1,289 thoughts on “Open Thread – Weekend 25 June 2022”

  1. Can’t they get them those small pavers? Full size bricks are wreaking havoc with Antifa’s wrists.
    Good question.
    The answer is that a brick is better for braining someone than a paver.
    The States are paroling criminals to wield those bricks as we speak.


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  2. Shatterzzz:

    what it can do is send it back to the states so each state implements its own laws.

    Isn’t that the point of the SCOTUS reversal? .. to return the decision to the, individual, States!

    …and if I’m reading it correctly, it’s the right thing to do. The US is a Federation of States, after all.


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  3. WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES: Shocking photos show men with ARROWS pierced through their arms and legs after 20 crossbows were ‘stolen’ and used in a fight in troubled Indigenous community

    – Photos show crossbows being used in a fight in Wadeye, Northern Territory
    – Crossbows were allegedly stolen from Mitchells Adventures, Darwin
    – Shocking photos show four men impaled with the arrows in their arms and legs
    – Remote Aboriginal community has been marred with violence in recent months


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  4. Doc Faustus,

    Seem to remember Beattie pulling a similar stunt but only after seriously ramping up the perks. Someone in NSW should remind the ALP about brick and glass houses when it comes to jobs for the boys.

    On Barrilaro I wonder if ICAC is looking his way as well. Good way to put him out of the picture for a couple of years.


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  5. Interesting, isn’t it, that the claque of activist lawyers denouncing Morrison and calling for a federal ICAC have gone silent over the antics of Anaesthesia Bjelke-Palacechook and her minions?

    I’m not defending Morrison and Joyce here, by the way. What was the federal government doing handing out money to local sports clubs etc anyway? How about a conservative party that displayed some principle and refused to join a competitive auction to bribe voters with their own money?


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  6. Rosie:

    the French Government continues the war against the burkini

    Good.
    We have bent over backwards to accommodate the Islamic religion and gotten nothing but contempt and violence in return.
    Assimilate or piss off. They have abused our hospitality too much.


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  7. Second speed camera car smashed in a week

    A second camera car has been targeted in Victoria – the fourth incident in less than two months.

    Link

    Oh dear. How sad. Never mind.


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  8. Rabz:

    Nice that the waffling windbag imbeciles that magicked such a ridiculous concept into existence have finally been given a long overdue and well deserved smackdown.
    Presumably the squawking is now audible in space.

    That’s a common misconception, Rabz. Space is a vacuum and cannot transmit sound so you can’t be heard squawking.
    You can, however, hear the farts.
    Not many people know that.
    🙂


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  9. BOSTON (AP) — A Connecticut woman who says she’s descended from slaves who are portrayed in widely published, historical photos owned by Harvard University can sue the school for emotional distress, Massachusetts’ highest court ruled Thursday.

    The state’s Supreme Judicial Court partly vacated a lower court ruling that dismissed a complaint from Tamara Lanier over photos she says depict her enslaved ancestors. The images are considered some of the earliest that show enslaved people in the U.S.

    The court concluded the Norwich resident and her family can plausibly make a case for suffering “negligent and indeed reckless infliction of emotional distress” from Harvard and remanded that part of their claim to the state Superior Court.

    The judges said the university failed to contact Lanier when it used one of the images on a book cover and prominently featured it in materials for a campus conference — even after she’d reached out about her ancestral ties.

    “In sum, despite its duty of care to her, Harvard cavalierly dismissed her ancestral claims and disregarded her requests, despite its own representations that it would keep her informed of further developments,” the ruling states.


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  10. Winston Smithsays:
    June 25, 2022 at 2:57 pm
    Rosie:

    the French Government continues the war against the burkini

    Good.
    We have bent over backwards to accommodate the Islamic religion and gotten nothing but contempt and violence in return.
    Assimilate or piss off. They have abused our hospitality too much.

    How many people would know about the Broken hill jihad in first world war? Islam is not compatible with western values in it’s current form.


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  11. Gets worse Old Lefty, NSW Liberal Speakman just appointed the AG from the Obeid & Mac Donald years as ICAC commissioner. Dracula and blood bank come to mind…


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  12. Will we be sighing in front of an NFT in a hundred years’ time as we do before Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, van Gogh’s Sunflowers, or Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s Big Yam Dreaming? Or will NFTs have passed into the shallow grave of obsolete technologies, like VHS and Beta?

    Real Art is the best way to go IMHO especially where the Painter/Artist is already dead.


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  13. Abortion Goes Back to the People

    In Dobbs, the Supreme Court finally corrects its historic mistake in Roe v. Wade.
    By The WSJ Editorial Board

    Can America still settle its political conflicts democratically, and peacefully? We’re about to find out after the Supreme Court Friday overturned Roe v. Wade and returned the profound moral issue of abortion to the states and democratic assent, where it has always belonged.

    Critics say the Court’s 6-3 decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization is rule by unelected judges. But Roe was the real “exercise of raw judicial power,” as Justice Byron White put it in dissent in 1973. That’s when seven Justices claimed to find a constitutional right to abortion that is nowhere mentioned in the Constitution and had no history in American common law. The Court on Friday finally corrected its mistake, which has damaged the legitimacy of the Court and inflamed our politics for 49 years.

    The Justices in the majority deserve credit for sticking with their convictions despite the leak of Justice Samuel Alito’s opinion in May. The leak was probably intended to create a furor to pressure the Justices to change their mind, and it has led to protests in front of their homes and even an apparent assassination attempt against Justice Brett Kavanaugh. By holding firm, they showed the Court can’t be intimidated.

    Justice Alito’s majority opinion hews closely to his draft, and it is a careful, thoughtful survey of abortion law and its history in the constitutional order. His opinion takes apart, brick by logical brick, the reasoning of Roe and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the other main abortion precedent the Court overrules in Dobbs.

    The central point, underscored by Justice Kavanaugh in his concurrence, is that abortion can be found nowhere in the Constitution. The parchment is neutral on the issue. The supporters of an abortion right claim to have found it in the due process clause of the 14th Amendment, which was ratified in 1868. But until the latter part of the 20th century, the idea of a right to abortion could be found nowhere in American law. No state constitutions included it, and until shortly before Roe no court had recognized such a right. Justice Harry Blackmun ignored that history and invented the right in Roe.

    Casey entrenched Roe in 1992, yet it did so without considering that history, while asserting that abortion was part of a gauzy right to privacy that includes “intimate and personal choices.” The three controlling Justices in Casey sought to balance that right against the “potential life” of a baby in the womb.

    But their judgment of how to strike that balance supplanted the moral choices of millions of Americans. “Our Nation’s historical understanding of ordered liberty does not prevent the people’s elected representatives from deciding how abortion should be regulated,” writes Justice Alito.

    The three dissenting Justices claim the majority has steamrolled the doctrine of stare decisis, or respect for precedent. But Justice Alito’s opinion deals step by step with the Court’s traditional stare decisis analysis, and his most telling point is that Roe and Casey haven’t come close to settling the issue.

    The controlling Justices in Casey went so far as to make an essentially political plea that Americans let their ruling settle the abortion issue. It was a futile attempt to end debate on a question that touches people at their deepest moral convictions. Abortion continues to roil American politics, and states continue to pass laws challenging the logic of both opinions. When a ruling is still controversial and unworkable after five decades, that is compelling evidence it was wrongly decided.

    Chief Justice John Roberts writes in a concurrence that the Court did not have to overturn Roe to uphold Mississippi’s ban on abortion after 15 weeks in this case. He says this would have been more judicially modest and less jolting to the public.

    We agree on his point about upholding the Mississippi law, but such a halfway ruling would only have been a legal holding action. More states would have written more laws that would have challenged Roe and Casey, and sooner or later the Court would have had to overrule both or uphold some remnant of them as settled law. Better to take this opportunity to return the issue to the states sooner rather than later.

    The political left is making much of Justice Clarence Thomas’s argument in a concurrence that the Court should revisit all of its precedents that are based on the use of substantive due process to find rights in the Constitution. That includes precedents on contraception and gay marriage.

    Substantive due process is a long-time preoccupation of Justice Thomas, and we respect him for it. But the doctrine is also deeply embedded in countless Court precedents that have far better stare decisis claims than does Roe. Overturning the Obergefell ruling on gay marriage, for example, would jeopardize hundreds of thousands of legal marriage contracts. That’s the definition of a reliance-interest justification for upholding a precedent. Justice Thomas also acknowledges in his concurrence that abortion is different from these cases, and note that no other Justice joined his opinion.

