 per cent pay bump, the average backbench MP will now be on $217k and Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s pay packet will total $564k.
    @tminear
    less than 2 min read
    June 14, 2022 – 8:29PM
    Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s pay packet will now total $564,000 under a new pay increase. Picture: Monique Harmer
    Victoria

    FEDERAL politicians have been handed their biggest pay rise in a decade, the day before the workplace umpire decides whether to lift wages for Australia’s lowest paid workers.

    From July 1, all federal MPs will receive a 2.75 per cent pay bump, based on the determination of the independent Remuneration Tribunal unveiled on Tuesday.

    This means the average backbench MP will now be on $217,060 plus their allowances.

    Anthony Albanese’s pay packet will total $564,364 after receiving a raise of $15,104.

    Peter Dutton will be paid $401,561 in his new role as the Opposition Leader, while Greens leader Adam Bandt will earn $314,737.

    Those filling the key parliamentary posts of Speaker of the House of Representatives and Senate President – which will soon be decided by the Prime Minister – will cash in $379,855 a year.

    They could pay Adam Bandt with used toilet paper and he’d still be overpaid…


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  17. Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s pay packet will total $564k.

    I wonder if Albo will mention that he grew up in public housing?


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  18. Greens leader Adam Bandt will earn $314,737.

    This is completely wrong. Malignant parasites don’t “earn” anything in the sense that they are being paid for meaningful work. He and his ilk are just another useless drain on the long suffering taxpayer.


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  19. I disagree especially with respect to the USD which is a Currency that has never been cancelled. It remains the World’s Reserve Currency.

    ???

    Accounts get cancelled. Crypto doesn’t.

    As Martin Armstrong explains, Governments can cancel and ban Crypto’s should they wish to do so.

    The USD is also rising against most other currencies with both International Capital flows into the USA and the prospect of the US Federal Reserve to rapidly increase the US Cash Rate (Short Term Interest Rate) over the course of 2022 and maybe beyond.

    BTC is still worth infinitely more than it was in 2008.

    It was being given away. If BTC goes to zero, the only currency you need are 9 mm, as dollars will be worthless too unless they are gold or silver.

    I very much doubt that the USD will ever be worthless. Gold bugs think otherwise though.

    Anyway, I’m with Martin Armstrong with all of this. He has a very good Blog called –

    armstrongeconomics.com

    Well worth following should you be interested.


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  20. Parasites are bad enough, parasites that that seriously damage or kill the host cannot be tolerated. This is where we are at with the politco-meja class.


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  21. Bet that Pollie pay rise goes down well with all the people who last a job in the last two years, or have been struggling with inflation…

    “I care not for thy plight, Augustus, for I am aboard the chariot.”


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  22. 132andBushsays:

    June 14, 2022 at 9:50 pm

    Just got home.
    All the street lights in our little town are dimmed.

    Take the RayBan Aviators off.


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  23. Where does that quote come from, ZK2A?

    Just heard it years ago, as one of the classy alternatives to “Fvck you, Jack, I’m all right.’


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  24. A judge has sympathised with a former financial officer who defrauded the Mulwala Water Ski Club for $1.1m after she claimed she fell victim to two online dating scams.

    I am surprised Mulwala Water Ski Club had a $meg that they didn’t miss. Anyway, read on.

    Ms Ferguson was first scammed by a man in June 2020. The court heard the man blackmailed her into transferring him $130,000 of her own funds …

    $130k of her own funds? Really?

    Mr Rodavan told Ms Ferguson he needed money to pay the families of the people who died, resulting in Ms Ferguson transferring $225,000 of her own funds.

    Hey, another $225k of her own funds.

    Having exhausted all personal funds, Ms Ferguson took the club’s money on 27 occasions.

    Stay with me on the maths here.
    She coughed up a total of $355k of (cough) “her own funds” and subsequently replenished that with $1.1 meg from the ski club.
    On those numbers she is 3/4 of a meg to the good.
    I smell a rat.


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  25. Blair – father was a law lecturer who did some
    Time in Adelaide. Blair is one of those twerps from an above average income earning family who turned on his society with immigration, dilution of English populations and trashing north England industrial belt while living it up in London. The most punch in you face moment was the eu vote based on countries population.
    Blair told Merkel he would support this.
    Blair showing his real world socialism Knew Merkels Chermany would control the European having the largest European population.
    Blair did a deal with the Polish twins who rioted against this motion saying if it was for Ww2 their population would have been 60 million.
    Checking out the group photo, Blair grinning like a Cheshire Cat in the front row laughing at Merkel on the inside. Merkel eyes are ending on the side at Blair and the shape of her mouth says it all.
    After railing against his society he accepts a knighthood and now this.
    All socialists are hypocrites who want to be famous at any cost.
    BTW I can’t stand mekel after what she did to my mothers country if birth.


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  26. The moonlight tonight is bright as day

    The full moon closest in time to the winter solstice is highest in the sky (at its highest, ie midnight); shining straight(er) down it’s like the sun in midsummer (at noon) – hence brighter!

    There’s also the fact that this full moon is close to perigee – closer to earth, bigger in the sky – hence brighter still.

    Tonight is the brightest moonlight of the year.


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  27. Just reading the Oz.
    It looks like Prince “I don’t sweat” Andrew will remain the fulltime ferret wrangler at Balmoral for the foreseeable future.


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  28. Any, “slainte” to you mob. I’m having a large single malt – or three – and reading Max Hasting’s book “All Hell Let Loose – The World At War 1939 – 1945.”

    Hastings makes the point that, regarding the murder of 25,000 Polish officers, murdered by the Soviet NKVD, and buried in mass graves in the Katyn forest –

    “Later allegations that the post -1945 Allied war crimes trials represented “victor’s justice” were powerfully reinforced by the fact that no Russian was ever indicted for Katyn.” Page 20.”

    Bit difficult to argue with him…


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  29. H B Bear says:
    June 14, 2022 at 8:14 pm

    Blot still wants dinner party invitations.

    You get the feeling he was hung out to dry by Newscorpse, who would do it again given the chance I suspect. I wouldn’t be sticking my head in the noose for them either. Qualification – I haven’t watched/read him for years and don’t rate him much.

    From memory, it was his decision not to appeal.
    But you are right, these days he is not worth the time, besides, his writing was always much better than his live programs, especially his interviewing style.

    His constant interruptions and talking over guests is most irritating.
    Sucking up to his enemies just makes it worse.

    Nah, forget him.


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  30. Reading the comments, I see a lot of people here are on the side of the Ukrainians, not much of a problem as such, we all have our reasons and biases, but some forget that there are always two sides to every story.

    Remember the old excuse?
    ‘He started it by hitting back’, applies perfectly in this conflict, one still can question the severity of the action.


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  31. Nature Strip (T: Chris Waller. J: James McDonald) just blitzed the opposition in the King’s Stand Stakes at Royal Ascot. At the end of the 1000 metres, Nature Strip was in a different suburb. The margin looked to be about 10 lengths.

    Nature Strip (9-4) was second ranked in the market to the American favourite Golden Pal (7-4), which missed the start and never challenged.

    Waller will decide later this week whether Nature Strip will back up in the Platinum Jubilee sprint on Saturday. James McDonald will pilot stablemate Home Affairs on Saturday, raising the possibility that Jamie Kah (the world’s best female jockey who just happens to be in the UK on “holidays”) will ride Nature Strip.


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  32. Update: trainer Chris Waller says it’s “unlikely” Nature Strip will run again on Saturday at Royal Ascot. The gelding will return to Australia to race again in the spring and Waller says he has achieved the purpose of his trip — an easy win today in the Group 1 King’s Stand Stakes.

    Just to emphasise how far ahead of the world Australia is, the King’s Stand Stakes is one of the world’s most prestigious races, but the prizemoney is a puny $A873,355, compared with $25.5 million for the 1200-metre Everest at Randwick, which Nature Strip won last year.

    With today’s victory, Nature Strip has earned more than £10 million (GBP) globally.


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  33. Tom says:
    June 15, 2022 at 2:50 am

    Bad luck, Gabor. McDonald went too hard too early on Tasman Bay in the Wolferton Stakes, leading then fading to finish midfield.

    Yes, that’s racing, I had misgivings about the horse being first up on this distance but these days the training methods are different so may not mean as much as it used to, the fact that he was cut off at the 200 M mark didn’t help either.

