1,418 thoughts on “Open Thread – Wed 1 June 2022”

  1. The idea of, “Hey, you want to turf Her Maj? Well, all those juicy Governor and Governor General gigs are gone too” kind of appeals to me.

    When the troughers currently in those roles (as opposed to ‘in those jobs’) realise this, they will embark on a campaign for net zero monarchs by 2050.


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  2. Justice Brennan’s Mabo decision will always be criticised but he was a big figure by any estimation.
    He made it known before he died that he did not want a state funeral.
    Just a Requiem Mass.

    I had a brief conversation with him once. Lovely man.


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  3. Alarmists are compartmentally insane; the psychology is fascinating. I’ve been arguing with them for nearly 15 years. Some are really smart, others are bovine. But all of them snap to an emotional state when the subject arises. The smartest will tokenise some of the stock alarmist shibboleths and when easily demolished lapse into personal insults and anger.

    I content myself these days, since The Climate Sceptics blog was cancelled by big tech, in ringing marginally sympathetic DJs and trying to keep the punters informed so when the shit hits the fan and the lights go out they have some direction for their anger.


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  4. The ABC isn’t reporting on this yet:

    A woman who was once involved in an online relationship with newly elected Labor MP Jerome Laxale claims the ALP brushed off several complaints alleging he possessed intimate photos of her.

    The woman, who chose to remain anonymous, claimed she was involved in a relationship with the member for Bennelong when he solicited her for nude photos, The Daily Telegraph reported.

    She alleged during the course of their relationship, which lasted from October 2020 to November 2021, Mr Laxale requested “private photos, nude photos, as well as suggestive photos”.

    The relationship ended amicably, with the woman assuming Mr Laxale would delete the images.

    However, when the woman worked for Mr Laxale in April this year as a Union member assigned to his campaign, she was told by rival Liberal campaigners they had “seen the pictures on Jerome’s laptop”.

    1. Not sure how you have an “online relationship.”
    2. Not sure why she shared intimate pictures with a bloke she wasn’t even going out with.
    3. Not sure how Liberals could see what was on his laptop.


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  5. If m0nty-fa is so keen on a federal ICAC, how about we suggest that all politicians in Parliament on 1 July 2022 explain to the new ICAC how they financed their investment houses.

    I wonder how many will suddenly find a need to spend more time with their families?


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  6. Is the tide turning?

    Amber has to sling 15Mil to the pirate – not that he’ll ever see it – even if she won powerball the legal vultures would swallow it. Meanwhile Pistol & Boo continue to eat and shit.

    And in Geelong according to the Hun…….

    A woman who had sex with a Geelong plastic surgeon admits she lied to medical regulators about the affair because she felt “hard done by” when he cut contact with her.

    But don’t get too optimistic lads. You’ll still need a signed declaration of consent witnessed by a JP if you want a stray root.


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  7. shatterzzz says:
    June 2, 2022 at 8:39 pm

    Coles CEO Steve Cain says supermarkets are being forced to jack up their prices
    He said suppliers demanding price rises have increased five-fold in the last year

    Aldi on the other hand are generally bringing prices back down from their pandemic highs. Some things are the cheapest I can recall.

    Coles is forgetting their role as price advocate for the consumer against the suppliers.
    I hope Aldi continue to eat their lunch


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  8. I had a brief conversation with him once. Lovely man.

    I didn’t know him but I’ve read a lot of his Judgments, including Mabo. Mabo is a travesty. It is pure Judge made law. it combines elements of English law to do with their dealings with new lands, both unoccupied and occupied and selects bits, contradictorily, to justify that aboriginal law existed and could be recognised by English law.


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  9. That description of the ‘relationship’ in the Daily Telegraph:

    The woman, who has asked The Daily Telegraph not to reveal her identity, claimed she was in an intimate online relationship with Jerome Laxale…



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  10. Dr Faustus,

    Just wanted you to know that all my passwords at work from now on will be some variation of KOKKSMOKER. Because I laughed out loud when I read that. Not sure how to work an umlaut in but.

    For the rest of you lot*:

    Richard II was starved to death in Pontefract Castle. And who was the keeper of that castle? None other than Thomas Swynford, son of Katherine Swynford (the lover/mistress/wife of John of Gaunt) and step-brother (of sorts) to Henry of Bolingbroke, later to be crowned Henry IV.

    Anya Seton’s book Katherine was referenced on this blog by Lizzie not so long ago. I devoured that book in my teens. Apparently, Katherine was possessed of incredible feminine beauty** and despite her lowly origins, she became the ancestress of just about every monarch of England since the mid-fifteenth century. I am thinking of making a pilgrimage to her resting place in Lincolnshire.

    * I have gone through several variations of Monty’s name and settled on C**tifa. Monty – Munty – C**ty – C**tifa. Why? Because his very first thought when those children died in Uvalde was not the suffering of their parents but the utility of those deaths to persecute his political enemies. What a total c**t.

    **Just goes to show men love a good-looking root.

    And, yes, I am having a laugh. Men are visual creatures but also much more forgiving of female flaws than women expect.


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  11. “Anya Seton’s book Katherine was referenced on this blog by Lizzie not so long ago. I devoured that book in my teens. “

    Luzu. I adored the book. I have it somewhere.


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  12. “Justice Brennan’s Mabo decision will always be criticised but he was a big figure by any estimation.
    He made it known before he died that he did not want a state funeral.
    Just a Requiem Mass.

    I had a brief conversation with him once. Lovely man.”

    I’ve heard the same. His son, Father Frank Brennan is also a thoroughly decent man…and remember, he was willing to put his head above the parapet to defend Cardinal Pell.


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  13. “Because his very first thought when those children died in Uvalde was not the suffering of their parents but the utility of those deaths to persecute his political enemies. What a total c**t.”

    Yep.


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  14. Luzu

    I have gone through several variations of Monty’s name and settled on C**tifa. Monty – Munty – C**ty – C**tifa. Why? Because his very first thought when those children died in Uvalde was not the suffering of their parents but the utility of those deaths to persecute his political enemies. What a total c**t.

    I use the “fa” on the end as a reference to his great mates, Antifa. It is an unsubtle dig at him for behaving like a fascist, while claiming to oppose fascism.


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  15. it combines elements of English law to do with their dealings with new lands, both unoccupied and occupied and selects bits, contradictorily, to justify that aboriginal law existed and could be recognised by English law.

    All right, again, can any of the bush lawyers here help out. Mabo declared Australia was “settled.” What would the legal status of the indigenous been, had Mabo declared Australia “invaded?”


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  16. Hahahahaha, converted demonrat in 2022.

    That’s the way to do it.

    Big-spending billionaires are upending politics. The Los Angeles mayor’s race is the latest test.
    Billionaire Rick Caruso has spent himself into contention for mayor of the nation’s second-biggest city.

    Even by the cash-flush standards of modern politics, Rick Caruso’s run for mayor of Los Angeles has been a shock-and-awe spending campaign.



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  17. Good points.

    The FBI knew exactly who Sussmann was — he’d represented the DNC when its servers were hacked, and blocked the FBI from conducting its own forensic investigation. When Sussmann purveyed supposed evidence of a Trump-Russia communications back channel, the bureau knew full well that it was getting political information from a partisan source. The evidence at trial showed that FBI headquarters concealed Sussmann’s identity from the bureau’s own investigating agents. The FBI’s investigation-opening document falsely claimed that the information had come not from Sussmann but from the Justice Department. And even when the information proved bogus, FBI headquarters directed that the agents open a full-blown counterintelligence investigation anyway. Trump’s obvious innocence made no difference.

    You can’t prove a false-statements charge unless it is established that the investigating agency was fooled by the lie. In Sussmann’s trial, the proof showed that the cover story did not fool the FBI; it enabled the FBI, which was second only to the Clinton campaign in its commitment to pursuing the Trump-Russia “collusion” tale.

    Powerful federal agencies interfered in a presidential election, on behalf of one candidate against the other. The public needs accountability for that. It won’t get accountability if Durham continues to portray the FBI as a witless dupe, rather than a willing collaborator.



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  18. KD at 9:07.

    When the troughers currently in those roles (as opposed to ‘in those jobs’) realise this, they will embark on a campaign for net zero monarchs by 2050.

    Dot said earlier that there was more to a GG’s “job” than the reserve powers.
    Like what?
    If we must have a republic, the reserve powers could be transferred to the High Court but it could not initiate action against a government in and of itself. Someone (likely an opposition party) would have to petition the HC to exercise those powers.
    What else?
    Swearing in of ministers? Again, the Chief Justice of the High Court.
    “Royal Assent” to Acts of Parliament. Well, in a Republic, Royal Assent is kind of redundant. The Speaker of the House and President of the Senate could jointly affirm that an Act has properly passed both Houses.
    Anything further, apart from ribbon cutting, being patron of charities and hoovering up taxpayer cash?


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  19. I don’t understand defamation law in the US and possibly in Oz too.

    Depp accused Amber Turd of signing off on a defamatory opinion piece in the WaPo.

    If WaPo ran the piece why isn’t the newspaper in trouble instead of Turd?


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  20. Mabo declared Australia was “settled.” What would the legal status of the indigenous been, had Mabo declared Australia “invaded?”

    The Judgment is a mess. It throws around 3 types of arrival: conquest/invasion, cession/settlement or occupation/terra nullius. Generally invasion extinguishes rights, cession an orderly transfer of rights and terra nullius no rights existed to be destroyed or transferred. If the HC said it was settled, after they disavowed terra nullius then rights could exist (and neither could activism based on invasion) so they said the special case of non-terra nullius meant that even though an invasion of sorts happened there was still an orderly transfer so rights could still exist. Furthermore those rights were recognised by Common Law but could be extinguished by legislation consistent with the constitution and existing legislation such as the RDA. Hence the rush to implement the Native Title Act 1993 by Keating.

    Initially NT had limited application to crown land but woke politics now see it intruding on nearly every type of title with the logical conclusion that the 3rd nations will get their own parliament.


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  21. If WaPo ran the piece why isn’t the newspaper in trouble instead of Turd?

    I dunno.
    Maybe as the writer/source of an Op-Ed piece she indemifies the paper.
    Perhaps Cap’n Jack just decided she was the target he was after.


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  22. All right, again, can any of the bush lawyers here help out. Mabo declared Australia was “settled.” What would the legal status of the indigenous been, had Mabo declared Australia “invaded?”

    It would have been easier for Mabo to win.
    Under the law before Mabo overturned it English law applied automatically (more or less) to a “settled” colony, but in a “conquered” colony the pre-conquest law continued until and unless overruled by the relevant authorities of the conqueror (e.g. the Imperial Parliament at Westminster or a colonial legislature).
    So if the Islands had been “conquered” Mabo would have owned his land unless the government could have proved that some law had deprived him of it. The Mabo decision basically abolished the distinction between “conquered” colonies and “settled” colonies where there were inhabitants already there at the time of “settlement”. The old rule now applies only to absolutely deserted territory.


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  23. Sorry Z2KA I think you’ve now got two not entirely consistent explanations.
    But whichever of us is nearer correct specifically, cohenite is right that the judgment is a mess.


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  24. C.L.says:

    June 2, 2022 at 10:28 pm

    The Sussman jury was rigged.

