2,451 thoughts on “Open Thread – Tues 28 June 2022”

  1. The fact that it has not declared all regulatory bodies to be illegitimate immediately – which is evidently what you were hoping for

    Cute projection, Fat Man.

    That’s your hyperbole, and yours alone.


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  2. Security for the Carnival Magic tried to intervene when the physical fight escalated to as many as 60 people but eventually had to call in the Coast Guard to help escort the ship back, according to the New York Post.

    The 21st century version of “Murder on The Orient Express”.

    ‘Ladies and gentlemen, it is my melancholy duty to inform you that the killer is somebody in this very stateroom.’

    It was the retiree, at the buffet with the all-you-can-eat dessert plate.
    The fat Karen, outside the Captain’s office with the suggestion box.
    The hot-blooded threesome-hunter, in the waxing salon with the depilatory stick.


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  3. Cohenite :

    I find it repugnant that the 3rd wave of peoples should demand so much and have no moral authority to do so.

    Strongly agree.

    I’ve long thought that if any one group deserves special recognition it is veterans and their descendants. Shedding blood, making the ultimate sacrifice for the country confers on you and family line a right of ownership and possession that others are not entitled to.


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  4. A Leonard Cohen retrospective?

    Make sure there are no nearby razorblades…

    Canucks think he’s a sunny character or something.

    Perceptions of happy and sad music may not be universal across cultures, new research finds (30 Jun)

    New research led by Western Sydney University has found that perceptions of major and minor chords and melodies—what Western culture commonly thinks of as “happy music” and “sad music”—may not be universal and is likely the result of culture-dependent familiarity and associative conditioning.

    I think Canadians are miserable souls, but they love Mr Cohen and morose tales of sinking ships. I suppose being forced to live next to a nation of wild extroverts could do that for you.


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  5. You can’t make this stuff up…

    Not enough chicken leads to gunfire at anniversary party

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Police say a man tried to kill his brother-in-law during an argument at a couple’s anniversary party in South Memphis.

    Police said Rogers’ mother, Stephanie Morgan, ordered him to get his guns.

    The family continued the argument outside in the front yard, where police say Rogers pulled out two guns and shot Dandridge at least six times.


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  6. Zulu Kilo Two Alphasays:
    June 30, 2022 at 10:40 pm
    Not forgetting teachers who could throw the board duster or chalk over their shoulder with unerring accuracy & no technical calculations involved! ..LOL!

    In England as a young 9 year old, we had a Scottish Maths Teacher who taught us Mental Arithmetic. He was so good that he would fire the maths questions at us around the Class and if he got the wrong answer back, he would throw the chalk or blackboard duster at you even though he was already 2 or 3 other children ahead of you in firing off the questions. He was that good. And I (and others) learned Mental Arithmetic which has been with me ever since.

    I still wonder though where he got all the chalk and dusters from as we only had one blackboard. Secret hiding place up his jacket sleeve I guess.


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  7. The cost of building a renewable future

    Regulators, politicians and industry players are debating how best to build and pay for a system that no longer uses coal-fired power. The short answer is that consumers’ bills are only headed in one direction.

    Jennifer Hewett

    The rise in millions of residential and business power bills starting from today is only the beginning. Unless the energy market changes dramatically, prices for all consumers will keep accelerating next financial year too.

    The soaring price of oil, gas and coal globally is leading to a belated recognition that “fossil fuels” are still required and in drastically short supply right now.

    The constant refrain that renewables are cheaper as well as cleaner may be true in the long term. In the medium term, it conveniently omits arguments about who pays what for the cost of the additional transmission lines and storage that help make wind and solar power systemically viable.

    Hint. Most of that cost eventually gets passed onto consumers’ bills.

    And despite Chris Bowen’s enthusiasm about the eagerness of the private sector to invest far more in transmission and renewables, the hurdles to doing so quickly haven’t been eliminated by a new federal government declaring a political truce with the states.

    The transition of the energy market also requires the difficult balancing act of keeping enough coal-fired and gas-fired power in the grid until there’s sufficient investment in renewables, transmission and storage capacity to replace them.

    The release of the Australian Energy Market Operator’s “integrated system plan” is an attempt to describe how the national electricity market can achieve this shift over the next 30 years in the cheapest, fastest and most reliable way for consumers. Many of the practical questions about how best to do this cannot be neatly answered now, even in a sober 100-page report.

    That’s not really the fault of regulators like the AEMO or the Australian Energy Regulator or the Energy Security Board. The details of how the energy market is transforming itself in ways that were largely unimaginable even a decade ago have confounded most predictions, no matter how “expert”.

    The pace of advances in technology and management of the grid will only increase. But the unwieldy combination of state and federal governments, regulators, local planning approvals and having the right financial incentives or framework in place to encourage more private sector investment more quickly moves far more slowly.

    Yet AEMO’s prediction that far more coal-fired power will shut down by 2030 than has so far been announced by Australia’s generators only makes the need to deal with the gap between expectations and financial and physical reality more urgent.

    AEMO’s chief executive Daniel Westerman describes the amount of investment required as “staggering”. At the moment, for example, coal still accounts for around 60 per cent of generation in the national electricity market despite its decline being both rapid and irreversible.

    According to the vote by various industry and consumer groups as part of AEMO’s lengthy consultation process, renewables are expected to account for 83 per cent of generation by the start of the 2030s.

    Even if that exact percentage is not correct, the direction is clear.


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  8. duncanmsays:
    July 1, 2022 at 12:37 pm
    John Sheldricksays:
    July 1, 2022 at 11:47 am
    27000 the second wave came. They were the Murrayians. They walked from Japan

    Walked from Japan? To Australia? LOL. Could they walk on water then? Who writes this BS?

    people who are not ignorant of prehistory. That’s who.

    https://pixels.com/featured/sea-levels-during-the-last-ice-age-noaascience-photo-library.html

    Wow!! I didn’t realise that Map Making was so good all those many years ago. And without satellites too.


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  9. Gotta hand it to AnAl .. he’s living the “houso” dream “freebie” long term holidays abroad! .. all the years raising 4 kids in a drug addled “houso” estate in south western Sydney with towel-head druggies battling Vietcong druggies for control, addicts collapsed in the needle strewn gutters (nowhere near as bad as “houso” Camperdown .. but still…! .. LOL!) you’d spend a lot of time dreaming of escaping on O/S trips away from it all just for a week or two but it was just pie-in-the-sky stuff but for AnAl its become reality!
    And it’s not only him & “that chap Wong” running up our carbon footprint but the “druggies moll” is also enjoying a stint in gay Paree with Macroon, reportedly, whispering, “Missed ya where’ve ya been , sweetie” into her shell-like .. apparently, the media weren’t interested enuf to mention she’d joined the conga line of Laborites who “don’t call Australia home”, at the moment .. LOL!


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  10. Retaining a “social licence to operate” is not just a problem for the coal and gas industries.

    Not only does no-one want to build any new coal-fired power stations. The maintenance of existing and ageing equipment in this market is ever less commercially sustainable. But the accelerating withdrawal of coal compounds the private sector’s reluctance to invest in new gas generation to provide “firming” power for renewables without financial support from governments. The federal government is responsible for the construction of the Kurri Kurri power plant in NSW while EnergyAustralia’s Tallawarra B is being built with backing from the NSW government.

    The general view is the proposed development of a “capacity market” – to effectively pay generators to have firming power available as needed – might include gas (despite Victoria’s objections) as well as pumped hydro and batteries. But coal is still likely to be excluded, given political and environmental sensitivities.

    To cope with the need to rapidly increase investment in wind and solar as well as batteries and pumped hydro projects such as Snowy 2.0, AEMO is focused on the need to simultaneously build another 10,000 kilometres of new transmission links to connect generation and storage with users.

    “What we have outlined is a road map for investment in Australia’s national electricity market to ensure that Australians have access to affordable and reliable energy, and we know the most affordable and reliable energy going into the future is firmed renewables with transmission,” Westerman said on Thursday.

    The five big projects the regulator cites as most urgent to progress are the Hume Link connecting Snowy Hydro, the VNI West interconnector between NSW and Victoria, the Marinus Link connecting Tasmania to Victoria, expanded transmission to the renewable energy zone in northern NSW and a boost to the greater Sydney transmission ring.

    According to AEMO, the estimated $12.7 billion cost will deliver net market benefits more than double that.

    But projects are bogged down in arguments over the share of payments and returns expected by various governments and industry players as well as cumbersome state and local government planning approvals, including resistance by some communities affected. Retaining a “social licence to operate” is not just a problem for the coal and gas industries. Managing such differences is likely to test the post-election spirit of greater collaboration between governments and industry – not to mention consumers.

    Nor are energy experts all in agreement. The dead-end future of coal may be clear but not the transitional role of gas. Critics such as Bruce Mountain of the Victorian Energy Policy Centre also question the cost of interstate transmission lines and the validity of a capacity market compared to mandating renewable electricity storage targets in the same way the original renewable energy target for generation worked.

    Households and businesses will be more interested in the one-way direction of their bills.


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  11. Sheldrick

    You may enjoy that article on British ancestry.

    England, was ALWAYS English.

    I may try to find stuff about North sea trading & intermarriage as well later.


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  12. Wow!! I didn’t realise that Map Making was so good all those many years ago. And without satellites too.

    The 251s map-making dept. at Pascoe University was the envy of ancient mariners thru-out the world .. ships, canoes & weekend strollers from far & wide sought copies of their works ..


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  13. A Rochdale grooming gang leader dubbed ‘The Master’ will be allowed to remain in the UK.

    Aziz was jailed for nine years in 2012, for conspiracy to engage in s3xual activity with a child by penetrative s3x and trafficking for s3xual exploitation a 15-year-old girl.

    He took his victim to flats in Rochdale where she was plied with vodka and drugs and coerced into s3x with gangs of men in return for payment to him.

    Rauf’s lawyers also said deportation would be a breach under articles of the European Convention on Human Rights, arising out of their individual circumstances relating to their private and family life.


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  14. m0ntysays:
    July 1, 2022 at 9:22 am

    The major implication of the ruling is that SCOTUS has declared itself to have the power to abolish any regulation it doesn’t like, for arbitrary partisan reasons. It just has to do it one by one.

    m0nty you fat imbecile.

    It’s been known since the Marbury v Madison decision in 1803 that the Supreme Court has power to rule on whether government actions are legally valid or not. There’s nothing remarkable about that.
    The “major question” doctrine of interpretation has been explicit for at least well over a quarter of a century. If Congress wanted the EPA to have the powers at issue in the case, it’s had since 2014 to give legislative approval to the EPA’s “Clean Power Plan”. It hasn’t.

    It’s crystal clear on the face of s.7411 that the EPA went beyond power. The start of the section specifically states that the relevant power given to the EPA relates to “emissions reduction” technologies, and no purported power over generation technologies is mentioned. Only a drooling braying shiteating mental defective of the utmost dishonesty could pretend that this decision is a declaration of an “arbitrary partisan” power.

    The dissent is the most dishonest document ever written, at least since the last time Breyer, Kagan and Sotomayor got together. The EPA itself tried to repeal the Clean Power Plan a few years ago, but a District Court ruled the repeal invalid and insisted that the Clean Power Plan stay in force; i.e. the Clean Power Plan is in force against the decision of the EPA and only because of a judicial decision – and now the clown troupe trio say that the Clean Power Plan must be upheld because the Court should defer to the expertise of the EPA. Sotomayor has the honourable excuse of being less intelligent than a pot plant, but Breyer and Kagan ought to be publicly flogged as a warning against dishonest usurpation of legislative authority.


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  15. Guardian class patrol boats gifted to Pacific island nations have been found to have multiple defects

    Well the name is the first problem, right there.

    But seriously, many years ago was sent around some Pacific islands for a few duties. Was surprised to see in each capital there was a small squad of Aussie Navy sailors, keeping the patrol boats we had donated to them going.

    From what I understand – could be wrong – the maintenance is now done locally. Given the education standard that might be a problem. I remember the bloke who slept every night instead of watching his gauges, and when a beeper kept going off – annoying him into wakefulness – found a pair of pliers and cut the wire to the audible alarm. The entire engine seized and was a write off. He wasn’t though, being a “respected elder”.


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  16. Canberra weather – 6.9C atm, no wind & no sun.

    Loonie Bowen wants more ruinables and transmission lines – no coal, gas or hydro (unless it’s pumping water uphill to go down again).

    And the AEMO has slutted itself to Bowen.

    Jo Nova is all over it.

    Effectively — the AEMO (the Australian Energy Market Operator) is the taxpayer funded advertising agency for the Renewables Industry. The point of the latest AEMO super-report, apparently, is to get Australian taxpayers or consumers to foot the bill for the high voltage lines that the unreliable industry desperately needs but can’t pay for itself.


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  17. Gotta hand it to AnAl .. he’s living the “houso” dream “freebie” long term holidays abroad!

    Pity none of his staffers told Trudy what Albo’s nickname is, he might’ve remembered then.

    Justin Trudeau appears to forget Anthony Albanese’s name (1 Jul)

    ‘Not big in Canada’ can be AnAl’s epitaph. Shorten thinks he’s doing great though.

    Albanese doing ‘quantum level’ better than Morrison: Shorten (1 Jul)

    Between Willy Dick Shorten and AnAl it’s going to be a long three years.