    NVM collected a nice place at Beverly race 2 #10


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  34. Some early morning reading, from The Breaking Up: Australia’s history since 1788
    (Bit of a text wall, I wonder if it will post…)
    IT SEEMED LIKE A GOOD IDEA AT THE TIME.
    By Roslyn Ross
    Why are Aboriginal remote communities such cesspits of dysfunction? It cannot be blamed on a lack of money, attention or time invested in solving their problems.
    So, what is going wrong? Why are the vast majority of Australians with Aboriginal ancestry doing fine and those in these communities are living such lives of such misery and violence that it is criminally negligent to allow it to continue? What are we getting so very wrong?
    The claim is that the experience of colonisation has caused these problems when the reality is, all humans are descended from the colonised and most do fine. Which suggests, looking around, that it is the lack of assimilation which is the cause of the dysfunction. We know that, because the vast majority of those with Aboriginal ancestry are fully assimilated into the modern world and have been for generations. They are doing as well, if not sometimes better than the average and have the same sorts of outcomes as other Australians. This is why it is so wrong to talk about ‘indigenous’ Australians as some sort of entity or whole.
    The minority who are in dysfunctional lifestyles are those still trapped in primitive tribal cultures and who have been welfare-dependent for generations. With no cultural appreciation for education, demonstrated by the fact parents do not ensure their children attend school, they are also largely uneducated and illiterate which means that welfare-dependency is their destiny as written. Why would parents fail to understand the importance of education, of literacy and numeracy? Because they do not think as you think, even when functional, which often they are not and dysfunctional people are poorly equipped to think clearly about anything.
    Humans function best when they take responsibility for themselves and learn to be independent and self-sufficient. This creates strength of character, resilience and flexibility as any sensible parent knows for their child and the same applies to any human system.
    Welfare is invaluable and humane in short-term situations but it is destructive long-term and never an effective answer to problems. I saw this living in four African countries, and indeed, some enlightened locals in the countries where I lived, Angola, Zambia, South Africa and Malawi, were also aware of the well-meaning but terribly destructive impact of aid. Too much help and people become dependent and childlike. The most paranoid saw it as a foreign plot. It wasn’t and it isn’t, a plot to disempower, but never underestimate the destructive power of good intentions. As the maxim has it – no good deed goes unpunished, or, in every gift there is a curse.
    Nothing changes unless the culture changes and cultures can only effect constructive change from within. Yes, there are outside influences, but the motivation for change must come from the culture, because anything imposed from the outside will just be more ‘icing’ on a mouldy ‘cake.’ If the culture in which people live does not change for the better then they will not change for the better and the causes of the problems will not change and the original dysfunction will continue and manifest into new forms.
    Some one trillion in aid, US dollars, has been poured into Africa in the past 50 years and the average person is worse off than they were half a century ago. Aid does not work, at least beyond immediate crisis situations, and even then, as I saw, those in power often collect the aid the West sends in times of crisis and sell it on to other countries, with none of it going to help their needy. In their world, their needs come first because that is how people think and that is how their world works. That is also a major problem in Aboriginal communities.
    Ongoing Aid encourages and entrenches a mendicant attitude and brews even worse corruption. It weaves itself into the foundational culture and changes nothing for the better. If the aid manifested as planned it could help, but such plans mostly fail because they do not take into account, human nature.
    Most great, noble and revolutionary plans fail or go awry, like religion and communism, because they do not take into account human nature. And even the successes have sharp unexpected edges. Provide something useful to the women in tribal societies and it’s a good chance the men will take it for their own use. Why would the donors think that something useful would remain in the hands of women who are inferior in the society and under male control? But think it they do, because when they ask their questions, everyone smiles, including the men, and says Yes!
    What is meant to happen and what actually happens are frequently two very different things. As an example, most would agree that ready access to water is critical and that women in Africa having to walk kilometres to get water and carry it home in buckets, is a major problem which should be addressed. And it was, with campaigns to construct wells and pumps, or to provide pumps to wells, in each village. A noble, admirable idea. So, what happened?
    Local chiefs would either take charge of the well and dictate who could use it, or remove parts for construction and maintenance of their own personal well. And, when equipment broke down, who was going to pay to fix the well? Indeed, who had been taught the skills to fix the well? The Mzungus (whites) with the money of course. And that is why Africa is littered with broken water pumps. No-one thought it through. But it certainly seemed like a good idea at the time. I have since read there are now charities which seek to help locals repair the pumps.
    Another great idea was providing mosquito nets for people. This happened when I was living in Malawi, for more than five years, a tiny country along the edge of a huge lake. The nets were provided and what happened? Well, ever resourceful the locals thought they would make great fishing nets. Who cares about mosquitoes? They had always lived with them. And that is what they did. Except those innovative Mzungus had provided mosquito nets drenched in poison to, well, kill the mozzies and so, using them as fishing nets soon had the fish in the lake dying. Not only were the locals now without mozzie nets to possibly offset malaria, they were without food on which they relied to survive. No-one thought it through, but it seemed like an excellent idea at the time.
    The same problems exist with Aboriginal communities for the same sorts of reasons. These places are riven by familial, tribal and traditional divisions. They do not and cannot agree on anything most of the time, except when someone comes along and wants to give them something when the answer is a communal yes and where no-one, giver or receiver, thinks it through. Well, thinks it through carefully and strategically enough. Lots of thinking but much of it in the realms of assumption if not fantasy.
    Aid is most often based on what people on the outside think others should be, do or have, without those making decisions actually understanding who the people they want to help actually are, how their world works and the social and cultural dynamics which will influence any help provided. If they have any sense of the alien culture with which they are dealing it is usually a romanticised, invented fantasy of culture rather than the real thing. They mean well. Yes, they do, but in idealism and ignorance they also do great harm and waste a great deal of money.
    I have a family member who worked as a social worker in Aboriginal communities in Alice Springs and Darwin, who said a major problem is that if you ask people in these communities a question they will usually say Yes. It is the same in Africa. Partly it is because in many of these cultures, yes, is the polite answer and also the goal is to please the powerful and rich person in front of you who wants to give you things. Why would anyone say no to a gift?
    So, houses are built for those in Aboriginal communities without taking into account that if someone dies in a house, in such primitive tribal communities, no-one can sleep in that house anymore. Aboriginal cultures in 1788 were highly superstitious, as indeed were all humans at stone-age levels of existence, and these superstitions have endured in those communities which are the least assimilated into the modern world. Leaving a simple Wurlie now inhabited by the ghost of someone dead, and whipping up a new one with a few branches and bark, is a very different matter to replacing a community of abandoned houses. Whose fault is it that the houses are now deemed uninhabitable because of superstitition?
    As another example of what can go wrong when you paste the modern world onto an old one: stoves are provided in kitchens. Without taking into account that the normal cooking practices are to throw an animal onto the fire and so, they do the same thing with the cooker, turning on all the hobs, putting the animal on top, and very soon it is so full of animal fats and juices it no longer works. Those using the cooker have, seemingly, no idea this will destroy it and certainly no idea how to fix it, if indeed they could embrace such a concept of repair in a world where ‘ask and it shall be given’ is how things work. Another broken piece of modern equipment littering the land as water pumps do in Africa. And for the same reasons, no-one thought it through. But they did mean well, and everyone agreed it was a good idea at the time.
    I also have family members who have been actively involved in negotiating with Aboriginal communities and the same factors are in play. Yes, is a good answer if it pleases the person in front of you and is likely to be of benefit, but saying Yes requires that it accords with the dictates of whoever runs your family and tribal group, regardless of what the needs of the community or what your personal view might be.
    When mining companies want to build useful structures in a community, like a school and health centre, they will have to deal with individual ‘needs’ and wants which will be about money and Toyotas. The power-brokers in the community are out for themselves and the mining companies are out for the community, at least in terms of these consultations, and foolishly believe they are negotiating with people who care about the community when they only care about themselves. And yes, no doubt there can be exceptions but they too are imprisoned by the system.
    Generally, the outcome for the Aboriginal community will be a school or a health centre, not both, and the rest in money and cars. Without such concessions no agreement can ever be reached and no mine will ever be built. The school and health centre would of course meet the needs of everyone in the community and the money and cars will meet the needs of a few in the community – the most powerful. Remote areas of Australia are littered with trashed Toyotas. They are our ‘water pump’ equivalent. Perhaps a charity can be set up to teach the locals to repair and restore them. What does it matter when there will be another car gifted? What does it matter when only today is relevant?
    I know that sounds harsh, but, in such cultures the only thought is for today and what tomorrow or next week may bring is irrelevant. Thinking ahead, is, or was, a European/Western approach to life and is no doubt a reflection of more developed societies. They are more developed because they began to think ahead, to plan strategically, to embrace and manage change; to be aware of outcomes.
    This is why the local Aboriginal community for the Argyle Diamond Mine in the Kimberley region of WA, despite forty years of substantial royalties in the many millions, achieved very little, if anything beyond some heady personal gains. And when the mine closed recently, were bemoaning the loss of such monies and the penury it would bring. They had forty years to put millions to good use and they did not. Why? Because they did not and do not think in such a way and their tribal structures and systems do not allow such thinking.
    The dangerous assumption made by those looking to help, is that they are dealing with people who think as they do. That is the thing about cultures, they are different and they are certainly not equal. Never assume the person to whom you are talking thinks as you do, let alone understands how you think or even cares.
    During my time in Africa, there would be people, including fairly well-educated individuals, who would do the silliest things, often involving theft, where it was guaranteed, they would be found out, but which they did all the same because they could not or would not think past the moment. And they held superstitious beliefs which they were certain would protect them.
    There was a case in Malawi when two workers on a mining site decided to steal a television set from one of the Dongas. They had bought themselves some ‘magic dust’ which would make them invisible. One presumes they had enough to liberally sprinkle on the television set as well. But they must have bought a dud batch because as they walked up to the gates, intending to exit when they opened, the guards challenged them and asked why they were carrying a television set out of the camp. The expressions on their faces would have been priceless.
    That, however, is how different mindsets can be in cultures which have not assimilated into the modern world. How could anyone believe such a thing, you might ask? Good question, but they do and such ways of thinking are also a part of Aboriginal tribal cultures and their reality is ignored at everyone’s peril and that is one major reason why these communities are worse today than they have ever been, despite all that help.
    When René Descartes wrote: Cogito, Ergo, Sum – I think therefore I am, it was to make a case that our capacity to think was proof that we existed. That may well be the case, but it is worth remembering that a more useful maxim is – What I think creates what I am and cultures create how and how much people can think. All thinking is not equal.
    Tribal communities are rarely self-reflective because that did not help them when they were nomadic hunter-gatherers. They learned to do what they were told by whoever ran the tribe, usually an old man, the chief, in Africa, and in Australian Aboriginal societies, a number of old men. Their word was law and anyone who challenged it was dead. And if death was not the outcome, the community/tribe would often wreak punishment in the form of banishment from the group, which, meant death anyway.
    And today, where these tribal societies continue to exist, the chief, or ‘head man’ or Elder or whatever name you want to give the boss, will dictate what can be done. Anyone who goes against that will not last. For instance, in an African village if someone wants to plant something different in their garden, they risk the wrath not just of the chief but of the other villagers. The tribal mentality, a backward mentality once expressed by all humans at less developed levels, is that ‘everyone is in the pot’ and those who try to ‘climb out’ must be pulled back into the pot.
    Modern minds interpret this as ‘community co-operation.’ It is not, it is tribal dictatorship and community control. No doubt this attitude originated in hunter-gatherer societies where it was necessary to come together in order to survive. People worked together in order to eat and to eat was to survive. Without this primal and primitive need, and beyond the dictates of the chief, what was there to bring people together?
    There remains a primal instinct that the group must remain together for survival, even when there is no evidence, in the current reality, that is the case. Old habits die hard. Individualism must be countered at any cost. This of course does not apply to wealth or power for those in a position to take and hold wealth and power. Might is right in such cultures.
    Into the equation came the missionaries and the colonists who brought aid, in essence, a form of wealth. ‘Sit-down money’ the acute aborigines originally called it and sit-down money it was and it is. When someone provides you with food, shelter, support, then all you have to think about is how much of it you can get for yourself. There is no longer any need to work together, to function as a community. Why work when it is handed to you on a platter?
    The world frays at the edges and begins to tear inwards to a centre which cannot and does not hold. In Aboriginal communities as in Africa the same attitudes are all too commonly at work – self first and foremost, immediate family second, extended family a possible third and everyone else can go to hell. I had well educated and successful men describe this reality to me in both Angola and Malawi when I lived there. That is why African countries are pretty much basket-cases, including South Africa, which once handed over to African tribal entities, began gurgling down the plughole of corruption.
    That is why Aboriginal communities are the disasters that they are – because the same dynamics are at work. People think differently which is why cultures are different. Turn a tribal hunter-gatherer society into a mendicant society and you get dysfunctional humans and cultures which cannot function in any world; the one which no longer exists and can no longer exist but which they pretend still exists, or the one they need to join, but are encouraged not to join beyond the material and mechanical which is gifted – the modern world. How could anyone remain functional caught between two such worlds?
    And yes, of course there are exceptions because there are always a few rebels in every society, but they are a minority and there are not enough of them to bring about the necessary changes. Aid has created a mentality where people see themselves, indeed are told they are, entitled victims. Holding out hands in order to receive what you are told is your ‘right’ and due, is easier than using those same hands to work hard to change yourself and your world.
    Working to end the mendicant mentality must come from the outside with a slow easing of the flow of aid and support for these communities which are destroying people, particularly children, in ways which should never be allowed. History reveals that Aid has not worked and that welfare, beyond short-term, does more harm than good.
    If it seems like a good idea, it probably isn’t. At least not without very careful consideration and prolonged and informed thinking it through.