    Which brings us back to the politics of abortion and democracy. The debate will now shift from courts to the political branches, which should be healthy for the judiciary. Democrats made clear on Friday that they will make abortion rights a major campaign theme in the midterm elections, and President Biden declared that “this is not over.”

    Fair enough. Both sides of the abortion debate will now have to achieve their policy goal the old-fashioned way—through persuasion, not judicial fiat. Some in the pro-life movement want Congress to ban abortion nationwide. But that will strike many Americans as hypocritical after decades of Republican claims that repealing Roe would return the issue to the states.

    A national ban may also be an unconstitutional intrusion on state police powers and federalism. Imposing the abortion values of Mississippi or Texas on all 50 states could prove to be as unpopular as New York or California trying to do the same for abortion rights.

    One tragedy of Roe is that it pre-empted an abortion debate that was moving in the states a half century ago. That debate can now resume. Some states will ban it in most cases, while others like California may seek to pay for the abortions of women from other states.

    It will take awhile, and more than one election, but we hope that eventually the public through its legislators will find a tolerable consensus, if not exactly common ground. That’s the best we can ask for in our imperfect republic, if we can keep it.


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  14. OldOzziesays:
    June 25, 2022 at 3:22 pm
    Abortion Goes Back to the People

    Indeed. RvW was always about US federalism. The original federal structure of the US gave more power to the states. The commies since then have strived to centralise power, as is the case in Australia, and Roe was fundamental to that. This rectification is consistent with the original intent of the framers of the constitution.


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  15. Show me a human that can live in water for 9 months.

    I don’t get it, we all did. Or is that the point.

    Whether the foetus is a human being is a matter of choosing a definition and is irrelevant. What is beyond dispute is that killing it is preventing the existence of a fully human life at some future point. Say forty years later, if you’re cynical. So abortion of a foetus is undeniably the abortion, cutting short, of a human life. Turning a ‘clump of cells’ into a might-have-been. Denying life to some potentially fully human being.

    You have to be unbelievably crass not to think this is an evil thing to do. It might, in some circumstances, be a lesser evil, but it’s always horrible.


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  16. Real Art is the best way to go IMHO

    How about a giant metallic purple dog dropping?

    A Massive Jeff Koons Balloon Sculpture Is Being Auctioned to Raise Millions for Humanitarian Aid to Ukraine (10 Jun)

    On June 28, Christie’s will begin taking bids for Balloon Monkey (Magenta) at its 20th/21st Century: London Evening Sale. Current owners, billionaire Victor Pinchuk and his wife Olena Pinchuk, are selling the sculpture to raise funds for humanitarian aid for those directly impacted by the war in Ukraine. Proceeds from the sale will be used to assist soldiers and civilians that have been wounded during the conflict and require prosthetics, medical treatment and rehabilitation services. The massive artwork, which is nearly 20 feet tall, is expected to fetch up to $12.6 million when it crosses the block.

    Oops, sorry it’s a balloon monkey not a dog dropping. Easy mistake to make.


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  17. Substantive due process is a long-time preoccupation of Justice Thomas, and we respect him for it. But the doctrine is also deeply embedded in countless Court precedents that have far better stare decisis claims than does Roe. Overturning the Obergefell ruling on gay marriage, for example, would jeopardize hundreds of thousands of legal marriage contracts. That’s the definition of a reliance-interest justification for upholding a precedent.

    If there is no basis for the contract beyond an erroneously ruled decision, so what? Obergefell has only been law for 7 years, while Roe has been law for 49. There are numerous abortion providers that are now out of business in several states, countless employees now out of work, and so on. You can tell that WSJ never really supported opposition to gay ‘marriage’. And now they’re here, trying to stop anyone getting any crazy ideas like reversing Obergefell after the stunning reversal of Roe and Casey. Absolutely sick to death of these people trying to herd conservatives into their trash defeatist positions.


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  18. “Absolutely sick to death of these people trying to herd conservatives into their trash defeatist positions.”

    Yep…and it’s usually other so called conservatives doing the herding.


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  19. Zyconoclastsays:
    June 25, 2022 at 3:03 pm

    BOSTON (AP) — A Connecticut woman who says she’s descended from slaves who are portrayed in widely published, historical photos owned by Harvard University can sue the school for emotional distress, Massachusetts’ highest court ruled Thursday.

    FFS!
    When will the idiocy stop? Don’t bother answering. I already know the bloody answer.


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  20. Old Leftysays:
    June 25, 2022 at 2:59 pm
    And then there is the silence over the judiciary in Victoria and Queensland becoming practically a sub-branch of the ALP.

    Well, Vic Pol are most certainly in Dan the Dustbin Man’s pockets.


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  21. “Rockdoctorsays:
    June 25, 2022 at 3:14 pm
    Gets worse Old Lefty, NSW Liberal Speakman just appointed the AG from the Obeid & Mac Donald years as ICAC commissioner. Dracula and blood bank come to mind…”

    Stupid stupid fucking Liberals.


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  22. More great art…
    A giant black comb with a fist handle

    Mayor LaToya Cantrell
    @mayorcantrell

    As Juneteenth approaches, we celebrated with an unveiling in Lafayette Sq.?????
    This sculpture is very fitting for this time & place as we celebrate the freedoms that we have gained

    We know that it doesn’t come without struggles, fights, and protests for 200+ years


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  23. As Juneteenth approaches, we celebrated with an unveiling in Lafayette Sq.?????
    This sculpture is very fitting for this time & place as we celebrate the freedoms that we have gained

    Come on, man, this is extremely funny. If Ricky Gervais had said it, you’d have laughed your socks off.


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  24. Overturning the Obergefell ruling on gay marriage, for example, would jeopardize hundreds of thousands of legal marriage contracts.

    Similarly to Roe, overturning Obergefell* wouldn’t in itself change anything. It would only restore the proper primacy of the democratically elected legislature over issues like this.

    The effect of an overturning of Obergefell on existing gay “marriages” is exactly the kind of factor which ought to be left to the legislature, with all its powers to gather data and seek public and expert input, and its legislative authority to enact transitional rules if it thinks fit.

    * Overturning the effect of Obergefell, I mean. The majority judgments are so bereft of anything remotely resembling legal reasoning that there’s really no legal precept to be overturned.


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  25. Overturning the Obergefell ruling on gay marriage, for example, would jeopardize hundreds of thousands of legal marriage contracts

    Every single decision of a court of superior record can jeopardise someone’s claims or perceived claims.

    The decision should be in the hands of each state legislature or up to a plebiscite. That’s what Amendment X decrees.

    Enumerated powers of Congress. Section 51.

    Centralisation of power ought to be reviled.


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  26. Tim

    The effect of an overturning of Obergefell on existing gay “marriages” is exactly the kind of factor which ought to be left to the legislature, with all its powers to gather data and seek public and expert input, and its legislative authority to enact transitional rules if it thinks fit.

    I think overturning Wade, or at least handing back to the states is different to the gay marriage issue. To be somewhat coarse as it’s hard to explain it in any other way. There’s a finality to abortion. The kid is killed off and the mother can continue on with her life. There’s an end.

    Gay marriage is different in the sense that two people have married, co-mingled their assets most likely and theoretically act out their lives as a married couple do. Bringing this to an end would likely cause all sorts of hardships that we could only begin to understand once gay marriage is overturned. Okay, it would be handing it back to the states as was done with the abortion issue. However, what would happen in those states that legislated against gay marriage. Would they also cause existing gay marriages to be dissolved? Would they recognize gay marriages in the blue states of people moved? It’s not that simple.


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  27. cohenitesays:
    June 25, 2022 at 5:24 pm
    Shock horror, obuma calls for an insurrection over Roe.

    LOL. And OBummer was supposed to have been educated in the Law? He obviously has no understanding of the US Constitution and of the difference between Constitutional law and Statutory law……………Wot’ a corrupt ‘plonker’ he is.


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  28. And OBummer was supposed to have been educated in the Law? He obviously has no understanding of the US Constitution and of the difference between Constitutional law and Statutory law……………Wot’ a corrupt ‘plonker’ he is.

    He claimed to have specialized in constitutional law.


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  29. However, what would happen in those states that legislated against gay marriage.

    It’s not that simple.

    It is simple, JC.

    There is no such thing as homosexual ‘marriage’. Where states legislated against this, they are now free to ban or approve these ‘marriages’ as the voters see fit.

    Homosexual unions should not be persecuted and the people involved should be covered by legal rights as per a defacto union. But they are not marriages.


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  30. JC, I was addressing your comment:

    However, what would happen in those states that legislated against gay marriage.

    Homosexual marriage is not endorsed in the American Constitution. As with abortion, it should be a state issue, decided by the electorate.