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  18. rosiesays:
    July 1, 2022 at 12:16 pm
    People walk is true
    In ages past land bridges existed
    They could cross on those

    I agree. But where are all their rock paintings and other stuff? Did it all get destroyed by the next wave of ‘invaders’? There doesn’t seem to be much evidence of any one else or what they did before this latest ‘Mob’ before the ‘White Mob’ arrived (on ships).

    The ‘White Mob’ have had a marvelous impact IMHO.


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  19. Cheri Jacobus
    @CheriJacobus
    · 10h
    Reminder: The Catholic Church will not baptize a stillborn baby, because it never took took a breath.
    Life begins at first breath, and ends at last breath.

    These people are desperate.


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  20. Rauf’s lawyers also said deportation would be a breach under articles of the European Convention on Human Rights, arising out of their individual circumstances relating to their private and family life.

    Chop his balls off. Then drop him off in the North Sea in mid winter. That should fix it.


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  21. Good to have a Win occasionally

    Was watching Grand Designs New Zealand S06E03, grand designs new zealand 2021 earlier in the year

    Guy building the house was an Industrial Designer and went to a museum where the chair he designed, chosen by Steve Jobs at Apple and Bill Clinton for their offices

    https://www.sitbackandrelax.com.au/life-chair-by-formway.html

    Found Used Office Furniture Site in MEL

    Life by Formway – Grey/Green
    New R.R.P. $1495
    Was $245.00
    $65.00

    Minor cosmetic damage & wear tear.

    In Stock Delivery Available
    127 Yes

    now down to 124 available – that was quick

    Asked Daughter in MEL to go out to select and purchase 2 chairs for me as they did not ship to Sydney – 1 Chair has made it to SYD via Daughter-in-law and looks new – pick up 2nd chair next trip to MEL (also looks like new)

    (MEL Son-in-law had them in new offices)

    Really comfortable – all controls cast metal – even a solid pull out tab summarising controls


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  22. John Sheldrick says:
    July 1, 2022 at 1:10 pm

    The story says the UK Gov waited till he ditched his Pakistani citizenship before trying to remve his UK citizenship.
    Whoops!


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  23. Dotsays:
    July 1, 2022 at 12:50 pm
    Sheldrick

    You may enjoy that article on British ancestry.

    England, was ALWAYS English.

    I may try to find stuff about North sea trading & intermarriage as well later.

    Britannia was populated by the Ancient Britons who were Celts. Then the Romans turned up uninvited just like everybody else. The name England is derived from the Angles and Angleland.

    Fascinating stuff and I just love the history of the British Isles. Being a Pom myself.


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  24. Interesting that since Brazil relaxed gun laws over a year ago, guns deaths and crimes are down 40% to 1980 levels!!!

    #Shootingbackworks


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  25. Bruce of Newcastle says:
    July 1, 2022 at 11:57 am

    the idea that Lithuania gets to have a blank cheque for starting WWIII is part of the leadership drift that got NATO into this current mess.

    Maybe if Vlad had been nicer to Lithuania, instead of threatening them, they might not’ve limited transport across their country to Konigsberg.

    Russia tried to divorce itself from Kaliningrad many years ago by offering it to the neighbouring Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic. This was probably around the time that Khrushchev was hacking off parts of Russia and giving them to the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic.

    The Lithuanians said no thanks, they saw no benefit of having a 1 million strong Russian enclave incorporated into Lithuania, that was a good decision as the situation in Ukraine has shown.

    The Russians won’t give it away now, it gives them a warm water port in the Baltic Sea apart from St. Petersburg which could easily be blockaded.

    The Lithuanians are playing with fire, I understand that NATO are telling them to back off, but they are intransigent. This could become very dangerous as there are only 60 kilometres between Kaliningrad and Belorussia along the Lithuanian / Polish border. The Russians could easily seize this territory which would not only blockade Lithuania from its western allies, but also cut off Latvia and Estonia. Let’s hope that wise heads in Vilnius prevail.

    PS. Koenigsberg ceased to exist at the end of WWII. The German population was resettled in what was East Germany and the German government has signed away any sovereignty to what was East Prussia.


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  26. Cops commission external probe into executive over comments on Zach Rolfe’s return to duty

    NT Police has refused to confirm whether a senior member of its executive is under investigation for misconduct relating to the return of Constable Zach Rolfe to active duty.

    NT POLICE has refused to confirm whether a senior member of its executive is under investigation for misconduct relating to the return of Constable Zach Rolfe to active duty.

    The NT News understands an external investigation has been commissioned to begin this month following claims the executive summarily ruled out any possibility of Constable Rolfe coming back to work for NT Police.

    Const Rolfe was acquitted on all charges in the Supreme Court in March over the shooting death of Aboriginal teenager Kumanjayi Walker in Yuendumu in 2019.

    It is understood Const Rolfe has now permanently returned to Darwin after being formally transferred from Alice Springs and plans to continue working as soon as he is cleared through an internal investigation.

    In response to questions about the external probe, Assistant Commissioner Bruce Porter said any investigation was confidential.

    “In line with our current practices we always maintain confidentiality on any report from the public for the purpose of the integrity of any investigation and for the wellbeing of the member,” he said.

    It comes after officers were forced to remove a piece of roadside graffiti in Alice Springs threatening Const Rolfe with a spearing.

    Member for Araluen Robyn Lambley said the graffiti which read, “spear Rolfe not spare Rolfe” was “inciting violence and divisive”.

    “As soon as it was drawn to my attention I called the police and the council and I’m not sure what happened after that but within 24 hours it was gone,” she said.

    But Ms Lambley said she did not think the message reflected the wider views of the Alice Springs community.

    Mr Porter said while he would not comment on individual cases, “special considerations are made for individual members with unique circumstances” in regard to officer safety.

    “NT Police have a duty of care to provide all officers the safest possible working environment,” he said.

    Meanwhile in Darwin, a sign reading “Integrity matters, sack Chalker now” was also hastily removed from the intersection of McMillans Rd and the the Stuart Hwy.

    In comments recently published in the police union newsletter, Const Rolfe said he would continue to “fight to get back to work” despite being “completely abandoned” by the force’s top brass.

    “Since the actual shooting itself, up to my arrest and throughout the investigation, the NT (Police Association), (president) Paul McCue and its members have been side-by-side with me at each step, to the point where they were even sitting with me in the cell in the Darwin watch house,” he said.

    “At a time when the organisation (not the workers on the ground, I know and am aware of the support I had the entire time from you cops on the street) completely abandoned me, the NTPA was always there for me.”

    NT News


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  27. Eyriesays:
    July 1, 2022 at 12:52 pm
    Didn’t Google look at going 100% renewable a few years ago and their engineers concluded it was impossible?

    Phoooey! What would engineers know. If you want technical advice, talk to Yartz or Lore graduates, and also Ecommunists.


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  28. Timothy N

    Only a drooling braying shiteating mental defective of the utmost dishonesty could pretend that this decision is a declaration of an “arbitrary partisan” power.

    You are far too flattering to m0nty-fa.


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  29. The Chase, The Hot Seat, A Current Affair, MasterChef, Every News Bulletin… beat ABC’s 90th b’day celebrations’ ratings… 😛


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  30. John S

    But where are all their rock paintings and other stuff? Did it all get destroyed by the next wave of ‘invaders’?

    Check out the Kimberley Bradshaw rock paintings, they are markedly different to aboriginal art work.


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  31. The Russians could easily seize this territory which would not only blockade Lithuania from its western allies, but also cut off Latvia and Estonia

    That they haven’t and instead keep threatening to nuke everybody tells me all I need to know about whether or not Russia can or will do much beyond what it is ready doing.

    Remember the Russians are threatening them over an EU-sanctioned blockade of Russian construction materials, natural resources and machinery going through EU territory.

    If it was going anywhere other than the Kaliningrad oblast, it wouldn’t be an issue to anyone. Russian or otherwise.


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  32. Also in the NT:

    FORMER NT chief minister Shane Stone has been sacked from his position as head of the National Resilience and Recovery Agency.

    The announcement was made in the final paragraphs of a press release from the Emergency Management Minister Murray Watt on Friday

    Mr Stone has taken leave effective immediately, and will cease working for the NRRA from August 31.

    The move to dump the former chief minister was widely expected after Labor’s election victory in May.

    Prior to the election, Senator Watt vowed to sack Mr Stone after the NRRA boss made controversial comments about rebuilding flooded homes on the east coast.


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  33. Old Bloke

    PS. Koenigsberg ceased to exist at the end of WWII. The German population was resettled in what was East Germany and the German government has signed away any sovereignty to what was East Prussia.

    Nothing like a spot of ethnic cleansing to remove potential future problems. Perhaps there should be more of it. Assimilate, or move.


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  34. According to AEMO, the estimated $12.7 billion cost will deliver net market benefits more than double that.

    Please show me the modelling and assumptions being used so that as an interested Tax Payer I can do an audit on your deliberations. Oh, you can’t or you won’t. In that case just fuck off as I don’t believe your BS.


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  35. Kimberley Bradshaw rock paintings

    Thanks BJ… I’ve got a lot to learn!!!

    From wiki:

    Research concerning Gwion Gwion art is controversial and little consensus has been reached. Debate has primarily concerned Walsh’s interpretations regarding the origins, dating and ethnicity of the Gwion Gwionw artists, and his rejection of Aboriginal people as being their descendants. The implications of his interpretations generated considerable criticism beginning in the mid 1990s due to its continuing potential to undermine native title claims in the Kimberley. The ongoing disagreements regarding the age of the art and debate about whether it was created by non-Indigenous people makes Gwion Gwion rock art one of Australian archaeology’s most contentious topics



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  36. Maybe if Vlad had been nicer to Lithuania, instead of threatening them, they might not’ve limited transport across their country to Konigsberg.

    The only reason this is being done is because the US is goading Russia via Lithuania. It’s a nuisance now but things will get interesting when sea transport gets difficult in winter.


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  37. The one part I didn’t understand was why the employers were so quick to jump on the abortion bandwagon, and then I realised why:
    $4,000 is cheaper than Maternity Leave.
    So there you have it – a human life is worth $4k.

    Yes Winston, exactly what Tucker was on about last night. He had a good sarcastic rant on HOW DARE YOU WANT A FAMILY!


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  38. ‘The wind is always blowing and the sun is always shining somewhere in Australia’…..Chris Bowen.28/6/2022.
    This is why teachers need a pay increase, so we can attract better teachers from overseas.


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  39. Even mediocre would be easier to bear: how NZ lost its mojo

    OLIVER HARTWICH

    “We have lost clarity of how we add value, why we are here, what we exist for.”

    That was among the findings in an internal review prepared by the New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA), obtained by Radio New Zealand (RNZ).

    But that statement could equally apply to New Zealand as a whole. The country has lost its mojo after a decade of feeling good about itself.

    For many years, pollsters Roy Morgan and Curia have been asking New Zealanders whether the country is heading in the right direction. Apart from a few months around the Global Financial Crisis in 2008, large majorities of Kiwis have always responded “Yes”.

    During the first Covid lockdown, in April 2020, the highest positive value was 77 per cent for ‘right direction’. This figure has now dropped to 36 per cent, while 50 per cent of New Zealanders believe their country is going in the wrong direction.

    That is quite a mood swing, and there are reasons for it.

    The biggest contributor to New Zealanders’ grumpiness is the discrepancy between political promises and reality. Without constant promises of world-class performance, even mediocre results would be easier to bear.

    The aforementioned NZTA review is a good example. With a depressingly high road toll, the government has embarked on a “Road to Zero” campaign. Its ambitious goal: no more deaths or serious injuries by 2050. The promotional awareness campaign will cost $15 million over three years.

    Yet, as RNZ found out, since 2018 NZTA has installed less than a fifth of the road-safety barriers due by 2024.

    On these numbers, the “Road to Zero” could be a long one.

    But it will also be a costly one because the transport bureaucracy has mushroomed in recent years.

    As of June 2021, NZTA employed about 2,081 staff. That figure was 1,372 only four years earlier.

    Staff growth at NZTA did not mainly take place on the frontline. HR workers went from 57 to 122 full-time equivalents; managers from 214 to 456; accountants from 44 to 66; admin staff from 307 to 485; and communications officers from 32 to 88. None of those mentioned above will ever install a bollard, put up a road sign, or fix a pothole.

    NZTA is symptomatic of a much wider problem in New Zealand, even though it is only a small puzzle piece. Faced with a serious problem, the government sets an ambitious long-term goal. It then launches massive public relations campaigns. Following that, it blows up the bureaucracy but fails on deliverables.

    It is the same story in practically every major policy area.

    Housing was one of the big issues in the 2017 election campaign. At the time, Labour promised to fix the housing market, reduce homelessness, and build 100,000 affordable KiwiBuild homes over the next decade.

    The results after five years? New Zealand house prices have grown by almost 8.7 per annum on average. Emergency Housing Grants, which were below $10 million per quarter in 2017, now exceed $100 million. And KiwiBuild, so far, has delivered just over 1,300 homes – with only 98,700 to go.

    New Zealanders used to be proud of their education system, which was considered world-class.

    Today, the only measure by which New Zealand schools lead the world is in declining standards.