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  35. Davey Boy says:
    June 15, 2022 at 3:07 am

    A very good read.

    I know that sounds harsh, but, in such cultures the only thought is for today and what tomorrow or next week may bring is irrelevant.

    Unfortunately, that’s the way the politicians, come do-gooders think as well.


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  36. Davey Boy 3.05am . At least the missionaries brought education health and medicine. The rot really set in when the Aboriginal community caught the eye of political strategists and became political ammunition. Now they have been dumped in favour of illegal immigrants leaving the likes of Jacinta Price to clean up the mess.


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    17
  37. Davey Boy says:
    June 15, 2022 at 3:07 am

    Indeed, an excellent read, and makes the point that Starkey does with the west, not everybody thinks the same, even similar cultures like US/UK, and we have to stop assuming they do.


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    2
  38. The Australian has an article on the lefts drive to ‘clean up’ politics in Canberra. Yet in another article left strategists proudly boast how they played the man and went after Scomo to win office.
    So the left will clean up politics until the next time they run into an obstacle. …so until 9am then.


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  39. I know some here detest or at least ridicule ‘Wog-ball’ but this match England – Hungary was a gem.

    Just a hint, it’s a game of strategy not unlike chess and there is no “close enough is good enough” give ’em a point.

    Hungary-England 4:0


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    2
  40. “Yet in another article left strategists proudly boast how they played the man and went after Scomo to win office.”

    That was obvious, and it was initiated last year with the Porter and Higgins stuff and so the smearing of Morrison as having a “women problem” began in earnest. The left then launched their campaign from there.

    There was plenty…and I mean plenty….of stuff to use against Albanese and Labor. But the Liberals, always inept, always on the backfoot and always thinking they should be nice, were paralysed and all they could vomit up in the election campaign was “it won’t be easy under Albanese”. Until the right stop playing nice and start playing hardball then this will continue. In fact, I would argue that the recent election campaign was almost as bad as the 2016 campaign….although Morrison was a very good campaigner, it failed to curb the electoral slaughter.


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    17
  41. Stefanovic the Younger informs me this morning that monkeypox is to be renamed after 30 apparent scientists wrote to somebody saying that the current name is offensive and racist.

    I full agree with this sentiment.

    From now on, it should be named poofterpox.


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    36
  42. Russian gas into Europe via all pipelines now at 206mcm/d down from a 350m peak this year.
    At the same time, total Russian gas exports are up since Feb.
    Global customers are buying Russian gas (at a steep discount) as fast as they can organise the ships.
    Meaning gas is becoming less of a bargaining chip for both sides.
    Meaning this is going to go on for a lot longer.

    Fuck I feel sorry for the punter on the street in Ukraine.


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  43. Just watched Chris Waller trained Nature Strip leave the field behind in the Royal Ascot 1000 sprint.
    One Pommy race caller on video called the horse Nature Stripe the whole way. We have the best callers and that’s not in dispute.


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  44. We have the best callers and that’s not in dispute.

    The worst callers are Americans.
    They pretty much only commentate on the front 2-3 horses for most of the trip.


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    1
  45. The tribal mentality, a backward mentality once expressed by all humans at less developed levels, is that ‘everyone is in the pot’ and those who try to ‘climb out’ must be pulled back into the pot.
    Modern minds interpret this as ‘community co-operation.’ It is not, it is tribal dictatorship and community control.

    Yet it happens in modern society too. Think differently and some loudmouth will try to put you back in your box. Challenge the tribe and you’re toast.

    Look at our current suite of preoccupations – climate change, vaccination, military conflict – and attempt to test the waters with a different point of view.

    The “magic dust” notion works particularly well with the first two. How much magic dust has been sprinkled and at what cost regardless of its efficacy? And people still believe in spite of the evidence to the contrary because everyone else seems to.

    Thanks Davey Boy – that warmed up my brain on a cold, cold morning.


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  46. Media reporting an exclusion zone near Ipswich due to a truck accident that was carrying dangerous chemicals.
    Sure it was.
    Clearly a cover story for bussing people to the camps.


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    2
  47. Alan Jones is in superb form on his nightly programme on adh.tv. Last night he spoke some plain old-fashioned home truths, and he doesn’t mince words….

    “We are a first world country for God’s sake”.

    “This is a “huge massive dereliction of duty by our politicians, flawed policy and one which I’ve been warning about for years and years. As a result Queensland narrowly missed a night of blackouts but there are warnings that another increase to power bills could be on the cards as the energy crisis deepens”.

    “This is happening because of the premature closures of coal fired power plants to meet political ideology”.

    “I’ve warned until I’m blue in the face that without coal fire power we are cactus, it is that simple”.

    Chris Bowen and his predecessors are the problem, they set the policy by genuflecting to renewables and decarbonisation, by both Labor and the Liberals, which is the root cause of this mess”.

    Well said Alan.


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  48. “Chinese troops can prevent spillover effects of regional instabilities from affecting China, secure vital transport routes for strategic materials like oil, or safeguard China’s overseas investments, projects and personnel,” the report in the Global Times said.

    Australia think again about overturning the cuckold Darwin Port lease agreement. We’s been warned. Good to see the renewed dialogue is having a positive affect.


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    5
  49. Jaysus.

    We’ve got about 50 per cent of the children in reception and nursery who are not toilet-trained. We have to employ care workers just to change nappies. We’ve got children who are still drinking from bottles with teats when they start school.

    No doubt all the fault of those Tory scum in Westminster
    for not taking charge of all parenting responsibilities.


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    6
  50. Victoria Energy Policy Centre director Bruce Mountain said Australia was in an “absolute market crisis”.

    Professor Mountain said generators are largely shielded from volatile spot prices (the market value for energy) and effectively holding production to drive up prices.

    “Nothing like this has been experienced in Australia,” Professor Mountain said.

    “What’s really going on, I suspect, is bullying by the coal and gas producers – they’re pointing to the spot prices.”

    He said most generators secure their fuel through contracts with the price locked in months in advance.

    “I suspect this is quite possibly a very serious case of market cornering,” Professor Mountain said.

    “We need an independent inquiry into the extent to which their production is affected by spot prices.

    “I don’t think we can accept at face value the idea that the generators are blameless.

    “Serious government action is needed now.”

    Technical note: What’s really going on, I suspect, is bullying by the coal and gas producers – they’re pointing to the spot prices.

    Coal and gas producers are playing their own games. However, it would be helpful if Prof. Mountain didn’t confuse the roles producers and generators play in the electricity market.


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  51. Thanks Davey Boy – a thoughtful piece that accords with my own unexpressed thoughts.

    In some respects you could apply the same ‘ongoing aid creates mendicancy’ to the GST carve-up and NEM…


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    6
  52. feelthebern says:
    June 14, 2022 at 3:04 pm
    JC, are they wearing masks?

    No, it was L.A. and you don’t have to wear masks.

    vr

    I’d bet the dirtbag is still be paid.


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    2
  53. Lotocoti, teachers and parents have been reporting the same sort of thing here.

    The toilet training issue is sheeted back to parental laziness and neglect and the “comfort” of disposable nappies over terry towelling. Toilet training a child takes time, application and a parent to be present at all times and willing to clean up often atrocious poopy horrors. Parents are outsourcing this most basic of responsibilities to child care or not bothering to do it themselves. It is not a feature of deprived areas – it is a widespread social failing.