    I suspect the more correct term is “the jury pool was stacked”.


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  25. Sorry Z2KA I think you’ve now got two not entirely consistent explanations.
    But whichever of us is nearer correct specifically, cohenite is right that the judgment is a mess.

    I’m just remembering two of the situations that arose..

    1 – Running the family farm, there was a programme of a Government grant, for fencing off salt affected land, and planting it to salt bush. I applied for such a grant to be told that “It would facilitate the process, if you had permission from the traditional owners.”

    Research revealed that the “traditional owners” lived two hundred kilometers away, and had never set foot on the property in their lives.

    2 – A meeting of farmers was addressed by a certain prominent activist, who informed the meeting that they would just have to sit down with the tribal elders, and renegotiate the terms under which they occupied Aboriginal land.

    Certain parties had “lunched well” and asked said activist, if they would be sitting down with the elders, and renegotiating the terms under which they had brought a house, on Aboriginal land..

    “I took out a mortgage, and paid for that land…”


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  26. CM article on day 4 of Qld Police vax mandate hearing. It cant be said enough but senior QPS command and Dr Griffin are scum. Made worse by the fact the press has gone along with it and clearly are intent to do so. It is clear to all the vax do not work as intended but lets keep jabbing anyway. Meanwhile their Union does nothing. The guys fighting the mandate are the ones I would want in the Police and my utmost respect to them.

    4 days so far and nobody from Qld Health or CHO called. Do we even still have a CHO or is the smug Dr Griffin now it ?

    If some want to do a Google on Dr Griffin you find he works for an Aussie company called Nucleus Network ($600m value) who conduct many medical trials, mainly for overseas pharma, in Oz. Speed is one of their key offerings to clients. He features prominently in their promotional material and in their Youtube clips. One of the trials he led in Oz was for Novovax and his comments prior to approval in Oz was that it would probably be used as a booster shot. This turned out not to be the case as it was initially approved for 2 first shots but not as a booster. Call me cynical but it was only approved as a booster after initial take up of Novovax was so bad. Naturally the trials were conducted well before Omicron but I guess when you are such an expert that is a minor matter.

    Griffin appears regularly on TV (the Project on Monday and mentioned in Daily Mail), radio and pretty much weekly in the CM. He constantly pushes getting the next jab as he did in his evidence below. When he is referred to in the press it is as an expert from the Mater Hospital. Since he must get significant financial benefit from Nucleus Network (ie. big pharma) would it be a conflict to be one of the most prominent in the country advocating for more booster shots. Or at least mention his connection to Nucleus.

    So the question is to those QPS cops who took the first shots, how many do you think the organisation is going to want to impose ?

    On 1 November 2021 Nucleus Network was taken over by a well known international company. Go to end of post to see which !

    “A deputy police commissioner has denied recommending that a mandatory vaccination direction be introduced to stop some police officers’ resentment of unvaccinated officers. Deputy Commissioner Doug Smith said he knew that an earlier direction requiring police on border control be vaccinated against Covid-19 caused “some disquiet’’.

    Mr Smith was under cross-examination by counsel for police trying to overturn a mandatory vaccination direction. More than 60 police and 12 ambulance officers are involved in the first legal challenge to mandatory vaccination, in a civil trial in Brisbane Supreme Court.

    Mr Smith said he was aware of speculation that police who did not want to work on border control refused to get vaccinated so they could avoid that work. He said he also was aware of speculation that officers who had been vaccinated and were eligible to be sent to border control resented unvaccinated colleagues who were deployed elsewhere. Dominic Villa SC put to Mr Smith that he recommended to Commissioner Katarina Carroll that a vaccination direction be introduced to remove the source of resentment among officers.

    “That is not correct,’’ replied Mr Smith, who was involved in helping Ms Carroll prepare her vaccination directions. He also was responsible for monitoring compliance with vaccination directions. Mr Villa put to Mr Smith that he understood that the only way police could access stage one of the vaccination rollout was to introduce mandatory vaccination. (am I reading this right – the only way frontline officers could be in first to get vax was if it was mandatory for all). “There was a connection there,’’ Mr Smith said, but he denied it was why he recommended that the Commissioner introduce a mandatory vaccination direction last year.

    “It is your own feeling that it is unjust for Queensland police officers and staff members to remain unvaccinated, correct?’’ Mr Villa said.“I’m not passionate about it, no,’’ Mr Smith said. He denied Mr Villa’s suggestion that he regarded the police applicants in the Supreme Court proceeding as “troublemakers’’.

    Under a court stay order, QPS is not allowed to take disciplinary action against the unvaccinated police who are suspended on pay, while their application is before the court. It was put to the Mr Smith in instructing Crown law to seek to have the stay lifted earlier this year it was to provide the basis for termination of the officers’ jobs. “It was to get the culmination of proceedings which had been on foot for some time,’’ Mr Smith said. He agreed that until the stay was lifted he was hamstrung in instituting proceedings against the officers.

    Infectious diseases expert Professor Paul Griffin also was cross-examined about a report he provided to the court, for the Police Commissioner and Queensland Ambulance Service. He agreed the Omicron variant appeared to accentuate rapid waning of vaccine protection. Prof Griffin also was asked if vaccines provided limited or no protection against infection from Omicron. “I wouldn’t say it’s limited to no (protection), it’s certainly reduced compared to previous variants,” Prof Griffin said.

    Prof Griffin agreed that for any benefit against transmissibility of Omicron it was necessary for regular boosters to be administered.

    The hearing is continuing.

    BLACKSTONE.


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  27. “Mastermind Australia” is a shit show.
    The contestants are all podgy, usually 2/4 fluid and fruity, and have white trash expert subjects based on TV or fillums.
    The compere- an ABC/SBS legacy appointment- has the enraging qualities of being both yappy and somehow slurringly ill-enunciated.
    The show usually runs as me muttering at the screen during the expert round, and my kids getting more than the grown-up contestants in general knowledge.
    Hard Quiz is little different, mainly the panel format and a host who is even more up himself.
    The End. That’s my contribution to overnight Catwatch.


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  28. Bourne, thanks for posting that.
    Famous trials, blow by blow: Depp v Heard, Ben Roberts-Smith, Brittany Higgins Pty Ltd.
    Trials that never actually happened: Maxwell, Sussmann, Jab Command resistance… anyone taking on the Lizard People.


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  29. Top Ender reporting in from the front line of fighting back against masks.

    Jetstar offered anyone without a mask on a free one to get onto the plane. I wore mine until 5 mins after takeoff and then dispensed with it. None of the trolley dollies cared.


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  30. The whole sordid story is hilarious.

    1. Big breasted porn star accuses Trump of having sex with her and then paying to STFU.
    2. Grubby porn lawyer gets involved and steals her money.
    3. Trump sues the porn star and wins the defam case.
    4. Porn lawyer caught stealing from the porn star and ends up in jail.
    5. Well before that, leftwing idiots were touting grubby porn lawyer as presidential material.

    @bennyjohnson
    ·

    BREAKING: @MichaelAvenatti
    sentenced to four years in prison for defrauding Stormy Daniels



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  31. Zipster says:
    June 3, 2022 at 5:37 am

    Another shipment of tanks from Poland to Ukraine

    Bit disappointed by the Polish action, sucking up to Brussels maybe?

    Smart move but, getting rid of the old decrepit armament.
    But accordingly, to Zelensky they are winning so why the need for new weapons ?


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  32. Zipster says:
    June 3, 2022 at 5:40 am

    JP Morgan CEO Screams Economic Collapse | Unseen Interview

    It would be interesting to see if JPM’s senior management are currently going through a stock vesting period or they’re getting close to another new stock option allocation . A lower price therefore being advantageous. Never trust these fucks.


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  33. EXPOSED: The left’s 10 steps to DESIGN a national emergency

    Glenn Beck

    There are 3 pillars needed to transform America outside of the Constitution, and the Biden administration is crossing each one off its list. In fact, a 10 step ‘action plan’ to remedy climate change — presented to President Biden when he took office — eerily represents nearly all actions the left is taking today. THIS is their roadmap, Glenn explains, to gain more control over your life. They’re looking for a national emergency — a crisis they can design that will allow more power, more legislation, and more rules by which you’ll live. THIS is the way they’re doing it…


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  34. Looks like Turd will be bankrupt, but the poor widdle jury was confused by all the evidence!

    “Excellent grounds to appeal”

    She’s not going to rebuild her career anyway. Depp did a great public service.


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  35. Priorities…from the Daily Telegraph today…

    “The number of grocery suppliers asking Coles for price rises is five times higher than it was a year ago, the supermarket chain’s CEO has revealed.

    As the cost of everything from electricity to credit and diesel skyrockets, growers and manufacturers are also seeking bigger hikes than usual, the chain’s boss Steven Cain said.

    “As I sit here today, we have got five times as many requests for price increases as we had last year. Five times,” Mr Cain told The Australian’s Global Food Forum.”

    Meanwhile, from the Oz today…

    “On May 18, Coles announced it would offer all employees 10 days of paid leave to go and change their sex. Euphemistically named gender affirmation leave, the policy is described as “an important step for Coles’ commitment to Champion LGBTQI+ inclusion in the workplace and further into the Australian community”.

    In the same media release Coles announced it would be sponsoring Pride Cup Australia, a non-profit organisation that, among other things, lobbies for the inclusion of trans athletes in women’s sports.

    While Coles has been competing with Woolworths to be the most inclusive employer for LGBTQ+, both companies have been underpaying their staff.”

    If you didn’t laugh you’d cry.


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  36. Prince Andrew ‘tested positive’ for covid and thus did not make an appearance alongside Er Maj during her knees-up.

    Yeah righto.


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  37. The only time I shop at Coles is when I want something on special that I need on the off weeks when its not on special at woolworths. I only shop at woolworths if Aldi don’t stock a certain product.


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  38. JCsays:
    June 3, 2022 at 4:06 am
    “Pride month”in NY. I’m excited aren’t you?

    Well, no.
    But good on you if you are, and enjoy celebrations of sundry and diverse depravities as are run-of-the-mill in your chosen abode. Whatever floats your boat I guess. Just encourage NY’s perverts, degenerates, freaks and weirdoes to keep it over there, there’s a good fellow!


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  39. Looks like business as usual in WA:

    WA’s deputy premier has defended spending millions preparing land in East Perth for a prime waterfront development by proponents Andrew Forrest and Kerry Stokes.
    Key points:

    The state government has so far spent nearly $70 million on the site
    It says there are a lot of issues with the site, including contamination
    It is confident it can be turned into a world-class “statement” for WA

    The state budget has detailed $9.2 million for works at the East Perth Power Station site, on top of some $60 million already committed.

    Deputy Premier Roger Cook said the spend was necessary.

    “East Perth Power Station has been a dilapidated and run down site,” he said.

    “We need to act decisively to activate and really bring that whole precinct to life.

    “It has the potential to be a magnificent opportunity for us to really invigorate that particular park.

    and

    In 2020, Andrew Forrest’s Minderoo Group (which later changed its name to Tattarang) was named as a preferred proponent, along with Kerry Stokes’s Australian Capital Equity.

    At the time, Minderoo predicted an investment of $218 million to transform the old power station into a residential, commercial, recreational and tourism site.

    The state had valued the site at just $1, due to the issues associated with it.