    Reading and literacy have dropped dramatically in the OECD’s PISA rankings. The mathematics skills of New Zealand’s 15-year-olds are only as good as those of 13.5-year-olds 20 years ago. Despite an increase in education spending per student, more than 40 per cent of school leavers are functionally illiterate or innumerate.

    Aside from such big policy failures, New Zealanders are bombarded with worrying news daily. There are GPs reportedly seeing more than 60 patients per day. Patients are treated in corridors at some hospitals’ A & E departments, where waiting times now often exceed ten hours.

    As gang numbers have grown, gun crime has also become a regular feature in news headlines. Ram raids, where youths steal cars and crash them into small shops, have become common.

    Rather than dealing with these and many other issues, the government appears determined to add new challenges to doing business. It is about to introduce collective bargaining in the labour market and an extra tax on income to fund unemployment insurance.

    And these are just the big-ticket items. Practically every industry can tell its own stories about new complex regulations, usually rushed through with minimal consultation, if any.

    Furthermore, there is growing unease about the government’s move towards co-governance. It sounds harmless but it would radically alter how democracy operates in New Zealand and undermine basic principles of democratic participation.

    All in all, the picture that emerges is that of a country in precipitous decline. That would be alarming enough. What makes it even more so is a perception that the core private and public institutions lack the understanding of the severity of the crisis or the ability to counteract it.

    Some notable exceptions aside, the New Zealand media is underfunded and not performing the functions of the Fourth Estate properly.

    Despite the vast expansion in public service numbers, it lacks quality and focuses on trendy issues rather than its core functions. In particular, the Reserve Bank and the Productivity Commission need a reset. And across the political spectrum, again with notable exceptions, the political parties lack parliamentarians with the qualifications and experience necessary for a turnaround job.

    New Zealand needs to be careful not to turn into a failed state. That does not mean it should expect civil unrest, but a period of prolonged and seemingly unstoppable decline across all areas of public life.

    The only way to reverse this process would be for New Zealand to regain its mojo: its mojo for serious economic and social reform. It has happened before. And it must happen again.

    Oz


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    6
  40. From Dot’s link, the genetic makeup of the English (regardless of Angles, Saxons etc) is from the Iberian peninsula. Basques in fact. No wonder holidays in Spain are popular, like a return migration.

    Cassie reminds us of Wallace line and the difficulty of walking from Japan, regardless of the land bridge between PNG and Oz. If other mammals won’t do it, people certainly can’t.

    All very fascinating.


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    6
  41. Check your pockets

    Climate ripe for trade deal with Europe: business

    Madrid | Anthony Albanese’s embrace of climate action, his reset of relations with France and Russia’s war in Ukraine have generated momentum in Europe for the conclusion of the stalled free trade agreement, says Simon Crean, the former Labor leader and chairman of the European Australian Business Council.

    After Mr Albanese said on Wednesday that talks would resume by October, following his meeting in Madrid with European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, Mr Crean said the atmosphere was ripe in Europe for a deal.

    Mr Crean was speaking to The Australian Financial Review from Brussels after having led a delegation to Paris of about 30 senior business and industry representatives from sectors ranging from energy, mining, water, infrastructure, aviation, agriculture, education and defence.

    They met French Trade Minister Franck Riester, as well as the Movement of the Enterprises of France (MEDEF), the nation’s largest employer federation.

    Mr Crean said not only had Australia’s assistance for Ukraine created goodwill, the crisis was also stoking a need for an alternative source of energy and critical raw materials.

    “It’s not only because of the reset that Labor’s victory has created, it’s the Ukraine crisis,” he said. “They are genuinely looking to Australia.”

    Mr Crean, who on Wednesday was in Brussels with his delegation to meet members of the European Parliament trade committee, said the Europeans regarded a free trade agreement (FTA) as a priority.

    While no one was prepared to put a time on when it could be concluded, there was potential to “get agreements of substance”.

    “There is absolutely no doubt that there is a palpable change in attitude towards Australia with the election of the Albanese government,” said Vicki Thomson, CEO of the Group of Eight universities and a member of the delegation.

    “There is now a window of opportunity to capitalise on this reset and of course the support of France is integral in the successful negotiation of the FTA with the EU,” she said.

    “The visit by Trade Minister Don Farrell has been viewed as hugely positive and in many ways we are the warm-up act for the PM’s meetings in Paris later this week.

    “What has provided an opportunity to break through is the Australian government’s different position on climate change. That has meant that Europe are much more willing to re-enter negotiations and to progress this agreement.”


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    2
  42. Ah, John Sheldrick. Why is it that England sends us their dumbest Poms. Is it because we keep beating them at cricket?

    Rack off back to Scunthorpe.


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    1
  43. ‘The wind is always blowing and the sun is always shining somewhere in Australia’…..Chris Bowen.28/6/2022.

    I’ve got it! Windfarms on utes*!

    *idea is crazy enough to get green support.


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  44. Why the constant assumption that those debbil-debbil Americanskis must be pulling the strings whenever poor old Russia is mildly inconvenienced or stood up to by one of its neighbours, Dover?

    Lithuania has repeatedly said it is enforcing EU sanctions.

    Last I checked, the EU generally shits on America or at best treats it with relative disdain. No matter who’s occupying 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.


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  45. I read a while back that there is those red headed Russian muslims were most closely related to British and Basques so wasn’t a surprise to read that that the Basques were the main supplier of British DNA.


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  46. The only reason this is being done is because the US is goading Russia via Lithuania.

    Um, there could be a tad of history involved too.
    And some internal politics.
    Bad relations between Russia and Lithuania go back a few years.

    “Smolensk is Lithuania”: Lithuanian MP reminds Russia of long-standing border agreement (11 Jun)

    AFTER the Russian State Duma registered a draft law rejecting Russia’s recognition of Lithuania’s independence, a member of the Lithuanian Seimas – the unicameral parliament of Lithuania – has referred to the 17th century Smolensk War treaty, which can also be revoked.

    In response to the bill introduced by the Russian deputy of the State Duma, Eugen Fedorov, which demands the Russian Federation cancel the recognition of the independence of Lithuania, the deputy of the Lithuanian Seimas Matas Maldeikis has requested the cancellation of the Treaty of Polanyi of 1634, between Russia and the Commonwealth of Poland.

    Rejecting Lithuania’s independence is just a mite inflammatory. Free Smolensk now!


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  47. the state govt is using them as the “excuse” to upgrade/build a lot of desperately needed infrastructure eg Bruce Hwy widening, Sunshine Coast Hwy widening, railway Beerwah to Maroochydore, new overbridge to replace the most congested intersection (Kawana Way and Caloundra Rd). Interestingly in the budget there was no mention of increased firey, ambo, plod or hospital services

    Ahem, that largesse for employing corrupt ex politicians has to come from somewhere. Having driven the length of the Bruce Hwy between Rocky and Mossman a few times since being back I know where it has been syphoned from. I won’t even start on the harebrained scheme to make the Gregory Developmental rd/Hwy an alternate route that between Capella and Belyando Crossing should be ripped up and returned to gravel it is that bad.

    As you say Diogenes if Queensland population is expected to double watch for a push to partition the state into 2. Increasing numbers of NQ residents like myself have warmed to the idea.

    As for more sotherners (Yes I have been one) I am in 2 minds. In the regions plenty of conservative escapees but it has gotta be a reason Brisbane is electing Greens.


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  48. Despite an increase in education spending per student, more than 40 per cent of school leavers are functionally illiterate or innumerate.

    That cant be right.
    12 years of compulsory schooling and nearly half the “graduates’ cant read/write?

    I blame a lack of diversity and not enough compulsory penis tucking classes.


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  49. The EPA itself tried to repeal the Clean Power Plan a few years ago, but a District Court ruled the repeal invalid and insisted that the Clean Power Plan stay in force; i.e. the Clean Power Plan is in force against the decision of the EPA and only because of a judicial decision – and now the clown troupe trio say that the Clean Power Plan must be upheld because the Court should defer to the expertise of the EPA.

    What happened is that the Plan was an Obama administration policy which a Trump drone tried to reverse, only to fail miserably when the DC court pointed out he was incompetent. Then SCOTUS said actually no, we get to make policy now, look at me we are the captain now, and we side with Republicans.


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    1
  50. Boambee John says:
    July 1, 2022 at 1:31 pm

    Nothing like a spot of ethnic cleansing to remove potential future problems. Perhaps there should be more of it. Assimilate, or move.

    There was a lot of that going on at the end of WWII. Czechoslovakia for example kicked out 1 million ethnic Germans at a time when there were already millions of displaced homeless people wandering around in Europe, and there wasn’t a word of condemnation spoken by the western powers.


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  51. Sums up every Public Service in Australia at Federal/State/Territory/Local Government

    As of June 2021, NZTA employed about 2,081 staff. That figure was 1,372 only four years earlier.

    Staff growth at NZTA did not mainly take place on the frontline. HR workers went from 57 to 122 full-time equivalents; managers from 214 to 456; accountants from 44 to 66; admin staff from 307 to 485; and communications officers from 32 to 88. None of those mentioned above will ever install a bollard, put up a road sign, or fix a pothole.

    NZTA is symptomatic of a much wider problem in New Zealand, even though it is only a small puzzle piece. Faced with a serious problem, the government sets an ambitious long-term goal. It then launches massive public relations campaigns. Following that, it blows up the bureaucracy but fails on deliverables.

    It is the same story in practically every major policy area.


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  52. Old blokesays:
    July 1, 2022 at 1:58 pm
    Boambee John says:
    July 1, 2022 at 1:31 pm

    Nothing like a spot of ethnic cleansing to remove potential future problems. Perhaps there should be more of it. Assimilate, or move.

    There was a lot of that going on at the end of WWII. Czechoslovakia for example kicked out 1 million ethnic Germans at a time when there were already millions of displaced homeless people wandering around in Europe, and there wasn’t a word of condemnation spoken by the western powers.

    That was a Europe that had far more in common with each other.
    Bosnia X Rwanda when the current multicultural fetish wears off, unless we’re extraordinarily lucky.


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    2
  53. Vicki:

    Never-before-seen microbes locked in glacier ice could spark a wave of new pandemics if released

    This is pretty transparent, isn’t it?
    China has seen how the FearPorn re Covid19 has tipped the balance in hastening the demise of the economies and political stability of western countries. Why wouldn’t they keep pressing our buttons when we react so predictably?

    China is now setting the scene for a NastyCovid. Wait and see.
    ………………………………………………………………………….
    re: Health of The Winston. I was only making the point about the amount of Transplant Recipients in Australia who are dependent on OS drugs to stay functioning if the factories shut down.
    Apart from everything else, I’m as fit as a fiddle.
    “Old age – it’s no place for sissies.”


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  54. the Clean Power Plan is in force against the decision of the EPA and only because of a judicial decision

    What happened is that the Plan was an Obama administration policy

    M0nty – It’s a tactic called “sue and settle”. One of the most egregious undemocratic and corrupt practices of the Obama Administration, and Biden has recommenced doing it. Hopefully the Scotus decision limits it.


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    3
  55. Despite an increase in education spending per student, more than 40 per cent of school leavers are functionally illiterate or innumerate.

    A relo of mine worked on the election; she couldn’t believe the number of people who asked her or any of the other election workers about voting. “Did putting a ‘1’ against a candidate mean that that was selecting a first choice?”


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  56. That Kakazkhstan’s “Yeah, Nah” on recognising Russia’s annexures in Ukraine this week (and Armenia before that) drew only mild butthurt from Vlad’s minions instead of proper vitriol (They left that to his Chechen enforcer, avid Tik-Tokker and general stooge, Ramzan Kadyrov), suggests to me that if Russia wants to regain its old territorial ambitions and rekindle its dreams of old empire and respectability, it might need to offer something more than old Soviet nostalgia, and tanks if you dare to disagree…


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  57. Very sad to report the death of Dr. Vlad Zelenko, the valiant physician who was one of the first to advocate the use of early treatment of Covid19 with repurposed drugs.

    He did not succumb to Covid, but of a cancer that first became apparent around 2018. Movingly, he said the cancer was a gift that allowed him to face his critics unafraid and determined. We are in his debt.

    https://americasfrontlinenews.com/post/dr-vladimir-zev-zelenko-passes-away


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  58. What happened is that the Plan was an Obama administration policy which a Trump drone tried to reverse, only to fail miserably when the DC court pointed out he was incompetent.

    Becuase only an incompetent would try to reverse an Obama-era (and thus by definition, perfect) policy, eh Fat Man?


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    2
  59. Lysander…..the idea of windmills on utes is’nt crazy, its ‘batshit’ crazy. And from here on all utes heading off to B&S balls will have to be fitted with 4 meter wide windmills to gain entry.


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    4
  60. dover0beachsays:
    July 1, 2022 at 1:09 pm
    Cheri Jacobus
    @CheriJacobus
    · 10h
    Reminder: The Catholic Church will not baptize a stillborn baby, because it never took took a breath.
    Life begins at first breath, and ends at last breath.

    These people are desperate.

    Will a Catholic priest baptise any dead person? My understanding is that 1 Corinthians 15:29 is held in all mainstream churches including Catholicism not to permit baptism of (or on behalf of) the dead.
    That’s sufficient to explain why stillborn babies aren’t baptised – its life has ended. Does Cheri Jacobus have any evidence to support her assertion that there’s some extra doctrine about when life begins, or is it all just confected bullshit?