    The language delay – parents do not seem to speak to their children normally, if they speak to them at all. There is some sort of weird argot going on, often well after the child goes to school (I am an inveterate and unashamed eavesdropper). Parents preoccupied with their devices, anxious about what some random internet droob thinks or does, while avoiding that most delightful and affirming activity – interacting with their child. Again, this is not a feature of poverty, it is happening everywhere.

    Children are hard work. The work-shy should think again before popping out a designer baby or two.


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    17
  54. Further Liberal Party/Australian Government Stupidity

    NSW government knocked back Origin offer to sell Eraring power plant

    The NSW government considered a pitch to buy the loss-making Eraring Power Station in secret talks with Origin Energy last year. But the deal fell apart amid government concerns that underwriting a plan to keep the coal-fired power station open longer could “crowd out” other investments in energy.

    After negotiations failed Origin announced the closure of Eraring in 2025.

    Origin first approached the NSW government in mid-2021 with a pitch to hand over control of the NSW Central Coast power station under a deal that would transfer ownership to the government in 2023 financial responsibility from 2025 onwards.

    A presentation to government in July 2021 opening talks on a deal was blunt about the challenges Origin faced at the ageing power plant, which the company expects could cost $10 million a month to operate from mid-2025.

    “The market shift to renewable energy coupled with commitments to build more dispatchable capacity means Eraring is already loss making and this position will deteriorate over the decade,” an Origin briefing pack to the government stated.

    “We recognise the implications of the Eraring closure and we have developed a proposal to support the state in minimising disruption and mitigating the impacts on security and pricing.”

    A timeline drafted by the government’s investment banking adviser ICA Partners revealed negotiations opened on November 1, with several options canvassed for Origin to hand over control of the plant from 2025.

    Part of the deal included Origin committing to a building an 800MW, two-hour battery next to the plant and potentially expanding a Shoalhaven pumped hydro facility.

    By November, the government said it could decide ahead of Origin’s half-year results in February. But by December the deal had fallen over, and Origin walked away citing uncertainty about the retirement date and other issues.

    “Origin wants the state to operate the plant post-2025 and sell back to Origin a block of power. State wants an insurance model that allows the plan to operate post-2025 only as required for reliability purposes,” ICA Partners investment banking adviser Michael Siede is recorded to have said in a final briefing note. The government did not want to be seen to be influencing market outcomes, he added.

    The documents reveal government fears over taking on risks it could not control and that committing the power station to operate for longer could discourage or “crowd out” investment in other energy sources. The notes also reveal a government preference to keep the plant open using extensions to address shortfalls in supply rather than committing to a specified time frame.

    A note prepared by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment on December 8 reasoned that the power station was “not expected to be needed for price or reliability beyond June 2025” and that extending its operation beyond 2025 could expose consumers to unnecessary costs while “outcrowding” other investments.

    Government advisers also reasoned that Origin was a “socially responsible” organisation and would not shut the plant down in 2025 if the market needed the supply. Two months after the talks failed, Origin announced it would close Eraring in August 2025.

    The NSW government attempted to keep the sensitive documents under wraps using a claim for privilege which was ultimately dismissed in late May.

    The dossier lays bare six months of high-stakes negotiations with the energy giant who spruiked the deal as a solution to lock in certainty over the state’s energy supply as broader questions were surfacing over when Snowy 2.0 would come online.

    As revealed by The Australian Financial Review, Snowy 2.0 will not begin dispatching power until late this decade after unexpected project blowouts, potentially prompting a shortfall and forcing states to reconsider their opposition to using coal and gas in a planned capacity market mechanism.

    An Origin spokesperson confirmed the discussions.

    “Origin undertook extensive discussions with the NSW government to identify what options might exist for the future of the plant. However, these concluded when no agreement could be reached.”

    A spokesperson for Energy Minister Matt Kean declined to comment on the talks but said the current situation in the energy market was being driven by external factors, not future closure dates.

    “Eraring will not close until 2025 at the earliest, as announced to the ASX by Origin Energy,” he said.

    Under one plan pitched by Origin, the government would assume control of the power station from 2023 and would start covering costs from 2025 onwards until its final closure date.

    After the transfer in 2023, Origin would keep two units open for two years and operate the plant on the state’s behalf while the state paid all costs for the plant to an agreed budget plus coal costs, with a defined volume and price off-take agreement in place.

    The state said it wanted to explore the possibility of keeping four units in operation and whether there could be a mothballing option for some months to reduce emissions.

    The state offered concessions to Origin including an upfront fee and a commitment to provide two years’ notice of retirement. The government also committed to selling Origin the required minimum output at discounted prices while handing the energy company the option to generate more than the minimum amount.

    A schedule of expected costs prepared by Origin on one iteration of the plan showed it would cost the government just under $250 million from 2022 until 2027.

    This included an annual management fee to Origin of $10 million, while the state would also cover operational and capital costs, and would pick up the cost of coal from 2025 onwards.

    By that time, the government would use revenues from the plant’s output – estimated to be about $240 million a year – to offset costs, for a total cost of $71 million in fiscal 2026 and $56 million in 2027.


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    3
  55. Another anecdote of life in the people’s republic of victoria.

    A friend of mine did a shutdown job in the north of Melbourne over the weekend, where a bloke had a red hot go at severing his arm with an angle grinder. They do first aid and call 000.

    No ambulance available. Call a taxi.

    They chuck him in the back of a car and drive to the nearest hospital, which they can’t actually drive to the emergency department because vehicles are backed up onto the arterial road nearby. So old mate missing big chunks of his arm has to walk from there into emergency and cause a scene to get any attention.

    The health system isn’t failing. It’s failed. What’s happening now is just the disintegration happening in real time.


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  56. “I’ve warned until I’m blue in the face that without coal fire power we are cactus, it is that simple”.

    I can’t get that Magic Dust metaphor out of my mind. It’s a winner.

    The Great and the Good and the Smarmy thought they could create sufficient energy from renewables by using Magic Dust and sneak it by the Laws of Thermodynamics at the gate. And make muchos $$$ in the process.

    Caught!


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  57. A questions for economics Cats. Sorry if this sounds silly, but it’s something I never see discussed, only government spending, not printing per se.

    If printing money creates inflation, then shouldn’t taking money out of circulation reduce it? I’m aware that this creates its own issues, but we know interest rates are a blunt instrument.


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    2
  58. Another critique of the stinking carcass that is the remains of the Lieboral Pardee.

    https://quadrant.org.au/opinion/qed/2022/06/slithering-and-pandering-on-the-road-to-ruin/

    An extract.

    An enduring lesson of Australian politics is that right wing politicians (and journalists) who attempt to cultivate their ideological opponents never win them over, but always bleed away their own support base. Differentiate yourself from your opposition, and do so on things that matter to voters, that is key. Minor parties in Australia have dubbed the two major parties here the Lib-Lab duopoly and similar epithets. James Allan, borrowing a phrase that I, in turn, borrowed from someone else, has said that the Liberals have not been “Labor-lite”, they have been Labor-heavy. So too with Boris. Does anyone in Britain think he is a conservative (whatever else he might be)? As Allison Pearson tartly observes:

    We thought we were voting for Winston Churchill and we got the shifty offspring of Edward Heath and Greta Thunberg.



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  59. The Beer whisperersays:
    June 15, 2022 at 8:22 am
    A questions for economics Cats. Sorry if this sounds silly, but it’s something I never see discussed, only government spending, not printing per se.

    If printing money creates inflation, then shouldn’t taking money out of circulation reduce it? I’m aware that this creates its own issues, but we know interest rates are a blunt instrument.

    Try this.

    http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/publications/Documents/quarterlybulletin/2014/qb14q1prereleasemoneycreation.pdf


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    1
  60. At least the Fed has made sure no one will be surprised when they go 75bps tonight.
    Unlike the RBA that blindsided all but 3 of 29 economists that get polled in Australia re rates.
    The RBA really doesn’t know have much of a strategy apart from follow the Fed.
    They have much less of a strategy regarding guidance.


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    2
  61. What’s you mechanism for taking cash out of circulation, BW?

    Banks routinely return old notes for replacement. You would simply replace it with an appropriate ledger compensation.


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  62. The Parrot’s fingerprints are all over the gas shortage.

    Shut the Gate with your frozen fingers and keep it shut with your stiff corpse.

    Or open it and stay warm.


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    5
  63. Perhaps most astonishing about the Libs is that they can have a line up replete with Debate Club alumni and they still can’t mount a decent rebuttal to the swill Labor and the ABC tip out at us all as a matter of course.

    Even back in Porter’s uni days the politically aspirant were already abusing institutions. Lefties using it as an infants swimming pool to practice and exercise politics, and the young Liberals using it as a place for getting laid.

    Nobody really looking at debating skills.

    And, sure enough, debate in this country is wasteland. Looking at some of the talent they have in the US, watching them articulate arguments in interviews – then compare to the soporific ooze we get. Of course, in the US the parties (well, the GOP) has a little less control over candidates and one can get through who is content to upset the establishment.

    I can’t help but wonder how things might have fared for the Libs had the Warringah Motion got through. But then the Liberal party’s faceless men would have found their little envelopes stuffed with cash from their more sordid liaisons beginning to get a bit thinner.


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  64. H B Bearsays:

    June 15, 2022 at 8:27 am

    Well said Alan.

    The Parrot’s fingerprints are all over the gas shortage

    Yes.
    Screamed “Lock The Gate!” for ten years and now it’s all “Oh shit! No gas!”


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    9
  65. Davey Boy says:
    June 15, 2022 at 3:07 am

    Some early morning reading, from The Breaking Up: Australia’s history since 1788
    (Bit of a text wall, I wonder if it will post…)

    IT SEEMED LIKE A GOOD IDEA AT THE TIME.
    By Roslyn Ross

    Why are Aboriginal remote communities such cesspits of dysfunction? It cannot be blamed on a lack of money, attention or time invested in solving their problems.