    I wonder who decided that the prime waterfront site was worth one dollar, and next thing we know, taxpayers are spending $70 million to remediate it after it was bought by developers?

    Yup. Business as usual in WA.


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  40. Australia Energy Council CEO on SKY putting Australian gas supply and price problems down to Putin.
    State premiers with exploration and fracking bans all cheer.


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  41. 5. Well before that, leftwing idiots were touting grubby porn lawyer as presidential material.

    Yeah, that was hilarious.

    I think it was one of the ways they dealt with the Trump win: To attach hope to someone as a replacement. The porn lawyer because he was nipping at the ankles of the giant. They also went through a phase of trumpeting the coming of Oprah. (I think because they thought her star power would eclipse that of Trump, star power being what they saw as a key to his victory).

    I think Oprah’s star began to wane soon after.


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  42. johanna

    I wonder who decided that the prime waterfront site was worth one dollar, and next thing we know, taxpayers are spending $70 million to remediate it after it was bought by developers?

    Yup. Business as usual in WA.

    Does WA have an ICAC? m0nty-fa wants to know.


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  43. I wonder who decided that the prime waterfront site was worth one dollar

    When I was working one of our labs was on old SECV workshops. A few hectares of old buildings near Williamstown somewhere. I went down there one day to see if we could quit the lease. Every building was still full of bottles of acid and chemicals when the government just walked away.

    These buildings are abandoned for a reason.

    Never found out what happened to the lease but I bet nothing has changed.


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  44. Reckon the Laxale story is a trap to fast-track the ALPCAC.

    As soon as it’s set up, it will hear and dismiss the case. Forever after, we’ll have a kangaroo court and any complaint that it’s biased will be met with “the very first case heard was a claim against a Labor MP even though there was little evidence.”


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  45. The Uluru Statement from the Heart is couched in indistinct folkloric terms. It obviously means different things to different people and the underlying concepts (or what appear to be concepts) – Makarrata, ‘truth telling’, ‘agreement making’ – are left deliberately vague. The Constitutional amendments are completely unstated.

    Yet we have talking heads assuring us that it’s all crystal clear, carefully and rigorously drafted – and backed by all Australians except the Neanderthal Right.

    Chris Kenny:

    From a constitutional perspective he says the care taken in crafting the strategy also gave him assurance the changes wouldn’t lead to “judicial activism”.

    “We need to make sure that those people on the right of centre understand that this is not a progressive idea and it is not a symbolic idea,” Mr Kenny said.

    “It’s an idea to unite the country behind measures that can actually close the gap. Something we all want.”

    Julian Leeser

    …was won over by the care taken in crafting the changes and the possibility for more effective reform.

    “I do think this is practical. The whole point of having consultative advisory bodies – and that’s all they are – is to make better policy on the ground,” Mr Leeser said.

    An Expert

    “I think this is bigger than ordinary political divides and I think there’s a tonne of goodwill on the political right for this issue,” she said.

    “I think the advocates in this issue have done the groundwork to do everything possible to get conservatives on side to minimise that nasty side of the debate.

    “This is the only constitutional reform proposal on the table that empowers Indigenous people with a voice in their affairs on the one hand, but also upholds and protects the Constitution, protects parliamentary supremacy.”

    Yet, Gwenda Stanley, a Gomeroi woman and caretaker of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, discredited the Uluru Statement:

    “I would like to know what is in this constitution and how will it benefit us as Aboriginal people in this country.

    “Does anyone else know what they’re voting for because last time I sat at a Labor women’s rank-and-file [meeting] last year and not one of those Labor members could tell me what was in the constitution.

    Hopefully someone will stop talking in riddles and insiderspeak and crack on with actually consulting and exposing the details to the voting public – 97.3% of whom have no idea what is being proposed.

    Because if the 2022 election results tell us anything, it’s that the punters are pissed off with the insiders…


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  46. If you believe this, you’d believe anything:

    Afghanistan’s Taliban rulers have begun a campaign to eradicate poppy cultivation, aiming to wipe out the country’s massive production of opium and heroin.
    Key points:

    The Taliban announced the ban on poppy cultivation in April
    The crop is a major source of opium and heroin in Europe and Asia
    There are fears many will be forced into poverty because of the crackdown

    The move comes despite farmers fearing their livelihoods will be ruined at a time of growing poverty.

    Recently in the Washir district in southern Helmand province, armed Taliban fighters stood guard as a tractor tore up a field of poppies while the field’s owner stood nearby.

    Like every other group temporarily in charge of parts of Afghanistan throughout history, they have selected the warlords they are doing business with, and are wiping out the competition.

    Any experienced Asian correspondent knows this, as well as anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of the history of the region for say, the last 300 years..

    But, for today’s dewy-eyed, illiterate graduates, the world is full of prancing unicorns and nothing ever happened before Snapchat.


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  47. If you want to understand past use and land values have a look at the SAS rifle range at Swanbourne WA on Google Maps. Perverts will understand you can have a nudist beach in a metropolitan area.


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  48. Hopefully someone will stop talking in riddles and insiderspeak and crack on with actually consulting and exposing the details to the voting public – 97.3% of whom have no idea what is being proposed.

    Reckon that’s an accident?


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    1
  49. From a constitutional perspective he says the care taken in crafting the strategy also gave him assurance the changes wouldn’t lead to “judicial activism”.

    bwahahah ahahahahhahahahahahhahaha

    we need to have recall on judges urgently!!


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    6
  50. “an important step for Coles’ commitment to Champion LGBTQI+ inclusion in the workplace and further into the Australian community”.

    they left out the P, how is that “inclushive”?


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    1
  51. “Pride month”

    why stop at a month, just make it a permanent fixture, you know it makes sense.

    what’s not to love about genetic defectism.


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    2
  52. 5. Well before that, leftwing idiots were touting grubby porn lawyer as presidential material.

    I remember reading that Porn Lawyer LLB at one stage in 2018 had some ridiculous number of interviews on CNN, MSNBC etc in the preceding three months. More than 100.


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    3
  53. While Coles has been competing with Woolworths to be the most inclusive employer for LGBTQ+, both companies have been underpaying their staff.”
    Stunning.
    Coles will give employees full pay if they don’t like their junk, but all employees must have the batflu jab, forever.


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    6
  54. JCsays:

    June 3, 2022 at 4:06 am

    “Pride month”in NY. I’m excited aren’t you?

    I’ll see your Pride Month and raise you Reconciliation Week, which was preceded by AGL Indigenous round (two rounds actually) and will be followed by NAIDOC week, all with a constant back-beat of da Voice, da Voice, da Voice.


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    6
  55. Any word on Novavax getting booster approval?

    “Where mRNA isn’t suitable”

    Everyone I know at my work who had it eventually had bizarre side effects.

    Ah yes, “Pfizer arm”, should not be a thing.


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    3
  56. I wouldn’t trust the High Court for anything involving integrity, those dinner party invites don’t happen by themselves. If laws were written in plain English there would be no need for interpretation. Laws are written for lawyers.


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    4
  57. https://twitter.com/RnaudBertrand/status/1532236805143027713
    Or
    https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1532236805143027713.html

    I didn’t download the report he’s talking about, but the thread makes interesting reading. Jells with what I’ve been saying for a few years now, that the legitimacy of institutions and government in the western world is declining.
    People no long believe the government works for their interests, or the justice system delivers actual justice. No accountability, no justice, etc. etc. People stop being invested in the system and eventually the system fails.
    Police no one trusts, a justice system that lets criminals go with a slap on the wrist regularly, and governments carrying on like they have a mandate to do whatever they want when no one trusts them. Looking around right now, where are we in the process? How long until people stop playing in the bounds of the system? How long until they reject the whole thing?


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    12
  58. Liberals will let teal seats stew on lack of power for now

    Peter Dutton said the path back to government runs through the suburbs, regions and small business. In reality, he has not abandoned the blue-ribbon seats lost to teal independents.

    Much has been made about how Anthony Albanese is just the fourth Labor leader since World War II to take the party from opposition to government. The other three were Gough Whitlam, Bob Hawke and Kevin Rudd.

    Not much, however, has been said or written about how only four Liberal leaders have also achieved the same feat.

    Robert Menzies defeated Ben Chifley; Malcolm Fraser, albeit controversially, took power from Whitlam; John Howard defeated Paul Keating; and, in 2013, Tony Abbott became the fourth Liberal leader to win government from opposition since World War II when he knocked off Rudd.

    New Liberal leader Peter Dutton is aiming to be the fifth. History tells us Dutton won’t get there because no one, Labor or Liberal, who became opposition leader immediately after their party lost government has gone on to become prime minister. Moreover, it has been 90 years since Australia had a one-term government.

    Dutton is unperturbed by such precedents and, given the disdain for orthodoxy that politics displays these days, who could blame him?

    On Monday this week, as Albanese told caucus to plan for at least two terms in government, Dutton told his troops the plan was to limit Labor to just one.

    The task will be enormous. The Coalition has been reduced to 58 seats, meaning it needs a minium of 18 more to win back power. The Nationals retained all their seats at the election, meaning the recovery pretty much rests solely with the Liberal Party, whose losses included the six blue-ribbon seats in Melbourne, Sydney and Perth that went to teal independents.

    From Albanese’s perspective, none of the teals occupies a seat that Labor has a chance of winning. They are Dutton’s challenge, not his.

    Dutton all but ignored this aspect of the catastrophe on Tuesday when he outlined the path back to power as running through the suburbs, the regions and the small business constituency.

    As for the Liberal voters who deserted the party for the teals, there was no love. Well-heeled voters could cope with high petrol prices, “but in many of the areas we represent, in the suburbs, regional communities, people are putting $20 and $40 in their car because they can’t afford to fill up”.

    “Similarly with the electricity bills. There’ll be an increase under Labor. Let’s be clear, electricity prices will up under Labor.”

    There was no humility, just defiance.

    To back his stated course of action, Dutton cited initial post-election analysis that showed while 200,000 voters deserted the Coalition for the teals, 700,000 left the Coalition to vote for parties on the right.

    For example, in the NSW seat of Hume, held by Angus Taylor, there was a 7.3 per cent primary swing to One Nation, despite the candidate being rarely sighted and the party not bothering to staff polling booths. Labor has similar tales to tell, especially in Victoria.

    It attributed swings to One Nation and the United Australia Party to what one MP called the larger-then-usual “pissed-off factor” which was aimed at both major parties and was a consequence of the COVID-19 hangover. Dutton called it a “pox on both your houses” election.

    None of these swings to the right cost the Liberals seats, but many of them were rendered more marginal.

    Let them stew for a while

    Inside the party, there is a prevailing view to let those who abandoned the Liberal Party stew for a while on the fact that their seat no longer has any pull in Canberra.

    This will be aided by Labor forming majority government with 77 seats, which enables it to sideline the 16-member crossbench.

    But from Albanese’s perspective, none of the teals occupies a seat that Labor has a chance of winning. They are Dutton’s challenge, not his.

    “We’re not going to poke them in the eye,” one minister says of the teals. “We’re happy for them to stay there because they keep the other mob out.”

    Dutton still thinks there is scope to pick a fight on climate change. That’s a risk, but one that was slightly mitigated by the catastrophic energy crisis that has greeted the new government and rekindled a demand for gas.