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    8
  61. Why the constant assumption that those debbil-debbil Americanskis must be pulling the strings whenever poor old Russia is mildly inconvenienced or stood up to by one of its neighbours, Dover?

    It’s not an assumption. The idea that Lithuania is courting a conflict with Russia without US/ UK/ Polish/ etc. backing is too silly for words.

    Lithuania has repeatedly said it is enforcing EU sanctions.

    EU recently organized a work-around. Probably France and German-led solution which Lithuania is ignoring because the others told them it will be all fine.


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    1
  62. Also, is it possible to put Rosie’s The Leftwit from Cry-Me-A-River effort from this morning up as a Liberty Quote?

    Or is that prod at m0nty a bit too specific to work?


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    1
  63. M0nty – It’s a tactic called “sue and settle”. One of the most egregious undemocratic and corrupt practices of the Obama Administration, and Biden has recommenced doing it. Hopefully the Scotus decision limits it.

    +1

    Running “no contest” cases and settling for millions in slush funding for pet causes was common and normal.


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    5
  64. Dr Faustussays:
    July 1, 2022 at 12:01 pm
    In Cheerful news:

    Never-before-seen microbes locked in glacier ice could spark a wave of new pandemics if released

    In a new study, researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences took ice samples from 21 glaciers on the Tibetan Plateau — a high-altitude region in Asia wedged between the Himalayan mountain range to the south and the Taklamakan Desert to the north. The team then sequenced the DNA of the microscopic organisms locked inside the ice, creating a massive database of microbe genomes that they named the Tibetan Glacier Genome and Gene (TG2G) catalog.

    Evidence suggests that some of the newfound bacteria could be very dangerous to humans and other organisms. The team identified 27,000 potential virulence factors — molecules that help bacteria invade and colonize potential hosts — within the TG2G catalog. The researchers warned that around 47% of these virulence factors have never been seen before, and so there is no way of knowing how harmful the bacteria could be.

    I guess we’ll find out when they start appearing in wet markets…

    This is getting quite ridiculous and it’s a wonder that Humans have lasted this long on Planet Earth. More stuff to maybe alarm us. FFS give it a rest and get on with Life and enjoy things before the Grim Reaper turns up.

    Pandemics, Scamdemics, Flu, Monkey Business Pox, its endless. Fear Porn on steroids. Get a grip people.

    Life is too short.

    And have the Best Day that you possibly can.


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  65. Tucker Carlson: Democrats Are Rounding Up And Raiding Homes Of Political Dissidents, Imagine If Trump Did This

    Energy prices, which are the key to any economy, have skyrocketed. That’s happened on purpose. This administration has done that both with the sanction regimes against Russia and its emphasis on, “green energy.” As a result of those two factors, you’re seeing the biggest rising gas prices in American history. And at the same time, you’re seeing a move to green energy forms that we buy from China – solar panels, wind farms, the components for those come from China. So effectively, you’re seeing a transfer of our energy grid from American control to Chinese control. This is an attack on the most basic institutions in American life. This is handing sovereignty over to our main global rival. It’s bad for America. In fact, it’s the worst possible thing for America.

    So in a functioning democratic system, this should be a problem for the people trying to do it. You can’t undermine the country you lead and expect to continue to lead it in a democracy and the Biden , knows this, and that’s one of the reasons that the signature tactic of the Biden administration, this is our topic tonight, has been the criminalizing of American politics.

    Why have a political debate when you can just arrest people who disagree with you? And that has happened. Far below the media radar since the day Joe Biden was elected. And tonight, to show it, we want to go through a litany, a list of Americans who have been arrested, detained by federal law enforcement on the orders of the Biden administration, not because they committed recognizable crimes, but because they disagreed with the political aims of the Biden administration.

    Now, again, you’re not reading about this in The New York Times because the rest of the media are pretending that it’s not happening. And instead, they’re focused on the January 6th Committee, which has taken, in fact, a lead role in this effort, rounding up enemies of the state. The entire process is a farce, and that was proved yesterday. If you watch the hearings yesterday, you know how absurd it is.

    Democrats, with the help of Adam Kinzinger and Liz Cheney, called up a star witness who testified she heard someone else say that Donald Trump attacked a Secret Service agent and tried to carjack the presidential limousine. Think about that. The President of the United States tried to seize control of the presidential limousine that he wasn’t driving? It didn’t make any sense. And then by the time that Secret Service agents who were on the scene denied the story to NBC News and other news outlets, nobody cared. They weren’t even pretending that it was true. The initial story was the point. The shock value was the point, not the factual basis of it. That’s what passes for rigorous investigation in Congress at the moment.

    But no media outlet is going to revisit their decision to turn over their airwaves to the January 6 committee, even after yesterday’s debacle. It is, in fact, a show trial. It is absurd by definition, and its absurdity is the point. The absurdity of it, the hollowness of it, sends the message, “We run the justice system now. You are powerless.” And that is the same message the Biden administration has sent to America for the last year-and-a-half, with the help of Merrick Garland, the most political attorney general in history.

    Here’s a list of the things they’ve done because no one else has assembled it.


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  66. The idea that Lithuania is courting a conflict with Russia without US/ UK/ Polish/ etc. backing is too silly for words.

    Funny how all of those apart from the US are either EU members or still closely interlinked.

    Perhaps Dover, in your hatred of Americans, you forget that there are a great many Europeans who would like to see the Russians taken down a peg. Based on their prior behaviour.

    And the only reason France and Germany are rushing to curry favour is because they bet too hard on exploiting the Russians so they could pretend their woke domestic agendas could work on the back of Russian coal, gas and oil. While appeasing their actions and trying to look the other way in the face of their own folks’ discontent.

    Many of those wrecked Russian tanks and IFVs and guns and planes in Ukraine have French and German optics, sensors, microchips and radios in them. All quietly provided since the EU sanctioned sending military-capable technologies to Russia after their first invasion of Ukraine in 2014.


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  67. m0ntysays:
    July 1, 2022 at 1:57 pm

    What happened is that the Plan was an Obama administration policy

    That doesn’t mean it’s legally valid.

    which a Trump drone tried to reverse,
    “Trump drone” meaning EPA official who was appointed by a President m0nty doesn’t like.

    only to fail miserably when the DC court pointed out he was incompetent.
    Poor old m0nty. Why do you assume that the DC Court is right and the Supreme Court is wrong? Answer: when a court decides in a way that suits the Dems, it’s sacrosanct, when it decides in a way the Dems don’t like, it can’t be right. The point, m0nty, is that the EPA tried to scrap the Clean Air Plan, a Court stopped them, and then the clown troupe trio solemnly announce that upholding the Clean Air Plan is respecting the authoritaaah of the EPA.
    Which, incidentally, is irrelevant. The EPA’s opinion on what’s good for the environment is utterly irrelevant to whether a purported action of the EPA is within its legal powers. A Court shouldn’t respect the authoritaaah of a bunch of bureaucrats as to the legal extent of their own powers.

    Then SCOTUS said actually no, we get to make policy now,
    Wrongo bongo, you fat mental defective. The Court said only that Congress hadn’t authorised the EPA to regulate generation technologies. The Court’s decision doesn’t impose, or forbid, any policy at all.
    Unlike the late and unlamented Roe v Wade. What was that if not a prescription of policy from the bench, with all its detailed rules about trimesters etc? Want to express a view about that?

    look at me we are the captain now, and we side with Republicans.
    m0nty you fat cockhead. The Court says Congress controls the issue. The Dems have control of both houses of Congress. You fat shiteating fuckhead.


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  68. m0ntysays:
    July 1, 2022 at 1:48 pm
    Ah, John Sheldrick. Why is it that England sends us their dumbest Poms. Is it because we keep beating them at cricket?

    Rack off back to Scunthorpe.

    LOL. Nice to hear from you ‘Montypox virus’. How is that rock BTW? The one that you crawled out from under. You have obviously not been reading my posts or those terrible Judgements by the US Supreme Court properly. Maybe cos’ you can’t read and retain anyfink’ in that tiny ugly pin head of yours. You fat twat.

    I hail from London (nowhere near Scunthorpe) and I was invited here by the Australian Government. They brought me out here to improve the stock. Haven’t you seen the sheep looking happier lately? LOL. Get back under that rock and STFU.


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  69. A must read.

    Snowballs Of Soft Totalitarianism

    Utterly predictable outcome.

    Around 2015, something changed. The young people they were hiring were focused on issues of race, gender, and identity as never before, and they were impatient with — even scornful of — what they regarded as the timid incrementalism of the organizations’ leaders. They wanted equity (as they defined it) immediately. They were acutely sensitive to what they saw as microaggressions, including the use of terms to identify different groups that they regarded as out of date and insulting. They were prickly, quick to take offense and to see malign motives rather than inadvertent mistakes.

    So not only are they eating their own, but being eaten by their own rotten creation. A lot more in this article than just enjoying seeing the woke left implode.


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  70. Masseys are Red,
    Fordsons are Blue.
    Chamberlain 9Gs in Orange is best,
    But your mileage may vary…

    Masseys are Red,
    Fordsons are Blue.
    I have a John Deere,
    so bugger you.


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    4
  71. The school where boys can wear skirts – but not shorts

    The changes in policy at Wymondham High Academy follow complaints from families that boys were being forced to wear trousers during the summer term, when temperatures can soar.

    The parents have been calling for a relaxation in the rules which would allow boys to wear shorts instead.

    The school agreed to review the regulations, but rather than permitting shorts it introduced a ‘gender neutral’ policy, permitting boys and girls to wear trousers or skirts – and neither to wear shorts.

    Jonathan Rockey, the school’s headteacher, defended the new policy as “something we are very proud of” and said it had involved consultation with families.


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  72. re the “all British are Anglo-Saxons” idea.
    It seems to be based on a misunderstanding of the data. Obviously when Britain was repopulated about 11,000 years ago after the last Ice Age, the people came from those parts of (what is now) continental Europe that are adjacent to Britain.
    But that doesn’t mean that they were Anglo-Saxons.
    The British DNA makeup, even before 20th century mass migration, was very diverse.

    https://news.sky.com/story/where-do-we-come-from-britains-dna-map-10367199


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    1
  73. It’s not an assumption. The idea that Lithuania is courting a conflict with Russia without US/ UK/ Polish/ etc. backing is too silly for words.

    the obama admin seems determined to push the EU into war with russia… er I mean biden admin


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  74. Jonathan Rockey, the school’s headteacher, defended the new policy as “something we are very proud of” and said it had involved consultation with families.

    these ppl are sick in the head


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  75. The school where boys can wear skirts

    I’ve no problem with that, provided they’re allowed to carry their claymores too.


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  76. My family was exiled from Britain over 170 years ago for the minor indiscretion of flirting with the gentries daughter and something about a unpaid gambling debt . There maybe more to that story but time has erased all the witnesses. Today I identify as a proud ‘Curmudgeon Man’ …always was, always will be’ and have the legal papers to prove my rights.
    # I dont need a smoking ceremony


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  77. 27000 the second wave came. They were the Murrayians. They walked from Japan

    Walked from Japan? To Australia? LOL. Could they walk on water then? Who writes this BS?

    You’re right, I was forgetting the aboriginals space and aeronautic programme. Walking is for hunters and gathers not aboriginal cosmonauts.

    Actually there were several short water passages which our intrepid 3rd nations had to contend with on their leisurely stroll to Australia back in the day. The Wallace Line is just one of them. All were faunal barriers which stopped animal nasties coming down to predate the wondrous Australian Mega Fauna. However, unfortunately they didn’t stop the hunters and gathers who could cross shallow water passages which were about 40 kms wide. In effect we traded tropical forests and amazing Mega Fauna for some fucking spit paintings in caves.

    The Sahul period was an interesting time. The world was in glacial conditions. Most or a lot of the world’s ocean water was trapped as land ice. The peak low level around the East Coast of Australia was 135 meters BELOW what it is today. The GBR didn’t exist until the oceans started to rise about 15000 bya after the 3rd wave of people got here and started doing what I described above.

    It’s not BS.


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  78. Curmudgeon Man

    Ugh… [Insert Rolled Eyes Emoji Here]

    😉

    (I’d use ‘Ook,’ but we’re not talking about the Librarian of the Unseen University of Ankh-Morpork…)


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  79. Walk after lunch, suburb is filled with music from the nearby school which seems to be having a disco. It’s amusing since the track most clearly audible was roughly three times older than the kids are. Unmistakable synth solo!

    Ike and Tina Turner – Nutbush City Limits (1973)

    Ripper video btw. But it shows the ghastly state of modern music that schools are playing fifty year old tracks. And Coles this morning was playing ABBA on their tannoy. Amazing. Maybe it’s because rappers keep going to gaol or are being assassinated or something.


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    4
  80. Curmudgeon Man…meaning . The curmudgeon man can be a bit irritable at times and very short with ‘woke’ people, teachers , politicians and people or persons who just piss him off.


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  81. m0ntysays:
    July 1, 2022 at 1:48 pm
    Ah, John Sheldrick. Why is it that England sends us their dumbest Poms. Is it because we keep beating them at cricket?

    Rack off back to Scunthorpe.

    m0nty-fa provides an intelligent, logical, well constructed response – NOT!

