A new appreciation of our culture and heritage? I think so!

The death of Queen Elizabeth II and the beginning of the reign of King Charles III has been a revelation. Five million Australians watched the Queen’s funeral. Many more would have viewed the ongoing, multiple television station coverage of reporters on the ground everywhere it mattered over the full ten days of mourning. A Roy Morgan poll conducted after King Charles took the oath showed 60% of Australians want to retain our system of government. Once again, republican claims that we are not interested in our constitutional monarchy have been disproven.

Something more than the standard position against change, – the, “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it” argument – justifiable though that is, has occurred to us at the Queen’s passing. Something much bigger and altogether more basic. Something we thought lost in the decades since the Queen ascended the throne in 1952 and for which we have realised no republican model of government could replace. What it is, is the full majesty of our culture and heritage.

When the new King, Charles III, took his oath at Westminster Hall, in accordance with the law and the assent of the people, and with all the arcane language, traditional vestments, processions and many constitutional acts and religious ceremonies, which culminated in the Queen’s funeral service at Westminster Abbey and her procession to Windsor Castle for her interment, a thousand year history played out before us. And we were in awe because it was the nation’s history.








27 thoughts on “A new appreciation of our culture and heritage? I think so!”

  1. Caught 5 seconds of Squalid Ally on Das Projekt last night flicking channels.

    His brain queef…

    We get rid of the monarchy and instead replace Charlie de turd with an Aboriginal Elder….

    Its a shame he doesnt take calls or id have reminded him we already had king Billy Cokebottle* waiting in the wings.

    *as Aboriginal as a Pascoe.


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  2. A Roy Morgan poll conducted after King Charles took the oath showed 60% of Australians want to retain our system of government.

    60%?! A few more years of mass immigration should take care of that.


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  3. Chilla Big Ears Tampon III is an irredeemable imbecile and an infuriating inbred hypocrite who will utterly discredit and in all likelihood destroy the monarchy.

    About the best we can hope for is that his reign is short and inglorious. As for an Australian republic, there is zero chance that whatever is foisted on us will be better than our current system* – but it will inevitably be far, far worse.

    *Which is an absolute joke as it is.


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  4. I take both of your points, woolfe and Kaos55. Many problems still exist.

    In the case of the emergency powers and the pandemic controls as a whole, that all must end and the quicker the better. The problem has not been the place of the Crown, but the mendacity of the politicians and the weakness of most (all?) of the opposition parties. And public opinion to keep things going under these controls. The power lies with the people; they must want to force the change by voting out the tormentors.

    Marshall’s gone and Morrison too, and deservedly so. Even if Guy is not “much of a chop,” – there are still some good people in the Victorian Opposition who should be able to be relied on – but to end this destruction of the civil society what matters is that Andrews must be next. Then, the rest must go down like nine pins. And a RC.

    Regarding the new King, what the oaths and proclamations have shown and to which he referred in his speech at Westminster Hall, is that the weight of history will constrain him. Shown, is that he reigns because of his promise and with the people’s agreement. That’s not something to be sneered at.


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  5. Apparently the only state where republicans have a majority is Victoria.

    Perhaps they should go it alone?

    Welcome to The Democratic Socialist Republic of Danistan!


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  6. Thank you BBS for an excellent piece. You echo my thoughts and feelings exactly.

    When I heard the news of the Queen’s passing two weeks ago today, I wept and I’ve continued to cry on and off since, particularly whilst glued to Sky News all last week and up to the magnificent and majestic funeral. My last cry was seeing the pages standing outside the castle with the Queen’s two beautiful corgies.