    The rest of my comment dealt with personal beliefs. I do not support abortion. I do not support homosexual ‘marriage’. However, I would not support punishments for anyone caught up in these situations.


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  31. However, what would happen in those states that legislated against gay marriage. Would they also cause existing gay marriages to be dissolved? Would they recognize gay marriages in the blue states of people moved? It’s not that simple.

    Maybe not (at least re interstate issues), but those are exactly the kinds of issues that ought to be left to the legislature. Any US state legislature which wished to do so could continue to recognise gay “marriage” precisely because of those factors, even if it might otherwise have abolished it. And if it does abolish gay “marriage” it will inevitably have to cater for those concerns when it does so.

    Re existing gay “marriages” – such a legislature might well provide that existing gay “married” couples will continue to have exactly the same rights and obligations as they would have had but for the abolition – i.e. a normal transitional law. If it doesn’t it will have to provide some other regime for addressing the issue.

    Re interstate gay “marriages” – there’s a whole area of law called “conflict of laws” about how any one jurisdiction will or won’t recognise the laws of another jurisdiction. As between states in a federation it’s usually governed in part by “full faith and credit” provisions in the federal constitution. There’s nothing unusual about a state in a federation having to determine how (if at all) it recognises rights and obligations created under laws elsewhere in the federation that don’t have a counterpart in that state.
    I’m not saying there’s a nice simple one line answer about gay “marriage”, but if there’s a federation at all interstate “conflict of laws” issues are just a day to day part of life. (And even where marriage is a nationally based system like here in Australia, cross-border issues like that arise all the time, e.g. how does Australia deal with legal issues arising in relation to polygamous marriages allowed in some foreign countries, or marriages that would be forbidden under our consanguinity rules, etc.)
    If the Court finds that a constitutional right to gay “marriage” doesn’t exist – which very clearly it doesn’t* – it would be wrong of the Court to continue to force it on every state on the assumption that state legislatures shouldn’t be allowed to decide how to deal with the issue.

    * Read the majority decisions in Obergefell. Anyone of intelligence, even with no legal training at all, ought to be able to see what utterly bogus drivel they are.
    Consider also – the abolition of slavery required an amendment to the Constitution, but Obergefell says gay “marriage” was a right all along. So if Obergefell is right, before the Civil War a gay slave wasn’t entitled to be free, but was (if he had only known) entitled to a gay wedding.


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  32. 2 dead, 14 injured in mass shooting at gay club in Norway

    Gaybar shooter known to the Norwegian Police Security Service.

    But it is such a safe country!

    Norway Is The Best Place In The World For Women To Live (Afghanistan Not So Much) (24 Jun)

    Norway has topped the list as the best place for women to live, followed by Finland, Iceland and Denmark, according to the latest report by the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security.

    The UK follows in 9th place out of the ranked 170 countries, with the U.S. in 21st position.

    At the other end of the spectrum, Afghanistan ranks in last place on the global index.

    One wonders, then, why they seem to want to turn Norway into Afghanistan. Maybe someone could ask the denizens of the no go zones in Oslo about this.


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  33. It’s not that simple.

    I think it is.

    The “marriage” is annulled. What the people involved do from there is up to them. But whatever they do, they’re not married.


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  34. Well actually there is from a legal perspective, Delta. The law of the land recognizes gay marriage and people acted on that.

    How does that not apply to all the businesses that established abortion practices in this or that state? As Delta said, you could treat them as civil partnerships or via some other legal instrument, but I’m not sure we should ignore the absurdity involved simply because some people may find it difficult.


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  35. The “marriage” is annulled. What the people involved do from there is up to them. But whatever they do, they’re not married.

    Void ab initio.

    There are legal precedents for determining the legal status of children, property, etc. justly.


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  36. Elbow to visit Ukrainian!

    His staffer responsible for digital media probably wants to spice up the prime ministerial instagram account. Shame if he got shot in the arse.


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  37. Void ab initio.

    There are legal precedents for determining the legal status of children, property, etc. justly.

    I think this is right. Most issues can be dealt with existing law. People are likely to have separate or joint assets and/ bank accounts so voiding the marriage shouldn’t matter. Could be a problem for those on a visa, but you could just transfer them to another type for the term of the existing visa. And so on.


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  38. Daily Mail

    Jason Roberts was 21 when he was jailed over the cold-blooded slaying of two cops in 1998. Twenty years later he could soon be a free man after epic retrial heard crucial police evidence was omitted in the case

    Jason Roberts was ordered a re-trial over two alleged murders in 1998
    He was jailed for shooting dead Sgt Gary Silk and Snr Constable Rodney Miller
    Roberts was convicted in 2003 but has been on trial for a second time
    Bandali Debs, who was found guilty of the murders, has given evidence in trial
    Roberts also took to the witness box to deny any role in the double murders
    Former homicide squad detective cast doubt on statements that led to his arrest



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  39. WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES: Shocking photos show men with ARROWS pierced through their arms and legs after 20 crossbows were ‘stolen’ and used in a fight in troubled Indigenous comm

    pssh …. a decent crossbow will go all the way through a deer, these are all pretty low energy hits


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  40. pssh …. a decent crossbow will go all the way through a deer, these are all pretty low energy hits

    Yes, they’re longbow arrows, not crossbow bolts.


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  41. Bruce in WAsays:
    June 25, 2022 at 8:47 pm
    pssh …. a decent crossbow will go all the way through a deer, these are all pretty low energy hits

    Yes, they’re longbow arrows, not crossbow bolts.

    Still look to be pretty low energy hits.


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  42. Yes, they’re longbow arrows, not crossbow bolts.

    Still cultural appropriation, the indigenous had neither longbows or crossbows.


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  43. Still look to be pretty low energy hits.

    Yes, absolutely. That broadhead through the outside of the knee should have zipped straight through. I have a few of those; you can literally shave with them.


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  44. Still cultural appropriation, the indigenous had neither longbows or crossbows.

    ZK2A! I’m shocked at you! That’s Indigenous, with a capital I!


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  45. Knuckle Draggersays:
    June 25, 2022 at 12:03 am
    Third Test. Pomland.

    NZ made 329, easy peasy Japanesey.

    The Poms are 6/55. Glorious.

    Day 3 now and England lead by a couple of runs. Remarkable batting from England. Glorious.


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  46. Remarkable batting from England. Glorious.

    Yes it is. Bairstow on 160+ reds so far and Broad on the other end of the long handle.


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  47. ZK2A! I’m shocked at you! That’s Indigenous, with a capital I!

    I habitually refer to the Indigenous, using titles that may be less then respectful – fortunately, I have yet to encounter any that speak Afrikaans.


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  48. On This Day:

    1876 – Battle of the Little Bighorn and the death of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer

    An insurrection against Big Government, whose leader’s words – ‘Where did all these fucking Indians come from?’ – later became the global 7/11 mission statement.


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  49. ‘Where did all these fucking Indians come from?’

    It’s probably about then that Custer wished he hadn’t left the Gatling Guns behind..


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  50. ‘Where did all these fucking Indians come from?’ 

    And then exclaimed, “We are in trouble, Tonto!”
    To which Tonto replied, “What’s this ‘we’, paleface?”


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  51. Anyway, “Sliante.”

    Mme Zulu is out of hospital, and convalescing at home. Painfully thin, but the medico says that its not unusual for those who have had similar treatment to be “on liquids” for anywhere up to six or seven weeks…


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  52. 1876 – Battle of the Little Bighorn and the death of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer

    We visited the Little Big Horn site. Custer and his troops never stood a chance; it’s a plain windswept hill with no cover whatsoever. So much so that the troops shot their horses to try to hide behind them.

    There’s a life-size pony soldier model in the museum … God, they were little! Most of them just mid-5 footers and very very slight build.


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  53. We visited the Little Big Horn site

    Little Big Horn and several Civil War battlefields were on the bucket list – Madame Zulu allows me my pastime of walking over old battlefields. Isandlewana, Arnhem and the Somme were three of the most evocative.


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  54. The Russians are shelling Kiev according to this report, sound like it was a tit-for-tat reprisal for Ukrainian shelling of civilians in Donetsk.

    Very much doubt it. RUS are not in artillery range of Kiev. Also, the claim the Belarus destroyed two Polish Battalions that entered Ukraine I haven’t seen anywhere and that would be a huge story.


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  55. ‘Goat of Kyiv’ triggers Russian boobytrap and injures 40 soldiers:

    At least 40 Russian soldiers have been injured after a Ukrainian goat set off a boobytrap they were laying around a hospital in Zaporizhzhia with its “chaotic movements”.