    Has m0nty-fa forgotten how many on the labor side of Australian politics came from the UK? Or is he just resorting to the old sport of Pommy bashing, in a mixture of rage and frustration at the weakness of his own political side? m0nty-fa, screaming “Go back to where you came from” is considered racist in these enlightened days.


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    2
  82. What happened is that the Plan was an Obama administration policy which a Trump drone tried to reverse, only to fail miserably when the DC court pointed out he was incompetent. Then SCOTUS said actually no, we get to make policy now, look at me we are the captain now, and we side with Republicans.

    m0nty-fa descends further into a morass of paranoia. He is starting to make Captain Queeg look like a paragon of mental balance.


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    2
  83. Bruce of Newcastlesays:
    July 1, 2022 at 3:01 pm
    Maybe it’s because rappers keep going to gaol or are being assassinated or something.

    Also rappers’ lyrics tend not to promote an attitude towards women which would elicit murmurs of approval in enlightened and progressive social circles.


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  84. Bluey

    That was a Europe that had far more in common with each other.
    Bosnia X Rwanda when the current multicultural fetish wears off, unless we’re extraordinarily lucky.

    Multiculturalism in Europe and here, in which is the fetish more pronounced?


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  85. Maybe it’s because rappers keep going to gaol or are being assassinated or something.

    PS, if you haven’t seen the episode of “Seven Periods with Mr Gormsby” where Mr Gormsby takes charge of the school concert, do look it up online.


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    5
  86. Rex Angersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 2:09 pm
    What happened is that the Plan was an Obama administration policy which a Trump drone tried to reverse, only to fail miserably when the DC court pointed out he was incompetent.

    Becuase only an incompetent would try to reverse an Obama-era (and thus by definition, perfect) policy, eh Fat Man?

    And who better to judge administrative competence than a completely unbiased DC judge?

    m0nty-fa is just phoning it in now.


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  87. Just a thought.

    Plenty going on in the Asia Pacific and Sleazy is busy trying to get into everything European. I’m not saying don’t have an opinion on Ukraine or express displeasure as a nation but us, in our part of the world that’s all it should be. It is a European issue and should be left to them largely. However I guess Thai kids hiding in bomb shelters because the fighting in Burma is spilling over the border isn’t as newsworthy.

    https://www.bangkokpost.com/thailand/general/2337188/myanmar-fighter-jet-crosses-into-thailands-air-space-in-tak

    Better news article here:

    https://www.chiangraitimes.com/news/thailand-launches-f-16-fighters-to-intercept-myanmar-mig-29/

    Plenty going on in our backyards and some pretty close to favoured holiday destinations.


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  88. Top Ender:

    “We have lost clarity of how we add value, why we are here, what we exist for.”

    In short, New Zealand governance is incompetent. A gift it shares with just about every other government in the Western world.
    The causes are the same – bloated bureaucratic parasites gorging on a weakened productive sector that is rapidly losing the will – and the regulatory environment – to succeed.


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  89. Timothy N

    m0nty you fat cockhead. The Court says Congress controls the issue. The Dems have control of both houses of Congress. You fat shiteating fuckhead.

    Don’t hold back, give us your honest assessment of m0nty-fa.


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  90. Perf Trader:

    Lysander…..the idea of windmills on utes is’nt crazy, its ‘batshit’ crazy. And from here on all utes heading off to B&S balls will have to be fitted with 4 meter wide windmills to gain entry.

    4 meter measured how? Diameter? Radius? Circumference?
    The first two will fail the initial road test.


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  91. GreyRangasays:
    July 1, 2022 at 3:19 pm
    . Haven’t you seen the sheep looking happier lately?

    I thought that was the Kiwi’s job.

    LOL. Plenty of sheep shaggers in the UK with their Wellington Boots (Gum Boots here). Farmers Delight no less. One sheep’s left back leg in the left leg of the Farmer’s Wellington boot and ………………Well, you know the rest.


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  92. Bruce of Newcastlesays:
    July 1, 2022 at 2:49 pm
    The school where boys can wear skirts

    I’ve no problem with that, provided they’re allowed to carry their claymores too.

    At the very least, a skean dhu.


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  93. m0nster at 1:57.

    What happened is that the Plan was an Obama administration policy which a Trump drone tried to reverse, only to fail miserably when the DC court pointed out he was incompetent. Then SCOTUS said actually no, we get to make policy now, look at me we are the captain now, and we side with Republicans.

    Shorter m0nster.
    Political ideologues marching through the institutions was fine up until now.
    But these are now our institutions.


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  94. Plenty going on in the Asia Pacific and Sleazy is busy trying to get into everything European

    Just Labor’s traditional stomping ground and preference, RockDoctor.

    The Chunks are mean and dictatorial, but there are still plenty of old Comrades and maaaaaaaaaaaates across Western Europe to relive the good old days of Torry-kicking with at stately dinners. All on their collective taxpayers’ dimes of course, as is only fitting.

    It also makes a great political distraction squirrel for the folks at home, when their Julia-era Mk.2 Defence Policy kicks in in earnest. In an environment even more adverse than when Julia was degrading our readiness and morale…


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  95. Still, when it comes to weapon safety and discipline and the young, I still fall back on the following:

    (Regrettably, any putative Mrs Anger would probably be aghast if I came home one day with a Vickers Mk6 or a 2pdr, and said it was being put away in the garage for when the babies are big enough…)


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  96. Again, Tucker showed a couple of nights ago how US democrapt Presidents go to Europe to say sorry for being American… Albo’s done exactly the same thing…


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  97. Lysandersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 2:07 pm
    Monty
    SCOTUS has announced a FATWAH on the epa.

    Mmmmm I love the smell of #Winning on a Friday. So much #Winning.

    I love the smell of lefties burning in the morning/afternoon/evening/night-time and with napalm. Burn baby burn……………………


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  98. “The Beer whisperersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 2:33 pm
    A must read.

    Snowballs Of Soft Totalitarianism”

    Thanks for that Beery. Dreher’s analysis is superb.


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  99. China has warned Australia that any “military accident” involving the two powers in the South China Sea will see “a harsh response.”

    One would hardly imagine that an accident could be a casus belli, but the times are fraught with danger.


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  100. China has warned Australia that any “military accident” involving the two powers in the South China Sea will see “a harsh response.”

    One would hardly imagine that an accident could be a casus belli, but the times are fraught with danger.

    Good article here Rog: https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/by-accident-or-design-or-designed-accident-chinas-unsafe-air-intercepts/

    The only conclusion you can come to is that these pilots are being told to try and force aeroplane accidents from the very top!


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  101. The only conclusion you can come to is that these pilots are being told to try and force aeroplane accidents from the very top!

    That was my first thought, L. – that an “accident” might be manufactured.


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  102. That was my first thought, L. – that an “accident” might be manufactured.

    I’m not the top military strategist here but, and excuse the pun, seems they’re gunning for it…


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  103. that an “accident” might be manufactured

    Between agriculture failures, blackouts, Covid lockdowns and the real estate implosion Mr Xi could do with a squirrel right now.


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  104. Dotsays:
    July 1, 2022 at 2:00 pm
    Britannia was populated by the Ancient Britons who were Celts.

    That’s not what the DNA evidence says.

    What and whose DNA evidence? Please elaborate.

    The Celts ended up in the Scottish Highlands, Wales and Cornwall. They have an affinity with Brittany in France and parts of Northern Spain where the locals have red hair. Then there is Ireland.


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  105. Between agriculture failures, blackouts, Covid lockdowns and the real estate implosion Mr Xi could do with a squirrel right now.

    Obviously very few people think of an invasion, but some ships off the shore to hassle out our imports and exports…that also heightens the likelihood of accidents.. (sorry I’m being a Doomtard)


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  106. Geeze can’t say I realised all the crap going on in SE Asia… nada on the news!!!

    Yes, similar to how Ukraine’s nazis actions in Donbass since 2014 was “reported”.


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  107. AEMO says 12bill will do the trick.
    Sack these guys now.
    It’s 100bill a year for a decade to reach Labor’s planned legislative targets.
    (unless you buy offsets galore & rack up the corresponding amount of debt).


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  108. The Burmese thing has been bubbling for years never makes the news. It quietened down during the reform years with Aung San Suu Kyi released from prison but since the crackdown things have changed for the worse. I remember trips to Thailand on breaks when there was a 3 way conflict going on, it would make the news in Asia. This however is on a scale I have ever seen before and incursion into Thai territory weren’t uncommon by ground forces or an artillery barrage but mostly in jungles against Karen or Shan bases not farmland. Never by air.


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  109. Oppenheimer is a British MD and geneticist.

    Funny…I was just reading about his work yesterday.

    Seems it is contested, as indeed all theories should be.


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  110. The Chinese media said that the Australian incident took place over international waters somewhere between Vietnam & Taiwan.

    Australia has not disputed that.

    The Chinese pilots were being dickheads.
    No doubt at the command of the big wigs.
    But why is Australia flying a surveillance plane between Vietnam & Taiwan.
    Considering the outrage, why haven’t the co-ordinates been released?


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  111. “We’ll cut your power bills and give power back to the people – rain or shine.

    Because Labor isn’t scared of the future. We’re ready for it – and we’re ready to make it work for Australian families.”

    Elbow’s campaign promise.

    Non-core?


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  112. Dotsays:
    July 1, 2022 at 12:34 pm
    This is a great article.

    From Dot’s article….

    The genetic evidence shows that three quarters of our ancestors came to this corner of Europe as hunter-gatherers, between 15,000 and 7,500 years ago,

    Here’s a tip, when you hear archaeologists talking about time ranges as mentioned above, say to yourself “It’s fairyland story time again.”

    The Celts, the Angles, the Saxons, the various groups who settled in the British Isles, Western Europe and Scandinavia are believed to have been there for many thousands of years, this belief is based on the overwhelming populations of Y-DNA R1b1a2 (M-269) in those lands. These archaeologists however are puzzled that the DNA of ancient skeletons shows type I Y-DNA which is associated with the Sami and Laplanders.

    The oldest skeleton found in Europe with R1b1a2 dates only to 800 BC, just yesterday in archaeological terms. What else of significance happened in 800 BC?, the fall of Samaria and the exile of the northern tribes of Israel (the House of Israel).


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  113. No….no…..no……..the new historical consensus is that Ancient Briton was settled by black Africans, despite there not being any evidence for this however if you disagree you are a waaaaaaaaaciiiiiiist. Perhaps this explains why Anne Boleyn was recently played by a black actress.


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  114. Boambee Johnsays:
    July 1, 2022 at 3:10 pm
    Bluey

    That was a Europe that had far more in common with each other.
    Bosnia X Rwanda when the current multicultural fetish wears off, unless we’re extraordinarily lucky.

    Multiculturalism in Europe and here, in which is the fetish more pronounced?

    Seeing most of Europe is still 80% or more French in France, Germans in Germany, Polish in Poland and we has such orgasmic virtue signaling here over 50% of the population being immigrants or children of the same…..

    Yes, people from the UK for example can slot in fairly well, and their kids will generally be “Aussie” etc. etc. and all the nuance. Overall though, when there’s not the degree of economic good times like we’ve had for the past 30 or so years I reckon we are going to be in serious strife.


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  115. Linky:

    Victoria and NSW will pay a huge economic and political price for the COVID-19 pandemic, losing potentially hundreds of millions of dollars worth of GST and seats in parliament to other parts of the country.

    If Victoria does not turn around the population crash it suffered through COVID-19, it could lose an unprecedented two federal electorates in boundary redistributions, while NSW is on track to lose one. Western Australia could reclaim the electorate it lost before the 2021 election as well as millions in additional GST payments.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/falling-population-to-cost-nsw-and-victoria-cash-and-possibly-seats-in-parliament-20220630-p5ay11.html


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  116. …although “great” news for McClown’s ego which will be thinking he single-handedly brought over 10’s of 1000’s of Eastern Staters… **rolls eyes**


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  117. But why is Australia flying a surveillance plane between Vietnam & Taiwan.

    Freedom of Navigation exercises. We do it, the Yanks do it, the Poms and Euros and even some of the more local powers do it, too.

    Air and shipping movements in waters and airspace that everyone but China recognises as belonging to either nobody, or are ok with international shipping and aircraft transiting through.

    China’s self-declared Air Defence Identification Zone as of several years ago, encompasses a box anchored by the Philippines, Vietnam, Taiwan and almost up to Japan. Including most of these countries’ own airspace and territorial waters.

    We just don’t hear about them until the Chunks escalate.


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  118. I immediately thought of the wrong claymore

    😀 Bit hard on the teacher.

    I once visited a pommy museum which had lots and lots of claymores and suchwhat. They were taller than me, and I’m not short. The mystery was the Scots never worked out that putting a point on the end of it might be useful: they were all tastefully rounded. Just shows how clueless Scotspeople are, and I confess to Scots heritage back to before the Norman invasion. No tartan or skirts though, we’re lowlanders.


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  119. The Burmese thing has been bubbling for years never makes the news.

    I’m fairly sure the junta is very firmly on Beijing’s patronage list. And the Thais have often taken in refugees they want either dead or under the thumb, and can be quite muscular in resisting Burmese cross-border military activity.