    Why am I so upset? Well, there are many reasons but let me preface my rant here by stating that I’m no great royalist however I’m no great republican either. In 1999, when I was a lot younger I voted for a republic and was disappointed when the republic model was soundly defeated. It took a few years however by 2009, I was happy the republic referendum had been defeated and now in 2022, I am not just happy the republic was soundly defeated but given the woke times we live in, when progressives and progressivism run amok and have infiltrated and almost destroyed every institution, I’m not going to swap Chilla and Camilla for characters straight out of a Hammer House of Horror movie….we know their names, here’s a smidgen of who’d be put up for the role of “president”…Grace Tame, Marcia Langton, Kevin Rudd, Malcolm Turnbull, Rosie Batty, Peter FitzSimian, his cane toad wife, Thomas Keneally, Squalid Aly etc etc….I’ll stop there because there’s only so much my stomach can take and if I continue I’m gonna be sick. But just imagine having any one of these dubious far-left “characters” as “president”? Everyday we’d be lectured to and smeared as waaacist, Islamophobic, transphobic, misogynistic, white supremacists and all the other smears and insults the left like to throw at ordinary Australians with gay abandon.

    A few days ago Dribbler Sheridan, who I generally have no time for because of his incessant TDS, wrote a good piece in the Oz about the monarchy. He also echoed my feelings and this paragraph summed it up best…

    “I’ve been a republican all my life and voted Yes in the 1999 referendum. I am still a theoretical republican but now find myself in that paradoxical category: republicans for a constitutional monarchy. I would vote No to any republican referendum now. It’s inconceivable, in this time of peak woke madness, that any change to the Constitution could produce something as stable and good as we have now. My monarchism is entirely pragmatic.”

    Quite so Mr Sheridan.

    I’ll end by saying, God save the King, long may he reign and long may he be King of Australia.


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  7. Cassie,
    I joined Australians for Constitutional Monarchy at the beginning of the push for a republic

    I did so because Paul Keating, the PM at the time, said that if you were not a republican you were UnAustralian. I thought, “what right did any politician have to question my patriotism.”

    In the lead up to the referendum vote, of 1999, I went to a meeting conducted by the local council. Essentially, it was designed to get a “yes” vote from the floor – a way to strengthen the “winds of change” argument so prevalent at that time. But no model was being presented.

    So when it came time to vote, I said to those on the same table that I wanted to be counted as an abstention. “You can’t do that,” the table convenor said, “you have to vote, yes or no!”

    I said, “until such time as you provide full details of the model, I’m not legitimising this process; even parliament accepts abstentions.” I was counted.

    All along, everything about the republic has been either about feelz or bullying.

    Through all these years, we, monarchists, have had the right concerns about a republic but now, with the historical events of the last two weeks, we have an even more powerful factor – the remembering and rejoicing of the history and culture – the culture of the West – that gave us our freedom and prosperity.

    As you said, the rise of woke has destroyed the last remnant of a “yes” vote for a republic.

    Long ago, Thomas Keneally said that sooner or later the monarchists would die out. Now, it maybe the other way round.


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  8. All along, everything about the republic has been either about feelz or bullying.

    ABC RN AM had the National Director ( I think) of ARM on this morning.

    He simply assumed that after 1-2 years of public discussion the referendum would be successful, such was his confidence in their recently announced “hybrid” model, whereby a president is publicly elected from a shortlist puit forward by the states, which actually garnered little support even from republicans outside of the ARM who believe a popularly elected president is too much of a shift for our polity.

    Even the ABC reporter poured cold water on the notion.


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  9. A Roy Morgan poll conducted after King Charles took the oath showed 60% of Australians want to retain our system of government.

    60%?! A few more years of mass immigration should take care of that.

    And wot’ they forgot to say that many of those who voted in the Poll were Laybore Voters. Stick that in yer’ pipe Elbow and Bandana Plonker……………………….


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  10. So when it came time to vote, I said to those on the same table that I wanted to be counted as an abstention. “You can’t do that,” the table convenor said, “you have to vote, yes or no!”

    I said, “until such time as you provide full details of the model, I’m not legitimising this process; even parliament accepts abstentions.” I was counted.

    All along, everything about the republic has been either about feelz or bullying.

    Through all these years, we, monarchists, have had the right concerns about a republic but now, with the historical events of the last two weeks, we have an even more powerful factor – the remembering and rejoicing of the history and culture – the culture of the West – that gave us our freedom and prosperity.

