Open Thread – Mon 11 Sept 2023


Napoleon at Brienne, Jacques Marie Gaston Onfroy de Breville, 1908

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Gabor
Gabor
September 11, 2023 12:57 am

Good moaning, back to work for some of us but croissants don’t grow on trees you know.

Have nice day-week as the cousins keep saying.

Alamak!
September 11, 2023 1:10 am

You made the claim that Q and CEO acted fraudulently. Provide evidence for the assertion and not some nob ACCC website detailing the flights that were cancelled.

I don’t have to do that because in this liberal democracy we have agencies like ACCC, imperfect as they may be, that are tasked with doing this. Enjoy your evening/morning.

Top Ender
Top Ender
September 11, 2023 2:08 am

We retreated to a small village called Glifa for an overnight rethink. All of central Greece was flooded with very bad headlines So we spent several hours working out our options, and decided on bring our flight forward…back to Oz on Monday night.

Travelling back to Athens was weird, like something out of an “end of the world SF movie”. Very few cars on the main A1 super-highway, and police roadblocks for anything going the other direction – eg: outwards from Athens and northwards. Freeways empty. Cars going the other way were lined up, with police advising them and generally turning them around. But there was one constant – Mrs TE guessed we would have six tolls, we were up to 5 with 100kms to go. They varied from 90p through to seven euros.

We gave car #4 of our travels back to Mr Hertz, and found an Air BnB in a seaside area of Athens. Flying the excellent Qatar Air again home.

Gabor
Gabor
September 11, 2023 2:30 am

Top Ender
Sep 11, 2023 2:08 AM

We retreated to a small village called Glifa for an overnight rethink. All of central Greece was flooded with very bad headlines So we spent several hours working out our options, and decided on bring our flight forward…back to Oz on Monday night.

Flying the excellent Qatar Air again home.

I feel for you for missing parts of your holiday, things happen, better luck next time.

I don’t travel by air, but my children and friends love Qatar, excellent service and even now, reasonable price.

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
September 11, 2023 3:48 am

Flying the excellent Qatar Air again home.

And the Empty Crates Mob are quite good as well.

As to ‘Quiantarse’. well Airbus/Boeing Tennis Elbow can get his ‘jollies’ on that one along with the Chairmans Lunge treats.

Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:00 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:01 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:02 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:03 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:04 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:05 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:06 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:06 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:08 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:09 am
Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 4:10 am
Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
September 11, 2023 4:21 am

Thanks Tom. I like Spooner’s Airbus/Boeing Tennis Elbow Lizard.

miltonf
miltonf
September 11, 2023 5:00 am
Pogria
Pogria
September 11, 2023 6:54 am

Spare a thought today for those who perished in 9/11.

Cassie of Sydney
September 11, 2023 7:08 am

“Spare a thought today for those who perished in 9/11.”

A dreadful day.

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 7:29 am

I see Ramirez’ TDS remains unabated.

Twenty two years ago, everyday people were still sound asleep, some with bags packed for their early morning flights, others with work clothes ready on hangers, perhaps lunches packed. Street sweepers wended their way along the kerbs in their night time cleanup, fire fighters were starting their graveyard shifts.

Meanwhile, others were wakeful. They had a plan to commit an unspeakable crime on innocent civilians. They too laid out their equipment for the task – harmless to anyone but ideological perverts.

Here in Australia, as dawn broke on the 12th, received the horrifying pictures. The night owls like my husband had watched, transfixed, from the early hours. Something is happening in America was all he said, a shocked face half a world away.

We are still experiencing the fall out from this today.

Cassie of Sydney
September 11, 2023 7:32 am

Further to the old fred, there are clearly a few here on this august blog who would be happy with a censoring media, as long as that media censors according to their tastes, their whims and their desires. My response to this? No, and it’s equally as dangerous as having an MSM fully captured by the left. I don’t want a one sided media. I don’t want a right-wing Nine Media, a right-wing ABC, a right-wing SMH, I want robust media outlets, be it broadcasting or print, that provide platforms for all opinion, and then people can make up their own minds.

There is more diversity on Sky than on their ABC. The best newspaper in this country, The Australian, tries to balance both left and right in its opinion pages. Which is why I buy it. I don’t have a problem with Chris Kenny or Mavis Bramston writing their pro-Voice propaganda, For every hysterical Kenny piece on da Voice, there are more measured pieces from Paul Kelly, Janet A or Dennis Shanahan. However, I draw the line at Dribbler Sheridan. He should be put out to pasture, he’s now just an embarrassment. They should leave foreign affairs to Adam Creighton, who’s much more nuanced.

Back to Peter Costello and Nine. Firstly, Costello is no Kerry Packer or Ruperdink Murdoch, he doesn’t own the company and he can’t directly interfere with opinion, programming and so on. His role is purely commercial, to keep Nine commercially viable. Costello can’t do what lonely old Rupert did back in April and fire Tucker Carlson. Oh and further to this firing of Tucker, that’s a classic example of a proprietor directly, and some might argue catastrophically, interfering in a media organisation’s operations. How did that go? Well, I say, not well, not well at all. Secondly, my understanding was that when Nine purchased the old Fairfax staples, that there was an agreement for the “Fairfax” staples, be it The Age and SMH mastheads, to remain editorially autonomous. The Nine media group includes such radio stations as Radio 2GB, and I’d hardly describe 2GB as “left”.

Cassie of Sydney
September 11, 2023 7:35 am

“We are still experiencing the fall out from this today.”

That fall out will continue for decades.

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 7:36 am

Odd how you get times wrong. In NYC, it’s only 5:30pm. It’s the “see you tomorrow”, “drinks after work” and pick up the kids time of day. Subways full, clattering home, a bit of shopping, working out what’s for dinner.

All those everyday things you do, heedless of tomorrow’s realities.

The great weight of evil and malice behind the attacks still has the power to shock me. Make today count, don’t ever waste it.

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 7:40 am

I don’t have to do that because in this liberal democracy we have agencies like ACCC, imperfect as they may be, that are tasked with doing this. Enjoy your evening/morning.

Almanac, you called Q and Joyce frauds. In this liberal democracy you need to provide evidence for these accusations. This isn’t your China, old pal.

Crossie
Crossie
September 11, 2023 7:44 am

Here in Australia, as dawn broke on the 12th, received the horrifying pictures. The night owls like my husband had watched, transfixed, from the early hours. Something is happening in America was all he said, a shocked face half a world away.

We were still up when the first reports and images came through, watched it all unfold in the next few hours. At the time we had a visitor from Canada who was alarmed at the cessation of global flights though by the time she was due to go home normal flights had returned.

During the 2003 visit to New York ground zero was still just a ruined pit. On the 2014 visit the new building was up as well as the memorial reflecting pool. I said a prayer for all the victims of that day.

Crossie
Crossie
September 11, 2023 7:53 am

There is more diversity on Sky than on their ABC.

Sky is the only channel with diverse views programming. Channel 7 leans to the centre but has no specific non-left programs though is still better than the rest of free-to-air channels.

Crossie
Crossie
September 11, 2023 7:57 am

However, I draw the line at Dribbler Sheridan. He should be put out to pasture, he’s now just an embarrassment. They should leave foreign affairs to Adam Creighton, who’s much more nuanced.

Adam Creighton is good value and is very measured when interviewed on Sky, not simply repeating CNN garbage like the vacuous Annelise Nielsen.

Crossie
Crossie
September 11, 2023 8:00 am

JC
Sep 11, 2023 7:40 AM
I don’t have to do that because in this liberal democracy we have agencies like ACCC, imperfect as they may be, that are tasked with doing this. Enjoy your evening/morning.

Almanac, you called Q and Joyce frauds. In this liberal democracy you need to provide evidence for these accusations. This isn’t your China, old pal.

Oh, you are a card. Tell that to all the people who have been called racists by our betters simply for opposing a constitutional change.

Tintarella di Luna
Tintarella di Luna
September 11, 2023 8:01 am

Sophie Elsworth such good value: in the OZ

Sky News Australia takes legal action against RMIT FactLab
THEAUSTRALIAN.COM.AU05:59
‘Blatantly false’: RMIT FactLab exposed after silently deleting ‘egregious’ fact check
Sky News Digital Editor Jack Houghton reveals RMIT FactLab has silently deleted a fact check, which claimed it… was false to question a statistic that alleged 83 per cent of Indigenous Australians supported the Voice. RMIT FactLab fact-checked an Indigenous woman who claimed the YouGov poll, which polled 738 More
By SOPHIE ELSWORTH
MEDIA WRITER
8:20PM SEPTEMBER 10, 2023
Sky News Australia has begun legal action against RMIT FactLab, demanding the retraction of false fact-checking verdicts on the TV channel’s online content, and reimbursement for lost revenue.

The broadcaster’s lawyers, Ashurst, have written to RMIT University and listed at least five fact checks published since December last year – four relating to voice referendum content – that claim Sky’s content is false.

RMIT FactLab, led by director Russell Skelton, published the five fact checks despite its International Fact-Checking Network certification expiring on December 2 last year. To issue fact-checking verdicts, RMIT FactLab must hold a valid IFCN certification as part of its agreement with social media giant and Facebook owner, Meta.

A legal letter to RMIT by Sky News Australia’s lawyers on August 28, said the lack of IFCN certification was problematic.

“Despite FactLab acknowledging it is not certified and its clear acceptance of that fact, demonstrated by the removal of some of the misleading material, the ‘verdicts’ will appear on the FactLab website and therefore are still being used on Facebook,” it said.

“As you are aware, Meta only works with IFCN certified organisations as fact checkers.

“Continuing to publish the verdicts, and provide them to Facebook, is clearly misleading when FactLab concedes it does not have the relevant certification required to do so.”

The letter has also accused RMIT FactLab of stating it has certification it no longer holds on fact check verdicts. Sky’s lawyers said this is “false and misleading” under Australian Consumer Law.

FactLab came under fire last month after it fact checked reports by Sky News host Peta Credlin that the Uluru Statement from the Heart was 26 pages long.

Sky News uploaded a video of Credlin’s comments about the statement’s length on its Facebook page but FactLab declared it was “false information” and a tag was placed on the video. It was subsequently unable to be viewed.

Sky News, owned by News Corporation, publisher of The Australian, published a lengthy report on the saga and conduct by RMIT FactLab in the “Fact Check Files”, by digital editor Jack Houghton.

Meta subsequently suspended its partnership with RMIT Fact-Lab, due to the lapsed IFCN certification status and concerns of bias in relation to fact checks done on voice debate content.

RMIT University’s lawyers responded to Sky’s legal demands on Thursday and said the broadcaster’s actions had resulted in the RMIT FactLab’s suspension. The lawyers also said when Sky established a Facebook page, “it agreed to Meta’s terms of use” and that Sky should instead take legal action against Meta.

“These terms include that your client’s content may be subject to whatever programs Meta utilises or applies, such as third party fact checking programs, or algorithms which either promote or reduce your client’s contents appearance in user’s feeds,” RMIT’s lawyer said. “If, as your client claims, it has suffered quantifiable financial loss, because of Meta’s application of its own terms of use, then your client’s claim is against Meta.”