    The troops were setting up a tripwire when an escaped goat from a farm in the village of Kinski Rozdory triggered it.

    They had pinned grenades around the edge of a local hospital and placed the trap as a “circular defence”, Ukraine’s Chief Intelligence Directorate said.

    Ha! I bet you this was right after the tried to sacrifice the goat to Mammon.
    Unbelievable to think this was published, but by all accounts, the UK is prepared to believe anything they’re told about this war by the media.


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  56. Zyclonocast 3pm. It has been said that the Maori are not the indigenous people of NZ they are arrivals to the land of the long white cloud as there have been others.


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  57. The Maori have been there since they invaded around 1400 AD.
    They dispossessed the Moriori, and the remnant sailed to the Auckland Islands Group.
    The Maori didn’t find them until 1836, when they continued to murder, rape and enslave the Moriori.
    The Moriori were not Polynesians.


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  58. She was a pretty good sort back in 1956 when Senator Jack Kennedy was riding her hard.
    But, yeah, her family were Baltimore Gangsters for Generations,
    her older brother was the only one of 14 not convicted for an horrific Pack Rape in the 1950s.


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  59. Congress has been bought by the Finance and Real Estate interests.
    So long as they stay bought, they’ve got a job forever.

    Abortion Laws, Gun Rights, BLM, Antifa, it’s just Bread & Circuses for the Masses, to take their attention away from reality.

    The reality that they’re being robbed to finance the Bank/Real Estate Free Lunch.


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    2
  60. NY Times has a decent column on the CIA’s increasingly overt presence in Ukraine.
    It reminds me of when they ran a small column on an alleged NSA data collection program at the end of the George W Bush years.
    They then referred to that small one-off column non stop when the Snowden story broke years later as them originally breaking the story.


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  61. Don’t worry Ed, they’ve fixed there error with respect to the Moriori. Can’t have any of the recent lot painted as brutal invaders.

    During the late 19th century some prominent anthropologists mistakenly proposed that Moriori were pre-M?ori settlers of mainland New Zealand, and possibly Melanesian in origin.


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  62. It’s extraordinary that the USA has become so like its former nemesis the USSR. Imprisoned political dissenters, geriatric corruptocrats and all


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  63. Knuckle Draggersays:
    June 25, 2022 at 9:35 pm
    On This Day:

    1876 – Battle of the Little Bighorn and the death of Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer

    What did Colonel Custer and Saddam Hussein have in common? They both wondered where the hell all those Tomahawks were coming from.


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    5
  64. During the late 19th century some prominent anthropologists mistakenly proposed that Moriori were pre-Maori settlers of mainland New Zealand, and possibly Melanesian in origin.

    The Moriori did predate the Maori invasion, but they weren’t Melanesian racially, having white skin, red hair, a gigantic stature and democratic decision making.
    I’ve been told that there are still a few [mixed Race] Moriori in the South Island.


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    1
  65. Apart from the Fox universe, there is a media blackout on the Arizona statehouse riots.

    To get around the Google censorship, apart from using Duck Duck Go, it helps to know the name of the local newspapers, like Phoenix’s The Western Journal:

    In events reminiscent of the Jan. 6 incursion at the national Capitol, pro-abortion protesters tried to break into the Arizona state Senate in Phoenix Friday night while the legislature was still in session.

    The protest took an aggressive tone at about 8:45 p.m., when protesters began banging on the windows of the Arizona Senate and trying to break the glass, according to the Arizona Department of Public Safety.
    Republican Sen. Kelly Townsend called the incident a “hostage” situation.
    “We are currently there being held hostage inside the Senate building due to members of the public trying to breach our security,” Townsend tweeted Friday night. “We smell tear gas and the children of one of the members are in the office sobbing with fear.”
    “Appalling to hear some Democrats defending those outside trying to break the glass and breach security,” she also wrote.



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  66. Rick if you are using the murray pine for yourself I’d cut it thicker for floor boards. I’ve got it in my coast house and it scratches easily. I sanded and refinished it only to have wife move furniture without lifting. Grrrr. Mate ran off weatherboards, really looked good. Took a lot linseed for the first 2 years.


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  67. True and the geriatric corruptocrats have an army of rabble, vandals, street fighters and thugs they appear to be able to mobilize very quickly.


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  68. Republican Sen. Kelly Townsend called the incident a “hostage” situation.

    She’s good.

    Senator Kelly Townsend ??@AZKellyT
    We are currently there being held hostage inside the Senate building due to members of the public trying to breach our security. We smell teargas and the children of one of the members are in the office sobbing with fear. I expect a J24 committee to be created immediately.
    1:56 PM · Jun 25, 2022

    Any comment from AOC or Lou Correa yet..?


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    4
  69. Sudden Adult [Vaccine] Death Syndrome: Excess Deaths in Australia are up 18% since the start of 2022 but only 6% of all deaths have been attributed to COVID-19

    The other day I saw a vaguely familiar middle-aged woman in a coffee shop. Not an acquaintance but someone I had seen around multiple times. She looked like death warmed over. Almost bemused looking, moving stiffly and awkwardly with a rather dazed appearance. Guess the first thought in my mind? Nothing scientific about this and obviously I don’t have any direct knowledge but, unfortunately, all too often it’s the correct conclusion.


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  70. H/T Bio Clandestine telegram

    People have been reaching out to me about the video of Putin being rushed to The Kremlin. Press Secretary Dmitry Peskov just publicly refuted the claims that Putin would be giving some sort of emergency speech, but did not refute that he was in fact rushed to The Kremlin.

    Over the past couple of days, Russia has been dealing with an escalating situation with Lithuania, over a railroad blockade of food supply from Kaliningrad to Russian ally Belarus, via the Suwalki Corridor.

    The US are publicly backing Lithuania, and NATO countries are supplying troops all along the Russian border in Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Poland. Over the past couple days, Russia has warned repeatedly that if the blockade is not removed, they will have to resort to “non-diplomatic solutions”.

    So is something going on in Russia? Absolutely, and we all should be paying attention. One false step, and this proxy war could turn into something else entirely.

    -Clandestine


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  71. Pfizer CEO calls for annual COVID vaccine to achieve greater ‘compliance’

    ???

    COVID was detected in samples of sewage in Spain from 2019. Being endemic for this long, there is no need for any further public health initiatives.

    Why does anyone listen to the Pfizer CEO?

    He has less credibility than Theranos or Clive Palmer’s nephew.


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  72. Hypocrisy is Trudeau’s stock in trade.

    Hilarious how the media like to portray Trump as privileged. They literally enable Trudeau’s misguided authoritarianism.


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  73. Jab jab booster……………………

    Just to be crystal clear on this point, as I said on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on January 23, 2022;

    “Regarding the genetic COVID vaccines, the science is settled.

    They are not working, and they are not completely safe.

    Now we have Omicron. These vaccines were designed for the Original Wuhan strain, a different virus. Whether they made sense for protecting our elderly and frail from the original virus is irrelevant. So let’s stop arguing about that. We must look forward.

    These vaccines do not prevent Omicron infection, viral replication, or spread to others. In our daily lives, with our friends, with our families, we all know that this is true.

    These genetic vaccines are leaky, have poor durability, and even if every man, woman, and child in the United States were vaccinated, these products cannot achieve herd immunity and stop COVID. They are not completely safe, and the full nature of the risks remain unknown.”

    https://rwmalonemd.substack.com/p/immune-imprinting-comirnaty-and-omicron?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email


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  74. In a just world he’d be behind bars, not telling us what to do.

    Swinging from a rope would be just. I’d pull the handle on the trapdoor, if I was feeling merciful that day, otherwise it’s “hoist him up boys!”


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  75. Vicki, from yesterday:
    Some advice would be appreciated. Re internet and Optus mucking about with your email…
    We are also considered remote, but are a similar distance from Sydney and Canberra as you are from Sydney.

    Check out Starlink. We have it and so far is nothing short of brilliant. The dish will cost around $800, then it is $139 per month for unlimited data. Data speeds of over 100 megabit per second.


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  76. Bruce of Newcastle says:
    June 26, 2022 at 8:52 am
    Fun how the journo quoted her whole tweet except for that last sentence…
    I saw it yesterday somewhere, it was very funny.

    It was a selective Titus’ing, fester. I’m surprised as you know the drill.


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  77. The Court Finally Rectifies a Hideous Legal Blunder Matt Purple, The Spectator

    Set aside your opinions about abortion for a moment. Throw down the fluttering placards about “THE PRO-LIFE GENERATION” and “KEEP ABORTION LEGAL”; avert your eyes from the demonstrators praying outside Planned Parenthood. And ask yourself this: was Roe v. Wade good law? Was it sound that a “right to privacy” was conjured out of pseudo-constitutional dust and then used to overturn abortion laws in all fifty states?