    As you said, the rise of woke has destroyed the last remnant of a “yes” vote for a republic.

    Long ago, Thomas Keneally said that sooner or later the monarchists would die out. Now, it maybe the other way round.

    And it will be exactly the same with this so called Voice vote. If they don’t provide the detail then vote a resounding NO. Fark them ALL……………………


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  11. I think Aussies are prepared to give Charles a fair go. They’ll see how he acts and will then decide. If he upholds the tradition and follows the examples of Elizabeth his mother and Elizabeth his grandmother then he will be accepted.

    But if after the grace period he gets political, and climate policy is extremely political, then the polling numbers will go south and raghead Fitzy and his mates will be straight back into it again.

    (I did get a little watery of eye when I read the report about the double rainbow.)


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  12. The problem is not a “Republic, if you can keep it”, but with those touting themselves as “republicans”.

    Pretty much everywhere one finds a country with a name starting with “Democtratic Republic of…”, one actually finds a failed or failing state, and / or a total thugocracy, merrily inflating its own currency to levels of lunacy not remotely approached by the Weimar fiasco. Check out the Zimbabwean Hundred Trillion Dollar note, for a clue.

    How many barrow-loads of fiat notes will it take to buy a wheelbarrow? Wait, you can afford a second wheelbarrow? Off to the re-education camp with you!

    Maybe THAT is the plan, however.

    Then, there are the “Democratic PEOPLES republics”……….. How are the lawn clippings in Pyongyang, these days?


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  13. Upon the death of the queen, the vast majority of Australians have figured out that, if you get rid of the monarchy, you escalate the activism of the Australian democratic system where a popularly elected president become a rival for the popularly elected prime minister.

    Since they eat, sleep and breathe the politics of subversion, republicans can’t figure out why most of us just want to be left alone by politics and politicians.

    According to the 24/7 republican activists, the idea that politicians should spend our money wisely, do their jobs competently and keep out of our faces is a luxury from a bygone era that we can’t return to because it limits the power to which they are addicted.

    I suggest that the vast majority of Australians are now telling the republican activists to shove their politics up their arses, to leave us alone and if, they try to bring it to a vote, they’ll be told in no uncertain terms they can go to hell.


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  14. 60%?! A few more years of mass immigration should take care of that.

    I wouldn’t assume that is the case.

    As the plebiscite on ssm revealed, many migrant dominated electorates are socially conservative.

    If they come from unstable republics, they may also appreciate the stability a consitutional monarchy provides.

    They’re certainly not all Mehreen Faruqis, by a long shot.


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  15. Tom,
    That desire/demand to be left alone has always been part of our psyche. But post the pandemic I think it’s even more pronounced – we’ve all had enough, which doesn’t look good for the ARM.


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  16. Here’s a thing that has been floating around the intertubes for a while:

    “The most terrifying force of death, comes from the hands of “Men who wanted to be left Alone”.

    They try, so very hard, to mind their own business and provide for themselves and those they love.

    They resist every impulse to fight back, knowing the forced and permanent change of life that will come from it.

    They know, that the moment they fight back, the lives as they have lived them, are over.

    The moment the “Men who wanted to be left Alone” are forced to fight back, it is a small form of suicide. They are literally killing off who they used to be. . . .

    Which is why, when forced to take up violence, these “Men who wanted to be left Alone”, fight with unholy vengeance against those who murdered their former lives. They fight with raw hate, and a drive that cannot be fathomed by those who are merely play-acting at politics and terror. TRUE TERROR will arrive at the Left’s door, and they will cry, scream, and beg for mercy . . . . but it will fall upon deaf ears.”

    Hence the decades-long campaigns to suppress or obliterate every possible or imagined manifestation which may form part of this possible “blowback”.

    State Terrorism is a REAL thing. DOMESTIC State Terrorism is even more real.

    And a disturbing proportion of churnalists, Wackerdemics, pubic serpents and pollie-muppets seem to think this is a good thing.


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