However, Sky’s lawyers sent a legal letter to RMIT University on Friday disputing these claims.

“Our client may have agreed to Meta’s terms of use, but its agreement to those terms do not extend to actions that breach the law and thus enable FactLab to conduct its ‘fact-checking’ for Meta whilst in breach of the consumer law,” the letter from Sky’s lawyers said.

“In any event, it is RMIT who has breached its agreement with Meta by failing to adhere to the requirements of its third party fact checking program.”

Liberal Senator James Paterson wrote to Meta on August 30 and asked the tech giant to review all previous fact checks done by the RMIT’s FactLab and release the findings publicly.

On Saturday, Meta’s regional director of policy, Mia Garlick, in a response to Senator Paterson, said complaints about fact checks should be sent to the IFCN.

“With respect to any concerns about the nature of a fact check, to ensure the independence of the fact-checking process and to allow them to be promptly addressed, these must be addressed directly with the individual fact-checker within seven days of the fact check,” she said.

“At present, given the length of time that has occurred since the fact checks you reference, complaints about any concerns that a fact-checker has not met the IFCN requirements should be directed to the International Fact Checking Network.”

An RMIT spokeswoman said FactLab’s accreditation with IFCN is in the process of being renewed. “RMIT FactLab stands by the accuracy of its work to date and remains dedicated to slowing the spread of viral misinformation and disinformation through its fact checks,” she said.

SOPHIE ELSWORTH MEDIA WRITER

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 8:01 am

Last there in summer, 2019. The site is sombre, but busy. Nothing stands still, and neither should it. It’s a living city, not a museum.

The pools, marking the buildings’ footprint, have a waist-high coping. It’s sloped and carved with the names of those who perished. Not in alphabetical order…the placement is far more poignant and thoughtful. They are grouped with their workmates, remembered in death as they last stood in life, with the people they spent their days with.

The coping is punctuated with the occasional flower. A birthday, an anniversary, something significant. It’s powerful and emotive, and that’s not a bad thing.

Cassie of Sydney
September 11, 2023 8:04 am

I don’t want media outlet that lean either left or right. I want media outlets that offer opinion from both sides.

rugbyskier
rugbyskier
September 11, 2023 8:04 am

The History Channel had a doco on this morning which consisted of home videos of New Yorkers on that terrible day 22 years ago. It was raw and gut wrenching. Never forget.

Six years ago I was in New York and had a flight that day to Toronto. The TV had the service where the name of every person who died was read out one by one. Driving across Manhattan to Newark Airport the solemn atmosphere was evident. I just hope that time does not diminish the memories too much.

lotocoti
lotocoti
September 11, 2023 8:05 am

Remainer Brookes’ Brexit breakout would probably lose something
if he made mention of some of the other H.E. members.
Like Israel.
And New Zealand.

Tintarella di Luna
Tintarella di Luna
September 11, 2023 8:06 am

Sophie again — updated from yesterday’s article

ABC presenter Leigh Sales said she has concerns about activism journalism in the media industry
By SOPHIE ELSWORTH
MEDIA WRITER
@sophieelsworth
UPDATED 3:25PM SEPTEMBER 10, 2023, FIRST PUBLISHED AT 2:11PM SEPTEMBER 9, 2023
ABC presenter Leigh Sales has serious concerns about activist journalism and the increasing “blurring of lines” in the media ­industry.

Speaking at the Women in Media conference in Sydney on Saturday, Sales said while the surge in artificial intelligence and its effects on the media was of serious concern, activism by journalists was a bigger worry after becoming more prevalent in recent years.

“The AI (artificial intelligence) stuff is worrying but what worries me more is the blurring of activism and journalism and the loss of what I would call ‘independent journalism’,” she said at the ­conference.

“I’ve been worried about that for a long time. I wrote a book about this called On Doubt in about 2007 and now I look back and go, ‘Oh my god, I can’t believe I was writing about this in 2007, that was the Golden Age of independent journalism’.”

The comments come just two weeks after Sales instructed staff at the public broadcaster that the Uluru Statement from the Heart was a “one-page document” and that those arguing it was longer were wrong.

She gave staff exact instructions on how to beats arguments that the statement was many pages long, including scripts for employees to read during interviews if someone argued it was not a single-page document.

Sales, who hosts ABC’s Australian Story program, told the audience there had been worrying signs since 2007 that “organisations have picked out their ideological bent and they’re reporting from that”.

“I’m so big on things like setting aside your own opinion and trying to go into things with an open minded mindset.

“Fake news, misinformation … the bullying that occurs on social media, reporters are doing reporting that doesn’t fit with the zeitgeist or world view, that all really concerns me.”

ABC presenter Leigh Sales speaks of her concerns about activism journalism at the 2023 Women in Media…
The email instructing stuff about the length of the Uluru Statement was sent by the ABC’s editorial policy chief Mark Maley on August 24. In it Sales, the former 7.30 host, said an example of misinformation was “the claim that the Uluru Statement is a 26-page document”.

“That is inaccurate,” she wrote.

“The Uluru Statement from the Heart is a one-page ­document.”

The document’s length provoked much debate between the Yes and No camps and some pro-voice advocates, including Uluru Statement co-architect Professor Megan Davis, who in her newly-released book said it was “18 pages long”.

Earlier this month Sales did a sit-down interview with Ten’s The Project’s co-host Waleed Aly, and said she didn’t take positions on anything. If you “want to be a journalist, you have to leave your opinions at the door”, she told Aly.

She also told the Women in Media conference that diversity of perspectives in journalism remained vital to ensure stories were covered by people with lived experience.

“In any newsroom you want as much diversity as possible and I don’t just mean cultural diversity, I mean economic diversity … you want people who have come from working class backgrounds, you want people who have grown up in the country and not just inner-city Sydney,” she said.

“You want people that didn’t go to university as well those who went to university and you want people from all sorts of different cultural backgrounds. If you don’t have, for example, someone in your newsroom who grew up and their mother was on a single-mother pension … they’re not going understand really what stories about cost of living are like.”

SOPHIE ELSWORTH MEDIA WRITER

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 8:17 am

Crossie

I don’t get the logic. Extend your thought a little further. We should call Q and Joyce frauds because the left are using unfounded slurs against NO voters. Is that where you want to be. Moreover our old China thinks one of the most useless politicised entities in the country (ACCC) is a reliable entity. Really?

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
September 11, 2023 8:17 am

ABC presenter Leigh Sales speaks of her concerns about activism journalism

Can’t be any mirrors in Ms Sales’ house.

Dot
Dot
September 11, 2023 8:21 am

Wasn’t QANTAS making fraudulent bookings in part at least to deny others from using terminals?

Cassie of Sydney
September 11, 2023 8:23 am

“most useless politicised entities in the country (ACCC)”

Yep.

Petros
Petros
September 11, 2023 8:25 am

I want media outlets that allow uncensored comments.

Crossie
Crossie
September 11, 2023 8:27 am

JC
Sep 11, 2023 8:17 AM
Crossie

I don’t get the logic. Extend your thought a little further. We should call Q and Joyce frauds because the left are using unfounded slurs against NO voters.

Goose, gander, sauce.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
September 11, 2023 8:32 am

Petros

Sep 11, 2023 8:25 AM

I want media outlets that allow uncensored comments.

Are you prepared to put up your house and super to indemnify them if your published comment is libellous?

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 8:39 am

Dot

Q came out of mothballs with all sorts of teething problems such as serious staff shortages etc

The only way to measure their performance is to put them beside other airlines and see how they went. Try the US airlines. It was the equivalent of a late term abortion. Q has done well in comparison.

Joyce made a few mistakes, but he’s not a fraudster which was what almanac was suggesting.

Muddy
Muddy
September 11, 2023 8:39 am

Also on this day in history, though not as profoundly shocking:
1914 – An Australian naval & military task force occupies the colonial German capital of their New Guinea territory, leading eventually to a mandate from the League of Nations for Australia to govern the same. (Japan scored German territories further north).
1943 – Australian troops begin the reoccupation of Salamaua, on the Huon Gulf of New Guinea, dislodging the Japanese after 18 months. Lae & Finschhafen followed, eventually leading to the clearance of the Huon Peninsula. When the Americans occupied the opposite shores (Western New Britain), the way was clear to initiate a north-western momentum.

Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 8:40 am

Tinta beat me to it (above):

Headkicker Sophie Elsworth has taken over The Australian’s Monday Media Diary – a much needed credibility boost for a news source that had become little more than a gossip column for journos.

Today, Elsworth takes issue with 3AW’s new Drive host Jacqui Felgate, who’s little more than a walking social media billboard for a range of products over which she has not yet declared any conflict of interest:

(To save you scrolling up)

AWOL sponsorships
Journalists are increasingly blurring the lines by using their social media accounts to shamelessly plug products and tag businesses in return for freebies.
These can include anything from driving around in the latest SUV, to powdering their noses with the hottest make-up lines and even showing off their newly whitened teeth.
High-profile presenters and broadcasters are usually the ones who score lucrative deals with brands that deliver them nice perks in return for spruiking the goods.
While Diary isn’t saying the journalists or broadcasters are breaking any rules, it’s important that those who are receiving help to boost their bank balances with sponsorship deals make sure they declare them.
In fact, for radio broadcasters the strict disclosure rules are laid out in the Australian Communications and Media Authority’s disclosure standards.
Then it’s up to viewers to decide whether they think it’s a problem or not.
Anyone familiar with 3AW broadcaster Jacqui Felgate, who was recently appointed the station’s new drive host to replace Tom Elliott (who will replace veteran host Neil Mitchell when he departs at the end of the year), knows product plugs are commonplace.
Her Instagram account is filled with sponsorship deals and the hashtagging of freebies received, with her partnerships disclosed in her posts.
Felgate has been filling in across various 3AW programs for more than a year but these lucrative arrangements need to be disclosed by someone who is on air for more than three hours a week over a four-week period. There is a recent ad promoting Coles Supermarkets, her role as a BMW ambassador for the German brand’s luxury electric cars, her amazing experiences with Smile Solutions, and her sharing of how she improved her skin courtesy of a paid ad with Maybelline – the list goes on.
There’s even a paid partnership with Virgin Australia, one worth knowing about if the troubled Qantas pops up in on-air conversation.
Felgate joined the station in 2022 in various roles including food reviews, football commentary and as a fill in host for weekday programs, however on 3AW’s commercial agreements web page there was no mention of any of her sponsorship deals online as yet.
When Diary contacted Nine to find out when Felgate’s long list of deals would be declared, the ¬response was “no comment”.
Watch this space as to whether 3AW updates its commercial agreements page to ensure it abides by ACMA’s rules.
ACMA was asked about the matter on Friday but was unable to respond in time.

In my opinion, Felgate can’t ethically run the Drive show without strict observance of the professional ethics that apply to journalists. Felgate has been a journalist for years if not decades as she previously worked for the Seven Network, where she was the weekend sports presenter.

But she’s now behaving as if the rules don’t apply to her.

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 8:43 am

Crossie

You’re arguing we should punish innocent people in order to payback the left.