    After three years of constant complaint about how useless the Morrison government was at everything, Labor’s first response to the crisis was to blame its predecessor and say there is nothing that can immediately be done.

    Not quite “I don’t hold a hose”, but definitely not what voters want to hear.


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    9
  59. Wonderful, uplifting article which clearly explains why censorship and keeping control of the narrative is the number one priority. But, then, that hardly needs explanation because it’s the top priority in every dictatorship.

    why public health “experts” never want to fight “the amateurs”

    and we watched this kung-fu theater die in real time.

    most amusing was what it elicited from those who knew how to fight. one look and this fraud was obvious. it was 7 year olds yelling “hee-yah” and tripping over their feet.

    many (probably most) of us that got drawn into this debate were not grounded in epidemiology. honestly, that’s probably why were were able to see the problem. if you actually knew how any small part of any of this worked, you could see that the “experts” were doing that bit wrong.

    so you grabbed whatever thread looked off to you and started to pull. and it rapidly became obvious that this was neither as complex nor as obscure as was being made out. it was just jargon and authority being used to intimidate and to impress those unfamiliar with what science is supposed to look like (alas, most of the public).

    but, if you knew biology, drug or drug trial design, statistics, data handing, and/or inferential and deductive reasoning, you could rapidly catch and exceed the mendacious monasteries of public health. and so people came from all over from finance and academia and physics and chemistry and the life sciences. actuaries rode roughshod over PhD’s in epidemiology. people who build HFT algos looked at SAGE models and could not stop laughing for a week.



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    8
  60. The AFR View

    Labor gets mugged by global energy reality

    The coal and gas supply crisis shows that old energy can’t be dumped before the new is ready to pick up the load.

    A full-blown national energy crisis has dropped into the lap of the Albanese government two weeks after it won an election in which it promised to ease cost of living pressures.

    Both Labor and the Coalition spent the election cynically telling voters they could cut power bills while fixing up climate change along the way.

    Now household and industrial power bill shocks are fuelling the inflation surge driven in part by Australia’s success in recovering quickly from the pandemic, and in part by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

    After blaming Scott Morrison for higher energy prices, Labor has been mugged by the same global forces that have compounded years of structural policy failures for which almost all sides of Australia’s climate wars share some of the blame.

    Most of all, Australia and the world are paying the price of curtailing the supply of the key fuel – gas – that is critical to keeping the lights on during the decades-long transition to a renewables-based low-carbon economy.

    Energy Minister Chris Bowen is right to suggest there is no quick and easy answer, even if that risks sounding like it isn’t the new government’s job. He also is right to reject knee-jerk reactions that risk making the problem worse.

    The immediate crisis is the result of a perfect storm including the early winter cold snap on the east coast, a sharp reduction in solar electricity generation and disruptions to the coal-fired power stations that still account for most of Australia’s baseload electricity.

    The most readily available fix may be Origin Energy CEO Frank Calabria’s call to get coal-fired power stations fully operational again.

    A third of east coast coal-fired capacity was offline last month because of mishaps, maintenance, or problems at coal mines. The surge in global coal prices has further diverted gas from industrial use and heating into electricity generation, lifting east coast gas demand by a third amid a global gas market already in severe undersupply.

    Yet this is happening in a country full of onshore gas that is scientifically safe to tap, but locked away under moratoriums imposed by governments fearful of environmental activists.

    “The east coast is a prime example of what happens if the energy transition is focused only on stopping new oil and gas projects”, says Santos boss Kevin Gallagher, who is trying to accelerate the company’s huge Narrabri gas development in NSW, due to open in 2026.


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    7
  61. The unvaccinated deaths of 260 as a percentage of 963,169 is 0.026. The vaccinated deaths of 759 as a percentage of 4,277,351 is 0.018.

    Add the vaccine deaths to the latter tally and it would be even closer. Maybe considerably higher.

    New study links COVID vaccines to 25% increase in cardiac arrest for both males & females (31 May)

    A new study by Israeli researchers and published in Nature has revealed an increase of over 25 percent in cardiovascular-related emergency calls in the young-adult population, following the rollout of COVID vaccines, among both males and females. No similar increase was found due to COVID infection alone.



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    7
  62. If laws were written in plain English there would be no need for interpretation.

    Exactly. Fat pompous waffling windbags engaged in Humpty Dumptying at everybody else’s expense.

    What’s that Shakespeare quote again?


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    5
  63. Another shipment of tanks from Poland to Ukraine

    I gather their donations are being replaced with a mix of surplus
    Abrams, Leopard 2s and Challengers.
    That should make logistics fun.


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    4
  64. What’s that Shakespeare quote again?

    What light through yon window breaks?
    My kingdom for a horse?
    Hubble bubble toil and trouble?
    Which one?


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    2
  65. Minister Matt Keogh vows more help for Australian veterans
    Kimberley Caines
    The West Australian
    Fri, 3 June 2022 2:00AM
    Comments
    Kimberley Caines

    Veterans have hit out at Anthony Albanese’s decision to move the Veterans’ Affairs portfolio from Cabinet, calling it a “downgrade” and “deeply concerning”.

    While welcoming the Government’s additional $500 million funding commitment, the Returned & Services League on Thursday said many veterans were “angered” by the move.

    “The RSL will be vigilant in ensuring that this funding commitment is delivered and will continue to press the government to resolve the crucial issues faced by veterans and their families,” RSL Australia president Greg Melick said.

    Matt Keogh, the new Veterans’ Affairs and Defence Personnel Minister, told The West Australian that there was “certainly no delineation” by the PM.

    “The Defence portfolio is also held by the Deputy Prime Minister (Richard Marles), which means there’s the representation in Cabinet of all defence matters, whether it’s defence industry or veterans’ affairs or defence personnel,” Mr Keogh said.

    “They are receiving the absolute highest advocacy and representation within Cabinet under Richard’s leadership.”

    The Burt MP was locked up in briefings on Thursday where it was revealed the number of compensation claims made by veterans was “growing” above 60,000. “That is concerning,” he said.

    Mr Keogh said processing veterans’ compensation applications was one of his top priorities, with Labor committing more than $200 million to put on extra staff to deal with the backlog.



    Report comment

  66. Sounds like Dutton is aware of the right moves to make. Heard the correct lines before though. Guess we will see if he follows through.


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    7
  67. The coal and gas supply crisis shows that old energy can’t be dumped before the new is ready to pick up the load.

    Please don’t bother us with facts; we have an eight year plan.


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    7
  68. Interesting:

    1) “We know that we have at least 900 team members who identify as transgender or gender diverse,” Coles Chief Legal and Safety Officer and chair of the Coles Pride Steering Committee David Brewster said.

    2) The 2016 Census counted 1,260 sex and/or gender diverse people in Australia.

    3) Coles Supermarkets/Number of employees 112,269

    What does that say about Coles people?


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    13
  69. Top Ender says:
    June 3, 2022 at 2:41 am
    Top Ender reporting in from the front line of fighting back against masks.

    Jetstar offered anyone without a mask on a free one to get onto the plane. I wore mine until 5 mins after takeoff and then dispensed with it. None of the trolley dollies cared.

    Didn’t happen 2 weeks ago on Qantas

    Non-stop messages to wear Masks over loudspeakers in Terminals, Business Lounges SYD/MEL and on Flights

    QF Business Lounge Staff excellent, realised with wounds on head unable to wear mask, and had Boarding Passes printed mask exempt and highlighted in yellow. and advised QF Flight Crew on Manifest – as QF cancelled both original flights – missed favoured seat up front and ended up down the back of economy

    Mask Karen diagonally in front of my row complained to Hostie I did not have a mask on and she said “He’s OK he has Medical Exemption”

    Will see how it goes next week


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    1
  70. Something about running a supermarket must cause delusions of grandeur. You never forget the first time you come across Battlestar Galatica in the suburbs of Melbourne.


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    5
  71. Old Ozzie @9.34.

    Well, Duurrrh. No one could have predicted that, right? Not even the AFR. What an unpleasant surprise.

    I hope those environmental idiots freeze to immobility in whatever smug, organic, virtue sandcastle they inhabit. Getting hit with the reality stick is always a bitch.


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    5
  72. I’ve been arguing with them for nearly 15 years

    Cohenite, I find it odd that you and Bruce both cite that timeframe. I’ve been denouncing gerbil worming as a crock of shit from the moment I heard of it, which was mid 1989. It first came to prominence courtesy of that Hansen fraud at a US congressional hearing in mid summer 1988, where he insisted on opening all the hearing room windows so the morons he was haranguing would “feel the immediacy” of the (non existent) emergency.

    How did I immediately know it was a crock a shit? It was being screeched about by the same fraudulent anti-scientific fact and evidence free imbeciles who were pushing the new ice age scare in the seventies.

    Thirty fours year of utter bullshit and counting – and we’ve finally reached the stage where these preposterous idiotic lies are now starting to seriously degrade peoples’ quality of life.

    Not because of catastrophic human induced climate change (which doesn’t exist) or human carbon dioxide emissions (which do not drive increased global temperatures), but by the staggeringly stupid hideously expensive anti-human “policy measures” introduced to prevent the aforementioned chimera.

    Stupidest time in human history, ever. Thanks, collectivists.


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    26
  73. H B Bearsays:

    June 3, 2022 at 9:17 am

    Something about running a supermarket must cause delusions of grandeur. You never forget the first time you come across Battlestar Galatica in the suburbs of Melbourne

    Jeez, I’d forgotten that.
    I don’t go to that part of town much.
    Don’t even know if it is still there.
    My exposure to a few of the employees who worked at Battlestar indicated that they were, in fact, more uppity than grocers should be.


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    2
  74. Coles Supermarkets/Number of employees 112,269

    And expanding rapidly from the look of it. I was in Coles yesterday, it’s dodgems. The young ladies with their trolleys picking out stuff for online shoppers have multiplied like tribbles.

    There’s an irony in this, since Coles spent lots of effort to get people to use their robot checkouts in order to reduce their number of checkout chicks, thereby infuriating shoppers, only to now have a dozen or more full-timers wandering around the store with large trolleys.

    I don’t know what is causing this phenomenon. Maybe there’re lots and lots of people terrified to go into virus-ridden Coles stores now that normal people have given up on stupid useless masks, sanitizers, social distancing and green vaccination certificates. I can’t see how shopping online could be any quicker really. And it’s got to be more expensive or Coles wouldn’t be able to employ all these trolley chicks.


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    7
  75. The coal and gas supply crisis shows that old energy can’t be dumped before the new is ready to pick up the load.

    Reminds me of an old Dutch proverb which translates as:

    Never throw out old shoes before you have new ones.

    Drummed into me as a child, never let me down.


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    11
  76. Gyro

    Well, no.
    But good on you if you are, and enjoy celebrations of sundry and diverse depravities as are run-of-the-mill in your chosen abode. Whatever floats your boat I guess. Just encourage NY’s perverts, degenerates, freaks and weirdoes to keep it over there, there’s a good fellow!

    Tell us gyro, how enjoyable do you find the Sydney Mardi Gras? Are you in one of tbe floats?


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    1
  77. Have I done the maths right? Still suffering from getting out of the airport at 0130.