    Davey Boy an excellent post – I have saved in Notes with correct paras for future reference

    A Couple of bits struck a chord from personal experience

    So, houses are built for those in Aboriginal communities without taking into account that if someone dies in a house, in such primitive tribal communities, no-one can sleep in that house anymore. Aboriginal cultures in 1788 were highly superstitious, as indeed were all humans at stone-age levels of existence, and these superstitions have endured in those communities which are the least assimilated into the modern world. Leaving a simple Wurlie now inhabited by the ghost of someone dead, and whipping up a new one with a few branches and bark, is a very different matter to replacing a community of abandoned houses. Whose fault is it that the houses are now deemed uninhabitable because of superstitition?

    As another example of what can go wrong when you paste the modern world onto an old one: stoves are provided in kitchens. Without taking into account that the normal cooking practices are to throw an animal onto the fire and so, they do the same thing with the cooker, turning on all the hobs, putting the animal on top, and very soon it is so full of animal fats and juices it no longer works. Those using the cooker have, seemingly, no idea this will destroy it and certainly no idea how to fix it, if indeed they could embrace such a concept of repair in a world where ‘ask and it shall be given’ is how things work. Another broken piece of modern equipment littering the land as water pumps do in Africa. And for the same reasons, no-one thought it through. But they did mean well, and everyone agreed it was a good idea at the time.

    When mining companies want to build useful structures in a community, like a school and health centre, they will have to deal with individual ‘needs’ and wants which will be about money and Toyotas.

    Generally, the outcome for the Aboriginal community will be a school or a health centre, not both, and the rest in money and cars. Without such concessions no agreement can ever be reached and no mine will ever be built. The school and health centre would of course meet the needs of everyone in the community and the money and cars will meet the needs of a few in the community – the most powerful. Remote areas of Australia are littered with trashed Toyotas. They are our ‘water pump’ equivalent. Perhaps a charity can be set up to teach the locals to repair and restore them. What does it matter when there will be another car gifted? What does it matter when only today is relevant?

    This is why the local Aboriginal community for the Argyle Diamond Mine in the Kimberley region of WA, despite forty years of substantial royalties in the many millions, achieved very little, if anything beyond some heady personal gains. And when the mine closed recently, were bemoaning the loss of such monies and the penury it would bring. They had forty years to put millions to good use and they did not. Why? Because they did not and do not think in such a way and their tribal structures and systems do not allow such thinking.


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  66. Nobody really looking at debating skills.

    there is no debate, the post-modern impulse has turned logic on its head

    anybody that wants a debate is a bigot.


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  67. feelthebernsays:

    June 15, 2022 at 7:33 am

    Media reporting an exclusion zone near Ipswich due to a truck accident that was carrying dangerous chemicals.
    Sure it was.
    Clearly a cover story for bussing people to the camps

    No.
    Trusted sources on the innernet tell me that it was a truckload of Schwab WEF 5G Chemtrail vaccines.
    Driven by an Indian crew of four.
    Not all the nano-wrigglers are accounted for.


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    2
  68. Blueysays:
    June 14, 2022 at 10:27 pm
    Bet that Pollie pay rise goes down well with all the people who last a job in the last two years, or have been struggling with inflation….

    But, but, but, Parliamentary pay ( and the pay of judges and senior military officers) is set by the independent Remuneration Tribunal. Set up by Parliament, members selected by an independent process, and everyone involved knows on whom their jobs and salaries depend. But, completely and totally independent. //sarc//


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  69. I can’t get that Magic Dust metaphor out of my mind. It’s a winner.

    Me also Calli. Thanks to Davey Boy for his post! My immediate thought was “masks” which are useless magic dust to make you invisible to Covid. It’s sad that society is going so antiscientific now.


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  70. Dunno Beery. I can’t see how that could be attempted without destroying someone’s assets, somewhere, somehow.

    It’s simply replacing cash with electronic money, but would that make any difference at all is the question.

    My confusion is that printing extra money does contribute to inflation, so shouldn’t the reverse also be true?


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  71. Maybe butchery classes for indigenous youth would be helpful.

    Bern, as the coroner said in Mad magazine “what would I possibly want with survivors?”

    Politicians want to be seen spending money on big shiny things. What happens afterwards they don’t give a flying rat’s arse.


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  72. With no cultural appreciation for education, demonstrated by the fact parents do not ensure their children attend school, they are also largely uneducated and illiterate which means that welfare-dependency is their destiny as written.

    There’s an element among the indigenous population here that won’t send their children to school “for fear of losing their culture.”


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  73. Another example of Magic Dust.
    Local Councils who erect signs saying “Nuclear Free Zone”.
    The barrier preventing a nuclear blast from entering that LGA has been sprinkled with Magic Dust.

    Reading Davey Boy’s post, the term “cargo cult” kept popping up in my mind.


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  74. Perhaps most astonishing about the Libs is that they can have a line up replete with Debate Club alumni and they still can’t mount a decent rebuttal to the swill Labor and the ABC tip out at us all as a matter of course.

    The Lieborals play by the Marquess of Queensberry rules when you need a bare knuckle fighter or a length of pipe. Ask Wilson Tuckey.


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  75. Its my understanding that The “cash” which appears as stimulus cheques, jobkeeper payments, and the balance sheets of the RBA is created out of thin air.


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  76. With little real inflation, the Fed raised rates 0.25bps at a time through the first 3 years of Trump.
    From 0.5% to 2.5% even though Trump moaned about it.
    The Fed moving to that neutral stance was a reasonable thing.

    Roll forward to 2021.
    Inflation was never going to be transitory.
    They should have been upping rates 25bs at a time from the second half of 2021.

    Why wasn’t the Fed as vigilant during the second half of 2021 are they were for 3 years of Trump?


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    2
  77. So, houses are built for those in Aboriginal communities without taking into account that if someone dies in a house, in such primitive tribal communities, no-one can sleep in that house anymore

    The elders of one community in Western Australia were adept at playing that card, until one of the local station owners, thoroughly versed in tribal lore, set the record straight.

    “No, the old men always said no – one could live in a house where someone had died, until the rains came, and washed all the spirits away..” Spoilsport…


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    6
  78. Blueysays:
    June 15, 2022 at 9:07 am
    The Beer whisperersays:
    June 15, 2022 at 8:36 am
    Ugh, link broken, Bluey. Got another one?

    Lets see if this try works.

    Maybe if I actually put the link in….

    https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/quarterly-bulletin/2014/q1/money-creation-in-the-modern-economy

    Just click the pdf link. Or you can find it by searching the bank of england site with the key words “quarterly report money creation in the modern economy”, it came up as the 3rd result down for me.


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  79. Wally Dalisays:
    June 15, 2022 at 9:05 am
    Its my understanding that The “cash” which appears as stimulus cheques, jobkeeper payments, and the balance sheets of the RBA is created out of thin air.

    Indeed that is a primary source of inflation. The first thing the government needs to do is stop feeding inflation. The second is to reverse it, which is where my question comes in.


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    2
  80. There’s an element among the indigenous population here that won’t send their children to school “for fear of losing their culture.”

    Not entirely dissimilar to a sentiment I sometimes see expressed here by (presumably) white folks.


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    2
  81. Davey Boy says:
    June 15, 2022 at 3:07 am

    Perhaps you could send Greg Craven a copy.

    No point sending any pollies a copy, they can’t read anything as complicated as that.


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    5
  82. Wally Dalisays:
    June 15, 2022 at 9:05 am
    Its my understanding that The “cash” which appears as stimulus cheques, jobkeeper payments, and the balance sheets of the RBA is created out of thin air.

    You’re understanding is 100% wrong.

    The government borrows the money for fiscal programs. It sells bonds into the market. The QE program is something totally different. QE is a Liquidity measure meant to soften deflationary factors. QE is essentially printing money but funding fiscal deficits is not.


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    2
  83. ‘Elbow enjoying post-election boost not seen since Rudd.’

    They even skite about media partisanship.

    Those jackboots in the face are coming thick and fast and unashamed.


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  84. Interesting to watch the language change in the current energy crisis. It is no longer a “shortage” but a “gap”. Whatever – the lights are going to go out and I’m freezing.

    The sunlight uplands are just around the corner. Tomorrow.


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  85. But there is no question that if you are admitted to a western hospital with a COVID-19 diagnosis, your risk of death during that hospitalization has been amazingly high.

    In my opinion, many of those hospital deaths were avoidable – many were iatrogenic (due to medical error). Iatrogenic disease is the result of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures undertaken on a patient. Again and again I hear academics, physicians, hospitalists and relatives of patients speak of the horrors of hospital-based treatment of COVID-19, of the unnecessary isolation of the patients, of the horrible and inhumane treatment which patients are receiving, of the toxicity of the FDA-approved and Fauci-promoted drug Remdesivir (globally nicknamed by nurses and orderlies “run, death is near”), and of the contribution of bad intubation and ventilation practices to those outcomes.

    https://rwmalonemd.substack.com/p/early-covid-treatment-works-yet-more?s=r


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  86. Why wasn’t the Fed as vigilant during the second half of 2021 are they were for 3 years of Trump?

    Just like the RBA: wall-to-wall Keynesian lovers of big government who don’t understand the first thing about modern economics, how to actually make stuff and Say’s Law.


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  87. Interesting to watch the language change in the current energy crisis. It is no longer a “shortage” but a “gap”. Whatever – the lights are going to go out and I’m freezing.

    Mind the gap!


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    4
  88. Customers to pick up tab for generator compensation

    Households and businesses will be hit with higher power bills to help compensate energy regulators paying millions of dollars to generators who are forced to boost supply in the market to help avoid potential blackouts in Queensland and NSW.

    With cumulative price thresholds reached on the east coast, the Australian Energy Market Operator has intervened to direct some generators to put more supply into the market at loss-making prices.

    If a generator is tapped by AEMO to increase their output, they are automatically compensated through a complex formula under the National Electricity Rules.