No, we shouldn’t do that as it’s wrong.

Joyce behaved like a woke idiot at the end but I’d be very careful to call him a fraudster. Over the years he did an incredible job running the airline.

Muddy
Muddy
September 11, 2023 8:48 am

Dependence on a utopian ‘balance’ in the mesozoic media will lull conservatives into a false sense of security. What is required is to understand our audience as well as/better than, our opponents. It’s inarguable that our message delivery & associated tactics are woeful.

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 8:48 am

I’m surprised that sales were not linked to stock levels at Qantas and that the software didn’t allow for the absence of product but still permitted a sale.

It may be that airlines do their sales differently to most other businesses but this is pretty basic stuff.

mem
mem
September 11, 2023 8:50 am

The renewables industry is cracking apart. Local suppliers are floundering. And here we go, the only answer is more taxpayers money to prop up uncompetitive businesses?
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-09-11/wind-tower-companies-and-unions-want-local-procurement-guarantee/102837748

Crossie
Crossie
September 11, 2023 8:51 am

JC
Sep 11, 2023 8:43 AM
Crossie
You’re arguing we should punish innocent people in order to payback the left.
No, we shouldn’t do that as it’s wrong.
Joyce behaved like a woke idiot at the end but I’d be very careful to call him a fraudster. Over the years he did an incredible job running the airline.

Are you claiming that Joyce didn’t know about the bookings for non-existent flights? And if he didn’t then how was he such a brilliant CEO? Joyce may be lots of things but innocent he is not.

rosie
rosie
September 11, 2023 8:52 am

I think there might be different ramifications between claiming a particular major corporation and its CEO behaved fraudulently and labelling everyone who might anonymously vote no racists.
Neither is acceptable but I suspect only one potentially ‘actionable’, as one great former cat sage might have suggested.

Indolent
Indolent
September 11, 2023 8:53 am
Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
September 11, 2023 8:56 am
rosie
rosie
September 11, 2023 8:56 am

Werent there lots of cancellations because covid quarantine rules meant staff were unavailable well beyond normal provisions for sick leave?
I recall it was chaotic.
I guessing a commercial operation would have preferred to fly the planes than not.

Crossie
Crossie
September 11, 2023 8:57 am

ABC presenter Leigh Sales speaks of her concerns about activism journalism at the 2023 Women in Media…

Interesting that Leigh is only concerned about activism journalism now that their audience share has slumped. There must be a lot of uncomfortable conversations at Ultimo.

Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 8:58 am

Joyce behaved like a woke idiot at the end but I’d be very careful to call him a fraudster. Over the years he did an incredible job running the airline.

Correct, JC.

Joyce transformed Qantas into the mega-successful airline it has become — a task that was too hard for his predecessor Geoff Dixon.

He didn’t need Uncle Luigi’s help, but he got it anyway because Qantas worked out that the prime minister would respond less than ethnically to certain inducements.

Elbow can’t suddenly start complaining about the Australian political playing field where leading companies are forced to take political positions to curry favour with the government. Elbow and his predecessor Scott Morrison authored Australia’s new fascist economy.

Indolent
Indolent
September 11, 2023 8:59 am

The Problem with Smart Meters -Worldwide Testimonies

They are not compulsory here but you wouldn’t know it from the correspondence from providers. I think I already mentioned that I received a letter of from Origin last year stating that my meter would “updated” on such and such a date and please be available. I rang and said that I did not want a smart meter and only then did they admit that it wasn’t compulsory.

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 9:00 am

It would be helpful to know the timeline between sales and cancellations. If it’s only a matter of days, that’s conceivable. If it’s weeks or even months, then the issue becomes one of incompetence and perhaps malfeasance.

Ticketing systems are pretty sophisticated. It’s not is if physical vouchers are still widely used – it’s all automated. And those programs would have already been in place well before Covid. A flight cancellation would result in a “hold” on sales, a simple computer function.

Qantas isn’t the only airline to be grounded for so long. I know BA had endless problems with cancellations, and still do. Did they also sell many…many tickets for flights cancelled well prior to the sale?

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 9:00 am

Are you claiming that Joyce didn’t know about the bookings for non-existent flights?

I’m claiming that you look first before crossing a busy road.

And if he didn’t then how was he such a brilliant CEO?

I’m claiming that if an extremely complex operation comes out of mothballs after a two year lockdown it’s not going operate as a well oiled machine.

Joyce may be lots of things but innocent he is not.

That’s what we were told about Pell.

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 9:02 am

Tom

Get wodney to give you 1099 ticks for the last comment. Well deserved.

rosie
rosie
September 11, 2023 9:02 am

The Guardian is all over it, 8000 instances of selling tickets after a flight had been cancelled, when the transport industry was nuts.
The ACCC are out to punish a company that lost billions due to covid chaos.
Yet it sounds like an overloaded system problem to me.
Can they point to this happening pre covid, then they might have an argument it was deliberate.

rosie
rosie
September 11, 2023 9:04 am

The average time was two weeks.

rosie
rosie
September 11, 2023 9:05 am

There is no point in comparing internationals who were all flying around long before Australia opened its borders.

Rosie
Rosie
September 11, 2023 9:07 am
Black Ball
Black Ball
September 11, 2023 9:08 am

Tim Blair:

One of life’s great delights is watching smug lefties run headfirst into reality.

We see a great deal of this in Australia.

Labor was forced to abandon its “welcome to boaties” policy a decade ago after thousands turned up without passports or other identification, then claimed additional asylum seeker benefits for being underage.

Poor kids. Some of them were so short of cash that they couldn’t afford hip replacements.

More recently, the Albanese Labor government has come under attack from its own leftist allies after approving a number of new coal mining projects.

The government signed those lucrative approvals because it’s really hard to run for re-election when recharging a mobile phone costs more than buying one and voters are harvesting animal shelters for meat.

Judging by recent polls our Labor rulers can expect another reality hit on October 14. As Andrew Bolt writes today: “Nothing will now save Labor’s Voice from a massive defeat, and the Albanese government must now save itself from dying with it.”

Seems about right. But the Prime Minister and his government are at least travelling better at present than leftist New York mayor Eric Adams.

Adams has enjoyed quite the emotional and philosophical journey in recent years.

In 2021, when campaigning for mayoral office, Adams luxuriated in New York’s precious “sanctuary city” status and declared: “We should protect our immigrants. Period.”

Of course it’s very easy to hold that view when illegal immigrants are pouring across the southern border into Texas rather than into New York, some 3200km away.

Mindful of the words on his city’s Statue of Liberty – “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore” – Adams even greeted border-crossing refugees when they turned up on buses last year.

They’d been sent to Democrat New York by the Republican government of Texas, a state largely left to fend for itself against a flood of illegal immigrants.

So Texas delivered a load of illegals to caring, humanitarian New York. Adams, at first, was glad to meet them.

“As the mayor of New York I have to provide services to families that are here, and that’s what we’re going to do,” Adams said at the time.

“I’m proud that this is a ‘right to shelter’ state and we’re going to continue to do that.”

But Texas called his bluff. The Lone Star State kept sending busload after busload of “huddled masses yearning to breathe free”.

Pretty soon, despite the numbers arriving in New York being a mere fraction of those who were overwhelming small Texan border towns, Adams began to reconsider his city’s generosity.

He even aimed criticism at his own party’s confused and gravity-challenged Democratic President Joe Biden, whose staff repeatedly insist that there is no particular issue at the southern border (they also insist that there is no particular issue with Joe Biden. The blind devotion of these people to their demented leader and his shambles of an administration borders on the religious).

Finally, last week, Adams cracked. In full view of his city, his country, the world and the almighty, Adams became the living embodiment of an age-old truism: a conservative is a leftist who’s just been mugged.

“I’m gonna tell you something New Yorkers, never in my life have I had a problem that I didn’t see an ending to. I don’t see an ending to this,” Adams raved at a town hall meeting on Wednesday night.

“This issue will destroy New York City. Destroy New York City.”

President Biden’s lack of federal assistance drew special attention from Mayor Adams.

“Month after month I stood up and said this is gonna come to a neighbourhood near you. Well, we’re here, we’re getting no support on this national crisis and we’re receiving no support,” he said.

“One hundred ten thousand migrants we have to feed, clothe, house, educate the children, wash their laundry sheets, give them everything they need, health care.”

That’s basically a longer version of the Statue of Liberty’s beautiful promise.

Perpetually left-voting New York was invited to live up to its own noble slogan and plainly can’t quite manage it.

“One time we were just getting Venezuela,” Adams continued. “Now we’re getting Ecuador, now we’re getting Russian-speaking coming through Mexico, now we’re getting Western Africa.”

If a conservative said various races and nationalities were destroying an entire city they’d be condemned, driven from public life.

But much of New York is on the mayor’s side.

The city has run headfirst into reality. And now it wants a way out.

Jorge
Jorge
September 11, 2023 9:08 am

Tom Switzer had Shireen Morris on his RN program on the weekend. She is a keen Voice advocate.

She put up a word wall when he pointed out that the Yessers describe it as a modest, measured request but also a profound, transformational change. How can it be both ?

Alexander Downer was interviewed as well and made some knockout points.

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 9:08 am

Rosie, the only problem I have is a simple processing one.

Cancel a flight, hold ticket sales – the moment the decision is made, the system is activated. A keystroke or two. This is not difficult, because someone decided to cancel the flight. That someone in operations has access to the scheduling and sales via their keyboard.

It sounds as though this simple but vital element was left for later on and someone else – which is basic incompetence.

Pat Mac
Pat Mac
September 11, 2023 9:10 am

I for one, will never fly with quaintarse again. Too much arrogance in the way it’s staff are made to treat us.

I am also not a fan of Branson, but I am ok with his airline. At least the air staff appear to be friendly.

Fraud? Dunno, that one can be tough to prove. That leprechaun though, what a prick.

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 9:10 am

There is no point in comparing internationals who were all flying around long before Australia opened its borders.

Why? Their operations systems are all similar.

Makka
Makka
September 11, 2023 9:11 am

Elbow and his predecessor Scott Morrison authored Australia’s new fascist economy.

They had willing eager partners. The totally innocent Australian Business didn’t get their arms twisted to get in bed with the Govt.

The only reason this soft fascist partnership manifested was because they mutually benefited. Govt gets Business to go into bat for it’s Green/Woke/Vax agenda and Business can “encourage” Govt to impose regulatory hurdles that restrict/suppress competition. That’s the Aussie way.

Roger
Roger
September 11, 2023 9:12 am

ABC presenter Leigh Sales speaks of her concerns about activism journalism at the 2023 Women in Media…

The same Leigh Sales who two weeks ago wrote an advisory memo to ABC staff on how to deflect claims that the Uluru Statement was not a mere one page document?

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
September 11, 2023 9:13 am

From Sancho’s link.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians weren’t counted in the nation’s census until 1971, and for most of last century many of their children were forcibly removed by the government under assimilation policies.

rosie
rosie
September 11, 2023 9:15 am

Cancel a flight, hold ticket sales – the moment the decision is made, the system is activated. A keystroke or two. This is not difficult, because someone decided to cancel the flight.