    1) “We know that we have at least 900 team members who identify as transgender or gender diverse,” Coles Chief Legal and Safety Officer and chair of the Coles Pride Steering Committee David Brewster said.

    2) The 2016 Census counted 1,260 sex and/or gender diverse people in Australia.

    3) Coles Supermarkets/Number of employees 112,269

    What does that say about Coles people?

    It says that transgender or gender diverse people are 0.005 % of the population.

    But at Coles they are 1.122 of the workforce.

    So if you are out there in the population you’ll brush up against a trannie once in a town of 50,000.

    But in Coles one in every hundred is one.

    How lucky is that?


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    11
  78. Bruce of Newcastle says:
    June 3, 2022 at 9:26 am

    Coles Supermarkets/Number of employees 112,269

    And expanding rapidly from the look of it. I was in Coles yesterday, it’s dodgems. The young ladies with their trolleys picking out stuff for online shoppers have multiplied like tribbles.

    There’s an irony in this, since Coles spent lots of effort to get people to use their robot checkouts in order to reduce their number of checkout chicks, thereby infuriating shoppers, only to now have a dozen or more full-timers wandering around the store with large trolleys.

    I don’t know what is causing this phenomenon. Maybe there’re lots and lots of people terrified to go into virus-ridden Coles stores now that normal people have given up on stupid useless masks, sanitizers, social distancing and green vaccination certificates. I can’t see how shopping online could be any quicker really. And it’s got to be more expensive or Coles wouldn’t be able to employ all these trolley chicks.

    Same experience here at Coles. Almost every aisle is clogged with the online shopping trolleys. And, they are big, taking up twice the space of an individual shopper with a trolley.

    I can imagine the business model where everyone orders online and they don’t have to have supermarkets anymore. But I suspect that it is a long way away, if ever.


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    4
  79. Roger, this may be of interest to you.

    Thanks dover.

    It should be said the Ukrainains are certainly not the only ones guilty of such behaviours.

    Ethnophyletism is the bane of Orthodoxy.


    Report comment

  80. The Marxists running the White House have just wheeled out the puppet president to redeliver the same old Democrat speech about the need to confiscate guns from Republican voters.

    Tucker Carlson, who led yesterday’s show with a piece on gun confiscation by communist regimes like China’s and their sympathisers in Canada, Australia and New Zealand, starts his show in a few minutes. Can’t wait.


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    9
  81. The young ladies with their trolleys picking out stuff for online shoppers have multiplied like tribbles.

    Please BoN, you know the correct analogy is “like Martian Flatcats”. Tribbles were a steal without attribution.


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    1
  82. Everyone I know at my work who had it eventually had bizarre side effects.

    Everyone I know who had Pfizer is not 100%.

    Let’s skip the class action and go straight to lynching.


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    19
  83. An oldie but still a goodie. Courtesy of Westprint Maps.

    After every flight, Qantas Airlines pilots fill out a form called a gripe sheet, which conveys to the mechanics problems encountered with the aircraft during the flight that need repair or correction. The mechanics read and correct the problem, and then respond in writing on the lower half of the form what remedial action was taken, and the pilot reviews the gripe sheets before the next flight. Never let it be said that ground crews and engineers lack a sense of humour.

    Here are some supposedly actual logged maintenance complaints and problems as submitted by Qantas pilots and the solution as recorded by Qantas maintenance engineers.

    (P = The problem logged by the pilot.)

    (S = The solution and action taken by the engineers.)

    P: Left inside main tyre almost needs replacement.

    S: Almost replaced left inside main tyre.

    P: Test flight OK, except auto-land very rough.

    S: Auto-land not installed on this aircraft.

    P: Something loose in cockpit.

    S: Something tightened in cockpit.

    P: Dead bugs on windshield.

    S: Live bugs on backorder.

    P: Autopilot in altitude-hold mode produces a 200 feet per minute descent.

    S: Cannot reproduce problem on ground.

    P: Evidence of leak on right main landing gear.

    S: Evidence removed.

    P: DME volume unbelievably loud.

    S: DME volume set to more believable level.

    P: Friction locks cause throttle levers to stick.

    S: That’s what they’re there for.

    P: IFF inoperative.

    S: IFF always inoperative in OFF mode.

    P: Suspected crack in windshield.

    S: Suspect you’re right.

    P: Number 3 engine missing.

    S: Engine found on right wing after brief search.

    P: Aircraft handles funny.

    S: Aircraft warned to straighten up, fly right, and be serious.

    P: Target radar hums.

    S: Reprogrammed target radar with lyrics.

    P: Mouse in cockpit.

    S: Cat installed.

    P: Noise coming from under instrument panel. Sounds like a midget pounding on something with a hammer.

    S: Took hammer away from midget.



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    31
  84. A third. Unforgivable incompetence.

    Or a foreseeable consequence of being required to run a billion dollar plus asset in an uneconomic fashion.


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    10
  85. Sounds like Dutton is aware of the right moves to make.

    At least he is not responding to the election loss by claiming that they have ‘heard’ Australians and will now rededicate themselves to the key items on Labor’s agenda.

    Maybe he saw what was coming before the election and was pissed off. Maybe he is also pissed off with Trumble’s mob who prevented him from becoming PM when he thinks he could have won.

    A bit of anger is a good thing – ‘cos there is a shedload of it out around the electorate.


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    22
  86. Aha!

    Deputy Prime Minister Richard Marles says the government has not ruled out increasing domestic coal production in a bid to alleviate soaring energy prices, promising to leave “(no)stone unturned”.

    The Albanese government is battling energy shortages that have driven a spike in electricity prices and ignited a three-day crisis, with Resources Minister Madeleine King scrambling to consult with industry operators to see how they could work with the government to alleviate skyrocketing gas prices.


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    2
  87. Deputy Prime Minister Richard Marles says the government has not ruled out increasing domestic coal production in a bid to alleviate soaring energy prices, promising to leave “(no)stone unturned”.

    The 8 Year Plan – 43% less emissions by 2030 – hits its first snag.


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    6
  88. Roger – yep, weather still trips up the power guys. heat in the West, heat or cold in the East. Can have a good run for a few years, meanwhile Harvey Norman is pumping out split systems.


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    1
  89. How did AEMO not know, or announce, the energy crisis only two weeks ago?

    The good and great at AEMO will be shuffling around uncomfortably and looking for blame-takers.

    The fossil fuel and generating industries have been explaining and pointing towards the current situation for nearly 20 years.

    It’s a science and engineering problem – tedious detail, not outrageously complicated, but inflexible.

    It’s been backed away from by Law/Economics/Arts specialists, operating with the hopey hope that ‘the market will find a way’ and ’technology will deliver solutions’.

    It has.
    This is it.


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    11
  90. The ‘First Nation’ is apparently not on the same page:

    The Uluru Statement of the Heart came under heavy fire during an episode of Q+A that tackled the issues surrounding Indigenous rights, on the 30th anniversary of the landmark Mabo ruling.
    Key points:

    Minister for Indigenous Affairs Linda Burney said she would listen to concerns about the Uluru Statement
    Tent Embassy caretaker Gwenda Stanley heavily criticised the statement
    Ms Stanley made accusations that some Indigenous communities were “concentration camps”

    Audience guest Gwenda Stanley, a Gomeroi woman and caretaker of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, discredited the Uluru Statement as she raised her concerns that it, Mabo and native title have done nothing for Indigenous people in Australia.

    “When is this government, an Australian government going to address the Holocaust and the genocide in this country?” she said

    “We do not support the Uluru Statement.

    “I was one of those delegates that was locked out of the constitution summit meeting.

    I read yesterday that Gina’s company has pulled out of an option to redevelop a Queensland island resort, formerly Great Keppel.

    When I read the number of government agencies that needed to be aligned (about six) and then the local Aborigines were divided into factions for unrelated reasons, and they had also to be appeased, you can see why no sane person would touch it.


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    9
  91. It’s been backed away from by Law/Economics/Arts specialists, operating with the hopey hope that ‘the market will find a way’ and ’technology will deliver solutions’.

    A wishin’ and a hopin’.


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    1
  92. Sydney Morning Herald.
    Humanity certainly does not require another nuclear power plant. We are already gifted with the largest nuclear power plant in the solar system.
    It is a star called the sun and it supplies daily and forever enough energy to supply the Earth’s needs several times over. Long may it shine.
    Cornelius van der Weyden,
    Balmain East


    Report comment

  93. I read yesterday that Gina’s company has pulled out of an option to redevelop a Queensland island resort, formerly Great Keppel.

    I wonder if there is something else she might threaten to ditch.
    She is the main sponsor of Swimming Straya. I doubt she will continue to pour money into an organisation which shows all the signs of wavering on trannie swimmers.


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    6
  94. Minister for Indigenous Affairs Linda Burney said she would listen to concerns about the Uluru Statement
    Tent Embassy caretaker Gwenda Stanley heavily criticised the statement
    Ms Stanley made accusations that some Indigenous communities were “concentration camps”

    Gwenda and St Ruth should hook up.


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    2
  95. 5. Well before that, leftwing idiots were touting grubby porn lawyer as presidential material.

    @bennyjohnson
    ·

    BREAKING: @MichaelAvenatti
    sentenced to four years in prison for defrauding Stormy Daniels

    Well, he got his four year term after all.


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    7
  96. In ‘he who controls history’ news: https://www.smh.com.au/national/australia-s-oldest-uni-library-overhauls-how-people-use-indigenous-resources-20220530-p5apjm.html

    The University of Sydney library will restrict access to sacred Indigenous materials and offer First Nations communities a “right of reply” to historically inaccurate texts under changes aimed at making it less Eurocentric.

    The protocols will also stop the library acquiring new works from non-Indigenous academics and authors containing First Nations knowledge unless the communities involved have provided informed consent.

    The protocols also require the library to audit its collection to check for sensitive material that should not be accessed without permission from communities.

    .. then we progress to book burning..

    In making the changes at Australia’s oldest university, the library has also acknowledged that much of its collection contains inaccurate, offensive and outdated views of Indigenous people and cultures.



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    3
  97. Linda Burney said she would listen to concerns about the Uluru Statement

    Somehow I don’t think these ladies will be placated with whispers of “we’re listening”, Linda.


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    4
  98. H B Bearsays:

    June 3, 2022 at 10:35 am

    Even forty billion dollars isn’t enough to risk taking on the Pony Club and The Little Reef that Could.

    Yep.
    She knows that as soon as she signs on the dotted line, every wannabe hero in the public service will be throwing blockers in her way.


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    4
  99. this south westerly is gonna keep blowing cold for a while longer

    and imagine being stuck in the water for hours in weather like this.

    At approximately 5am on Saturday 1st June 1878. there was a terrible crash, and the ship ran into a small island, Mutton Bird Island, east of Sherbrooke River near Port Campbell. The Loch Ard sank in only fifteen minutes.


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    1
  100. dover0beach says:
    June 3, 2022 at 10:09 am

    A third of east coast coal-fired capacity was offline last month because of mishaps, maintenance, or problems at coal mines.

    A third. Unforgivable incompetence.

    No, it’s by design. Distributors are incentivised to take renewable first, despite the premium price, then gas, then coal. For generators with gas plants in their portfolio it makes economic sense to have the coal offline to maximise usage of gas. It’s easy to turn an easily maintainable problem into a plant shutdown if the money makes it so.