    Just the sort of stuff you’d want to stoke if you’ve determined your best way to take Tawian off the Tawianese might be to get all the neighbours even more fractious and politically divided than usual…


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  120. In 2008, long before Wadeye’s current troubles saw hundreds flee their homes and feuds conducted with crossbows and machetes, Patrick McCauley reported for Quadrant on his experience as a teacher in the community. Things were bad then. They are much worse today….

    Link


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  121. We just don’t hear about them until the Chunks escalate.

    Just last year the Japanese scrambled their fighters close to 1000 times due to mostly Chinese but also Russian fighter encroachments into or close to their air space.


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  122. Any country with as many Karens as Burma is going to have problems.
    We have more than enough ourselves too.
    I don’t have a manager.
    Sorry.


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  123. The only conclusion you can come to is that these pilots are being told to try and force aeroplane accidents from the very top!

    The Russians tried to pull the same shit repeatedly on US and Commonwealth transport aircraft during the Berlin Airlift in 1949.

    Had a Mig or Yak actually clouted one of those transports, it may well have set off the War everyone was holding their breath over.

    The Chinese have had good teachers.


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  124. although “great” news for McClown’s ego which will be thinking he single-handedly brought over 10’s of 1000’s of Eastern Staters… **rolls eyes**

    Drawn to the illuminated codpiece like moths to a flame.


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  125. Funny how all of those apart from the US are either EU members or still closely interlinked.

    Perhaps Dover, in your hatred of Americans, you forget that there are a great many Europeans who would like to see the Russians taken down a peg. Based on their prior behaviour.

    I’ve lived among them, I don’t hate them. I do, however, have serious misgivings about the foreign policy class. Further, are we really supposed to be impressed or take sides because some East Europeans have past grievances with Russia? As if the Baltic states, Polish, Lithuanians, etc. all have clean hands let alone the French, Swedish or Turks.

    And the only reason France and Germany are rushing to curry favour is because they bet too hard on exploiting the Russians so they could pretend their woke domestic agendas could work on the back of Russian coal, gas and oil. While appeasing their actions and trying to look the other way in the face of their own folks’ discontent.

    Or, it could be that their noticing that the sanctions regime has been a failure, that the food and energy situation is worsening, that they have nothing at all to gain and much to lose by further deterioration of the situation, and that by being cheap-arses, militarily, for several decades, they’ve effectively surrendered control of their security policy to the US, which probably thinks that a major war in Europe might not actually be a bad thing for it, all things considered.


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  126. “We’ll cut your power bills and give power back to the people – rain or shine.

    Because Labor isn’t scared of the future. We’re ready for it – and we’re ready to make it work for Australian families.”

    Elbow’s campaign promise.

    Non-core?

    these are not the promises you are looking for …..


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  127. “Trump drone” meaning EPA official who was appointed by a President m0nty doesn’t like.

    Hang-on, what? This is starting to look like another Dem own goal here. Let me get this straight, SCOTUS just narrowed administrative discretion because the Dems where unhappy that a executive appointment of Trump’s in the EPA sought to reverse previous Obama policy via an exercise of administrative discretion? If anything illustrates the ‘deadliness of doing’ its this decision and Dobbs.

    It’s amazing we let people like you out in public, unchaperoned.


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  128. The only conclusion you can come to is that these pilots are being told to try and force aeroplane accidents from the very top!

    They did it when Bush II first got in too, some mid-air collision forcing that American plane to make an emergency landing. They took their time before they returned it.


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  129. The Third Wavers just got bent over the ute in Sri Lanka to the tune of ten wickets.

    Got rolled in their second innings for 113 in 22 overs. Travis goddamned Head, who bowls an excellent variety of pies got four wickets.

    Jesus wept.

    The upside is that the cheat and run-out specialist Smith doesn’t get another run with the stick.


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  130. Not long ago, Kerry O’Brien convinced a governor-general of Australia (Sir William Deane) to apologise on live television for a massacre (not far from Wadeye at Mistake Creek) that was proven to have been perpetrated by an Aboriginal man. Neither of them apologised to my people for this profound cultural insult, yet this too is racism—serious, popular and pervasive.

    From the article on Wadeye that Top Ender posted upthread.

    “Mistake Creek” was somewhat complicated – the white station manager who Aboriginal “eyewitnesses” described as leading the massacre, had actually been dead for two years at the time, and the massacre actually conducted there was seven years earlier, when a group of Aboriginal stockmen murdered a group of nomadic Aborigines in a dispute over a woman. Nevertheless, the good Sir William Deane almost wept on air as he apologized.


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  131. Just last year the Japanese scrambled their fighters close to 1000 times due to mostly Chinese but also Russian fighter encroachments into or close to their air space.

    Don’t forget the JMSDF getting ships to sea because of CCP ships in our waters or the Norks having missle tests and “fishing Boats” in the region.


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  132. The upside is that the cheat and run-out specialist Smith doesn’t get another run with the stick.

    Yes but Warner improved his series average somewhat.


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  133. “We’ll cut your power bills and give power back to the people – rain or shine.

    Because Labor isn’t scared of the future. We’re ready for it – and we’re ready to make it work for Australian families.”

    Literally this is the truth. No power, no power bills.
    Just missing the little bit “As long as it”
    As in
    We’ll cut your power bills and give power back to the people – As long as it rains or shines”

    No hydro and no sunshine and you are on your own.

    And its quite possible to make the second paragraph more truthy as well by changing the emphasis on the word work.
    As in
    “and we’re ready to make it (hard) work for Australian families.”


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  134. Rex,

    That part of the world have been trading in argy bargy since before European engagement. I remember one rest up in Thailand was when Thaksin Shinawatra was PM, the Thais and Hun Sen of Cambodia nearly went to war over a temple. I stayed closer to Bangkok but my mate with a Thai mrs from the border regions of Cambodia was amazed at the mobilisation of forces up that way. All the border guards had been replaced with soldiers, the military checkpoint at Sa Kheo was beefed up and sandbagged. Snap VCP’s all over the place. His wife’s family completely unperturbed as they had seen worse during the communist insurgencies.

    Couple months later all good even after Thai armour had been massed in Si Saket and regimental fire missions across the border there. If you didn’t know you wouldn’t have guessed. What both sides never resorted to was air power. That’s what sparked my interest in my above links.

    The whole thing was a show of strength while the people at the table bargained. Once a deal had been made it was over. Mate also knows of similar argy bargy on the Lao border near Ubon Ratchithani around same time. IMO the moderating factor is probably the intermarriage and sub-ethnic links in these areas and across the region. My mates mrs has ethnic heritage across 3 countries but they identify as Thai’s.

    Be an interesting line of study that we Australians have no idea of having no land borders and only being relative newcomers to the world stage.


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  135. Roger:

    China has warned Australia that any “military accident” involving the two powers in the South China Sea will see “a harsh response.”

    It just goes to show that any sign of weakness to China is rewarded with further threats.


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  136. It just goes to show that any sign of weakness to China is rewarded with further threats.

    Yes…the “reset” didn’t last long, did it?


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  137. If Victoria does not turn around the population crash it suffered through COVID-19, it could lose an unprecedented two federal electorates in boundary redistributions

    Seats don’t “belong” to States.
    They are not theirs to “lose”.
    They belong to voters.
    If voters move, electoral boundaries move. Except in Tassie.


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  138. Be an interesting line of study that we Australians have no idea of having no land borders and only being relative newcomers to the world stage.

    True. To cross an Australian border from outside means coming in force. With everything.

    While international convention seems to make incursions and raids by small groups of (non-Combined Arms) ground troops with just organic and intimate air or maritime support or limited and intermittent cross-border shelling acceptable. Albeit only against targets and people not clearly identifiable as belonging to the opposing nation.

    Up to a point, of course…


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  139. They took their time before they returned it

    Yep. An EP-3C electronic intelligence bird.

    Full of the very best and latest EW signal hoovering sensors and analysis software western ingenuity could develop.

    Who’s to know that if you were able to force down and take apart a PLA-AF Elint bird today, how much of its gubbins and widgets look all but identical to the regular fit-out of a 2004-05 era EP-3?

    (Some of our AP-3 maritime patrol planes were set up similarly, and spent a lot of time in the Sandpit eavesdropping on insurgent satphone and mobile calls)


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  140. If Victoria does not turn around the population crash it suffered through COVID-19, it could lose an unprecedented two federal electorates in boundary redistributions

    Just a temporary blip. Those flat cow paddocks are just too tempting when the Population Ponzi gets cranked up again.


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  141. and that by being cheap-arses, militarily, for several decades, they’ve effectively surrendered control of their security policy to the US, which probably thinks that a major war in Europe might not actually be a bad thing for it, all things considered.

    I note you didn’t answer the French and Germans selling Russia military-grade equipment under the table the whole time since 2014 for Russia to modernise its troops and weaponry with. Despite their own declarations and signing within the EU of sanctions against sending such things to Russia after their first invasion.

    Call America warmongers all you like. That most Europeans (particularly in the East) might be more than a little bit sick of French and German hypocrisy and appeasement of a nation that has all these other places to get through before it reaches them, while they themselves are in the firing line of emboldened Putinist bellicosity and weight-throwing, might have a slightly stronger pull on attitudes at the moment than merely any alleged or genuine meddling by the American foreign policy classes.

    You can bet that the Swedes and Finns, who didn’t really give two figs about NATO before February 24th, suddenly changed tack because America manipulated them and wanted them to act as cannon fodder…


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  142. You can bet that the Swedes and Finns, who didn’t really give two figs about NATO before February 24th, didn’t suddenly change tack because America manipulated them and wanted them to act as cannon fodder…


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  143. Celt these days is not regarded as a useful category in archaeology and has no particular unified genetic value either. It is not regarded as anything more than an C19th invented term for the iron age tribal people of south-western Europe and Britain who were pushed to fringe lands in the modern era; Germanic is a rubric of the same sort, this one usually applied to the north-western tribes. Both were terms Imperial Rome used regarding its widespread conquests and interests in ‘Gaul’ – north and south rather than terms wide populations used for themselves. No known ancient grouping ever called itself ‘Celtic’.

    Oppenheimer’s work is older (his major book published 2006), more recent genetic studies have been claimed to show far more population replacement, but the field is extraordinarily contested (I am still trying to sort it out locationally). Recent genetic studies can be contradictory. I am only tangentially interested in these at this stage in their development. Too complex, although the genetic admixture does allow a strong NW European input to pre-Roman as well as Roman Britain, and later of course too.

    Oppenheimer has received flak for his view that a northwestern Germanic language influenced British languages in the pre-Roman period. He read my Quadrant article on Arthur and got in touch. He’s been encouraging to me about my theories concerning the Germano-Scandinavian nature of the pre-Roman father god in Britain – the All Father (Arthur) and has forwarded to a colleague who is a scholar of Basque language my suggestions concerning a proto-Indo-European father god called Atar (the word for father in the Basque language), a term which became reflected in Roman times in the Gens Artorius. He also forwarded my article to an archaologist at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford who works the mythologies expressed on pre-Roman coins, who has also been in touch with helpful comments.


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  144. Lysander:

    Obviously very few people think of an invasion, but some ships off the shore to hassle out our imports and exports…that also heightens the likelihood of accidents.. (sorry I’m being a Doomtard)

    China will probably not do anything obviously connected to the incident, but just think how easy it would be to have something nasty to escape into our farmscape – like brucellosis or common bunt.


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  145. Further, are we really supposed to be impressed or take sides because some East Europeans have past grievances with Russia? As if the Baltic states, Polish, Lithuanians, etc. all have clean hands let alone the French, Swedish or Turks.

    Given you’ve repeatedly argued since this thing started to go kinetic at the beginning of the year that Russia’s worries, complaints, past territorial claims, historic grievances and so forth must always take priority in other world powers’ thinking whenever Russia starts sabre-rattling and trying to tear pieces off its neighbours or former vassals and justifying it because everyone’s out to get them, I think keeping the rest of Central and Eastern Europe and the ‘Stans, and all their no less relevant grievances and claims in mind is equally reasonable and valid.


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  146. Albo’s girlfriend makes monumental blunder:

    Jodie Haydon has deleted her LinkedIn profile after Daily Mail Australia revealed she posted about changing the date of Australia Day and supporting striking teachers.

    The 43-year-old had declared she wanted to avoid making political commentary as the Prime Minister’s partner – but used her LinkedIn account to freely air her progressive views.

    In the past year she called for the date of Australia Day to be changed, with a post saying: ‘Sovereignty has never been ceded. Always was, always will be Aboriginal land.’

    it won’t matter much. Labor are still in their honeymoon period, which will probably last months.

    Daily Mail


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  147. Amd while we’re at it, Russia has given up trying to reinforce and fortify Snake Island as a means of exerting control over the Black Sea.

    While they are officially calling it a ‘Goodwill Gesture,’ too many irreplaceable landing craft, fast attack boats, helicopters and Surface-to-Air and Surface-to-Surface missile systems and radar sets have been sunk or shattered while supplying the place to represent a reasonable rate of return for their efforts.

    This will relieve some pressure on world grain export markets, as commercial shipping is now possible from Odessa.


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  148. Albo’s girlfriend makes monumental blunder:

    She made herself a target on the social media sewer

    AAAAAhahahahahahahahaha

    Schaedenboner time


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  149. Sovereignty has never been ceded. Always was, always will be Aboriginal land.’

    Guess who got his bottom smacked, by the Daily Mail, for suggesting that a collection of nomadic, hunter gatherer tribes with a Stone Age culture, never had sovereignty to cede in the first place?