I dont know how Qantas systems were coping. I’m guessing in the circumstances of unprededented demand and staff, including adminstrative staff, testing positive to covid, there may have been system problems.
I doubt it was as simple as a keystroke or two.

Roger
Roger
September 11, 2023 9:17 am

…much of New York is on the mayor’s side.

The city has run headfirst into reality. And now it wants a way out.

I believe Martha’s Vineyard is a welcoming place.

With many soon to be empty dwellings as the northern summer nears its end.

shatterzzz
September 11, 2023 9:18 am

Just back from my Monday swim .. age (75) starting to catch up, usual 1km but more breast stroke than freestyle laps nowadayz .. 6 months ago 20 free, 3 months ago 10 + 10 and today 15 BS & 5 Free ..

Cassie of Sydney
September 11, 2023 9:20 am

“Joyce may be lots of things but innocent he is not.”

Judge, jury and executioner.

rosie
rosie
September 11, 2023 9:21 am

Internationals didnt have the problem of being hit with a sudden surge in demand for flights in 2022 after two years of Australian border closures, coupled with stringent exclusion rules for positive tests.
Europeans had been flying around since at least May 2021.
I’m not going to assume fraud simply because post covid there was a lag between flights being cancelled and bookings being taken.

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 9:27 am

You too, Rosie

1098 upticks

Wods is going to have a busy morning.

rosie
rosie
September 11, 2023 9:33 am

Oh and a little perspective, it was 8000 bookings out of a total of over 21.25 million passenger journeys in 2022.

Dot
Dot
September 11, 2023 9:34 am

That’s what we were told about Pell.

Yea, one for the “a farty breakfast with acrid tears” & ‘da woodchippa’ crowds to consider re: malicious and fraudulent investigations undertaken by “hero cops” like Gazza Jubelin, etc.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
September 11, 2023 9:37 am

Let’s say I book a flight from Sydney to Melbourne at 4:30 p.m. on 30th September.
That flight is cancelled, but Qantas has other flights available on that route.
Is it wrong to retain the cash and offer alternatives.
I think the problem with long standing flight credits is that they regarded them as captive fares to be dealt with at leisure.
If they can sell seats for 50% more than my credit is worth, they are going to keep bumping me.

shatterzzz
September 11, 2023 9:37 am

Almanac, you called Q and Joyce frauds. In this liberal democracy you need to provide evidence for these accusations.

Sad to see when folk just ain’t mooovin’ wiv the times ..!
PROOF is sooo 2019-ish .. nowadayz post-BAT FLU all that is required is the “accusation”

Dot
Dot
September 11, 2023 9:38 am

rosie

If a bank has 200 bn transactions in a month and has 800,000 questionable transactions in the same period, you cannot dismiss them as mere errors.

These claims need to be investigated (and they may be totally baseless). If the terminal access was intentionally compromised for competitors then QUNTAS may be in deep doo doo.

Farmer Gez
Farmer Gez
September 11, 2023 9:39 am

Djokovic is now GOAT in slams.
Stick that up your arse NY Bidenites.

Boambee John
Boambee John
September 11, 2023 9:39 am

Tom

In my opinion, Felgate can’t ethically run the Drive show without strict observance of the professional ethics that apply to journalists.

Echoes of Alan Jones and “Cash for comment”? But not showing the same enthusiasm for complaining as when they were attacking a class enemy?

rosie
rosie
September 11, 2023 9:41 am

Where did I suggest it wasn’t worthy of investigation?
It’s offered up as fraud, no question. Alan Joyce fraudster, no question
That is the issue.

H B Bear
H B Bear
September 11, 2023 9:42 am

I dont know how Qantas systems were coping

If QAN systems are anything like banks I expect it take months to get anything done. I also expect someone in management knew the problem was occurring and decided to allow it to continue. I am not sure that would have been the CEO (it should have been but I would not be surprised if it was not.)

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 9:43 am

The other possibility is provisional cancellation.

An undersubscribed flight is *cancelled* subject to more bums on seats, then it is reinstated should sufficient tickets be sold.

As for “simple keystrokes” it’s amazing what they can achieve if a system is programmed accordingly. Seems to work for other complex businesses.

shatterzzz
September 11, 2023 9:44 am

Op shopping yesterday .. hard cover copy of Lisa Wilkinson .. IT WASN’T MEANT TO BE LIKE THIS .. $2.00 …. gave it a miss ..!

MatrixTransform
September 11, 2023 9:45 am

it isn’t fraud

it is theft

Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 9:47 am

Calli, the ACCC has created more problems than it has solved, but I have fully supported its new rules that ban companies from lying about their products and services in their advertising.

The ACCC is talking about fining Qantas around $250 million for selling seats on flights that it never had any intention of operating.

For a company making north of $2 billion p.a. in annual profits, that’s not a disincentive. To get the new CEO’s attention, the fine will need to be $500 million+.

ACCC chairwoman Gina Cass-Gottlieb is just a wealthy corporate lawyer whose uncle Moss Cass, was one of the radicals in the Whitlam regime. That’s why she got the job.

Cass-Gottleib is no friend of Australian consumers. Her weekly shopping is covered by a luxurious expense account. Being Moss Cass’s niece, she is, I expect, an enthusiastic supporter of Australia’s skyrocketing domestic electricity bills because it is helping to bring down capitalism. Like the rest of the wealthy elite, household budgeting is not her problem.

But I hope the fine Qantas is forced to pay breaks a record.

Kneel
Kneel
September 11, 2023 9:47 am

“I don’t want media outlet that lean either left or right. I want media outlets that offer opinion from both sides.”

+1000

Yes, I want REPORTERS to report what is known, who said what etc. I don’t mind some opinion JOURNALISM, but I want REPORTERS first and foremost.

Buccaneer
Buccaneer
September 11, 2023 9:48 am

“I’m gonna tell you something New Yorkers, never in my life have I had a problem that I didn’t see an ending to. I don’t see an ending to this,” Adams raved at a town hall meeting on Wednesday night.

“This issue will destroy New York City. Destroy New York City.”

How long before Adams starts shining a spotlight on the New York skyline with a bat shaped symbol?

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 9:51 am

Are you on the gin, Liz.

As you’re here, JC, I favour a G & T nightly in this vale of tears. Same as the old Queen Mum, and she held on till one hundred and one, still smiling. Role model. 🙂

MatrixTransform
September 11, 2023 9:51 am

but I want REPORTERS first and foremost

read The Age … where journalistic kiddies are given group assignments

2 for the price of 1

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
September 11, 2023 9:52 am

mem
Sep 11, 2023 8:50 AM
The renewables industry is cracking apart. Local suppliers are floundering.

It’s not even an industry. It’s a racket that even the Mafia would be proud of. Guv’ment (Taxpayer) sponsored as well. Although the Taxpayers are only now slowly waking up to the scam. FFS.

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 9:53 am

Another server error.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 9:54 am

We flew home Qantas Business Class from our recent stopover in Seoul, Korea.

Worst Business Class flight evah.

Colonel Crispin Berka
Colonel Crispin Berka
September 11, 2023 9:57 am

from the RedBridge poll last week…

[as a reason for supporting the proposal] 16 per cent of voters said that the Voice “was initiated by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people”.

Imagine, if you will, a referendum to change the constitution to enshrine the right to taxpayer-funded federal subsidisation of golf course membership fees.
Can you imagine 16 percent of voters saying that their main reason for supporting the subsidy of golf courses was that the proposal “was initiated by Anglo-Saxon people”?
It would not happen. Nobody would think for 5 seconds that golf course subsidies should be supported simply because the people asking for it were white.
The most generous interpretation here is it’s just more evidence that 16% of the country are as thick as two short planks. They might even be a bit racist.

What do you cats hear in your social circles?
Are people talking about the racist aspect of the Indigenous Voice To Parliament?

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 9:57 am

Okay…what are the normal, everyday words that have been banned? I’m trying to post a comment without swearing, anger, nastiness or any of the other garbage that floods these august pages. Yet it is refused.

shatterzzz
September 11, 2023 9:57 am

I dont know how Qantas systems were coping. I’m guessing in the circumstances of unprededented demand and staff, including adminstrative staff, testing positive to covid, there may have been system problems.
I doubt it was as simple as a keystroke or two.

Of cvourse it was! .. the program(s) weren’t affected by BAT FLU or staffing .. allowing a system to keep selling non existent flights is, obviously, inbuilt into the program, with forethought .. a deliberate fraud …….!

H B Bear
H B Bear
September 11, 2023 9:58 am

Interesting times around the Vitrioli Skelton kitchen table.
“How was your day Dear?”
“Not good.”

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
September 11, 2023 10:00 am

During the 2003 visit to New York ground zero was still just a ruined pit. On the 2014 visit the new building was up as well as the memorial reflecting pool. I said a prayer for all the victims of that day.

And some of those victims were Muslims.

Speedbox
September 11, 2023 10:01 am

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Sep 11, 2023 9:54 AM
We flew home Qantas Business Class from our recent stopover in Seoul, Korea. Worst Business Class flight evah.

Why?

(not pro-Q. Just interested.)

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
September 11, 2023 10:02 am

calli
Sep 11, 2023 9:57 AM
Okay…what are the normal, everyday words that have been banned? I’m trying to post a comment without swearing, anger, nastiness or any of the other garbage that floods these august pages. Yet it is refused.

Maybe it’s the AI.

Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 10:03 am

read The Age … where journalistic kiddies are given group assignments

Nothing wrong with shared bylines, MT. It’s standard industry practice.

The problem with The Age is that:

a) It is now a workers collective that can get editors fired on a shopfloor vote. Therefore, editors aren’t allowed to edit.

b) Every story The Age runs now has a political purpose. At The Age, “public interest” is so last century.

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 10:03 am

Anyways…off to Stitch n’ Bitch for the first time since July. Might do a straw poll on the Voice, although I suspect everyone except the politicians are Voiced-out.

😀

calli
calli
September 11, 2023 10:05 am

Always better to demonstrate actual intelligence than the artificial sort. People can always tell.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
September 11, 2023 10:06 am

Real Deal on Saturday morning posted an article on NT jackery and its recent antics:

The Northern Territory’s new top cop is pleading with almost 250 former police officers to rejoin the force in a bid to heal rifts in the organisation following a ­“tumultuous” few years sparked by a fatal police shooting and the Covid-19 pandemic.

To recap, a constable shot a career criminal wanted for a raft of violent badness in Yuendumu. At the time of the shooting, the cop was being stabbed by the crook with a pair of surgical scissors.

The NT government was tanking, and tanking badly. Three years earlier, Chief Minister Michael Gunner gave NT Assistant Commissioner Jamie Chalker a lucrative job in his Department of Housing, heading up delivery of houses in remote locations – on yuuuge cash, it is said.

Gunner then parachuted Chalker into the Commissioner’s chair after the departure of Reece Kershaw (now the AFP honcho). Chalker got the nod ahead of Michael Murphy, and there was – and remains – substantial discussion that in exchange for the big jack chair Chalker owed Gunner, and owed him big time.