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  78. BNN Newsroom
    @BNNBreaking
    ·
    4h
    BREAKING: The Pentagon has stated that any abortion laws enacted as a result of the Supreme Court’s decision will not be recognized.

    As I said in yesterday’s post, Lincoln was right. There is no half-way house on these issues, one or the other side will win.


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  79. Are Dems Crushing the Poor & Middle Class on Purpose? Roger Kimball, Spectator

    Taking a page from Lenin’s playbook

    It’s like Biden wants us to be poor

    I have often been struck by the number of pithy observations — revelatory, pointed or simply true — that were not said by the person to whom they are attributed. Vladimir Lenin apparently never said (in Russian or in English) that “the way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation.”

    This was an insight that Lenin thoroughly grasped. It stands behind his chilling observation that “communism means keeping track of everything.” (Another attribution, true, but if he didn’t say exactly that, he assuredly meant it.) Imagine if Lenin had had the surveillance tools provided by Google, Facebook and other social media. His agenda of dependency would have proceeded even further than it did.

    As it happens, we do not need to imagine such a contingency. We have our very own made-in-America variety present and accounted for. Over the course of a few months, we have gone from a situation where all the beautiful people running our lives were telling us that inflation was merely “transitory,” that it was a “high-class problem” because it meant that more people were buying things (yes, Jen Psaki actually said that), to screaming headlines that inflation is out of control, that it is the worst in forty years, that it is tanking the economy.

    The real question is whether Biden — or whoever is pulling his strings — is deliberately taking a page from Lenin’s playbook or (is this more or less frightening?) whether it is simply the supreme incompetence of his entire administration.

    I do not know the answer. But here’s a thought experiment. Ask yourself what Biden and his minders would have done differently had they actually intended to impoverish the American citizenry.


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  80. Here’s how to do renewables, but the fixed cost of new homes would increase.

    A home system, integrated sub systems:

    Solar UV which can run in overcast conditions.
    Heat exchanger with in ground well/heat sink.
    A Rankine cycle heat rejection turbine.
    Paper, human waste and vegetables matter fermentation to produce basic organic fuels such as ethanol and acetone.
    A primary fuel turbine for heat and direct electricity.
    A gas (air) compression system as charged “fuel”.
    A catalytic/cracker system to convert fuels into other fuels (like propane).
    Batteries, inverter etc.
    Wood furnace.
    Solid fuel pelletiser.
    A sulfur/iodine exchange cycle system to make fuels from air and water.
    Automation and mechanical systems.

    I would expect 100k – 150k in costs. The safety, reliability and redundancy of the system would have to be world class and could possibly cost another $100k.

    A friend nearly went off grid and was up for about $45k.

    A 900 m shared electrical supply cable was marginally cheaper, including the cost of poles and construction.


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  81. Some advice would be appreciated. Re internet and Optus mucking about with your email…

    I read the stuff yesterday (didn’t really understand it) and I’m guessing it’s a silly question but why would any provider mess about with someone’s emails ..


    Report comment

  82. Rabzsays:

    June 26, 2022 at 9:51 am

    Dim Smith on Outsiders desperately trying to differentiate himself from Groundhog Guy

    To what end?
    Smith is quitting Parliament after getting pissed and crashing his car.


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  83. These journos are on a dangerous course. If they always say Islamic jihadis are mentally ill the public might get a certain unintended impression about such things. Wouldn’t want that would we?

    These days “mental issues” seem to be the catch-all media cover for lotza problems .. reading most stories involving CENTRELINK/welfare issues and 9 times out of 10 you get the “victim” is suffering some sort of “mental” issue ……


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    2
  84. Distinguished Professor: “Fed Up” With “Religious Climate Claptrap”…”Green Energy Fantasies”

    Prof. Dr. Knut Löschke, (photo above) Member of the University Council at the University of Leipzig, Member of the Board of Trustees of the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, came out and stated at Facebook not so long ago:

    I’m fed up, or to put it even more clearly: I’m fed up with the permanent and increasingly religious climate claptrap, green energy fantasies, electric car worship, scary stories about doomsday scenarios from corona to conflagrations to weather catastrophes. I can no longer stand the people who shout this into microphones and cameras every day or print it in newspapers. I suffer from having to witness how natural science is turned into a whore of politics.

    I am tired of being told what to be ashamed of by abused, pubescent children. I am tired of being told by some deranged people that I am to blame for everything and everyone – but especially as a German for the past, present and future misery of the whole world.”


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  85. Dotsays:
    June 26, 2022 at 9:51 am

    Used to work with a lady who had a rural property and did same. The inflated cost of the power poles & wires the power provider wanted to connect to the grid was eye watering. She checked out solar and deep cycle batteries. The later was cheaper by far.


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  86. Just got my electrickery bill for the Autumn quarter – $11 more than the previous bill.

    Be interesting to compare it to the upcoming winter quarter bill, given recent events.


    Report comment

  87. Pancho – I thought Dim had decided to try and resurrect his DOA political career* given Groundhog Guy’s recent ascension to the leadership?

    Funnily enough, I have no idea who was the leader of the Victorian Gliberals prior to Groundhog Guy.

    *Following that regrettable vehicular contretemps with a suburban house fence.


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  88. The Causes and Consequences of the Ukraine Crisis

    The war in Ukraine is a multi-dimensional disaster, which is likely to get much worse in the foreseeable future.

    The war in Ukraine is a multi-dimensional disaster, which is likely to get much worse in the foreseeable future. When a war is successful, little attention is paid to its causes, but when the outcome is disastrous, understanding how it happened becomes paramount. People want to know: how did we get into this terrible situation?

    I have witnessed this phenomenon twice in my lifetime—first with the Vietnam war and second with the Iraq war. In both cases, Americans wanted to know how their country could have miscalculated so badly. Given that the United States and its NATO allies played a crucial role in the events that led to the Ukraine war—and are now playing a central role in the conduct of that war—it is appropriate to evaluate the West’s responsibility for this calamity.

    I will make two main arguments today.

    First,

    the United States is principally responsible for causing the Ukraine crisis. This is not to deny that Putin started the war and that he is responsible for Russia’s conduct of the war. Nor is it to deny that America’s allies bear some responsibility, but they largely follow Washington’s lead on Ukraine. My central claim is that the United States has pushed forward policies toward Ukraine that Putin and other Russian leaders see as an existential threat, a point they have made repeatedly for many years. Specifically, I am talking about America’s obsession with bringing Ukraine into NATO and making it a Western bulwark on Russia’s border. The Biden administration was unwilling to eliminate that threat through diplomacy and indeed in 2021 recommitted the United States to bringing Ukraine into NATO. Putin responded by invading Ukraine on February 24th of this year.

    Second,

    the Biden administration has reacted to the outbreak of war by doubling down against Russia. Washington and its Western allies are committed to decisively defeating Russia in Ukraine and employing comprehensive sanctions to greatly weaken Russian power. The United States is not seriously interested in finding a diplomatic solution to the war, which means the war is likely to drag on for months if not years. In the process, Ukraine, which has already suffered grievously, is going to experience even greater harm. In essence, the United States is helping lead Ukraine down the primrose path. Furthermore, there is a danger that the war will escalate, as NATO might get dragged into the fighting and nuclear weapons might be used. We are living in perilous times.

    Let me now lay out my argument in greater detail, starting with a description of the conventional wisdom about the causes of the Ukraine conflict.


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    3
  89. The real question is whether Biden — or whoever is pulling his strings — is deliberately taking a page from Lenin’s playbook or (is this more or less frightening?) whether it is simply the supreme incompetence of his entire administration.

    I do not know the answer. But here’s a thought experiment. Ask yourself what Biden and his minders would have done differently had they actually intended to impoverish the American citizenry.

    Biden and his minders (The Deep State) would have probably not done anything differently, just added more stuff in order to wreck the Market Economy and restrict Freedoms.

    The thing is, is that this ‘Build Back Better’ thing will not work out the way that they have intended. There is now ongoing ‘Push Back’ and the mid term Elections will most likely not go the Dumb Dumb Dems way.

    That should change things a bit, however, even if the the Republicans get more Gov’ment control, the US Public could not completely rely on them to undo the damage now being caused. Individual US States such as Florida are trying their best to ‘Push Back’ though.

    It’s People Power that’s what is needed and this will likely lead to the break up of the USA with certain US States who are more Market Economy and Freedom thinking aligning themselves against the lunatic ‘Build Back Better’ US States.