    AEMO designed it that way. No-one should be surprised.

    Remove all market rules except for lowest price getting the gig, and all these problems magically disappear.


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    8
  101. To be fair to Cornelius, he does at least seem to have some solar panels on his multi million ($10M?) dollar waterfront pad in Balmain East.

    I’m a little concerned by the 50ft motor launch out on his private jetty, but it could be his neighbour’s.

    Solar power you peasants!


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    3
  102. We are already gifted with the largest nuclear power plant in the solar system.
    It is a star called the sun and it supplies daily and forever enough energy to supply the Earth’s needs several times over. Long may it shine.

    It also puts out lethal radiation some of which makes it through the atmosphere can causes acute burns and cancer. Eventually as it ages it will swell up, overheat the Earth and eventually swallow it whole.
    A damn dangerous nuclear reactor, totally beyond our control.


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    6
  103. “I read yesterday that Gina’s company has pulled out of an option to redevelop a Queensland island resort, formerly Great Keppel.

    When I read the number of government agencies that needed to be aligned (about six) and then the local Aborigines were divided into factions for unrelated reasons, and they had also to be appeased, you can see why no sane person would touch it.”

    Yep. And you have to wonder why local Aborigines are consulted because no Aboriginal, until European settlement, would have ever set foot on Great Keppel.


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  104. no Aboriginal, until European settlement, would have ever set foot on Great Keppel.

    But it would be part of their “Sea Country”.
    A term of have just learned.


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    4
  105. The young ladies with their trolleys picking out stuff for online shoppers have multiplied like tribbles.

    Maybe I am weird but I prefer to be involved in selecting the food I will eat, and do choose somethings over others. I would not even just take random selections, and I would expect the people preparing people’s deliveries do be more heeding their manager injunctions to load up with products closer to expiry dates or a bit wonky.

    My experience of the shop drones of Colesworths is that they are sullen clock-watchers with absolutely no affinity with or especial goodwill for customers.

    I am happy to forego the wider (not better) range in those ghastly-lit sepulchres to Mammon, where a degraded clergy mechanically perform rituals without understanding or purpose, and go to IGA and Harris Farm. The people there, while not singing happy songs in unison at the registers or cartwheeling in the aisles, have a better attitude. Some of them smile!


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    5
  106. Bruce of N

    I can’t see how shopping online could be any quicker really. And it’s got to be more expensive or Coles wouldn’t be able to employ all these trolley chicks.

    Tried it a couple of times. The delivery windows were (then) three hours long. The first one was 0600 to 0900, the next 1800 to 2000. Not wildly convenient!


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    2
  107. Remove all market rules except for lowest price getting the gig, and all these problems magically disappear.

    Sadly no, that wouldn’t work. Has to be contracts for delivery on a 24 hour/365 day basis. Otherwise solar wins during the day, wind wins when windy and coal shuts down despite being the most reliable and efficient option.

    If you have contracts for delivery it kills the intermittents because they have to buy electricity to fulfill their contracts when the sun and wind are unavailable. That then penalizes them for the intermittency which is currently a parasite on the neck of the base load generators.


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    8
  108. I can’t see how shopping online could be any quicker really.

    Bruce, for the shopper, on-line must be faster than driving to and from the shop, walking up and down the aisles, queueing to scan your own items or waiting for the lady in front of you to have her full trolley items processed.
    On-line shopping only takes a few minutes – plus the wait time for delivery of course.


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    1
  109. More SMH wisdom.
    Perhaps we should consider reversing gas pricing? We could stop sending gas overseas at giveaway prices and prioritise Australian citizens/consumers at more reasonable rates.
    Nino Pol, Randwick
    Company develops gas field at great expense, then gives the gas away.


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  110. go to IGA and Harris Farm

    Eggactly.
    I like to reward the local IGA with my custom now because of the very positive experiences they delivered during the lockdowns.


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    9
  111. Cassie

    Yep. And you have to wonder why local Aborigines are consulted because no Aboriginal, until European settlement, would have ever set foot on Great Keppel.

    But, but, but, Benny Wong assured us that the “First Nations” had long established relations with their Indo-Pacific neighbours.

    Maybe the neighbours came to visit, looked, and went away. It took someone with the stubbornness of Poms to try to make something of the place and its inhabitants.


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  112. I do my on-line grocery shopping at BWS.

    Delivery in an hour (or less) and, if over an hour, next delivery no $10 delivery fee.

    BWS stocks most of the the nutritious food groups. 🙂


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  113. dopey

    Company develops gas field at great expense, then gives the gas away.

    At great expense, and over the violent, taxpayer funded, objections of residents of Balmain and Randwick, and then gives the gas away.

    Fixing!


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    3
  114. Company develops gas field at great expense, then gives the gas away.

    They still believe that capitalists are rotund old white men with walrus moustaches, and who wear top-hats and morning suits and carry an ornate cane in one hand and a bag full of gold coin in the other. And when they get to their homes which are transitional between gothic architecture and gothic novel, they retreat to their underground hoard rooms and perch atop the tallest mountain of gold and laugh a loud laugh as cold and hard, and black, as stone.

    They really see that as the barrier between their socialist utopia. They do not see businesses as creating wealth but as the dam wall holding it all back.


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    4
  115. How might an election have played out under PR [proportional representation]?

    Very interesting analysis. I didn’t know that you could shoehorn a PR system in under our current constitution.

    tl;dr the Coalition would do much better than it did last month, but the real winner would be the Greens as they get an almost permanent balance of power in the Reps as well as the Senate.

    I think this is the shape of things to come in the Reps without PR, with the Teals getting more seats than the Greens. The Greens would love to move to PR and they would be gagging for someone to join with them to push it through. Would the Libs do it for short-term gain, especially if it means wedging the Teals?

    You lot bang on about the Uniparty ™ with some justification, and I can foresee Labor and Liberal forming government together in the medium to long term if they both get attacked by the Green/Teal splitters.


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    1
  116. m0nty-fa

    You lot bang on about the Uniparty ™ with some justification, and I can foresee Labor and Liberal forming government together in the medium to long term if they both get attacked by the Green/Teal splitters.

    And how will you and your ilk react to that development? Suddenly the enemies you have hated and feared for decades are your allies? Much cognitive dissonance perhaps? Or perhaps not, to have cognitive dissonance, there needs to be a capability for cognition.


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  117. wind wins when windy

    The wind also tracks daylight as well. Always drops in the night as diurnal heating subsides except when there’s a weather system approaching or just leaving.
    “It’s a windy night” is a saying as that’s less usual than a windy day.


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    3
  118. Jesus these Greenpeace ads are laying it on thick.

    Human activity deadens and kills whales.

    Um…

    My old flat in Dee Why…1 km from the ocean.

    It would wake me up sometimes in the wee hours. It could be noisier than Pittwater Rd.

    Must have been a lot of dead whales up the road at Whale Beach.


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    2
  119. Red-blue coalitions are common in proportional representation nations M0nty. Germany has them often. Israel currently has one, sort of.

    The UK system in the Commons is the best, since it makes it easier for third parties to get a win in a constituency. That rewards the pollies for delivering what the voters want, and makes their votes count much more than in preference systems or proportional systems. And the voters then have an actual local representative instead of the unapproachable elite in the proportional system. UK would be better with a proportional in the Lords though, since the current bunch are extremely undemocratic.


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    2
  120. The UK system in the Commons is the best, since it makes it easier for third parties to get a win in a constituency. That rewards the pollies for delivering what the voters want, and makes their votes count much more than in preference systems or proportional systems.

    That may be skewed by regional parties like the SNP, DUP, etc.

    And the voters then have an actual local representative instead of the unapproachable elite in the proportional system. UK would be better with a proportional in the Lords though, since the current bunch are extremely undemocratic.

    In NSW, our 50 or so Federal seats could by split into 10 multi member electorates.

    …but what I really want, is of course, sortition.


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  121. The impact of wokeness on industry.

    Promotion based on Correctness not Competence.

    Never mind the lawyers; the first thing we do, let’s kill all the HR people.

    (That’s a humurous reference to Shakespeare, ASIO…OK?)


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    7
  122. Red-blue coalitions are common in proportional representation nations M0nty. Germany has them often. Israel currently has one, sort of.

    As I have been saying, we are moving to a European model under the current post-Westminster system and I can see the Greens pushing for a proposal like the one in the link to speed up the process. It would certainly be in their interests to get PR in, not sure if it favours anyone else though. The Teals would hate it I reckon, they’d prefer smaller electorates.


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  123. The Teals would hate it I reckon, they’d prefer smaller electorates

    They could benefit from Hare-Clarke proportional representation with multi member electorates.


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  124. Mother Lodesays:

    June 3, 2022 at 11:14 am

    The young ladies with their trolleys picking out stuff for online shoppers have multiplied like tribbles.

    Maybe I am weird but I prefer to be involved in selecting the food I will eat, and do choose somethings over others. I would not even just take random selections …

    Err, they are not random selections.
    Online shoppers invariably get stuff which is on the cusp of the “Use By” date.


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    3
  125. Ms Stanley made accusations that some Indigenous communities were “concentration camps”

    Thar’s a fvcking insult to anyone who survived one of those hellholes.


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    4
  126. They could benefit from Hare-Clarke proportional representation with multi member electorates.

    Would that require a referendum though? Much harder to get passed if so.

    The Libs and Labor combined to modify the Tasmanian H-C system to benefit themselves and shut out the Greens in 1998. I reckon the Greens would have long memories on that one, and if they can find an ally for some revenge at the federal level they would jump at the chance.


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  127. Read on dear reader.
    Yes, Colesworth stock-pickers are instructed to pick stuff close to use-by and dinted cans etc.
    Obviously online shopping for pick-up would be done in each supermarket but I reckon picking for home delivery might be concentrated on selected supermarkets, which is why it might appear to be more prevalent than it really is.


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    1
  128. Tried it a couple of times. The delivery windows were (then) three hours long. The first one was 0600 to 0900, the next 1800 to 2000. Not wildly convenient!

    Noticeably better when ordered via UberEats for immediate delivery.

    IGA have been on there for a while, some Woolies shops are now getting on there.


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  129. Thar’s a fvcking insult to anyone who survived one of those hellholes.

    Yes, they’re laying it on a bit too thick, but its fun to see some indigenous folk have left the socialist reserve and are throwing a spanner in the works of Elbow’s would be legacy project.

    They won’t be impressed by Linda Burney wearing a kangaroo pelt either.


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  130. PM says no live sheep export ban this term
    Paul OsborneAAP
    Fri, 3 June 2022 9:31AM

    A ban on live sheep exports from Australia is at least three years away.

    Prime Minister Anthony Albanese went to the election promising to ban the trade, which has been criticised by animal welfare groups but generates thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in export revenue.

    Mr Albanese told ABC Perth radio on Friday the phase-out would not occur this term.

    “No one’s envisaging a phase-out in in this term of government,” he said.

    “We’ll sit down and we’ll work these issues through cooperatively and respectfully.”

    He said his government respected farmers while also wanting to make sure animal welfare issues were looked after.

    “We haven’t put a timeframe on that because we want to make sure that we consult with farmers … and work it through in a cooperative way to make sure we get a win-win situation.”

    The government was committed to the northern summer export ban which was already in place, he said.