Chalker had to pay out early. Very early indeed. That constable was then directed to travel to Darwin from Alice Springs, where he was arrested, and parked up in the cells before being charged with murder.

All of this happened without a single statement having been taken.

H B Bear
H B Bear
September 11, 2023 10:12 am

The main problem with The Age is exactly the same as at Fauxfacts. It is just too expensive to kill off.

shatterzzz
September 11, 2023 10:13 am

On “smart meters” .. I’ve had one 2 maybe 3 years .. never noticed any additional difference to my usage on the bills .. I got that sort of letter from AGL about access .. came home one day and a small plastic oblong thingy with wires attached on the side of the electric box & a note in the letterbox to say dun .. and that was that ……..!

Real Deal
Real Deal
September 11, 2023 10:13 am

Thanks for your comments, KD.

Kneel
Kneel
September 11, 2023 10:13 am

“Are you claiming that Joyce didn’t know about the bookings for non-existent flights?”

I’m not a lawyer, however it seems to me that:
1) if customers acknowledged they had read the T&C’s, and said T&C’s “covered” cancelled flights, that’s perhaps not the best customer service, but probably OK;
2) if Q NEVER had a plane and/or staff (pilots etc) ready to fly it, but still sold tickets, then this looks bad;
3) if Q kept selling tickets after they had decided to cancel the flight, then this looks bad.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
September 11, 2023 10:15 am

II.

It is said by some in certain circles that Chalker ran the police as his own personal fiefdom, and that his peeps effectively had to swear undying loyalty to him personally – much in the manner of an Austrian painter some decades back.

Covid was perfect for him. He turned up to daily pressers behind the same Chief Minister that gifted him the job, and issued various edicts along the company line. This went on for so long he believed his own press.

The jacks themselves did not enforce mandates to anywhere near the extent of their southern counterparts. From speaking to a few, they spent their time driving around with self-imposed blinkers, ‘not seeing’ people driving around or walking their hounds, etc. No doorknocking (although that may have been recorded in their paperwork), no nothing. The few protest marches in Darwin were a relaxed affairs, with jacks at intersections joking with protestors (including yours truly).

Chalker did, though, remove the jacks who didn’t get hit with the jab/s because they failed to respeck his authoritah – i.e., a directive he gave them. Some resigned, and some challenged him – more on that shortly.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 10:17 am

We are thinking of trying out Qatar Airlines sometime next year for another European trip in summer 24. Hope they get more flights from Oz by then. Hairy’s booked us already for travel next March to the US, (using Delta I think to Puerto Rico), to pick up a Caribbean and South America cruise, coming home flatbed via Santiago on Air Chile. We’ve flown Business with them before and they are good.

We generally take Business Class for long haul trips. Shorter hops we do in daytime, sometimes in Premium Economy, sometimes just Economy and go straight to an airport hotel to recover.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 10:19 am

Lanair Chile is now Latam. An amalgamation, with Brazilian input.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
September 11, 2023 10:22 am

We are thinking of trying out Qatar Airlines sometime next year for another European trip in summer 24

Flew Qatar Airlines to Europe in 2017. Highly recommended.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
September 11, 2023 10:24 am

III.

“We saw a lot of resignations, through and post-Covid,” Mr Murphy said.

Yep. This is the reason every police force in the country is both running short of applicants, and taking everyone that applies, regardless of dunderheadedness.

I contend that cops join the cops to lock up crooks. They do not join the cops to enforce health policy dreamed up by unelected mediocre bureaucrats.

One of the very first things Murphy did was reinstate, with back pay, five of the abovementioned cops who challenged Chalkers directive to jab or get sacked. Evidently, and although it’s early days for Murphy, this has earned him substantial goodwill.

The 51-year-old said he planned to reshape the force’s leadership now that positions in the executive are opening up with ­Assistant Commissioner Bruce Porter and Deputy Commissioner Murray Smallage retiring.

Porter and Smalpage were part of the inner circle. Yes men to the core apparently, so mu so in Smalpage’s case that Chalker brought him over from the WA jacks as his deputy. There is very good mail that two more of Chalker’s Top Men will be gonski in the next month or so.

From people that know him – Murphy is not the messiah, and he is starting with a very low bar by replacing the most unpopular Commissioner in 150 years. However, it’s a decent start and time will tell.

Bourne1879
Bourne1879
September 11, 2023 10:25 am

Good to see Sky News fighting back over fact checking.

Would be interesting to look back at the fact checking of Sky presenters in 2021 in relation to vaccine matters. Pretty sure they were silenced for saying things that were or later found to be true.

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
September 11, 2023 10:26 am

*so much so*

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
September 11, 2023 10:27 am

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Sep 11, 2023 10:17 AM

Try flying with Emirates as I have heard that their Business Class is good. I flew with Qatar from London onto Colombo on Business Class in 2018 and it was very good.

All pre the Virus I know and I suspect that the Virus disruptions and lockdowns haven’t helped the current situation one bit.

I had a bad experience with Quaintarse recently and will never fly with them again.

Kneel
Kneel
September 11, 2023 10:27 am

“… Qantas worked out that the prime minister would respond less than ethnically to certain inducements.”

Far be it from me to point a spellink misteaks, but this is amusingly Freudian IMO.

H B Bear
H B Bear
September 11, 2023 10:28 am

Known antivaxxer wins US Open tennis.

Lysander
Lysander
September 11, 2023 10:28 am

I watched that entire presso on YouTube yesterday DB… it was quite good viewing but also scary to see the pickle the West have gotten themselves into…

The West, who have made so many promises to Russia (since 1994) regarding Ukraine not entering into NATO have really burnt their currency. And on the flipside, Russia are also in a pickle as they have no real clear delineation as to what a “win” looks like…

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
September 11, 2023 10:31 am

Oh and a little perspective, it was 8000 bookings out of a total of over 21.25 million passenger journeys in 2022.

ACCC tells us it was 8,000 flights, not bookings. So, unless QANTAS was cancelling an extraordinary series of one pax flights, we appear to be talking 100’s of thousands of paid bookings.

The ACCC today launched action in the Federal Court of Australia alleging Qantas Airways (QAN) engaged in false, misleading or deceptive conduct, by advertising tickets for more than 8,000 flights that it had already cancelled but not removed from sale.

The ACCC alleges that for more than 8,000 flights scheduled to depart between May and July 2022, Qantas kept selling tickets on its website for an average of more than two weeks, and in some cases for up to 47 days, after the cancellation of the flights.

Roughly 25% of the total flights scheduled in that 3-month period.

I’m neither an aviationist nor a booking system IT specialist – and certainly not a shill for the ACCC. But if this kind of system outcome wasn’t deliberate, or was tolerated because of convenience (and a neat way to boost working capital), then QANTAS’s defence is probably going to have to centre on ocean-going management incompetence.

Or possibly a distraction squirrel.

Rosie
Rosie
September 11, 2023 10:36 am

In the bran new cat world computer system errors don’t exist.
We don’t even know any details of how those 8000 bookings were made but we do know it was fraud.
I’m going to assume! that far many more people got booked on to cancelled flights but accepted alternatives. Is it only fraud if you chose not to take another flight and wanted a refund or are there thousands more fraudulent bookings hiding in the Qantas supercomputer?

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
September 11, 2023 10:36 am

H B Bear
Sep 11, 2023 10:28 AM
Known antivaxxer wins US Open tennis.

And good for him too.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
September 11, 2023 10:36 am

For a company making north of $2 billion p.a. in annual profits, that’s not a disincentive. To get the new CEO’s attention, the fine will need to be $500 million+.

Tom, the answer isn’t fines.
They will flow to Treasury with the ACCC angling for a cut.
The correct remedy is refunds to the customer with extra added compensation for inconvenience.

Cassie of Sydney
September 11, 2023 10:37 am

“Would be interesting to look back at the fact checking of Sky presenters in 2021 in relation to vaccine matters. Pretty sure they were silenced for saying things that were or later found to be true.”

They were, the biggest scalp silenced was one Alan Jones. And people like Craig Kelly, George Christensen and others were regarded as persona non grata. To be fair to Sky, they were being targeted by leftist scum (who were targeting advertisers), including those two big turds, Rudd and Turdbull.

H B Bear
H B Bear
September 11, 2023 10:37 am

Agreed Faustus, could be a real problem. A lot of it is just noise and people giving the Leprechaun a kick as he makes his way out the door. Plenty of brand goodwill being done too. Long overdue IMO.

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
September 11, 2023 10:41 am

But if this kind of system outcome wasn’t deliberate, or was tolerated because of convenience (and a neat way to boost working capital), then QANTAS’s defence is probably going to have to centre on ocean-going management incompetence.

Or possibly a distraction squirrel.

Round up the Usual Suspects. And there is a small one that has just walked out the front door with a nice swag of $$$$$$$$$$.

Book ‘im Danno’.

Rosie
Rosie
September 11, 2023 10:41 am

Oh I misread the article.
Still May June July kind of points to ocean going incompetence.
Legal question. Is it fraud if they took your money for a particular flight but offered you alternatives?

Crossie
Crossie
September 11, 2023 10:41 am

Cassie of Sydney
Sep 11, 2023 9:20 AM
“Joyce may be lots of things but innocent he is not.”

Judge, jury and executioner.

That’s me.

If it’s good enough for the political left* then by being fair and pure we just let them get away with it. They need to feel the injustice of it and to remember about presumption of innocence otherwise nothing will ever change.

*Even though Joyce is/was a business leader he is still of the left.

H B Bear
H B Bear
September 11, 2023 10:44 am

Sky v Media Watch, Sky v RMIT Factcheck …
“Seconds out the ring please.” Hard to think this is not a deliberate choice.

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 10:46 am

Bear

What’s your estimate of how many fliers Q will lose as a result . I’d say it will be unnoticeable all things being equal, but they aren’t equal because they have a sheila running the airline, which is asking for trouble.

Sure, you could argue they now have two
Sheilas back to back as CEO, but that’s a story for another day.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 10:48 am

Worst Business Class flight evah.

Why?

It was a free for all on entry. Noone to help with your cabin baggage. No sense of welcome, left to jostle with other passengers who were similarly treated. Find your own way with pillows and blankets, stuff your jacket into overhead yourself, and sort it out yourself re the meals tray. Fingermarks still on the TV screen. The fake champagne was warm. The orange juice was sour. The food was atrocious. Worse than meals we’ve had on other airlines in Economy – I kid you not. The choice was limited, they ran out of some things. You had to eat when they told you to and it felt like a production line. Cabin staff were unseen at any other time and were tardy in collecting the leftovers. If you wanted anything else to eat or drink you had to go hunt for it. The toilets were not kept very clean. No help with sorting out your bedding and putting the bed down. The cover was thin and not warm enough. No help to retrieve shifted articles from the overhead on arrival.

I think overall there was just a general sense of not caring, that passengers shouldn’t expect service, that near enough was good enough with everything, that there were no little luxuries in basics like pillows and covers and snacks, let alone the meals, and no thoughts about how to make you comfortable. No attentiveness. The contrast to Asian airlines was stunning, and that probably made it seem worse for us.