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  150. The only conclusion you can come to is that these pilots are being told to try and force aeroplane accidents from the very top!

    The key word is “accident”.
    They are dropping chaff in the path of AEWC aircraft. I am not sure of the capacity of these engines to eat chaff without giving up. They don’t care if they bring one down or not.
    I doubt these crews have good egress capability and, even if they did, rescue wouldn’t be easy if harassment continued.
    So, a downed aircraft and lost crew.
    What does Elbow do?
    Not much is my guess.
    The ABC will start questioning our provocation of Chinah.


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  151. Mind you, according to Sun Tzu, doing aggressive shit like this is only done when one is weak.

    Appear weak when you are strong, and strong when you are weak.

    Is China weaker than it appears?
    Maybe it is.


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  152. I note you didn’t answer the French and Germans selling Russia military-grade equipment under the table the whole time since 2014 for Russia to modernise its troops and weaponry with. Despite their own declarations and signing within the EU of sanctions against sending such things to Russia after their first invasion.

    Why am I required to answer it? You earlier completely ignored whether Lithuania would blockade Kaliningrad without US permission. Even so, it’s not as if the French and Germans have done nothing since Feb 24. The Germans have sent arms and armour, they’ve thrown hundreds of millions of investment in Nord 2 in the toilet, completely upended their energy sector, but this still isn’t enough.

    Call America warmongers all you like. That most Europeans (particularly in the East) might be more than a little bit sick of French and German hypocrisy and appeasement of a nation that has all these other places to get through before it reaches them, while they themselves are in the firing line of emboldened Putinist bellicosity and weight-throwing, might have a slightly stronger pull on attitudes at the moment than merely any alleged or genuine meddling by the American foreign policy classes.

    Firstly, the foreign policy establishment (Brookings, ISW, etc.) is not America. Secondly, that anyone can talk about Russian ‘bellicosity and weight-throwing’ given the last 30 years is incredible. Thirdly, if those East European nations want to settle scores they can do it themselves and on their own dime, without inviting another European war.


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  153. Publisher halts Ego book that details Brittany Higgins’ claims of sexual assault
    Exclusive
    Sophie Elsworth
    Media writer
    An hour ago July 1, 2022

    Publication of a newly-released book which details the events surrounding Brittany Higgins’ allegations of sexual assault inside Parliament House has been stopped amid the upcoming court trial involving the former Liberal staffer.

    Harper Collins, the publisher of Ego, written by Australian Financial Review journalist Aaron Patrick, has ceased further supply of the 324-page book that hit bookshelves and online stores just two weeks ago.

    A spokesman from the book publishing company confirmed the immediate stop to further distribution of the book following the pending criminal trial.

    “HarperCollins has temporarily paused supply until resolution of an upcoming criminal trial,” he said in a written statement.

    Despite this on Friday afternoon the book was still available for purchase from numerous bookstores, shops and online sites including Angus & Robertson, Booktopia and Big W.

    The criminal trial was due to start in the ACT Supreme Court last month but was delayed until October after it was derailed following a speech given at the Logies on June 19 by Network Ten’s co-host Lisa Wilkinson.

    She made comments about Higgins’ allegations just days out from the criminal trial starting.

    Consequently Chief Justice Lucy McCallum stayed the accused man Bruce Lehrmann’s trial, after Wilkinson made remarks about the allegations after winning the award for the story for the most outstanding news coverage or public affairs report for her interview that aired on The Project in January 2021.

    During the TV interview Ms Higgins did with Wilkinson, she detailed the alleged rape by a former colleague on the night of March 22, 2019.

    Justice McCallum said Wilkinson’s speech at the Logies had “completely obliterated” the line between allegation and guilt.

    New & improved business newsletter. Get the edge with AM and PM briefings, plus breaking news alerts in your inbox.

    Patrick’s book details the accounts of former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s campaign against Scott Morrison and many recent controversies that plagued the former Coalition government including the Higgins saga.

    In the book, which was released on June 15, a chapter was dedicated to the allegations made by Ms Higgins that she was allegedly raped inside a minister’s office in Parliament House three years ago.

    Mr Lehrmann’s legal team last year said the ex-Liberal staffer “absolutely and unequivocally denies any form of sexual activity took place”.

    Patrick said he was “disappointed” the book supply had been halted.

    “I am disappointed given the sales numbers were going extremely well for the book,” he said.

    “I don’t believe the book would have had any impact on this case given it’s been thoroughly vetted before it was published.”

    The Australian last month reported that several other book deals could be impacted by delay of the criminal trial, including a book by Higgins, for which she will be paid about $250,000.

    The deal was brokered by Wilkinson’s husband, Sydney Morning Herald journalist Peter FitzSimons.

    Latest Nielsen BookScan 2022 figures showed in the first 10 days of Ego being available for purchase, about 1150 copies had been sold.



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  154. too many irreplaceable landing craft, fast attack boats, helicopters and Surface-to-Air and Surface-to-Surface missile systems and radar sets have been sunk or shattered while supplying the place

    That was pretty well my first thought as well.

    Sure you can take it, but can you resupply it?

    A lesson Japan got hammered with in the Pacific campaigns.


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  155. Top Endersays:

    July 1, 2022 at 5:50 pm

    Albo’s girlfriend makes monumental blunder

    At least BloJo’s bit of fluff keeps her pillow talk off Social Meeja.


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    1
  156. Those flat cow paddocks are just too tempting when the Population Ponzi gets cranked up again.

    Which reminds me of another of Elbow’s campaign promises – to cut immigration and upskill locals.

    Can’t wait for this honeymoon period to wear off.


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  157. Cool stuff Lizzie!

    A nice thing about the Arthurian cycle is all the literature coming from it. Tolkien for example.
    Recently I reread “The Excalibur Alternative” by David Weber, which is a Scifi Arthurian(ish) novel. Others like Steve White have incorporated Arthurian material in their SF too.

    The whole Woden thing would make a fine theme also, along the lines of Sprague de Camp’s books.


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  158. Rex Angersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 5:55 pm
    Amd while we’re at it, Russia has given up trying to reinforce and fortify Snake Island as a means of exerting control over the Black Sea.

    While they are officially calling it a ‘Goodwill Gesture,’ too many irreplaceable landing craft, fast attack boats, helicopters and Surface-to-Air and Surface-to-Surface missile systems and radar sets have been sunk or shattered while supplying the place to represent a reasonable rate of return for their efforts.

    This will relieve some pressure on world grain export markets, as commercial shipping is now possible from Odessa.

    No grain is going through that way. Even if you leave aside it’s been the Ukrainians stopping export, laying mines there and both parties having tagged shipping, no insurance company will touch a ship going though there.
    No insurance means grain will have to move the way is has been, though rail to ports in other countries. I asked the question elsewhere, with a number of people who know their way around shipping.


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  159. Rogersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 6:08 pm
    Those flat cow paddocks are just too tempting when the Population Ponzi gets cranked up again.

    Which reminds me of another of Elbow’s campaign promises – to cut immigration and upskill locals.

    Can’t wait for this honeymoon period to wear off.

    I reckon #Absent Albo is short and catchy enough to take off on social media. Probably hit close to home for him too, seems to care about hit social media image as much as Danny boy.


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  160. “Essential infrastructure is vital to the wellbeing and security of a nation and is thus too important to be left to the whims of profit”

    Friedrich List
    Hey, this List guy mighta been onto something there?


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  161. British bank excels at go woke, go broke:

    Dozens of Halifax customers are closing their accounts with the bank after a staff member told them to leave if they don’t like their new pronoun policy.

    The bank announced on Twitter earlier this week that it would allow staff to display their pronouns their name badges.

    In a post that read ‘pronouns matter’ and the hashtag ‘ItsAPeopleThing’, it showed a photo of a female staff member’s name badge which featured ‘she/her/hers’ in brackets.

    But more than 150 social media users have since said they are boycotting the former building society after being lectured about inclusivity.

    Some have cut up their credit cards while others are lodging complaints about Halifax’s social media manager who, when customers accused the bank of ‘virtue-signalling’, told them: ‘If you disagree with our values, you’re welcome to close your account.’

    One user said: ‘Just closed my Halifax account after 19 years with them. They can stick their pronouns up their/his/her a**e’.

    Another said: ‘My wife and I have followed this advice, partly due to Halifax’s current virtue signalling but mostly the eagerness of AndyM to lose customers.

    ‘Mortgage is being moved, credit cards have been cancelled, deposit account closed. Had been with you since the 90s. Nice work.’

    Speaking today, PR expert Martin Townsend said Halifax’s policy is a ‘Ratner moment’ and ‘astonishing’.

    It was a reference to Gerald Ratner, who infamously caused the value of the jewellery firm he was chief executive of to plummet after branding its products ‘total c**p’ in a speech.

    Link


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  162. Poor bloke.
    Imagine how awful it must be to be asked a question before $80,000 gets lobbed into your bank account.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-01/uncle-jack-charles-asked-to-prove-aboriginality/101200382

    This is the same cement Abo who was on Phatty Addams’ radio show crowing how he saw committing burglaries against white people while he was a junkie as reparations.
    Uncle Jack says he was shocked to receive a recent phone call from a committee staff member demanding proof of his Aboriginality in order to receive an $80,000 second instalment under the Stolen Generations Reparation scheme.

    He told ABC Radio Melbourne’s Drive program the worker told him there were too many people falsely claiming to be Indigenous.

    And, you dont have to prove a thing.

    The Victorian Government’s Stolen Generations Reparations Package website does not make any mention of having to prove Aboriginality to receive compensation under a scheme it said was designed to address the trauma and suffering caused by the forced removal of Aboriginal children from their families and communities.

    It also states applicants do not have to provide proof of their removal, and that searches of government and other records can be done on their behalf, if given permission.

    Aboriginal Karen demands to speak to the manager.

    Uncle Jack told ABC Radio Melbourne the questioning of his identity was distressing.

    “I think it’s peculiarly and particularly racist against the First Nations people,” he said.

    He said the incident left him questioning why someone would falsely pass themselves off as Indigenous.

    “It’s too difficult to be an Aboriginal. Have a look at what I’m struggling through right now, hitting 79 in September and I’m still being bedevilled and perplexed,” Uncle Jack said.

    “I have been re-traumatised with this very questioning of who I am.”


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    4
  163. Even so, it’s not as if the French and Germans have done nothing since Feb 24. The Germans have sent arms and armour, they’ve thrown hundreds of millions of investment in Nord 2 in the toilet, completely upended their energy sector, but this still isn’t enough.

    Only after extreme duress was applied by their own people and aforementioned Eastern European nations in the press and EU and NATO meetings.

    Mutti Merkel’s utterly forgettable replacement is hanging to his power by a thread, after his party’s dithering and contempible early shipments of utterly rotted out ex- East German RPG ammo and a few thousand helmets and body armour sets. While simultaneously still paying handsomely for Russian natural gas.

    And the French only got serious after Kiev stood.

    So forgive me for rolling my eyes at France and Germany, doing the right thing after first doing everything else. And still trying to play nice woth the Russians because they need the Russian natural gas, coal and oil far more than the rest of Europe (being smarter about wholesale abandonment of such resources than them)…

    Secondly, that anyone can talk about Russian ‘bellicosity and weight-throwing’ given the last 30 years is incredible.

    You can wHaTaBoUt at me over debbil-debbil America all you like, Vatnik.

    The fact remains that you choose to accept and champion Russia doing the same things in Syria, Chechnya, Dagestan, Armenia, Georgia, Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan that you purport to deplore the Americans doing in Iraq and Afghanistan over the same period of time, because they’re closer to you than the Russians are.


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    1
  164. I’ve never argued that.

    Really?

    I seem to recall you and Zipster constantly telling the Cat about NATO expansion and American manipulation of Ukraine and forcing Russia’s hand and Russia calling any NATO expansion towards their borders a redline they were justified in acting against. Oh, and how all the Ukraians were all Nazis and genocidal murderers.

    And how all these things gave Russia the moral high ground and justification to act in self defence. Self defence basically meaning invade a nation and try to decapitate its government.

    And how anyone who disagreed was saying that arguing against the Russians’ rhetoric and actions was denying them their sovereignty. Particularly since America was the apparent string-puller in all of this.

    And if they weren’t your exact words, they were very certainly words to that effect.


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    3
  165. A quick and accurate summary of the position of Celticism in British archaeology, its origins and the disputes surrounding it, can be found in Ronald Hutton’s recent (2016) applauded ‘Pagan Britain’ pp 166-171- which The Times reviewed as ‘A magisterial synthesis of archaeology, history, anthropology and folklore’. ‘Celts’ were ‘lodged in the heart of the continent’ he says, across a wide range, which suited the times that sought European unity.

    “The characteristics of ancient ‘Celticity’ were assembled from a mixture of archaeological data drawn from all over this range, medieval texts in Celtic languages, and the comments of ancient Greek and Roman authors … Disquiet concerning this intellectual construct began to be expressed in Britain in the late 1980’s when a few archaeologists questioned whether it might not be impeding the interpretation of Iron Age Data. During the mid to late 1990’s a full scale attack on it, led above all by John Collis and Simon James. The essence of their case was that the word ‘Celtic’ had come to be applied to three different phenomena – to an ancient racial group, to a set of languages and to a style of curvilineal decoration. The problem was that the three did not correspond exactly to each other in geographic area, and that they had been developed as mental constructs independently and at different times.”