    People are voting with their feet and migrating from the lunatic left leaning US States to the more ‘Market Economy’/Freedom US States. All IMHO.


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  90. Old Ozzie, this last bit has a ring of truth to it.

    I am tired of being told what to be ashamed of by abused, pubescent children. I am tired of being told by some deranged people that I am to blame for everything and everyone – but especially as a German for the past, present and future misery of the whole world.”

    Along with the Swedes, the Germans are responsible for the genesis of the gerbil warming hysteria and of course let’s not mention how many wars those fuckers started.


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    3
  91. I’m fed up, or to put it even more clearly: I’m fed up with the permanent and increasingly religious climate claptrap, green energy fantasies, electric car worship, scary stories about doomsday scenarios from corona to conflagrations to weather catastrophes. I can no longer stand the people who shout this into microphones and cameras every day or print it in newspapers. I suffer from having to witness how natural science is turned into a whore of politics.
    I am tired of being told what to be ashamed of by abused, pubescent children. I am tired of being told by some deranged people that I am to blame for everything and everyone

    Yes, it is becoming rather tiresome.


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    13
  92. I do not know the answer. But here’s a thought experiment. Ask yourself what Biden and his minders would have done differently had they actually intended to impoverish the American citizenry.

    Why blame ol’ slack Joe?
    The problem goes back to the Reagan years when the Supreme Court recognised Corporations as having the same Rights as Citizens.

    Basically, they’ve increased the money supply by x 4, yet none of that money ended up on Main Street.
    It ended up with The Banks, who lent it out to bid up asset prices to astronomical levels.
    Same has happened in Australia.
    You may have noticed?


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  93. The Pentagon has stated that any abortion laws enacted as a result of the Supreme Court’s decision will not be recognized.

    LOL. The Pentagon is always breaking the law. Usually by invading other Countries without that Country’s permission.


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  94. dover0beach says:
    June 26, 2022 at 9:40 am

    BNN Newsroom
    @BNNBreaking
    ·
    4h
    BREAKING: The Pentagon has stated that any abortion laws enacted as a result of the Supreme Court’s decision will not be recognized.

    As I said in yesterday’s post, Lincoln was right. There is no half-way house on these issues, one or the other side will win.

    The Pentagon is a federal institution and the feds don’t follow state law. It’s no biggie and it doesn’t change a thing in terms of the states getting control of the abortion issues.


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  95. Histrionic narcissists

    A man can fail many times, but xe isn’t a failure until xe begins to blame somebody else

    — apologies to John Burroughs


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  96. The Green Party in Germany is backing continuing War in Ukraine, so they can’t be too serious about cutting emissions.
    They’ve also fired up Germany’s brown coal power houses, at the moment supplying 72% of Germany’s Electricity [Nuclear 15%] though RMIT and the ABC dispute those figures.


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  97. Dutch power grid can’t handle influx of electric car charging points

    By 2025, there will be some 3,000 neighborhoods in the Netherlands where no new electric car charging points can be installed, knowledge center ElaadNL said to BNR. The growing demand for electric vehicles and accompanying charging stations is quickly overloading the power grid, grid operators confirmed to the broadcaster.

    According to Rutger Croon of ElaanNL, the power grid in some 3,000 neighborhoods won’t have room for more charging stations within the next three years. Unless smart charging – when vehicles connect digitally to the grid and only charge when less power is used, like at night – is the only option.

    Grid operator Stedin also told BNR that the government must invest heavily in the rollout of smart charging “otherwise the grid will be too crowded.” The other option is to upgrade the power grid. “But that costs a lot of money and is a social choice. So we’d rather not do that.”

    According to ElaadNL, there will be almost 5 million charging points in the Netherlands by 2050.


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    1
  98. The Pentagon is a federal institution and the feds don’t follow state law. It’s no biggie and it doesn’t change a thing in terms of the states getting control of the abortion issues.

    Does it mean they would set up abortion clinics on Defence bases in “recalcitrant” states?
    And possibly set up sham enlistments to give civilians access?
    I really can’t see what they are getting at except for the normal DC swampy virtue signalling.


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  99. How similar are the trajectories of Godless societies that are by definition going insane?

    Note the historical prevalence of eunuchs in these societies, particularly those mentioned in The Old Testament.

    What do you call a male that has had their sex organs wholly or partially removed? (Forget about the supposed reason for a minute.).


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  100. The Pentagon is a federal institution and the feds don’t follow state law. It’s no biggie and it doesn’t change a thing in terms of the states getting control of the abortion issues

    🙂

    Anikin, that was satire, right?

    🙂

    Right?


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  101. Energy Minister Chris Bowen says the key to addressing long-term challenges in the electricity sector is to pump more renewables into the system.

    Battery operated Chris Bowen needs some reliable energy pumped into him. Around 30,000 volts and as many amps as possible. There. That should fix it and hopefully save the Grid.


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  102. Washington and its Western allies are committed to decisively defeating Russia in Ukraine

    Mearsheimer is very good but I think he’s wrong here.

    At some point the US will abandon Ukraine.

    “America is harmless as an enemy but treacherous as a friend.”

    – Bernard Lewis


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  103. She checked out solar and deep cycle batteries. The later was cheaper by far.

    Yep, makes sensible economic sense as long as you’re not running heavy equipment, in that case you just buy a big genset and you’ll still be ahead.


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  104. From the link upthread dealing with its ‘I wanted my cock removed but then I didn’t’ dunderhead:

    A man has said he had his sex organs removed on the NHS, before regretting it later the same day.

    A man, you say?

    The man, who tweets under the name TullipR, said he “cannot believe they were allowed to do this to me” following the procedure.

    He added that he was not warned of the outcome of the surgery, adding that he was not “asked if I wanted to freeze my sperm”. The man, who says he is gay, told his 19,000 followers on Twitter: “The minute I woke up from surgery, I knew I had made the biggest mistake of my life.”

    The. Man. Who. Says. He. Is. Gay. Uh huh.

    He continued: “I have been castrated. That is the correct term.”

    No, the correct term is either ‘self-castrated’ or ‘enthusiastically and willingly castrated’.

    The man says he transitioned aged 25, before starting to take female hormones. He then went on to undergo NHS surgery called “penile inversion with scrotal”, which removes the male genitals and uses the tissue to form a false vagina.

    The term ‘false vagina’ should be added to the lexicon in every country on Earth – as in, ‘that Irish roofer and driveway repairer is as dodgy as a false vagina’.

    After holding off on the surgery for two years, he finally agreed to having it done. He explained: “Eventually I found myself on the operating table.”

    Fuck off you ‘found yourself’ on the table. Was it an accident? You walked into your lounge room one day and ‘found yourself on the operating table’?

    “Immediately on waking up from surgery, I knew I had made the biggest mistake of my life.”

    Duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. The best bit:

    He added: “I have no sensation in my crotch region at all. You could stab me with a knife. I wouldn’t know.

    “The entire region is numb. No one ever told me that the base area of your penis is left. It can’t be removed. It means you have a stump inside which twitches.”

    Someone should have told Mr. Twitchy No-Dick that for most blokes, a cock is quite the accessory.


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  105. Search wars continue.

    Brave Search Passes 2.5 Billion Queries in First Year (25 Jun)

    Brave Search, the private, independent search engine competing with giants such as Google, has announced on its first anniversary that 2.5 billion queries have now been completed by the search engine.

    Brave recently announced that its search engine, Brave Search, has passed 2.5 billion queries completed on its one-year anniversary. Brave Search defined its goals for its search engine, writing that it wanted to be “a privacy-protecting, unbiased alternative to Google and Bing, and a truly independent alternative to providers—such as DuckDuckGo or Startpage—that rely on Big Tech to run.”

    I use it, and it’s improving, although not yet at the level of DDG*. For example the “news” tab was hopeless a few months ago but is now starting to deliver more useful results. Don Surber recommends Dogpile.com, but it seems to use cookies and requires a Captcha each time I try to use it (I get Brave browser to delete cookies on exit.)

    * Interestingly Goolag has gotten so bad and so censorious it is now worse than DDG for delivering even pretty innocuous searches.


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  106. Dutch power grid can’t handle influx of electric car charging points

    What I’d like to know is, were the decision makers warned about this but decided to go ahead anyway?


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    2
  107. The term ‘false vagina’ should be added to the lexicon in every country on Earth – as in, ‘that Irish roofer and driveway repairer is as dodgy as a false vagina’.

    Boy pussy.
    Snot pocket.
    Busted cunty boi clit.
    Post op brick house poonbro.


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    3
  108. I would expect 100k – 150k in costs. The safety, reliability and redundancy of the system would have to be world class and could possibly cost another $100k.