OldOzzie
OldOzzie
September 11, 2023 10:51 am

Here’s why Ukraine’s defeat could mean the end of NATO in its current form

The bloc has too much riding on Kiev’s highly-unlikely success, and that’s why it’s doing all it can to prolong the conflict

As the West’s proxy war in Ukraine slips inexorably towards utter failure, the neocons behind the debacle are faced with dwindling avenues of retreat.

Early confidence that Russia, in its current form, would collapse under the pressure of the harshest sanctions regime in history failed to materialize. Early Russian miscalculations on the battlefield were not followed by a military meltdown, but by a pragmatic display of strategic adaptability, which is begrudgingly admired in the military war rooms of the West.

The Russian army, far from falling apart, has steeled itself into making bold decisions to retreat when prudent and advance when required, both of which have proven devastating for their Ukrainian opponents.

It follows that, as the Western political elites that cultivated this conflict peer into another winter of political, military, and potentially economic discontent, it is now that we potentially face the most dangerous period in Europe since the outbreak of WWII.

The catalyst for a wider war in Europe isn’t, in fact, a limited conflict in Ukraine in itself, one that started in 2014 and, notably, had been largely ignored by Western powers for almost a decade.

The real issue is that NATO, which is currently engaged in a proxy War with Russia, is facing a ‘damned if you do and damned if you don’t’ scenario regarding its growing military involvement in Ukraine.

If the US-led bloc escalates further as defeat looms, it could likely lead to direct confrontation with Russia. If it doesn’t, its proxy will collapse and leave Russia victorious, a fate once utterly unthinkable in Brussels, Washington, and London, but now becoming a nightmarish reality.

Such a defeat would be devastating and potentially terminal for the prestige and reputation of the whole NATO brand.

After all, despite the Soviet Union having long ceased to exist, the bloc still markets itself as an indispensable bulwark against imagined Russian expansionism. In the event of an increasingly likely Ukrainian defeat, that ‘essential partner’ in ‘countering Russia’ will have been proven utterly impotent and largely irrelevant.

More cynically, the vast US arms industry would also be denied a huge and lucrative market. So, how does a multi billion-dollar machine that has prophesied absolute victory against Russia even begin to contemplate defeat?

And how do senior EU bureaucrats like Ursula Von der Leyen climb down from their quasi-religious devotion to the ’cause’ of utterly defeating Russia, which she has shamelessly evangelized for over a year and a half? Lastly, how does the American administration, which has gone politically, morally, and economically ‘all in’ against Russia in Ukraine, contemplate what amounts to an increasingly inevitable European version of Afghanistan 2.0?

They will need to do two things: Firstly, find someone to blame for their defeat and secondly, find a new enemy to deflect public opinion onto.

The ‘someone to blame’ will be quite easy to identify – the narrative will be flush with attacks on states like Hungary, China, and to some extent India, who will be accused of “undermining the unified effort needed to isolate and defeat Russia.”

Blaming Ukraine itself will also be central to this narrative. Western media will insure it’s singled out as incapable of ‘taking the medicine’ proffered by NATO and therefore suffering the consequences, not listening to Western military advice, failing to utilize Western aid correctly and, of course – given that little has been done by Zelensky to tackle the endemic corruption in Ukraine – this fact will be easily weaponized against him and used to lubricate a slick narrative of ‘we tried to help them, but they simply couldn’t be saved from themselves’.

The ‘shift focus to another enemy’ narrative is the simplest and most obvious – that will be China.

NATO is already trying to expand its influence in Asia, including via a planned ‘liaison office’ in Japan.

The ‘China is the real threat’ narrative is bubbling steadily to the surface in Western media.

And, most worryingly, should Western powers fail to make their case for ‘plausible deniability’ around the culpability for this war, there is always the option of further escalating it.

Such an escalation could rapidly lead to direct confrontation between NATO and Russia, an outcome no lucid observer on either side of the debate could or should be contemplating.

The problem is, rational assessment and negotiation seem to have become so rare in Washington and Kiev that a devastating escalation could, quite remarkably, be considered an option by the deluded neocon think-tank advisers wielding disproportionate influence over an increasingly desperate political class in Washington and Brussels.

In the event that NATO does indeed sanction a direct intervention into Ukraine, it will, of course, be justified as a ‘peacekeeping’ or humanitarian intervention by Polish or Romanian troops, but the categorization of the ‘mission’ will become gloriously irrelevant when the first clashes with Russian forces occur, followed by a potentially rapid spiral into all-out war between Russia and NATO.

H B Bear
H B Bear
September 11, 2023 10:53 am

Looks like they are going to have to blast The Chook out. Stand back everyone please. No tidy Snaekers exit stage left here (no pun intended).

Kneel
Kneel
September 11, 2023 10:53 am

“How can Trump win a fixed election?”

Seems to me that all the charges and 14th amendment stuff is designed to get DJT off the ballot, and to hinder his campaigning – why bother if he can’t win?

Biden won by around 43k votes in the key swing states in 2020 – Trump won those same states by around 70k votes in 2016.

When even CNN says Trump is leading in polling, the left start panicking and will do whatever they can can stop him from winning – remember, for the left it is “whatever it takes”.

MatrixTransform
September 11, 2023 10:54 am

ocean going incompetence

that’s what we need,

a national carrier where incompetence is its own reward

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 10:56 am

Try flying with Emirates as I have heard that their Business Class is good.

Yes. We’ve flown Business with Emirates and it was something of that standard that I regard as par for the course with this type of fare. Qantas didn’t match up at all, and as we’ve flown Qantas Business in the past it was obvious that the service had precipitously declined.

Dot
Dot
September 11, 2023 11:00 am

Legal question. Is it fraud if they took your money for a particular flight but offered you alternatives?

It’s really: Did they intentionally or recklessly use deception to financially advantage themselves or to financially disadvantage another party?

H B Bear
H B Bear
September 11, 2023 11:01 am

Hard to say JC. We never did any work with airlines, I’m not sure how much of it is truly discretionary, probably less than people imagine. QAN would have much of the business market tied up I expect. Airline management at every level has always been a particular case.

John H.
John H.
September 11, 2023 11:02 am

dover0beach
Sep 11, 2023 10:58 AM
Yes, I want REPORTERS to report what is known, who said what etc. I don’t mind some opinion JOURNALISM, but I want REPORTERS first and foremost.

I don’t mind opinion journalism so long as it is quarantined within the editorial pages. I think reporting, both news and investigative, should simply orientated towards recounting or exposing the truth, respectively. Analysis sits in-between because although it is often orientated towards the truth, it typically occurs within a frame, but that is only a problem if either the analyst or the reader is under the illusion that this isn’t the case. Oakeshott has the wonderful image that the modes of experience, practice, science, and the like are varieties of dreaming but that the peculiarity of the dream of the scientist is that he’s awake.

Oakeshott has an optimistic view of scientists.

Indolent
Indolent
September 11, 2023 11:02 am
Indolent
Indolent
September 11, 2023 11:05 am
H B Bear
H B Bear
September 11, 2023 11:09 am

I haven’t been following the to and fro on this recently but if this is the case, just wow.

If it’s on that scale it will take more than a couple of jingo Ayers Rock ads to repair the damage.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
September 11, 2023 11:14 am

Known antivaxxer wins US Open tennis.

Interesting to know if subclinical mRNA vax effects lower athletic performance. I can think of a few ways it might.

Athletes do anything for a tiny increase in efficiency. It may be that the vax is causing a slight decrease, through small blood or heart changes that you wouldn’t otherwise notice. That would be consistent with the comprehensive article from yesterday.

Not much could be done about it, the Joker paid for his stand. If you ain’t allowed to play that is worse than not being at top condition. Lot of stuff is still eventually to come out about this fiasco.

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 11:18 am

Dover

What are you wowing exactly?

ROUTES Qantas is Australia’s leading domestic airline, operating more than 5,300 domestic flights a week (nearly 760 per day) and serving 67 destinations in all states and mainland territories.

What was the problematic period? How long did it go for and what was the percentage of flights in question? Also, how would you factor in coming out of a long term lockdown?

Let me remind you that only last week you were suggesting Apple exploits its customers ignoring brand recognition and many other factors. The most expensive phone on the market with 10% share is exploitive? Wow back to you.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
September 11, 2023 11:19 am

mem
Sep 11, 2023 8:50 AM

The renewables industry is cracking apart. Local suppliers are floundering.

Details, details – you pettifogging mem.

Mr McKinna said his company could only make land-based wind towers and no Australian company had the ability to build offshore towers.

If Australian companies like Keppel Prince were to invest in offshore wind tower production facilities, Mr McKinna said a guarantee of demand over an extended period of time was required to justify the investment, which could cost upwards of hundreds of millions of dollars.

“These projects need to be planned and executed with a long-term vision — not boom and bust,” he said.

“My factory is currently idle,” Mr McKinna said.

“All of those wind towers going up around Western Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland are coming in from Vietnam and China.”

But luckily, Maximum Leader has the good, well-paid Green jobs thingo sorted out:

The state government spokesperson said 59,000 local jobs would be created across the supply chain as it worked toward its target of 95 per cent renewable energy by 2035.

This included offshore wind zones and local content requirements for these projects would be set in the near future.

Apparently there are 59,000 welders and fabricators and marine crews and offshore installers standing by, waiting to spring into action. And capital and construction crews and equipment for the manufacturing tsunami and the work boats and specialist marine laydown and support facilities for the offshore work.

Just not immediately clear if they are currently in Australia.
But we will know this in the near future.

In good hands.

Kneel
Kneel
September 11, 2023 11:21 am

“I don’t mind opinion journalism…”

Nor do I – the better opinion pieces often bring up points otherwise never addressed.

However, the current crop of young “journalists” want to “make a difference” and “tell a story”. While this has it’s place, that is NOT what I want from news – what I want is for you to me THE story, not A story.
Find out what happened; find multiple sources to confirm/question official narratives; tell me what is spin and what is true as best as you can find out.
Just give me the facts under the banner “news” and make sure you clearly mark opinion as opinion. Not hard.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
September 11, 2023 11:22 am

Electric cars have a road trip problem, even for the secretary of energy

Another fine tale of woe today, and from an obvious EV fan.

Tales of Towing With Our Rivian R1T: Electric motors are great for pulling trailers, but batteries? Not so much. (10 Sep)

I dont think tradies are going to be falling over themselves to buy electric utes like the Rivian.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
September 11, 2023 11:23 am

35 minutes ago
Minns backs minister over taser death documents
Tricia Rivera
Tricia Rivera

NSW Premier Chris Minns has defended his Police Minister Yasmin Catley for refusing to release documents relating to the death of Clare Nowland.

The 95-year-old grandmother died in May this year, 7 days after she was allegedly tasered by senior constable Kristian White.

“There’s a law enforcement conduct commission inquiry, a coronial inquiry and it’s a matter before the court,” he told 2GB radio on Monday morning.

“All information from the government … (has) been provided to those agencies. Anyone that’s conducting a lawful examination into the circumstances into Clare Nowland’s death is getting full transparency from the government.”