    Given the energy shortfalls in key east coast energy markets, especially Queensland and NSW, the generators will eventually be paid millions of dollars in compensation by AEMO which will then get passed onto consumers in the form of higher power prices via their retailers.

    “Ultimately, customers will pay for it in the end,” said the Grattan Institute’s energy program director Tony Wood.

    According to the National Electricity Rules, generators who are directed to meet a potential shortfall in a region, are paid a 90th percentile of the average spot price over the past 12 months and that is paid automatically within 20 days. AEMO will recover those costs from retailers through their participant fees.

    Conversely, if a generator is operating at a loss under the $300 a megawatt hour price cap imposed by the Cumulative Price Threshold, it is also eligible to apply for compensation through the Australian Energy Market Commission (AMEC).

    After a lengthy process, if the claim is approved, the compensation will be paid from AEMO to generators and AEMO will recover costs from the retailers. Retailers will then pass these costs onto their customers.

    The AMEC, which sets the market rules, said the cumulative price cap was supposed to be a “risk mitigation measure” for consumers to stop the very high prices flowing through the market.

    Market data showed generators withdrew capacity from the NEM after $300/MWh prices were imposed in both Queensland and then subsequently in NSW because it would be more worth their while to be directed by AEMO to generate.

    Industry sources said while generators can be compensated for lost costs under the compensation scheme in the Cumulative Price Threshold regulations, it was more profitable for them to instead be compensated by AEMO under a direction to generate.

    This forced Australian Energy Regulator chairwoman Clare Savage on Tuesday to write to energy generators to remind them of their obligations, saying some generators were withdrawing available capacity to get a better compensation deal.

    “The AER expects market participants to undertake their operations so as to ensure they are not causing or significantly contributing to the circumstances causing a direction to be issued,” she said.

    “The AER will continue to closely monitor and review rebids to withdraw capacity from the market.”

    But Josh Stabler, managing director of energy adviser Energy Edge, said there was no clarity on the exact rules that would apply for compensation at this stage.

    He said a representative from the AEMC speaking on a briefing call on the situation on Monday indicated that different rules might be used to resolve the current situation.

    “The costs associated with the compensation will be passed through to customers, not AEMO,” he said.

    “Theoretically, this should be lower than a higher price for the entire market rather than just high prices for the high-cost generators. But it is likely to get very messy.”

    Mr Stabler said that now the Cumulative Price Threshold had been exceeded and the market is capped in the four mainland states, it was more likely that the cap would be extended past the end of the week.

    “Generators are being dispatched at market outcomes below their fuel cost, so they are incentivised to extract their capacity, or bid unavailable, to avoid being dispatched,” he said.

    “This results in higher shadow prices which is included in the calculation of the CPT, and therefore, extending its duration.”

    Dylan McConnell, research fellow at the Climate & Energy College at the University of Melbourne, said that in both Queensland and NSW, market data showed several plants that had been forecast to be available to produce power were withdrawn from the market once the $300/MWh limit was set. That included about 2 gigawatts of capacity withdrawn in Queensland on Sunday evening.

    “It definitely seems like some generators are gaming the compensation regime,” Dr McConnell said.

    “The unintentional consequence is the various forecasts of load-shedding and lack of reserves across the system.”


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    1
  89. Interesting to watch the language change in the current energy crisis. It is no longer a “shortage” but a “gap”.

    To my cynical mind, a shortage is a failure to meet demand, whereas a gap can be covered over by reducing demand to meet supply.


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    3
  90. OldOzzie says:
    June 15, 2022 at 9:42 am
    Australian Governments Stupidity noted Overseas

    .. but not at home by the majority of the population.


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    6
  91. The toilet training issue is sheeted back to parental laziness and neglect and the “comfort” of disposable nappies over terry towelling.

    Disposable nappies are a huge factor in toilet training failures.
    TVs are a huge factor in language skills, moreso ipads and things now, some of that gibberish the lkids are speaking is probably bits of other languages they have clicked on in their youtube journeys.

    I recall being appalled by some of the “poopy ha-ha” stuff aimed at kids with a rellies daughter, lots of spiderman and peppa pig pooing and making silly noises.
    Attractive stuff to an unsupervised kid, and thanks to youtubes “oh you liked that, heres a never ending stream of the same stuff” algorithms they can spend whole days on the stuff.

    No substitute for mum and dad, as you say.


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    6
  92. Doom, DOOM, DOOOOOOM!!!!
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jun/15/sea-level-rise-in-england-will-force-200000-to-abandon-homes-data-shows
    Sea levels around the English coast are forecast to be about 35cm higher by 2050. Added to this, foreshores are being eroded, which leads to higher waves, especially when there are storms.

    The estimate of nearly 200,000 homes and businesses at risk of abandonment comes from researchers at the Tyndall Centre, in the University of East Anglia, published in the peer-review journal Oceans and Coastal Management.

    They also are shameless enough to conflate costal erosion (an ongoing and constant process) with sea level rises…


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    6
  93. not sure if people have noticed, but Venezuela went through a similar crisis.. selling their abundant energy overseas while local pricing rules kept it out of the reach of the locals.

    Mill was onto something.


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  94. H B Bearsays:

    June 15, 2022 at 9:21 am

    Interesting to watch the language change in the current energy crisis. It is no longer a “shortage” but a “gap”.

    I noticed no-one is calling it a “clusterfuck”.
    Strange.


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  95. MiltonF:

    I seriously don’t watch TV- it’s a load of shit. I must admit it’s been a big disappointment to me that the internet hasn’t put these dinosaurs out of business.

    It has put them out of commercial viability – the only thing between bankruptcy and the media is the subsidisation by the bureaucracy of the air time.
    Next time you happen to tune in, watch how much is propaganda paid for by the taxpayer.


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    6
  96. Australian Governments Stupidity noted Overseas

    .. but not at home by the majority of the population.

    The idea used to be that the pubic serpents would be much smarter than the majority of the population, and also smarter than the politicians. And so the pubic serpents would be slaving away doing the heavy thinking and taking care of the rest of us.

    What went wrong with that?


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    10
  97. Just reading this week’s Speccie, nostalgic for England in some ways, the demographics are such that the writing is always of sparklingly high quality in its sources of amusement, while Australian commentary can often seem rather parochial, lacking as it does a certain British blunt fopishness.

    Cripes, that sounds like contagious snobbery, like some sort of travellers’ viral curse. But it has to be said: the British, especially the English, are a different species to us Colonials.

    I like the Speccie a lot as it is good to keep up with the commentary and reviews on the UK as well as with the Australian content. Just backread five issues that arrived while we were away, particularly to catch up on the commentary around the Oz election. Also compelling reading is Jeremy Clarke’s Real Life, his wry cancer ‘journey’ (such a cliche as he makes plain) as he dispassionately presents his blackening toenails. Taki, not always in top form lately, is very good today. He’s all in favour of Private Clubs to avoid the Hoi Polloi invading his peaceful spaces. I have to say that I approve of the desire although not the mode, having that Groucho Marx feeling about joining any private club that deigns to extend an invitation to me.

    Cat friends can fill us in with a post-mortem election meet-up soon.

    James Delingpole in this week’s Speccie reviews the Ricky Gervaise Netflix show I briefly commented on the other day. I wrongly called it NaturalNature, whereas it is actually titled SuperNature. Delingpole cans Gervaise as ‘an achingly conventional millennial’ who neglects to tackle today’s issues while being quite funny about the shiboliths of decades long gone, and new ones that are already crumbling (such as transgenderism). I mentioned that Gervaise omitted any critique of climate change, and Delingpole goes to town on Gervaise’s other glaring sin of omission – no attack at all on the rise, management, and fall of Covid fascism and its lingering aftermath. Hence, says Delingpole, Gervaise is something of a fake maverick, though an admittedly funny one who can deliver a good show with plenty of plum lines, all done, may I add, with Gervaise’s undoubted aplomb.

    Britain does produce what I call these woke within the tent types. Piers Morgan is similar.


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    6
  98. DrBeauGan says:
    June 15, 2022 at 10:03 am

    The idea used to be that the pubic serpents would be much smarter than the majority of the population, and also smarter than the politicians. And so the pubic serpents would be slaving away doing the heavy thinking and taking care of the rest of us.

    What went wrong with that?

    that’s a good question I’ve pondered quite a bit.

    I think the pubic serpents have suffered like many large organisations – overrun with financial, management and to a lesser extent, science-types. The practical people who get shit done (like engineers and others) have become such a small voice that insanity (‘the feels’) has prevailed.


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    4
  99. Roger at 9:49.

    To my cynical mind, a shortage is a failure to meet demand, whereas a gap can be covered over by reducing demand to meet supply.

    They are certainly putting it on consumers to go stone age.
    But I took “gap” to mean timing.
    You know, just to tide us over until solar panels work in the dark and wind turbines spin in the doldrums.


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    2
  100. Its my understanding that The “cash” which appears as stimulus cheques, jobkeeper payments, and the balance sheets of the RBA is created out of thin air

    Poppycock! … it that were true it would cause inflation …. oh, wait …


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  101. I seriously don’t watch TV- it’s a load of shit. I must admit it’s been a big disappointment to me that the internet hasn’t put these dinosaurs out of business.
    Watched some TV news last night. It is actually entertaining with the sound off while you guess what is being said.


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    2
  102. Weekdays @ 10am: the daily Tucker Carlson update on American politics.

    It occurs to me that the greatest unwritten story in American politics is the unseen co-ordination and distribution of the Democratic Party’s daily talking points methodically parroted by everyone from the hosts of late night TV comedy shows (that aren’t funny) to the puppet president himself.

    It’s an awesomely awful pantomime from zombies who desperately want us to believe it’s unscripted and spontaneous.

    Sorry, kids. No Nobel Prize for you if you break the story of the century.


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    6
  103. I’ll never forget the email from “researcher” Phil Jones who asks a fellow researcher in an email to “hide the decline” and “use a statistical trick to flatten the curve” (as he couldn’t make warming look scary enough).