    Dot, I reckon the key is to having less systems. Each system adds complexity and reliability issues.

    Start with a steam boiler. This could probably easily made to run on 3 plus fuels. Wood, gas, oil, anything else that will burn.

    I reckon from there the best option is a small scale steam turbine. No uppy downy bits means that it might run for 60,000 hours no overhaul. This does introduce the possibility of running on compressed air but my understanding is that the efficiency isn’t good.

    If you want to run on compressed air efficiently then you need a reciprocating engine with a compression stroke (heats the charge to then cause expansion in the incoming cold charge). Not sure if there is an equivalent for turbines, but maybe a pre-heat chamber might work.

    From there, you use the turbine to run an AC generator into an inverter that either rectifies to DC to charge batteries or supplies your grid in AC. Managing this is complex but there are probably now off the self inverters that would do it.

    The big issue with inverters is that they generally look for an incoming grid supply, plus you need a load bank. Now a compressor(s) filling a big air receiver might be a good load bank.


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  109. “Immediately on waking up from surgery, I knew I had made the biggest mistake of my life.”

    And unlike a bad haircut, you can’t console yurself with the thought that it’ll soon grow back.

    Congratulations, you have become a human object lesson.


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  110. Knuckle Draggersays:
    June 26, 2022 at 10:41 am
    From the link upthread dealing with its ‘I wanted my cock removed but then I didn’t’ dunderhead:

    A man has said he had his sex organs removed on the NHS, before regretting it later the same day.

    A man, you say?

    What about his uterus, did the surgeon take that out two. Does the freak get it put back on now? Wonder if plays on the motorway at night. No more golden rivet for him. It is better to receive than give.


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    2
  111. Guessing this isn’t dominating Oz sporting headlines this morning .. LOL!
    The Matildas were left reeling early Sunday morning, after suffering a jaw-dropping seven-nil loss in their game against Spain.


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  112. A man has said he had his sex organs removed on the NHS, before regretting it later the same day.

    we can turn his scrotum into a nice little coin purse…


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    3
  113. Washington and its Western allies are committed to decisively defeating Russia in Ukraine

    Lavrov is quoted as saying a couple of days ago that Europe is building a war coalition. Are euroweenies all insane?


    Report comment

  114. It’s no biggie and it doesn’t change a thing in terms of the states getting control of the abortion issues.

    If people avoid state controls either by arguing that federal employees are not bound by state laws, by private employers financing out-of-state trips to procure an abortion that would contradict state laws, then this purported middle way will collapse.


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  115. In a just world he’d be behind bars, not telling us what to do.

    In a Mexican or Turkish gaol.
    Sharing a cell with someone called “Bubba”.


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  116. Russian gas imports to Europe (all pipelines) falls to 136mcm/d.
    Less than a third of what it was in Feb.
    Part hot weather.
    Part Russia squeezing the Germans.


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  117. Btw the Brave Search claim of being an “unbiased alternative” isn’t exactly correct.

    If you try something like ‘climate change site:realclimatescience.com’ you will get zero hits. Which means Tony Heller’s blog is being hard blocked. But if you search ‘real climate science tony heller’ you will get his main page and his About page as the top two hits…followed by a swag of the usual climate propaganda and hit pieces from desmog and SkS.

    By contrast if you search DDG and Bing with ‘real climate science tony heller’ his site doesn’t appear at all. Zilch, zip, except the propaganda rubbish.

    On Goolag though it does what Brave Search does, those same top two hits then the rubbish. So it looks like Brave Search is using Goolag, but then is trying to get around all the Goolag censorship. Unfortunately both Bing and Goolag hard block any routine results** from Tony Heller’s blog, so keep it in mind that you aren’t ever going to see any general search results that Goolag and Bing both dislike.

    The underlying problem is that big security platforms like Cloudflare refuse web crawlers from anyone other than Bing and Goolag. So no start-up search engine can ever directly categorize the web, they have to go through one or other of the big guys.

    ** If you Goolag search ‘climate change site:realclimatescience.com’ it does work, you get actual hits from his blog. So there’s a general search block of some sort, but not a specific block. Microtheft however completely hard blocks anything from Tony Heller on Bing.


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  118. The Causes and Consequences of the Ukraine Crisis

    The war in Ukraine is a multi-dimensional disaster, which is likely to get much worse in the foreseeable future.

    Conclusion

    Simply put, the ongoing conflict in Ukraine is a colossal disaster, which as I noted at the start of my talk, will lead people all around the world to search for its causes. Those who believe in facts and logic will quickly discover that the United States and its allies are mainly responsible for this train wreck. The April 2008 decision to bring Ukraine and Georgia into NATO was destined to lead to conflict with Russia. The Bush administration was the principal architect of that fateful choice, but the Obama, Trump, and Biden administrations have doubled down on that policy at every turn and America’s allies have dutifully followed Washington’s lead. Even though Russian leaders made it perfectly clear that bringing Ukraine into NATO would be crossing “the brightest of red lines,” the United States refused to accommodate Russia’s deepest security concerns and instead moved relentlessly to make Ukraine a Western bulwark on Russia’s border.

    The tragic truth is that if the West had not pursued NATO expansion into Ukraine, it is unlikely there would be a war in Ukraine today and Crimea would still be part of Ukraine. In essence, Washington played the central role in leading Ukraine down the path to destruction. History will judge the United States and its allies harshly for their remarkably foolish policy on Ukraine. Thank you.

    John J. Mearsheimer is the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. His many books include The Great Delusion: Liberal Dreams and International Realities and The Tragedy of Great Power Politics.


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  119. Does it mean they would set up abortion clinics on Defence bases in “recalcitrant” states?
    And possibly set up sham enlistments to give civilians access?
    I really can’t see what they are getting at except for the normal DC swampy virtue signalling.

    I think it will mean what some of the large firms are saying they will do. If a marine, navy seal or green beret gets “theyself” pregnant the Pentagon will afford them the cost of travel to get a hoovering.

    They could have hoovering clinics on base, but I doubt it.


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  120. These idiots have form wrt insane war mongering.

    Hiram Maxim turned up to a European trade fair with a vast array of new electrical appliances. Which were received with indifference.

    Maxim concluded that the only thing that really interested Europeans was new and more efficient ways of killing each other.

    He obliged them with The Maxim Machine Gun. The European’s received it with excitement and ultimately used it to scythe through an entire generation.


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  121. the cost of a full blown off grid
    triple it

    then add a live-in maintenance guy.

    I reckon the most feasible thing at the moment if you’re not able to do it all yourself is one of those bigger LPG powered gensets, a good sized lpg tank and a good sized solar inverter with battery bank.


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  122. If people avoid state controls either by arguing that federal employees are not bound by state laws, by private employers financing out-of-state trips to procure an abortion that would contradict state laws, then this purported middle way will collapse.

    Dover, be very clear headed about this. The SCOTUS offered zero opinion on abortion except to say that there’s nothing in the constitution that determines a right to an abortion. Therefore, the Feds and the states can organize themselves any way they want with respect to abortion. And yes, the Feds and big firms can offer hoovering holidays to whomever they want.

    SCOTUS simply struck down a bad finding, but didn’t negate abortion. Let’s say Wade never happened. There is no way the blue states wouldn’t have hoovering clinics.

    Also, the SCOTUS would also strike down any federal laws that tried to force the states to allow or even ban abortion. Hoovering is now a state issue.


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  123. rickw says:
    June 26, 2022 at 10:38 am

    BWAHAHAHAHABWHA,

    https://www.gbnews.uk/news/man-says-he-had-sex-organs-removed-on-nhs-then-regretted-it-the-same-day/324446

    Hey eunuch, how are they hanging?

    Have to disagree with comments like this.

    The NHS has no business enabling mentally ill people to self-mutilate at public expense.

    Guy is obviously a flake of the first order, unstable. If he had asked them to cut off his leg (yes, this is a thing) would they have done that as well?

    Hopefully some massive lawsuits in the next few years will deter surgeons and hospitals from acceding to requests for mutilation.


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  124. Thanks Rick and matrix.

    It certainly is very interesting.

    Anyway, on a more serious note, is Adam Sandler’s The Waterboy the source of the often used REEEEEEEEE! epitaph to an online triggering?

    I get triggered easily. It is because of my huge medulla oblongata.


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  125. If he had asked them to cut off his leg (yes, this is a thing) would they have done that as well?

    There is a stumpy prostitute in the awful Cradle of Filth* “movie”**.

    *A British black metal band.
    ** Not even funny on grounds of being ironically bad.


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  126. Are euroweenies all insane?