    He said the live cattle trade would not be included in the government’s deliberations.

    WA Premier Mark McGowan said during the election appropriate safeguards were in place to keep the trade operating, including the suspension of exports over the northern summer, extra vet checks and monitoring on ships.

    Australia exports around two million live sheep each year, with the major destinations being Kuwait, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Jordan, Israel and Malaysia.

    The Greens went to the election calling for an immediate ban on the trade, arguing sheep routinely die horrific deaths and suffer immense heat stress.

    Sheep suffer immense heat stress when the crew accept money from Animals Australia to turn off the fans and ventilation, and record the results……..


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  131. m0nty-fa

    The Libs and Labor combined to modify the Tasmanian H-C system to benefit themselves and shut out the Greens in 1998.

    The UNiParty at work. Look after themselves first.


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  132. Fancy that; engaging with a full blown leftie at the spectator and I mention that biden said: if a black doesn’t vote for him he ain’t black and I get censored as spam.


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  133. …no Aboriginal, until European settlement, would have ever set foot on Great Keppel.

    That’s a big call Cassie.
    A very big call.


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    5
  134. For the first time, Labor voters earn more than Coalition voters

    Households in Labor electorates now earn $8580 more a year than those in Coalition seats – a shift that could have profound effects on politics.

    Politics flipped two weeks ago. The average Labor voter now earns more than their Coalition counterpart.

    An $8580 Labor-Coalition pay gap emerged this election, and could have profound consequences for politics, policy and the two-party system.

    Under the Morrison government, households in Liberal electorates averaged $126,940 in income last year, Roy Morgan Research calculates. This was about 4 per cent higher than the $121,020 earned by households in Labor seats.

    Labor and the Liberals changed places at the 2022 election. At $118,880 a year, households in Liberal seats now earn 2.6 per cent, or $3140 a year, less than Labor-seat dwellers.

    The gap between the Coalition and wealthier Labor seats is 7 per cent, or $8580. And residents of Greens and independent-held seats are even wealthier. Their average household income last year was $145,690.

    The income data may help explain why both main parties are behaving in ways contrary to their historical allegiances. The Labor Party has promised to subsidise childcare for families earning $500,000, and new Liberal leader Peter Dutton has acknowledged his party’s relationship with big business is breaking down.

    The 2022 election may come to be seen as a historical pivot point, which forces the Coalition – the dominant power in Australian politics for seven decades – to evaluate its purpose, values and structure.

    “The Liberal Party is becoming Labor and Labor is becoming the Liberal Party,” an investment banker who lives in the Sydney seat of Wentworth said this week. “I’ve voted Liberal most of my life. Now I find myself reconsidering.”

    Wealthy Australians, especially those who send their children to private schools, are detaching themselves from the party that had, until a few years ago, made financial rectitude and lower taxes its primary mission.

    Almost by default, the Coalition is becoming the voice of the working and lower middle-classes – and a perceived bulwark against inner-city values and priorities.

    The voting-income effects were seen across the metropolitan sprawls. Today, of the 15 highest-earning electorates, seven are held by independents, five by the Labor Party and three by the Coalition (Bradfield, Berowra and Mitchell.) While six Liberal MPs fell to “teal” independents, three of the poorest five electorates swung right.

    During the election campaign, less wealthy voters’ primary complaint was inflation, especially petrol, according to some rural Liberal MPs. Those basic living concerns represent a political pressure, or opportunity, that may influence Coalition policy in opposition.

    For instance, Dutton might see more benefit in opposing expensive new transmission networks to connect solar and wind farms to the national grid than advocating for business tax cuts.

    But as the flip in the relationship between income and party affiliation forces both main parties to adjust policy priorities, they’re losing support in the transition.

    The Labor Party’s 33 per cent primary vote this year would have once been considered too low to win government. The Coalition’s was only 36 per cent.

    Breakdown has been building

    The conditions for the breakdown in big-party allegiances have been building for a generation, says Sarah Cameron, a Sydney University political scientist.

    They were, though, hidden by preferential voting, which forced disillusioned voters to choose one of the major parties – until generously funded independent candidates arrived.

    They tapped into two big changes in Australian society, according to Cameron. “Younger voters are more left-wing today than earlier generations, and women have become much less likely to vote for the Coalition,” she says.

    Scott Morrison, and his party, appealed to neither.

    Perhaps blinded by the success of the 2019 campaign, Morrison didn’t seem to appreciate that ostentatious masculinity repelled many educated women. No female counterweight existed at the top of the government to provide balance.



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  135. Sudan beckons

    Activist and writer Yassmin Abdel-Magied has taken a brutal swipe at the Queen’s platinum jubilee celebration, claiming the presence of so many Union Jack flags in her adopted homeland is like a ‘waking nightmare’.

    Furious commenters fired back at the remark, with some telling her to ‘go back to Australia’.

    The private-school educated former mechanical engineer recently admitted drama ‘always’ finds her.

    ‘I didn’t go looking for the drama, but somehow, I tended to attract it,’ the activist reflected on the controversy.

    ‘I think that, quite often, I was maybe a little ahead of my time.’

    ‘I feel a little bit betrayed by Australia, because it’s my country and these are my country people and it’s my home, and to sort of fight for your right to exist in your home country — it’s exhausting,’ she said at the time.


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  136. Last one, I promise.
    The coalition wasted 10 years. If Scott Morrison had held up a photo of the sun and announced that we don’t need to be afraid of this, by now we would have an energy market dominated by renewables. Electric and hydrogen cars and trucks would dominate our roads. And miners would have productive jobs as tradies and farmers. Instead, my region of limitless sunshine is powered by diesel generators.
    David Neilson, Araluen (NT)


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  137. Cassie of Sydney says:
    June 3, 2022 at 11:04 am
    Yep. And you have to wonder why local Aborigines are consulted because no Aboriginal, until European settlement, would have ever set foot on Great Keppel.

    let’s revisit this.. because it is incredibly ignorant.

    From the man himself, James Cook

    Sunday 27 May 1770

    At Noon we were about 2 Leagues from the Mainland and by observation in the Latitude of 22°..53? So Longitude made from Cape Capricorn 20 Miles west, At this time the northermost point of land we had in sight bore NNW distant 10 Miles this point I named C. Manyfold from the number of high hills over it Latitude 22°..43? So it lies N 26° West distant 17? Leagues from C. Capricorn between them the shore forms a large bay which I call’d Keppel Bay and the Islands which lay in and off it are in known by the same name. In this Bay is it Lay are a great number of Islands and good anchorage every where where there is a sufficient depth of water What refreshments it may afford for shipping I know not we caught no fish here not withstanding we was were the le at anchor — It can hardly be doubted but what it affords fresh water in more several place as both main land and Islands are inhabited, we saw smooks by day and fires in the night upon the Main and people upon one of the Islands —



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  138. Funny Great Keppel story.

    I did some part-time divemaster work at Great Keppel in the 1980s. Was in the days when the resort was absolutely booming. I was working for Haven Diving, the only dive shop on the island, and so technically not working for the resort, but did see some of their paperwork. One of the more memorable memos was that staff were to stop referring to female day-trippers as “loopies”. That label was applied because they came over for a day and then went loopy with anything male who would consent, and so on.

    One of my fellow divemasters was a crazy chap. Into pulling practical jokes and doing silly things underwater and so on, but a very capable bloke too. He did attack me with a one foot crab he’d picked up off the bottom one day, by sneaking up from behind and banging it into my facemask suddenly – was like being attached by the Alien monster. In return two days later I hung a brick off his tank on two metres of rope.

    Anyway, I digress.

    One day he was round the back of the dive shop in the staff-only section of the yard. He was making something out of a sheet of timber and a couple of two by fours lengths. After some time it became a shark’s fin, painted grey, and about 1 x 1 metre. The heavier pieces were to attach to his scuba tank.

    To great amusement from all – but not the diveshop owner, who remained in the dark – he set himself up to get into the water at dusk on Fishermans Beach, the main one off the front of the tourist resort. He was about 50 metres off the beach and there were still tourists in the water, but not for long. Mass screaming and so on. He managed most of the length of the beach, nicely submerged about four foot under the water, with a convincing upper of “shark fin” protruding.

    It all went very well, except over drinks in the staff resort area he would talk about it. Said he was going to do it again. Anyway, management visited the dive shop the next day, and there was vigorous discussion, and he was told to leave. Bid sad as he was a great chap, but he did have a large bite mark halfway up his arm from teasing a shark – a story for another day.


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    16
  139. zyconoclastsays:
    June 3, 2022 at 12:55 pm
    Sudan beckons

    Activist and writer Yassmin Abdel-Magied has taken a brutal swipe at the Queen’s platinum jubilee celebration, claiming the presence of so many Union Jack flags in her adopted homeland is like a ‘waking nightmare’.

    Furious commenters fired back at the remark, with some telling her to ‘go back to Australia’.

    please, christ no!

    can’t she just fuck off back to Sudan and tweet from there how wonderful the place is?


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    20
  140. Whether Aborigines went on holiday on Great Keppel Island or not, is not really the point.
    The point is that regulators and “custodians” were lining up to soak Gina for every last dollar, and generally make pricks of themselves.
    So she pulled the pin.


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    12
  141. Business has gone woke – so Libs should focus on Dandenong not Davos

    Peter Dutton was right to dismiss corporate Australia as being more in step with Labor and the Greens. The automatic and close relationship between the centre-right of politics and big business is over.

    John RoskamColumnist

    Anthony Albanese’s election victory has prompted all sorts of interesting reactions. Apparently, company boards should now start purging their ranks of “right-wingers”. That’s the view of Graeme Bricknell of the executive search and consulting firm, Korn Ferry.

    As reported last week in this newspaper, according to Bricknell: “Boards need to pay attention [to the election]. If you’re a die-in-the-ditch, right-wing board member with fixed views about how things were done 15 years ago, your time is nigh.”

    It’s unclear whether after the Coalition’s federal election victories in 2013, 2016 and 2019 Bricknell said companies should cleanse themselves of left-wing directors.

    Also unclear is what part of the election result company boards should supposedly be paying attention to.

    Labor got 32.70 per cent of the primary vote and the barest of parliamentary majorities in the House of Representatives. The Coalition got 36.04 per cent of the vote, the Greens 11.9 per cent, while together the Liberal Democrats, One Nation and the United Australia Party got 10.7 per cent of the vote.

    To most observers that’s a finely balanced outcome, revealing the need for magnanimity and moderation from our political and corporate leaders, rather than the justification for a radical reconstruction of the country.

    Presumed political purity, not business acumen is now the prerequisite for selection to the board of a large Australian public company.

    The only thing unusual about Bricknell’s opinion is he expressed it aloud. It’s exactly how most members of the company boards of big businesses think. Presumed political purity, not business acumen is now the prerequisite for selection to the board of a large Australian public company.

    For example, it’s almost impossible to imagine an executive recruitment firm recommending or a company board accepting the appointment of a director who publicly questioned the wisdom of changing the Australian constitution to permanently enshrine racial difference.

    A candidate for an executive or board position, who said they believed in what until very recently had been a core principle of liberal democracy, namely that all citizens are entitled to equal political rights regardless of their race, would probably never be heard of again.