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    9
  104. Sancho Panzer at 10:11 – yep, that was what they want you to think. More time, more windmills,more transmission lines will close the “gap”.


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  105. Its curious, Britain will have a 30+ cm rise in about 25 years.

    Yet ours is predicting a range…
    https://www.news.com.au/national/updated-mapping-shows-aussie-beaches-and-homes-at-risk-from-sea-level-rise/news-story/61a789cef41ce7d1f0642027f17dfff9#:~:text=NGIS%20Australia%20executive%20director%20Nathan,storm%20surges%2C%E2%80%9D%20he%20said.
    NGIS Australia executive director Nathan Eaton said the organisation wanted to communicate how the IPCC’s latest projections would impact Australian coastal communities. “By 2050, sea level change of 15cm to 30cm will be unavoidable. This means that coastal flooding will become worse during storm surges,” he said.


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    1
  106. I’ll never forget the email from “researcher” Phil Jones who asks a fellow researcher in an email to “hide the decline” and “use a statistical trick to flatten the curve”

    Then there was the one where he was saying he didn’t know how to do regression line in Excel, and no one else at CRU did either. It was amusing how inexpert they actually were at data processing.

    Phil Stumped at Calculating A Trend (Climate Audit, 2011)


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    8
  107. I’ll never forget the email from “researcher” Phil Jones who asks a fellow researcher in an email to “hide the decline” and “use a statistical trick to flatten the curve” (as he couldn’t make warming look scary enough).
    Funny how the emails proved there guys were a bunch of total frauds and that has gone into the forgettory?


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    9
  108. Minimum wage up by over 5%…

    During 2021, ScoMo could have called for a mini wages accord of 3% per year for 3 years.
    Coulda.
    Woulda.
    Shoulda.


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    3
  109. By 2050, sea level change of 15cm to 30cm will be unavoidable.

    The actual data is maybe 5-10cm. Five if you go on the tide gauges, ten if you go from the satellite data (which seems overcooked to me). Closer to nil on the Australian east coast because the land is still rising a bit from residual plate tectonics.


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    7
  110. I’m puzzled by all this alarmism about sea level rise due to the temperature above the crust.

    When you have even a cursory glance at plate tectonics, it’s clear that the crust “floats” on a super-heated and sometimes unstable mantle. The rise and fall of continents, their sideways movement and the depths of oceans is reliant on this.

    Not taking into account island building on reefs.

    Any thoughts on this, or do I have the bull by the tail as usual?


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    2
  111. Eyrie and Bruce – the ClimateGate scandal was the last straw for me. It’s the year I finally became a conservative (despite their attempts to hush it up with an “independent” inquiry)


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    7
  112. Has there been much or indeed any, MSM attention to the very high non-voting numbers from the election?

    If it gets a lot of attention, it will put the government under pressure to do something about it. Surely it wouldn’t be practical or economical to prosecute more than one and a half million people.
    Only a tiny proportion of the usual non-voting population is ever prosecuted anyway.

    Also, widespread attention to the fact that so many didn’t vote and weren’t punished would just encourage even more non-voting in the future.

    If the majority of the non-voters were conservatives it would be advisable for Elbow to encourage them, rather than punish them.

    Will the labor government and its media allies try to undermine the “compulsory” aspect of our voting systems to further their own aims?


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    2
  113. Oh noes.
    Another self inflicted crisis on the Euro horizon.
    Who’da thunk outsourcing evil planet killing production, to look good,
    to a country you launch sanctions against, to look good,
    doesn’t actually look good, outcomes-wise.


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    3
  114. Elephant in the room.

    2 New York Court of Appeals Judges Rule an Elephant has Human Rights (14 Jun)

    The Left isn’t stopping at insisting that men are women, and anyone can be any gender. The next frontier is ‘speciesism’.

    “Happy the Elephant is not a person, the New York state’s Court of Appeals ruled in a 5-2 decision Tuesday, meaning the Asian elephant will continue to reside at the Bronx Zoo, her home for the past 45 years.”

    …two Court of Appeals judges, Jenny Rivera and Rowan D. Wilson, issued dissents.

    “When the majority answers, ‘No, animals cannot have rights,’ I worry for that animal, but I worry even more greatly about how that answer denies and denigrates the human capacity for understanding, empathy and compassion,” the opinion from Judge Wilson reads.

    You are a wicked person if you don’t let an elephant live in a house.


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    4
  115. Can someone put together a list of the organisations and regulations governing the electricity system (it is clearly a lie to call it a “market”) in Australia.

    In one post above, we had the Australian Energy Regulator, the Australian Energy Market Operator, the Australian Energy Market Commission, the National Electricity Rules, the Cumulative Price Threshold, and the Australian Energy Operator.

    There also is the LRET. What else is there?


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    5
  116. Lots of items for sale on gumtree now seem to have “moving overseas” as the reason for selling.

    Tempting to ping them and find out which places they reckon aren’t a third world shit hole. Options seem to be pretty limited.


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    6
  117. Winston

    Next time you happen to tune in, watch how much is propaganda paid for by the taxpayer.

    It is the same for the “freebie” regional papers. I did a quick count on the local one a few weeks ago. Ignoring the two pages of (useless) TV programs for the coming week, around seven of the 30 remaining pages were taken up with paid advertising from various levels of government, before the commercial advertising was counted.

    They won’t bite the hand that feeds them.


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    3
  118. Dr BG

    What went wrong with that?

    Too many Yartz, Gender Studies and Sociology graduates unemployable elsewhere than universities and the government teat?


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    1
  119. 3D printer news.

    Australian Police Arrest Man for 3D Printed 15-Round Firearm (14 Jun)

    Police in Western Australia arrested an 18-year-old for allegedly building a 15-round firearm out of plastic using a 3D printer.

    CNN points to its Australian affiliate Nine News, which indicates the man allegedly made the firearm over the course of two days, using materials that cost $28.

    They note that the gun could fire 15 rounds.

    Unsurprising that it’s WA that’s bringing the hammer down on a kid printing a firearm. I wonder when 3D printers will be banned? Must be on the cards.


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    5
  120. In one post above, we had the Australian Energy Regulator, the Australian Energy Market Operator, the Australian Energy Market Commission, the National Electricity Rules, the Cumulative Price Threshold, and the Australian Energy Operator.

    What a fine collection of grandly named parasite organisations!


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    4
  121. Will the labor government and its media allies try to undermine the “compulsory” aspect of our voting systems to further their own aims?

    What a silly question.


    Report comment

  122. rickwsays:
    June 15, 2022 at 10:59 am
    Lots of items for sale on gumtree now seem to have “moving overseas” as the reason for selling.

    Tempting to ping them and find out which places they reckon aren’t a third world shit hole. Options seem to be pretty limited.

    Honestly, does it matter when we look to be rapidly heading that way ourselves? At least somewhere like Thailand you can get seen at a hospital if you’ve got money instead of the whole system collapsing like what seems to be happening here.


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    4
  123. And no, I don’t think it’s an “ignorant migrant issue”.

    I’m old enough to remember when Mothercare* and Home Ec. classes were compulsory for girls in grade eight, just as wood work, metal work and Tech. drawing were for boys.
    Did the Poms ever do that, or did they rely upon osmosis?
    *And those Spirax A3 books.


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    3
  124. They note that the gun could fire 15 rounds.

    I want to see WA plod prove this assertion. If he used plakky I would not want to be in the same room when it goes bang


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    6
  125. Fair Work Donkeys have raised pay. This raises minimum pay at my place by about $1.60 per hour.


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  126. Fair Work Commission decides on 5.2% minimum wage rise, vs inflation of 5.1%.
    Give it 3 months and we’ll be hearing about the 5% + and rising unemployment.


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    3
  127. What’s wrong with Australia exhibit xxxx

    Clare commenced her career in the public service – initially in the UK and then at the Federal Department of the Treasury. It was during her time at Treasury that her passion for the energy sector was ignited.

    Clare has a Bachelor of Commerce (Economics) and a Bachelor of Arts (Politics and History) from The University of Melbourne.

    More dilettantes with bludge ‘degrees’.


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  128. Eyrie says: June 15, 2022 at 11:26 am

    Fair Work Commission decides on 5.2% minimum wage rise, vs inflation of 5.1%.
    Give it 3 months and we’ll be hearing about the 5% + and rising unemployment.

    Yep, businesses unable to raise their prices & still maintain margin, will have to sack one in every twenty staff.

    I’ve had to do that before. It isn’t nice. It has to be done.


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  129. I think Elly Melly put it beautifully on twitter:

    “Climate change is making weather more unreliable and unstable so we’re investing in energy alternates that rely more on weather?”


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  130. The minimum wage case increase is a disgrace and by far the largest increase in over a decade. What hopelessly partisan and incompetent dunderheads.

    The decision will now inevitably fuel a wage price spiral and lead to an increase in unemployment.

    None of which could have been predicted/sarc off …


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  131. Diogenessays:
    June 15, 2022 at 11:25 am
    They note that the gun could fire 15 rounds.

    I want to see WA plod prove this assertion. If he used plakky I would not want to be in the same room when it goes bang

    The effectiveness of a plastic spring in lifting consecutively 15 rounds from the magazine into the firing mechanism must be doubtful, particularly after the magazine has been loaded for some time.


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    3
  132. Not sure if you lot have been engaging with the actual economy lately, but unemployment is not a problem at all. Most business are gagging for workers, there are staff shortages everywhere.

    When McDonalds are running a scheme where you can get a job after a five-minute interview, things in the labour market are a bit tight.


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    2
  133. Can’t put on workers if you can’t afford to pay them.

    And you can only afford to pay them if you a) have sufficient margin and can absorb the rise, or b) if you raise prices.

    Either way, expect businesses to close or the unemployed remaining unemployed or prices to rise.