    The proverbial hit the fan when Professor Barry Cunliffe, the foremost Iron Age scholar, in the early 2000’s “declared himself firmly against the idea of Celtic migrations or invasions, and a single Celtic culture, and above all of a single Celtic race”. He saw the development of ‘Celtic’ styles of speech, i.e a common language, to be the result of the extensive trading networks of the Bronze Age, which fell away significantly in Iron Age cultures, as iron was widespread throughout Europe and did not have to be traded; nor any more did tin. Thus the Celtic creole started to diverge in locationally into two forms recognised today, Goidelic in Ireland and Brythonic in Britain. In lower Europe it became incorporated in the Latin languages of Gaul, France and Spain. Hence even today French shares certain words in common with old Welsh – eglise meaning church, for instance (stemming in both cases from the Latin ecclessia).

    In Britain, like a watercolour wash, languages melded into each other, including Germanic elements as Oppenheimer depicts and which I also see as very likely. As a case in point, I note that Carausius, who led a pan-Brittanic and successful Breakaway-from-Rome Empire in Britain between 286-293 was himself of Germanic origin.
    moderated

  166. A quick and accurate summary of the position of Celticism in British archaeology, its origins and the disputes surrounding it, can be found in Ronald Hutton’s recent (2016) applauded ‘Pagan Britain’ pp 166-171- which The Times reviewed as ‘A magisterial synthesis of archaeology, history, anthropology and folklore’. ‘Celts’ were ‘lodged in the heart of the continent’ he says, across a wide range, which suited the times that sought European unity.

    “The characteristics of ancient ‘Celticity’ were assembled from a mixture of archaeological data drawn from all over this range, medieval texts in Celtic languages, and the comments of ancient Greek and Roman authors … Disquiet concerning this intellectual construct began to be expressed in Britain in the late 1980’s when a few archaeologists questioned whether it might not be impeding the interpretation of Iron Age Data. During the mid to late 1990’s a full scale attack on it, led above all by John Collis and Simon James. The essence of their case was that the word ‘Celtic’ had come to be applied to three different phenomena – to an ancient racial group, to a set of languages and to a style of curvilineal decoration. The problem was that the three did not correspond exactly to each other in geographic area, and that they had been developed as mental constructs independently and at different times.”

    The proverbial hit the fan when Professor Barry Cunliffe, the foremost Iron Age scholar, in the early 2000’s “declared himself firmly against the idea of Celtic migrations or invasions, and a single Celtic culture, and above all of a single Celtic race”. He saw the development of ‘Celtic’ styles of speech, i.e a common language, to be the result of the extensive trading networks of the Bronze Age, which fell away significantly in Iron Age cultures, as iron was widespread throughout Europe and did not have to be traded; nor any more did tin. Without this impetus, localisms started to develop in language and culture. Thus the Celtic creole started to diverge in locationally into two forms recognised today, Goidelic in Ireland and Brythonic in Britain. In lower Europe it became incorporated in the Latin languages of Gaul, France and Spain. Hence even today French shares certain words in common with old Welsh – eglise meaning church, for instance (stemming in both cases from the Latin ecclessia).

    In Britain, like a watercolour wash, languages melded into each other, including Germanic elements as Oppenheimer depicts and which I also see as very likely. As a case in point, I note that Carausius, who led a pan-Brittanic and successful Breakaway-from-Rome Empire in Britain between 286-293 was himself of Germanic origin.


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    2
  167. “Albo’s girlfriend makes monumental blunder:

    Jodie Haydon has deleted her LinkedIn profile after Daily Mail Australia revealed she posted about changing the date of Australia Day and supporting striking teachers.”

    I bet Albanese wants to change the date too. The other day, a leftist I work with, out of nowhere, asked me what I thought of “Jodie”. I had no idea who “Jodie” was so I said “who”? He then said “PM Albanese’s girlfriend”. I replied “I have no opinion of her”. He said “oh she looks nice”. I responded “she might be “nice”, just like Jenny Morrison was and is nice”. So I then asked “do you have an opinion of Jenny Morrison”. He didn’t respond.

    “Jodie” will be treated with kid gloves, she’s won’t be subjected to the vicious commentary that Jenny Morrison was subjected to.


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  168. The 43-year-old had declared she wanted to avoid making political commentary as the Prime Minister’s partner – but used her LinkedIn account to freely air her progressive views.

    Has she accompanied Albanese overseas?
    If not, then she’s a Beard.

    In the past year she called for the date of Australia Day to be changed, with a post saying: ‘Sovereignty has never been ceded. Always was, always will be Aboriginal land.’
    There’s some truth in that, and the History has been horrific, but is Albanese going to pay a share of the Income from his 6 investment properties to the local Camperdown tribe?
    Don’t make me barf.


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  169. You earlier completely ignored whether Lithuania would blockade Kaliningrad without US permission

    Why does Lithuania need someone else’s permission? Why would it? It is their territory the railway lines run through, after all. Not America’s.

    The Finns and Poles quite cheerfully did it of their own accord recently.

    Powers independently snub each other all the time. I note that there is no question that Kazakhstan chose to deny playing Putin’s games over recognising their Ukrainian annexures of their own accord. In fact, the only people claiming it was done to avoid foreign censure are the butthurt Russians themselves.


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  170. It’s absolutely clear that part of the right learned nothing from Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya and Syria

    Really?

    Because I won’t agree that Russia occupying other lands or taking bits from them by force is OK?

    Why do you think I agreed with America’s actions?


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  171. Really?

    I seem

    Seem, hey?

    recall you and Zipster constantly telling the Cat about NATO expansion and American manipulation of Ukraine

    Sorry, I had no idea raising these accusations that several people from Kissinger to Keenan had flagged decades earlier weren’t relevant now, but setting that aside, raising them doesn’t also mean that Russia gets priority.


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    3
  172. Rex Angersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 6:31 pm
    I’ve never argued that.

    Really?

    I seem to recall you and Zipster constantly telling the Cat about NATO expansion and American manipulation of Ukraine and forcing Russia’s hand and Russia calling any NATO expansion towards their borders a redline they were justified in acting against. Oh, and how all the Ukraians were all Nazis and genocidal murderers.

    And how all these things gave Russia the moral high ground and justification to act in self defence. Self defence basically meaning invade a nation and try to decapitate its government.

    And how anyone who disagreed was saying that arguing against the Russians’ rhetoric and actions was denying them their sovereignty. Particularly since America was the apparent string-puller in all of this.

    And if they weren’t your exact words, they were very certainly words to that effect.

    So the concept of the Russians declaring NATO on their direct (historically vulnerable) border in Ukraine is perceived as a threat, and is absolutely a red line they will act on, is what? Something that can be ignored because everyone who says maybe they’re serious is a vatnik?
    Even the places you mentioned, apart from Syria, where they were invited, everything is either inside the Russian federation, or directly on their borders. They absolutely have an pertinent interest there.
    You can’t say that about US intervention in, well, pretty much anywhere in the last 20 years.

    It’s pretty clear you very much on board Russia is not allowed to have their own national interest, it doesn’t make it right, it doesn’t make it moral, it does mean they have to be taken into account for places right next to them. It is simple realpolitik that so many “leaders” in the west appear to have forgotten completely, and any chance to change course is well and truly gone now.

    But no doubt I’m just a vatnik, so…..


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  173. that didn’t take long

    ‘Ignorant and ill-formed’: China slams Prime Minister Anthony Albanese for likening Russia’s invasion of Ukraine with Taiwan
    Beijing has blasted Prime Minister Anthony Albanese after he said China should learn from Russia’s strategic failure in Ukraine, particularly in its ambitions for Taiwan.



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  174. Perhaps Dover, in your hatred of Americans

    That’s a pretty hysterical and ridiculous statement- it implies that hatred of the military-industrial complex and the rotten US government extends to all Americans.


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  175. Rex Anger:

    That most Europeans (particularly in the East) might be more than a little bit sick of French and German hypocrisy and appeasement of a nation that has all these other places to get through before it reaches them, while they themselves are in the firing line of emboldened Putinist bellicosity and weight-throwing, might have a slightly stronger pull on attitudes at the moment than merely any alleged or genuine meddling by the American foreign policy classes.

    Seeing that these nations have been the battlegrounds for many of the frequent wars between Europeans, it’s a bit silly they haven’t formally allied together.


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  176. Bugler’s medal in Somme VC sale
    Jack Blackburn, History Correspondent
    Friday July 01 2022, 12.01am BST, The Times
    Walter Ritchie’s medals, including the VC won on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, will be sold in London this month
    Save

    The first day of the Battle of the Somme, 106 years ago today, remains the bloodiest day in the history of the British Army. But from a day of carnage emerged inspirational acts of valour that led to the awarding of nine Victoria Crosses.

    Medal collectors have a rare chance to bid for one of those medals later this month when it is auctioned with a guide price of up to £280,000.

    It was awarded to Walter Potter Ritchie, a 24-year-old drummer from Glasgow, who stood on a parapet in the full face of German guns and sounded his bugle to rally comrades to repel a counterattack.

    Despite making himself the focal point for enemy fire he survived “without a scratch”. British forces suffered 57,470 casualties that day, including 19,240 killed.

    Ritchie was also recognised for his repeated delivery of messages under fire and his “initiative”: he had smuggled the bugle into the line of fire, against orders.

    Robert Wilde-Evans, of the London auctioneer Spink and Son, which will sell the VC on July 21, said it was a “rather special” example. “Nine were awarded for the first day of the Somme, but only three of those recipients survived the war, and seven of the nine are in museums,” he said.

    Ritchie rose to become a drum major before leaving the army in 1929. He returned to serve briefly in the Second World War before being discharged owing to ill health. He died in 1965. His other medals are also on sale.

    “It is impossible to truly comprehend the chaos and carnage of the first day of the Battle of the Somme,” Wilde-Evans said. “The image of Ritchie standing on the parapet of that trench, under heavy fire, sounding the ‘Charge’ is the stuff of legend.”

    He added: “It is the greatest of privileges to share Drummer Ritchie’s story and ensure his medals are appreciated and valued for years to come.”



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  177. Winston Smithsays:
    July 1, 2022 at 6:45 pm
    Rex Anger:

    That most Europeans (particularly in the East) might be more than a little bit sick of French and German hypocrisy and appeasement of a nation that has all these other places to get through before it reaches them, while they themselves are in the firing line of emboldened Putinist bellicosity and weight-throwing, might have a slightly stronger pull on attitudes at the moment than merely any alleged or genuine meddling by the American foreign policy classes.

    Seeing that these nations have been the battlegrounds for many of the frequent wars between Europeans, it’s a bit silly they haven’t formally allied together.

    There is the Visgrad group, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia.


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    4
  178. In Britain, like a watercolour wash, languages melded into each other

    Lizzie, I suspect there was biff as well as melding, humans being human. Per my comment yesterday.


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  179. renovations proceeding nicely here

    got under another cupboard and found more gems left by the previous owners

    1x 1960’s Fosters Lager. still full. very cloudy
    2x 20yo Maxwell mead liqueur

    I might dodge the beer but see if the bottle and label are worth anything.

    reckon I’ll be cracking the mead though

    what a hoot


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    7
  180. Why does Lithuania need someone else’s permission? Why would it? It is their territory the railway lines run through, after all. Not America’s.

    The Finns and Poles quite cheerfully did it of their own accord recently.

    The Finns and the Poles are not between it and Kaliningrad, and Lithuania wouldn’t be doing this if it were not a part of NATO or without American assurances.


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  181. Let’s just say Dover, that this part of the Right has nothing wrong with a nation going to war if directly threatened or attacked by a nation or non-national group (Be it using the examples of 7/12/1941, 9/11 or the USMC’s Tripoli raid against the Barbary pirates in 1805.), or coming to the direct aid of a friendly nation asking for its help.

    But the minute the war is won or the crisis passed, and the nation starts inventing excuses to stay on, then the legitimacy is gone.

    As such, Libya ought to have been something to stay away from unless or until things started spilling over to friendly neighbouring nations who wanted help. And the Syria mess was best left untouched, until- As it did- The violence came to Iraq and Iraq called for help.

    Anything else, be it politics, provocation or an unfriendly power upsetting one’s neighbours and friends, is best dealt with by them. Or with the lightest possible touch and helping hand.*

    I remain a believer in a policy as enunciated by Theodore Roosevelt’s Speak Softly, and Carry A Big Stick.</em

    So, what Russia has done since 1991 is thus indefensible. As has what America did after the fall of Kabul in 1991, and not immediately packing up and vacating Baghdad and Basra after their capture in 2003. Regardless of the validity of the pretexts.

    * In fact, arms-length training support, financial assistance and supply of equipment has been something the US has been doing since its founding in 1776. I doubt you'd complain over its initial arming of France, UK and the Netherlands against Germany and Japan between 1936 and 1941.

    And its sanctioning of oil exports to a Japan running rampant in China in the same way Russia is now in Ukraine was deemed a proportionate and effective non-military solution to a friendly power being attacked by a competitor.

    Unfortunately, as history shows then (and now), the sanctioned power had no intention of backing down when it saw that everything it wanted appeared to be in its grasp.


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