The state Coalition submitted a freedom of information application that returned redacted pages of emails and government briefing notes into the incident.

“The application was from the leader of the opposition in relation to what was discussed or given to the minister for parliament. So not for the law enforcement commission … But what Yasmin Catley was going to say in parliament,” Mr Minns said.

“I didn’t provide that information or redact it but traditionally … advice that’s provided to parliament, so that’s written advice to the minister for question time for example, isn’t released publicly via freedom of information requests.

“The reason for that is, if you’re an official and you want to give your boss confidential advice about what’s going on with the parliament, how to answer a particular question, you do that in the knowledge that it’s not going to be on the front page of the paper the following day.”

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
September 11, 2023 11:23 am

dover0beach
Sep 11, 2023 10:58 AM
Yes, I want REPORTERS to report what is known, who said what etc. I don’t mind some opinion JOURNALISM, but I want REPORTERS first and foremost.

I remember the Good Old Days when James Dibble would read the Evening News on the ABC and just report the news.

These daze, it is all just propaganda.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 11:28 am

In support of Qantas though, it wasn’t entirely their fault that they had to bump a Business passenger down in order to fly an employee on that flight. We had the same thing happen on Hawaiian Airlines, when we flew Business back from Honolulu. I blogged about it here. We weren’t bumped as they had spare Business seats but we had booked to sit in carrels next to each other, and one of those carrels was now taken by the reserve pilot, who watched videos next to me most of the flight. We complained then, to no avail, as that seat was apparently ‘dedicated’ to an employee if needed. Why they couldn’t leave Hairy next to me and put the spare pilot in Hairy’s Business seat was not explained as anything other than ‘regulations’.

Obviously airlines gamble on having one spare Business seat somewhere should the employee condition come into play. Qantas didn’t. They’d overbooked, leaving no spare. And it was only when the media piled on about it that they offered a proper recompense to the passenger. We had to just accept our lot. Not too hard. I don’t get to sleep next to a handsome pilot very often. 🙂

Luzu
Luzu
September 11, 2023 11:29 am

Dear peoples,

The best possible news. The young fella missing in Ukraine has been found alive. It appears he was separated from his unit for a time and there was deep concern for him. But he has now been located.

Deepest thankfulness and gratitude in my heart.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 11:34 am

I want REPORTERS first and foremost.

Yep. Back to the days of Lois Lane, Reporter on the Daily Planet.

The rot set in with Journalism at universities.
Suddenly everyone wanted to be important, to be a ‘journalist’, with opinions.
Cadets doing the Courts round and the Shipping News no longer existed.

Cassie of Sydney
September 11, 2023 11:34 am

“Luzu
Sep 11, 2023 11:29 AM”

Amen.

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 11:35 am

Good to hear Luzu. You made the war a little more personal for the rest of us. I was actually thinking about that kid during the week.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 11:36 am

Deepest thankfulness and gratitude in my heart.

Uptick and best wishes for such good news, Luzu. It is what we were all hoping and I’ll bet what some were praying for too.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
September 11, 2023 11:37 am

In support of Qantas though, it wasn’t entirely their fault that they had to bump a Business passenger down in order to fly an employee on that flight.

Lizzie – Wrong way of going about it. They should’ve offered the employee $1000 if he flew economy. Would cost a lot less. Ok the EBA required that union wukkas have to fly business class, but what wukka would turn up their nose at a thousand bucks?

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
September 11, 2023 11:37 am

We had to just accept our lot. Not too hard. I don’t get to sleep next to a handsome pilot very often.

I once got to sleep next to Susie O’Neil (at the height of her butterfly career) on the Redeye back from Perth.

I imagine she still talks about it.

Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 11:37 am

NSW Premier Chris Minns has defended his Police Minister Yasmin Catley for refusing to release documents relating to the death of Clare Nowland.

The 95-year-old grandmother died in May this year, 7 days after she was allegedly tasered by senior constable Kristian White.

Bio:

Yasmin Maree Catley is an Australian politician who has served as Minister for Police and Counter-terrorism in New South Wales since 2023. She was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as the member for Swansea for the Labor Party at the 2015 New South Wales state election.[2]

Formerly a librarian with the Lake Macquarie City Council, she has worked in the offices of Federal Labor MPs Greg Combet and Anthony Albanese. She is married to Robert Coombs who himself served as the member for Swansea from 2007 to 2011.[3]

Just another professional political parasite who’s never had had a real job outside government. The Liars Pardy specialises in them.

The NSW police minister is a former frikking council librarian — so reassuring for the wallopers on the beat!

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 11:38 am

Totally agree, Dover.

For any business in a very competitive market, that’s the top of the pyramid in terms of where you want to be. They worked hard with their brand. How is that exploitive though in a market with much cheaper options?

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
September 11, 2023 11:43 am

Lady, I think the problem is the product, not the advertising…

‘Labor has failed miserably’: Independent Senator Jacqui Lambie scathing of government amid poor Voice polling (Sky News, 11 Sep)

Jacqui Lambie has accused the federal government of doing a “lousy” job promoting the Indigenous Voice to Parliament in the wake of a dire new poll.

The latest poll, by Resolve Strategic for the Nine newspapers, has the Voice failing on October 14 in all states, with the exception of Tasmania.

Overall support for the Constitutional change slumped to 43 per cent, while those against it increased to 57 per cent.

“Also, I just think Labor has done a really lousy job of selling this to be brutally honest.

“I think Labor has failed miserably. Once again, I hope they have a plan B ready, just in case.”

To be fair she gives Albo a serve about the cost of living, which is absolutely correct. But says zilch about why the cost of living is skyrocketing.

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 11:47 am

Just not immediately clear if they are currently in Australia.
But we will know this in the near future.

In good hands.

I know absolutely nothing about building and maintaining wind factories, but if I was put in a room and told to think about it, and write down what would need to be done, I would do better than our fool investors and politicians are doing now.

What is wrong with these people? The mind is so open their brains have fallen out?

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
September 11, 2023 11:51 am

The latest poll, by Resolve Strategic for the Nine newspapers, has the Voice failing on October 14 in all states, with the exception of Tasmania.

No resting on these laurels yet, please. The sheer massive force of advertising, plus the sense of being the ‘underdog’ could see the Yes Vote still rise from the dead and sneak in to defeat us. There is only one poll that counts.

Salvatore, Iron Publican
September 11, 2023 11:52 am

Farnham’s song, far from being a “Game Changer” (as was crowed about non-stop last week by the yes/left) appears to have had not even the slightest, most miniscule, upward impact on the Yes vote.

John H.
John H.
September 11, 2023 11:55 am

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Sep 11, 2023 11:34 AM
I want REPORTERS first and foremost.

Yep. Back to the days of Lois Lane, Reporter on the Daily Planet.

The rot set in with Journalism at universities.
Suddenly everyone wanted to be important, to be a ‘journalist’, with opinions.
Cadets doing the Courts round and the Shipping News no longer existed.

For the most part journalism is a lost cause. I prefer content creators. For example, I just watched an interview with Eric Weinstein. He makes some very good points about the decay of institutions. The interview was 15 minutes. In the MSM the interviews are less than 5 and usually just soundbites. Why bother with journalists and the MSM when content creators can provide much greater analytic breadth and depth, and source so many individuals rather than the usual talking heads?

Kneel
Kneel
September 11, 2023 11:57 am

“Yep. Back to the days of Lois Lane, Reporter on the Daily Planet.”

I recently subscribed to the US Epoch Times video-only offer they had – $US1 /month for 12 months.
If you want to check out what is available, you can log in with an email address only and watch 10 or so videos.
My favourites are: “Facts Matter” and “American Thought Leaders”, but there are docos as well and many other shows. You can also find (most) Facts Matter eps and “teasers” for American Thought Leaders on eww-tube (but many vids are taken down for “mis/dis-information”, even though the news reporting is fully cited to source links on the vid page).
I’m happy with it so far – worth more than what I pay, IMO.

Kneel
Kneel
September 11, 2023 12:02 pm

“As you said last week, they [Apple] are making 90% of the profits from 10% of the share in the phone market.”

Apple may have 10% of the global market, but have much higher penetration in the US and “the west” in general.

Tom
Tom
September 11, 2023 12:04 pm

Robert Gottliebsen on Qantas:

Qantas is looming as arguably the biggest corporate governance failure in Australia’s history, outside companies that run into serious financial difficulties as a result of their failures.
Potentially, the Qantas governance morass could trigger endless class actions and/or corporate investigations, which will tie the company up for many years.
What makes this so serious for Australia is the fact that, although it is a listed company, Qantas dominates our air transport in business, freight, tourism, and in time of war, defence. The nation can’t afford such a vital company to be crippled by governance issues. Worse still, the governance issues involve the chairman and board members as much as they involve the former CEO, Alan Joyce.
Accordingly, I urge chairman Richard Goyder to act in the national interest and recruit a top chair for Qantas – possibly one who is prepared to be, for a short time, executive chairman.
At the same time, the new chair with Goyder’s help needs to reconstruct the board.
Without a top new chair and a reconstituted board, new CEO Vanessa Hudson, as a top executive in the troubled days, has little chance of extracting herself from the mess.
I don’t believe CBA CEO Matt Comyn, who faced a similar though not as difficult a situation as Hudson on taking office, could have avoided being caught in the 2018 morass of the CBA without having a magnificent chair in Catherine Livingstone.
I am an admirer of Goyder, which why I have faith in him doing the right thing by Qantas and the nation. Sadly, he made the mistake of taking on the chair of arguably the three most difficult organisations in this country – the AFL Commission, Woodside and Qantas. His talents were spread too thin, and living in Perth did not help.
We should not forget that when Joyce took the Qantas CEO reigns under then chairman Leigh Clifford the public company was akin to a government body with management dominated by the unions.
Joyce, under the eye of Clifford, an outstanding job taking the company into the 21st century. And while undertaking the task he kept the brand in great shape.
But 15 years is often too long to be CEO, and in his last years he became totally besotted with maximising the profit and was prepared to trash relations with staff and customers in the process.
And the board and chairman watched ringside the resulting destruction of the Qantas brand and staff relations, thanks to the graphic and regular findings of Morgan Research. The evidence was there, but neither the chairman nor the board intervened. Had they done so, they might have discovered the ACCC alleged fictitious ticket rackets and refund scandals.
Anecdotally, one of the early chairman of Qantas, Sir Lenox Hewitt, loved sitting up in the front of the aircraft but regularly wandered back to talk to passengers in economy to understand what was really happening to the company’s customers. The tradition didn’t pass down to the current generation of directors.
That director failure means the governance issues facing the company are substantial.
Qantas has a 70 per cent market share and has become vital to our so many parts of our community. I repeat, we cannot afford this vital Australian company to fall into a governance morass. Yet the issues cover a wide area:
*When did the ACCC begin investigating the company’s fictitious ticket booking practices, and who knew about the investigation? Presumably the chairman did. Presumably the board. If so, in my view, this was vital market information that was not passed on. Those who knew about the investigation and withheld the information obviously had a different view to me about market relevance, but it’s a view that will be hard to substantiate.
*The issuing of fictitious tickets and delays in cancellation payments greatly boosted Qantas cash flow. In a company that pays large amounts to lease aircraft, this can be a boost to profits. Was the Qantas cancellation merry go around and fictitious ticket scandal simply a tactic to further inflate profits? If so, what was the boost?
*The Qantas CEO, chair and board correctly ran down the capacity of the airline to minimise losses during the Covid shutdowns and were understandably caught by the sudden resurgence in demand. What was required was a massive exercise of staff and customer relations that would have cost large amounts of money via one-off compensation and incentive programs, but would have retained the faith of its customers and staff. Profits would have been reduced
*Why did the company suddenly decide to increase its share buyback rate late in May 2023 when presumably the board knew about the ACCC investigation, and the boost being given to profits by the failure to refund cancellations?
*Who gave permission for the CEO to sell his shares into the buyback rather than to wait until the profit and ACCC investigation was announced? Once the ACCC investigation was announced, the shares fell sharply.
*Why on earth would Qantas have so publicly backed a political issue such as the “yes” campaign in the full knowledge that many of its shareholders, customers and suppliers had a different view. One explanation is that is sought good relations with the Albanese government at the same time the government was considering what to do with the Qatar airlines expansion application. (In what is probably a coincidence, but the AFL Commission backed “yes” while the federal government was considering backing the Hobart stadium).
The industry superannuation funds are major shareholders in Qantas, and they will be debating whether to take legal action. What they should do is ensure that Goyder does what he is required to do. Both ASIC and ACCC will need to devote large resources to the issues. Qantas itself will need to devote resources, which is why the chair may need to be an executive chair for a short time.
I believe that a new chair and a reconstructed board should be able to take a fresh approach to these matters and sort them out in what ever way is appropriate.
We may find that in some of the above situations that the company did nothing wrong at all. But there is no way Goyder and Hudson can resolve those issues, given their possible involvement in the knowledge or decision-making process.
Richard Goyder at this stage is the best possible person to select a top chair and, with that chair, reconstruct the board. He will then be able to leave the company knowing that he had the courage to realise the seriousness of the situation and to have acted in the national interest.
The worst possible thing for Qantas is if he tries to hang on and he and the company gets caught up in a total morass. And it is Australia that has the most to lose if he takes that course.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
September 11, 2023 12:05 pm