    I don’t think so. England, as in the south of the island is pretty level headed. The Dutch are pretty decent. There’s lots and lots of sanity pockets in a mostly insane continent.


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  127. It’s really funny when you think about it. Europe going insane twice in the last century caused so much grief to the world and these fuckers are lecturing the world on behavior. It’s hysterical.


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  128. Does anyone have any insight in this observation? Roaming around the web, looking for D’rat insanity, I’m finding that least attractive women (read really fucking pig ugly) are making the most noise about abortion. It’s like, they have zero awareness that there would be almost zero chance they would end up getting pregnant. 🙂 Is my observation off on this?


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  129. Also, the SCOTUS would also strike down any federal laws that tried to force the states to allow or even ban abortion. Hoovering is now a state issue.

    Depends on who is on the court. The 14th amendment argument is a good one.

    Neither side thinks this is or could be the end of the issue. No one opposed to abortion is satisfied with a regime where it is available in any state, or where private employers or the federal government, or an NGO fund an out-of-state trip to so they can kill their child in utero. It can only end with the entire country one way or the other. Just like the issue of slavery. There is simply no half-way house.


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  130. There is simply no half-way house.

    Well actually there is. There is no risk of being punished if as sheila gets into her car and goes across state lines to get a hoovering. Unlike slavery, if you were caught you were deadsky or beaten up to an inch of your life.

    You’re going to hear lots and lots of bawling now about road trips and other assorted hoovering travel.


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  131. Well well well, just going through some Blogs more localised to NQ affairs and caught this snippet. Wagners won the contract to build a boardwalk along the Ross Creek in Townsville, as usual the cost is inflated and the State Government is involved. These guys seem to have their fingers in every pie at the moment…

    5m wide and 280m long. $6.2mil. Nearly$4,500 per square metre, nice little earner.


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  132. Also, the SCOTUS would also strike down any federal laws that tried to force the states to allow or even ban abortion. Hoovering is now a state issue.

    Hahahaha, if you think the current SCOTUS is going to be constrained by logic or precedent, you’re a fool.


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  133. Wagners won the contract to build a boardwalk along the Ross Creek in Townsville, as usual the cost is inflated and the State Government is involved. These guys seem to have their fingers in every pie at the moment…

    I wonder if they got the contract for the Coathanger flagpole on Anna’s recommendation?


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  134. Hahahaha, if you think the current SCOTUS is going to be constrained by logic or precedent, you’re a fool.

    Fatboy, If you really believe that, then you would have been against SCOTUS downing those original findings that supported slavery or Jim Crow. Are you now coming out as an obese white supremacist? This court actually did show constraint by terminating the decision of an earlier court that was truly despicable in the way it overrode the constitution. It was a terrible decision that needed to be removed.

    You don’t have to be pro-abortion to consider Wade was an abomination… like you.


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  135. Guess who penned this ABC op-ed? I’ll give you the first two sentences as a clue:

    Bob Marley said it best: a hungry man is an angry man.

    Hungry people have driven revolution. Economic strife is a harbinger of unrest.

    That’s right. sTan has had yet another of his undergraduate PPE essays published.

    I will say this for sTan, however – at least he doesn’t bring Indigenous issues into everything he writes.


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  136. JC, that wasn’t the point re slavery, and, anyway, no slave owners were beaten to an inch of their lives or charged if travelling interstate. Completely stumped how people think the women travelling interstate is akin to a slave on the run. It’s the child in utero, deprived of the full protection of the law, that is analogous to the slave. The point, however, is that abortion is still a live issue post-Dobbs, just as slavery was post-Dredd Scott. And Dobbs didn’t directly address whether abortion is only a state issue so a federal legislative or SCOTUS ban is still possible.


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  137. Hungry people have driven revolution. Economic strife is a harbinger of unrest.

    He’s not wrong though.

    A society’s stability is based on people feeling they have a stake in its perservation.

    Absent that, the state must assert its power to survive and the consent of the governed is withdrawn.

    Then all bets are off.


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  138. JC, that wasn’t the point re slavery, and, anyway, no slave owners were beaten to an inch of their lives or charged if travelling interstate.

    We’re going down a rabbit hole. It was the runaway slaves getting caught and either killed or beaten.
    You brought up the issue of slavery. It’s nothing like slavery.


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  139. It can only end with the entire country one way or the other. Just like the issue of slavery. There is simply no half-way house.

    The Founding Fathers envisaged the United States as a group of self-governing democracies which co-operated for certain specific matters – sort of like a combination of NATO and the pre-Maastricht European Community.
    Slavery presented serious problems because of the high prevalence of runaway slaves reaching the north, whereupon they had to be either allowed to stay free, or forcibly returned to slavery. That’s why Dredd Scott didn’t solve anything. As a purely practical matter it would have been unworkable either way. Either free states would be forced to trash their own laws to return the slave, or there would have been a multi-generation problem, because according to the laws of the slave states children born to slaves were themselves slaves and therefore property which could be left by will, and so there would have been a situation where someone born, raised and permanently resident in Connecticut who visited South Carolina could be enslaved because their grandfather had run away – and then which state’s laws would prevail?
    Abortion may well be morally an equivalent issue but it just doesn’t raise the same purely constitutional problems that slavery did.
    The 14th Amendment argument is plausible but suffers one major problem. The citizenship clause hinges on a “person” being “born” in the USA. The pro-life argument thus requires a Court to interpret “person” elsewhere in the 14th Amendment in a way in which it simply couldn’t be applied to the citizenship test.


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  140. The Founding Fathers envisaged the United States as a group of self-governing democracies which co-operated for certain specific matters – sort of like a combination of NATO and the pre-Maastricht European Community.

    Yes Tim, and I read there are some decisions coming out later on this year with a more commercial bent, pushing the Fed/state relationship back towards its original intent. For the next couple of years the SCOTUS could end up being the only game in town as far as far-reaching actions go.


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  141. 5m wide and 280m long. $6.2mil. Nearly $4,500 per square metre, nice little earner.

    Rockdoctor – Not too horrendous, depending on the design and the geotech issues. The Red Bluff boardwalk is 380m over water on the eastern side of Lake Macquarie. The budget for it was $2.7 million in 2010. Gives you a point of comparison anyway.

    I tend not to ride it these days since the shared path there is very busy. It’s a nice boardwalk though and the view is excellent.


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  142. Two biggies that are still awaiting decisions.

    Climate Change In West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency, the court will decide how aggressively the E.P.A. may regulate carbon emissions from power plants.

    Immigration In Biden v. Texas, the court will decide whether the Biden administration can end a Trump-era immigration program that forces asylum seekers arriving at the southwestern border to await approval in Mexico.

    The EPA one is huge I think.
    I believe there was another impacting interstate commerce and the feds, but I could be wrong.


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  143. The Napier Waller Art Prize is open to all current and former service personnel in the Australian Defence Force.

    “We are honoured to provide this opportunity for those who have served, and those still serving, to share their their stories through art. The prize encourages artistic excellence, promotes creativity and highlights the experiences and talent of our service personnel,” Australian War Memorial Director, Matt Anderson, said.

    So, a portrait of an SASR trooper in full rig, or a sailor manning a gun, or a Ronnie RAAF on a strafing run should all be contenders?

    Perhaps.

    But here’s the winner.

    The rationale?

    “The winning work is very significant because it tells the story of women and mothers in the Australian Defence Force.”



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  144. We’re going down a rabbit hole. It was the runaway slaves getting caught and either killed or beaten.
    You brought up the issue of slavery. It’s nothing like slavery.

    No runaway slave was being beaten in free state. It was the decision in Dredd Scott that permitted that to continue in slave states. And Dobbs, although welcome in denying an federal right to kill the child in utero, still allows states to permit it. The only way to stop the proverbial slave from being beaten and killed is a federal ban on abortion.


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  145. Mental health covers a lot of things from removing a woman’s top on a Bali dance floor to removing someone’s head on a London street.

    Apologies to anyone with genuine mental illness.


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  146. “The winning work is very significant because it tells the story of women and mothers in the Australian Defence Force.”

    Anybody else remember the recruiting campaign “My Army lets me have all the time I want with my children?”


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  147. JC at 11:28.
    Correct.
    All the Supreme Court has done is state the obvious – that abortion is not an issue contemplated by the Constitution. They did not say that the Constitution forbids abortion.
    Look at the obverse side of the coin. Let’s say an anti-abortion group decides to run a SCOTUS case to shut down a hoovering clinic in, say, LA which is legal under California law.
    These same judges will presumably throw the case out on the basis that the Constitution is silent on the matter and the state of California has a right to make such laws.
    Perversely, the three dissenters and Roberts would probably agree.


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