    Simply describing big business as “woke” doesn’t do justice to the transformation that’s occurred in corporate Australia over the past two decades. The rise of the industry superannuation funds, the influence of the “corporate social responsibility” movement, and the affluence of economic prosperity are not trends helpful to the political prospects of the Liberal Party.

    And the Liberal Party as it usually is when it comes to issues of culture and values, has been caught completely flat-footed.

    In the same way they still hold the quaint notion the average resident of Wentworth or Kooyong will vote for them (a fortnight ago Liberals received 41 per cent of first preferences in that first seat and 43 per cent in the second), Liberal MPs continue to be angered, frustrated and vexed by the support (or lack of) they get from big business. But they shouldn’t be.

    One of the great insights of the keenest observer of the political economy of the 20th century. Joseph Schumpeter, was that big business has a bigger interest in itself than it does in the maintenance of the capitalist system – and the “creative destruction” of capitalism (a term Schumpeter coined) is, in fact, a threat to big business.

    The marriage of big business to political conservatism whether in Australia, the US, or the UK has only ever been one of convenience. As soon as the conservatives’ opponents shed their adherence to outright socialism, any allegiance big business had to the centre-right of politics was dispensed with.

    A few days ago, when Peter Dutton in one of his first statements as opposition leader “dismissed corporate Australia as being more in step with Labor and the Greens” he crystallised the second of the two great realignments represented by the 2022 federal election result.

    The first is that the old electoral heartland of the Liberal Party is now Labor, Greens or teal.

    The second is the end of the era of an automatic and close relationship between the Liberal Party and big business.

    According to Dutton, as neatly expressed by Phillip Coorey, this newspaper’s political editor, “the way back to power for the Liberal Party rest[s] with small and micro-business operators, the suburbs and the regions”.

    Not before time the Liberals have realised they should direct their attentions to Dandenong not Davos.

    John Roskam is executive director of the Institute of Public Affairs


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    8
  142. OldOzziesays:
    June 3, 2022 at 12:51 pm
    For the first time, Labor voters earn more than Coalition voters

    Households in Labor electorates now earn $8580 more a year than those in Coalition seats – a shift that could have profound effects on politics.

    ROFLMAO, it is now clear that you have to be wealthy to afford to be a Green/enviromentalist, you have to be well above average income to be able to afford to be a socialist, and the lower paid (but not so much the welfare recipients) are now open to voting for the Coalition.

    What was m0nty-fa saying a few days ago, about the Liberals having nothing to offer to the horny-handed sons and daughters of toil? Perhaps more than he thinks.

    But it has been obvious for years that many at the top of Labor are more attracted to the top end of town than to the workers they still claim to represent. See the example of Shorten, as a union leader, selling his members down the river for political contributions from businesses.


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    6
  143. How China has quietly overtaken an entire continent | China in Focus

    Beijing has been pouring billions of dollars into the infrastructure of Africa.

    But what started out as a seemingly generous move, has dark strings attached. Now that influence is rippling out globally.

    In this special report, we look at China’s growing influence in Africa, how it got to this point, and the impact it’s having on the rest of the world.

    And joining us to help shed light on the topic are Antonio Graceffo, China economic analyst; and Jon Pelson, author of “Wireless Wars: China’s Dangerous Domination of 5G and How We’re Fighting Back.”


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  144. It really is amazing how the Liberals have just given up after one battle. The Teals have broken them.

    Almost by default, the Coalition is becoming the voice of the working and lower middle-classes – and a perceived bulwark against inner-city values and priorities.

    Astoundingly, the Liberals are now the voice of the working class without changing a single policy from back when they were the party of big business! What a miracle.

    Much of the modern era in Western politics can be characterised as right wing parties acting like abusive husbands. In Australia, the Teals have now left home with the kids and the husband is an empty shell, alone with his own toxicity.


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  145. Deputy Prime Minister Richard Marles says the government has not ruled out increasing domestic coal production in a bid to alleviate soaring energy prices, promising to leave “(no)stone unturned”.

    Good job, LNP. You just lost a ‘climate change election’ and the first order of business of the incoming Labor government is to potentially increase domestic coal production in order to soften energy prices.

    BTW, when I said incredible incompetence upthread, that was directed to the policy wonks and politicians that have brought about the situation we presently find ourselves.


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  146. Gotta laff to avoid cryin’ LOL! .. down the Council INDOOR pool swimming laps this morning when buzzer goes off and everyone ordered out of water .. asks the LG what’s going on, sez,
    ” Some folk are complaining the water is cold so using the pool over for the day so it can be heated up” ..
    “it ain’t cold if your swimming”, sez I ..
    Can’t believe how much sway the ethnic rorters have when they ain’t happy .. FFS!


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  147. m0ntysays:
    June 3, 2022 at 1:43 pm

    If the Liberals should be doing – well, you didn’t really say, but something presumably – to regain teal seats, what should Labor be doing to regain seats from the Greens?


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  148. They won’t be impressed by Linda Burney wearing a kangaroo pelt either.

    Actually, it was a rather large sporran she carries a lot of baggage .. LOL!


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  149. Labor are nothing if not pragmatists.

    They’ll toss out climate action in order to retain power, no doubt at all.

    Free pass from the MSM, and bewilderment from the Libs.


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  150. Morrison had held up a photo of the sun and announced that we don’t need to be afraid of this, by now we would have an energy market dominated N U C L E A R – – P O W E R



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  151. My experience of the shop drones of Colesworths is that they are sullen clock-watchers with absolutely no affinity with or especial goodwill for customers.

    Geez! .. yer harsh! .. it’s a job not a “the aisles are alive with the sound of music” Von Trapp episode! .. imagine traipsing up & down Colesworths shelves for several hours a day and trying to grin & be cheerful to all & sundry!
    No idea what they pay these folk but, in my book, they deserve it, every cent! ..


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  152. watch the clusterfuck that labor will unfold over the next few years

    They’ve been in government barely a week and already the arrant idiocy and unworkability of their signature policy has smashed them good and hard in their stupid ugly faces.

    Welcome to the reality of “climate action” you knuckleheads.


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  153. Gulf Arab States declare they will not sanction Russia

    The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries will not join the West in imposing sanctions on Russia over the Ukraine war, Russian Foreign Minister, Sergei Lavrov, said yesterday.

    “Aspects of the international situation, which are connected with the events unfolded by the West around Ukraine, are well understood by our partners from the Gulf Cooperation Council States,” Lavrov told reporters in Saudi Arabia’s capital city, Riyadh. His visit included meetings with GCC Foreign Ministers.

    The Russian Foreign Ministry recently said in a statement that Lavrov and his Emirati counterpart, Abdullah bin Zayed Al-Nahyan, had discussed “close cooperation on stabilising oil global prices”.

    On grain exports, Lavrov accused the Ukrainian government of “blocking the way for its grain to get exports abroad”. “Our offer to our Western partners is clear, which includes providing corridors for ships transporting grain, after clearing mines, and the Turkish side has offered to help clear mines,” he said.


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  154. m0nty says:
    June 3, 2022 at 1:43 pm
    It really is amazing how the Liberals have just given up after one battle. The Teals have broken them.

    The ladies of the best postcodes will be one of the shortest political experiments we’ll ever see.
    They’re simplistic climate agenda has already been exposed by gas shortages and large food price hikes.
    The media will soon hunt then down for answers with pictures and stories of cold starving pensioners and single mums who’ve been impoverished by “real action on climate.”


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  155. The University of Sydney library will restrict access to sacred Indigenous materials and offer First Nations communities a “right of reply” to historically inaccurate texts under changes aimed at making it less Eurocentric.

    Given that the 251s had no written language skills other than the tutors & scholars at Pascoe University where, unfortunately, both scholars, students, buildings & everything else were lost when
    Jimmy “Sherman, hold my beer!” Cook unleashed his “burnt earth” across Oz and utterly eradicated and removed all traces of the “dreamland” that once was who is left to answer the call of “right of reply”? ..


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  156. What seems to be happening in Teal seats is on a par with inner urban seats and Labor. They are gentrifying and this is changing their demography. Kooyong and Goldstein were largely middle class families, whereas recently there has been an influx of medium density buildings going up that has changed the demography to some extent, and the change is largely people who are not attached to the hip of either party.

    There is no point pretending that these seats are in any sense blue ribbon but neither are they lost to Libs. They are just going to be very fickle from here on in.


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  157. No idea what they pay these folk but, in my book, they deserve it, every cent! ..

    I had a Coles delivery driver tell me once that he’d done the in store collection of orders too.

    They had 20 seconds to collect each item on the list!

    He much preferred delivery despite the traffic and heavy lifting of many orders. Some they have to carry up flights of stairs.


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  158. If the Liberals should be doing – well, you didn’t really say, but something presumably – to regain teal seats, what should Labor be doing to regain seats from the Greens?

    Labor would have better results attacking Liberal suburban seats than Green seats. They would much rather deal with the Greens in office with a depleted LNP opposition, even if they have to govern in partnership.

    The Libs are extremely weak right now trying to claim a new base, and Labor could wedge them nearly out of existence.


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  159. I can imagine the business model where everyone orders online and they don’t have to have supermarkets anymore. But I suspect that it is a long way away, if ever.

    I know that Woolworths have a couple of online only warehouse operations up & running in Sydney .. not sure about Coles but wouldn’t be surprised if they have them as well!


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  160. “OldOzziesays:
    June 3, 2022 at 1:20 pm”

    Thanks for posting that OO. Credlin last night referenced Roskam’s piece. He nails it.


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  161. “There is no point pretending that these seats are in any sense blue ribbon but neither are they lost to Libs. They are just going to be very fickle from here on in.”

    I would agree with that assessment. I think such fickleness applies to Wentworth. I suspect, whether in three years or six years time, some Teal seats will revert to the Liberals again, probably Curtin/Wentworth. However, the Liberal Party can no longer rely on these seats to form government.


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  162. That’s the thing with a four-cornered contest, it sets up all sorts of possibilities for temporary alliances and short-term enemies. Labor and Liberal could choose to fight the last war and bash each other, but that’s kind of what got them into this mess in the first place. They are both weakened in this new era so it is tempting to strike while their old foe is struggling, but they also need to defend their flanks from incursions by the new protagonists.

    The Teals have attacked suddenly and made a lot more ground in a short time than the Greens ever have. I live in an inner city electorate where the Greens gained a handful of percentage points – Gellibrand – but the process of Greenifying the electorate is painfully slow. The booths closer to the CBD were strong Green but the further you got out the stronger Labor was, apart from Williamstown which remains a Liberal stronghold. The Green effect will expand out like house prices eventually, turning Gellibrand and seats like it into Green playgrounds, but there isn’t an instant effect like the Teals had.

    The Greens may have taken a lot longer to consolidate their hold over those inner-city seats but I reckon it’s going to be harder to turf them out as a consequence. The Teals are Joanie-come-lately types without a long grassroots history behind them, so it mystifies me why the Libs are ceding their old seats without even token resistance.


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  163. Another problem the Tea Ladies face is relevancy and prestige. The seats they have taken used to boast of high profile Lib ministers and even PM’s.
    How do they keep a profile that attracts attention and satisfies the well heeled constituents, who are used to the A team.
    The Teals will predictably become more shrill and accusatory, jostling for the limelight. That grows tired quickly.


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