It’s obvious. We’ve been manic about playing ball games right throughout human history.

Early humans deliberately made mysterious stone ‘spheroids’ (Phys.org, 10 Sep)

The early ancestors of humans deliberately made stones into spheres 1.4 million years ago, a study said on Wednesday, though what prehistoric people used the balls for remains a mystery.

The team of scientists examined 150 limestone spheroids dating from 1.4 million years ago which were found at the ‘Ubeidiya archaeological site, in the north of modern-day Israel.

Using 3D analysis to reconstruct the geometry of the stones, the researchers determined that their sphericalness was “likely to have been produced intentionally”.

The early hominins—exactly which human lineage they belonged to remains unknown—had “attempted to achieve the Platonic ideal of a sphere”, they said.

But exactly why our ancestors went to the effort of crafting spheres remains a mystery.

Ugg, I bet you this deer carcass I can throw my ball nearer to that stick than you can with your ball.

shatterzzz
September 11, 2023 12:05 pm

but what wukka would turn up their nose at a thousand bucks?

Don’t know what Qantas payz pilots but I’m guessing he earn’t close to a $1 000 just walking from check-in to his seat ……. course if it were cash-in-hand! .. but we all know Qantas is as pure as falling snow so wouldn’t happen …
both CEOs, past & present, tellz us, as does our PM .. and none of those 3 would tell fibz, would they ..?

Fair Shake
Fair Shake
September 11, 2023 12:05 pm

In seven years, Welcoming Australia has grown from an idea and grassroots movement into an organisation that leads and activates the most extensive network for advancing social cohesion nationwide.

Thank you. You are part of this.

…..

In the face of geopolitical violence, climate change and the visible rise of xenophobia in parts of Europe and the global north – our collective efforts have never been more critical.

A new lot we have to deal with. ‘Welcoming Australia’. On the surface v soft language. Who could not agree? (Assuming youre a CC zealot). Dig down and its another swamp organisation with big objectives. Coming to a workplace tax trough near you.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
September 11, 2023 12:09 pm

The fun police come for circuses.

German circus replaces live animals with holograms (Phys.org, 10 Sep)

“It is no longer appropriate for Roncalli to show real animals in the ring,” circus boss Patrick Philadelphia, 49, told AFP.

Why would you bother?

shatterzzz
September 11, 2023 12:10 pm

Treated myself to a prezzie .. lotza building brick models of the TITANIC around but this is the 1st time I’ve come across .. sinking …..!

https://ibb.co/Qbvrb8y

JC
JC
September 11, 2023 12:12 pm

Because they know it means that their users will purchase products that are inferior price/performance compared with their competitors. Not so much the case now with their computers, the M1 and M2 chips have been very good, but their computers prior to this, particularly their desktops, were mid.

You appear to be confused with cause and effect. Also, why is your knowledge superior to the millions of people who buy an iPhone: that it’s an inferior product?

I’d equally argue that it’s superior and millions of folks agree with me.

They have found the sweet spot in terms of the revenue/sales profit curve that is supported by their customers. In a very competitive market it’s hardly exploitive.
Should we abuse a company which maximises its profit potential? Is that where we’re heading now?

Kneel
Kneel
September 11, 2023 12:16 pm

“…their computers prior to this, particularly their desktops, were mid.”

They never sold on performance, they sold on ease of use.
To be honest, Apple has “plug and play”, everyone else has “plug and pray” – related to their closed software systems, which of course also has downsides.

And they at least told the FBI to go jump when they wanted a “back door” into all phones, saying instead “give us the phone and we’ll get you access”.

So while I’m not a huge fan myself, I can see why many are.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
September 11, 2023 12:18 pm

I know absolutely nothing about building and maintaining wind factories, but if I was put in a room and told to think about it, and write down what would need to be done, I would do better than our fool investors and politicians are doing now.

No disrespect, any reasonably sentient human could do this better than the retards with their hands on the wheel.

I know I crap on about this, but governments and their carers have had the benefit of having all these issues and pitfalls and traps for young players – the ones currently tearing the arse out of the National trousers – explained patiently to them in easy terms by people with credible expertise and capacity to plan forward. For years.

What you are seeing in your lived experience is willful misconduct – not unexpected circumstances.

shatterzzz
September 11, 2023 12:25 pm

The sheer massive force of advertising, plus the sense of being the ‘underdog’ could see the Yes Vote still rise from the dead and sneak in to defeat us.

If you’ve already decided to vote NO, cos like me you know YES is a con, or simply watched/read/listened to all the for/against arguments why would you, between now and 14 Oct, be swayed by more YES advertising …..!
I’d be very surprised if there are many “swing” voters left to convince .. most folk, I’d expect, have already decided which way they are going, they just prefer to keep it too themselves ……..
still if there is one thing gummint excels at it’s throwing more OPM at ego driven pie-in-the-sky ideas ..

John H.
John H.
September 11, 2023 12:27 pm

Dr Faustus
Sep 11, 2023 12:18 PM
I know absolutely nothing about building and maintaining wind factories, but if I was put in a room and told to think about it, and write down what would need to be done, I would do better than our fool investors and politicians are doing now.

No disrespect, any reasonably sentient human could do this better than the retards with their hands on the wheel.

I know I crap on about this, but governments and their carers have had the benefit of having all these issues and pitfalls and traps for young players – the ones currently tearing the arse out of the National trousers – explained patiently to them in easy terms by people with credible expertise and capacity to plan forward. For years.

What you are seeing in your lived experience is willful misconduct – not unexpected circumstances.

Dr. Faustus do you know anything about road construction? Near my home there has been ongoing freeway upgrade on a bridge that has lasted 4 years and still far from complete. I don’t understand why it takes so long to complete these projects.

Kneel
Kneel
September 11, 2023 12:35 pm

” I don’t understand why it takes so long to complete these projects.”

I am far from expert, however I can tell you there is a lot of “unseen” prep work going on for this sort of project – foundations that need to cure completely and so on.
Remember – this is not a shed in your back yard, this is public infrastructure that will be (presumably) heavily used for decades. A little bit of paranoia and over-engineering is preferable in these cases and that can mean taking the time to ensure everything is OK before proceeding to the next step.

John H.
John H.
September 11, 2023 12:37 pm

shatterzzz
Sep 11, 2023 12:25 PM
The sheer massive force of advertising, plus the sense of being the ‘underdog’ could see the Yes Vote still rise from the dead and sneak in to defeat us.

If you’ve already decided to vote NO, cos like me you know YES is a con, or simply watched/read/listened to all the for/against arguments why would you, between now and 14 Oct, be swayed by more YES advertising …..!
I’d be very surprised if there are many “swing” voters left to convince .. most folk, I’d expect, have already decided which way they are going, they just prefer to keep it too themselves ……..
still if there is one thing gummint excels at it’s throwing more OPM at ego driven pie-in-the-sky ideas ..

The Noel Pearson interview on Insiders yesterday was laughable. He remarked how the indigenous people by offering the Voice were expressing their love to the Australian people. His tone was so different from months ago when he had an arrogant attitude to doubters and was full of bluster and confidence.

I’ve long thought most Australians tolerated the arguments of activists. We didn’t want to challenge them and hoped that at some point saner heads would prevail. Price and Mundine gave us confidence in that regard but both have been demonised by the activists.

The activists deserve to lose this vote. They didn’t realise that most Australians quietly believed that the problems of indigenous people were principally about the hopeless idealism that remote communities would allow indigenous people to live their traditional lifestyle.

We don’t need more of the same voices telling us we’re racists and don’t care about the plight of those in remote communities. Most of us are disheartened and in despair about the plight of some indigenous people. We also know that the activists can’t solve these problems.

The failure of the referendum may be the best thing that ever happened to indigenous people because it might promote new voices, new perspectives, and new ideas.

John H.
John H.
September 11, 2023 12:38 pm

Kneel
Sep 11, 2023 12:35 PM
” I don’t understand why it takes so long to complete these projects.”

I am far from expert, however I can tell you there is a lot of “unseen” prep work going on for this sort of project – foundations that need to cure completely and so on.
Remember – this is not a shed in your back yard, this is public infrastructure that will be (presumably) heavily used for decades. A little bit of paranoia and over-engineering is preferable in these cases and that can mean taking the time to ensure everything is OK before proceeding to the next step.

Thanks Kneel. Looking to overseas examples might help me understand this better.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
September 11, 2023 12:38 pm

And they at least told the FBI to go jump when they wanted a “back door” into all phones

Bit of a flap at the moment about Pegasus spyware on iPads and iPhones.

Update your iPhone now! Pegasus malware may be tracking your location (11 Sep)

Cassie of Sydney
September 11, 2023 12:40 pm

I don’t believe the journalism of Janet Albrechtsen in relation to the Lehrmann disgrace has been “a lost cause”, nor has the journalism of Sharri Markson in relation to the origins of the Covid virus been “a lost cause”.

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