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  134. I’m not sure if this comment should be on Peter’s thread on Christianity and socialism – but here goes:

    We have well and truly entered an age in which Christianity no longer seems to have an appeal to current generations. It is tempting to believe that Nietzsche’s belief that self realisation does not have to be obtained through religion has become the more attractive option for most.

    Those who still go through the motions of Church attendance most often adopt crazy beliefs in “relativism” that misrepresent the actual precepts of Christianity.
    The transcendant principles of the teaching of Jesus get lost in this muddled interpretation.

    We need a Second Coming.


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    3
  135. Did the Poms ever do that, or did they rely upon osmosis?

    They did way back when.

    I doubt woodwork and Home Eck have been taught in UK schools for 20+ years.

    I seem to remember they were rissoled from the Nation Curriculum under Blair, because gender-assuming and not consistent with Cool Brittania.


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    1
  136. I’ve become very sceptical of candidates getting the Trump endorsement doing better because of the Trump endorsement.
    My developing view is that in most cases (Dr Oz was one of the few exceptions) is Trump waits to see if one of the “America First” candidates get into a close to unlosable situation & then he jumps in.
    For example, in South Carolina, the incumbent – Rice – was being smoked in the polls by the challenger – Fry.
    Then Trump backs him.
    It’s not so brave to back a winner that in front by the length of Flemington straight.


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    1
  137. Police in Western Australia arrested an 18-year-old for allegedly building a 15-round firearm out of plastic using a 3D printer.

    CNN points to its Australian affiliate Nine News, which indicates the man allegedly made the firearm over the course of two days, using materials that cost $28.

    I want to see the police commissioner put 15 rounds through that plastic firearm before the kid is convicted.
    lets see the spastic mong actually do it instead of making such a fantastic and unbelievable claim.


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    5
  138. Wokeworths in full virtue signalling mode?

    Woolworths announces big move to ease cost of living crisis

    THEAUSTRALIAN.COM.AU

    Woolworths will freeze the prices of its essential trolley items until the end of the year.

    EMILY COSENZA
    REPORTER

    NCA NEWSWIRE
    9 MINUTES AGO JUNE 15, 2022

    Woolworths will freeze the prices of essential trolley items until the end of the year to help customers with the increased cost of living.

    Food inflation across the nation began to increase late last year and while it initially affected mostly meat and imported products, it has since grown to impact almost every category.

    The price of vegetables has skyrocketed, with some Australian supermarkets charging up to $10 for a lettuce because of the shortage caused by a poor growing season and flooding on the eastern seaboard.

    Woolworths will freeze the prices of essential trolley items until the end of the year. Picture: Supplied

    It has prompted the retail giant to freeze the prices on Woolworths brand products and essential trolley items like flour, sugar, canned tomatoes, frozen peas, chicken tenders, laundry powder and dishwashing liquid.

    In an email that will begin circulating among customers on Thursday, Woolworths Group chief Brad Banducci said the average family spent more than $200 on groceries and everyday essentials per week.

    “We know this is a significant portion of weekly household budgets,” he said.

    “As we all lean into the challenges of inflation, rest assured the whole team at Woolworths is committed to making sure you can always Get your Woolies worth.”

    Mr Banducci advised customers to be creative and shop seasonally, look for the Woolworths logo on packaging and use the fuel discount when filling up the car to help save some money.

    Last month, Woolworths dropped the price on more than 300 products as part of its Prices Dropped for Winter program. These included slow roast meats, cold and flu medicines, soups, coffee and pet food.



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  139. Fair Work Commission decides on 5.2% minimum wage rise, vs inflation of 5.1%.

    Nearly enough for the punters to hand over to AGL and Origin to keep the lights on.


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    4
  140. Double it.
    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2022/jun/14/a-very-high-number-reserve-bank-of-australia-governor-expects-inflation-to-hit-7-by-end-of-year

    The Reserve Bank governor, Philip Lowe, has warned Australians to be prepared for higher interest rates, saying inflation will likely reach 7% by the end of the year and it must be brought under control.

    In his first public appearance since the RBA raised the cash rate by a larger than expected 50 basis points at last week’s board meeting, Lowe said on Tuesday night he was predicting inflation to rise to 7%. That compares with current inflation of 5.1%.

    “By the end of the year, I expect inflation to get to 7%,” Lowe said in a rare television interview on ABC’s 7.30.


    Report comment

  141. thefrollickingmolesays:
    June 15, 2022 at 11:59 am
    Police in Western Australia arrested an 18-year-old for allegedly building a 15-round firearm out of plastic using a 3D printer.

    CNN points to its Australian affiliate Nine News, which indicates the man allegedly made the firearm over the course of two days, using materials that cost $28.

    I want to see the police commissioner put 15 rounds through that plastic firearm before the kid is convicted.
    lets see the spastic mong actually do it instead of making such a fantastic and unbelievable claim.

    Probably spend $10k on getting it functional like last time there was something they pushed so publicly.


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    1
  142. m0nty-fa

    When McDonalds are running a scheme where you can get a job after a five-minute interview, things in the labour market are a bit tight.

    When can we expect AnAl to put a time limit on unemployment benefits, and review the criteria for the Disability Pension?

    Shirley you would support such action, to improve the productivity of Australians? Or are you gagging for a resumption of the population Ponzi?


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    1
  143. Just now on Facebook,

    Pfizer Australia (Sponsored)

    Just 1 risk factor may cause even mild COVID-19 symptoms to get worse, but you may qualify for treatments. Find out if you are eligible for COVID-19 treatments.
    Oral treatments for COVID-19

    All comments are derogatory of Pfizer 🙂


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  144. The Reserve Bank governor, Philip Lowe, has warned Australians to be prepared for higher interest rates, saying inflation will likely reach 7% by the end of the year and it must be brought under control.

    Things Lowe has gotten wrong.
    Yield curve control. Said the RBA would defend rates at 0.1%. Hedge funds blew that up after 2 attempts.
    Rates on hold until 2024 – he said that up until late 2021.
    No signs on inflation concerns in Australia – that was up until 3 months ago – now 7% inflation fears.

    This is why confidence in the RBA has diminished.
    Even more so since Debelle left.


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  145. Mak Siccarsays:
    June 15, 2022 at 12:01 pm

    Wokeworths in full virtue signalling mode?

    Woolworths announces big move to ease cost of living crisis

    I’ve just trawled through the 196 items on Woolworth’s page that will have a price freeze and 90 + percent junk I would never purchase!


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  146. feelthebern says:
    June 15, 2022 at 12:13 pm

    The Reserve Bank governor, Philip Lowe, has warned Australians to be prepared for higher interest rates, saying inflation will likely reach 7% by the end of the year and it must be brought under control.

    Things Lowe has gotten wrong.

    It used to be that Central Banks would jaw-jaw down expected inflation numbers, since inflation expectations tend to become inflation fact. Inflation expectations even used to be surveyed.

    By nominating 7%, he’s just put a floor under the number. He shouldn’t be in the business of making predictions, he should be keeping them close to his chest and let the rate settings do the talking.

    Just another self promoter without a clue or an appreciation of history.


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  147. Wokeworths in full virtue signalling mode?

    No doubt there’s an element of marketing to this, but WW will be absorbing the price increases so there is a cost to them. Virtue signaling, otoh, entails no cost to the signaller.


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  148. Lowe didn’t do shit in March 2020 until Australian banks started tapping the Fed Reserve.
    Only then did the RBA pull the trigger on a range of measures.
    Then it was late 2020 before they actioned a whole comprehensive suite of tools.


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  149. OldOzziesays:
    June 15, 2022 at 12:23 pm
    We were promised violence after Supreme Court leak. They weren’t kidding

    Once is an accident. Twice is a coincidence. Three is a trend. More than a dozen is a coordinated campaign whose message is: You are next.

    These 27 Democrats voted against protections for Supreme Court justices

    The Supreme Court Police Parity Act passed the Senate on a 100-0 vote last month

    The House passed a bill Tuesday to increase security for Supreme Court justices’ immediate families, with 27 Democrats voting against, less than a week after a man was arrested for allegedly plotting to kill Justice Brett Kavanaugh.


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  150. Wokeworths in full virtue signalling mode?

    The standard ploy is to put the prices up a few days before the “everyday low price” sticker .. LOL!


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  151. Sancho Panzer at 10:11 – yep, that was what they want you to think. More time, more windmills,more transmission lines will close the “gap”.

    Short of a quantum leap in battery storage I don’t see how this gap can ever be closed whilst federal and state governments pursue their net zero agendas. And we’re probably three years away from a Labor-Greens government which will see the end of the extraction of fossil fuels in accordance with Greens policy. As the Greens promise, “We’ll have the power to push the next Government further and faster on the climate crisis.”


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  152. From the Herald-Sun link above:

    Victoria’s ENERGY MIX

    Black coal — 39 per cent nationally — 0 per cent in Victoria. The dominant energy source in Queensland and NSW that has been hit hard by recent outages. Not used in Victoria.

    Brown coal — 16 per cent nationally — 58 per cent in Victoria. Victoria relies on the Yallourn and Loy Yang A and B coal-fired power stations in the Latrobe Valley. A major unit at Loy Yang A is out of action until late September.

    Wind — 18 per cent nationally — 28 per cent in Victoria. Growing strongly as an energy source in Victoria but cannot provide crucial dispatchable generation.

    Gas — 13 per cent nationally — 6 per cent in Victoria Considered a key transition fuel as coal-fired stations retire and more renewables come online. Victoria’s moratorium on gas exploration and development added to supply headaches.

    Hydro — 11 per cent nationally — 6 per cent in Victoria. Snowy 2.0 is the country’s biggest storage project and will boost hydro resources, but it may not come online until 2028 after blowouts and delays.

    Solar — 3 per cent nationally — 1 per cent in Victoria. Australia is a world leader in rooftop solar, with more than three million systems installed covering about one in three homes.


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