2,451 thoughts on “Open Thread – Tues 28 June 2022”

  1. JC at 8:56.

    What a couple of dickheads. 20 years and haven’t made a profit.

    True.
    Never made an annual profit.
    But here’s the thing.
    I looked back at their quarterly results.
    They are fucking all over the place.
    Dec Qtr 20 – $600m loss.
    Mar Qtr 21 – $160m profit.
    Jun Qtr 21 – $213m loss.
    No apparent logical reason for the big swings.
    Very smelly.


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  2. Leigh Sales ends final 7:30 bulletin with tearful farewell

    theaustralian.com.au00:50
    Leigh Sales sheds a tear as she leaves 7.30
    Duncan Murray
    NCA NewsWire
    39 minutes ago June 30, 2022

    Leigh Sales delivered her final program as host of ABC’s 7:30 on Thursday night before walking away to spend more time with her family.

    Sales barely held back tears as she signed off for a final time.

    “It has been an absolute privilege. Thank you for having me, goodnight,” she said.

    The cameras caught Sales wiping her eye as the show’s credits rolled.

    The Walkley-winning journalist announced earlier this year she would leave the program after more than a decade as host.

    She explained the decision to leave felt right and allowed her to spend more time with her two young sons.

    High ranking government ministers who have found themselves in the firing line of Sales’ difficult questions delivered tributes on Twitter.

    Veteran Labor minister Tanya Plibersek called her a “formidable journalist – smart, thorough, compassionate and relentless.

    “Your pursuit of the truth has helped Australians better understand our country and our world,” Ms Plibersek said.

    Federal Treasurer Jim Chalmers described Sales as a “fierce, formidable and classy inquisitor”.

    “It was a big deal to be interviewed by her (and often a relief when it was over!). A complete professional and an absolute legend,” he said.

    A special edition of 7:30 will air on Friday looking back over the years Sales spent as anchor.

    Sales presented most of her final program with practised professionalism – introducing reports on the war in Ukraine and guilty verdict for National Crime Authority bomber Domenic Perre.

    She gave her final studio interview with three experts on the Uluru Statement from the Heart and an Indigenous voice to parliament, on which Australia will hold a referendum in the coming years.

    Why do the words “Good riddance” suggest themselves?


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  3. Ah, the good old days!
    I can remember when we had “mainframes” and “mini computers”.

    1970 I worked in PMG telephone accounts & billing section, West Street, North Sydney behind the Union Hotel .. 3 stories and the computer(s) & peripheries took up 2 of the 3 floors with about 20 staff operating 24/7 (3 shifts) .. the other floor was offices and the tape spooling/punch card section .. nowadays anything over 16gb ram could handle the computer workload except for the hard copy bill printing/enveloping machinery .. averaging 2 000 bills a day .. and when the enveloper broke down .. and it often did .. hand inserting! .. lotza O/T and sore fingers .. !
    Fun facts : we had a flag pole alongside the main entrance and the flag had to raised at sunrise and lowered at sunset everyday by the relevant shift .. or else! ..
    you also had to adhere to the dress code regardless of shift .. formal! .. LOL!


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  4. A special edition of 7:30 will air on Friday looking back over the years Sales spent as anchor.

    Seriously? Our taxes are paying for that? I shouldn’t be surprised, but honestly the self-indulgence, cronyism and sense of entitlement are off the scale.


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  5. Why do the words “Good riddance” suggest themselves?

    You read these sort of media “farewells” and are expected to understand that it was all sacrifice .. that they were doing it out of “luv” and the massive recompense & “signing off” hand-out are superflous to the joy they imparted to the audience ……. FFS!


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  6. Ok then.

    * Programmed a PDP 1170 timesharing beast.
    * Then a Burroughs B6700.
    * Commodore 64 at home with a plug-in Word Perfect cartridge and a cassette drive to save on. Make a coffee after pressing Play and Record.
    * Then an Apple IIE
    * IBM twin 7″ disc drive, and then someone said get a hard drive. Was in a box with a separate power supply.
    * Some weirdo invented WIMP and we all got mouses. Ridiculous – what was wrong with Command Line Interface?
    * Then on to various Macs and here we are.


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  7. and when the enveloper broke down .. and it often did .. hand inserting! .. lotza O/T and sore fingers .. !

    In the USA they used to call it ‘stuffing the envelopes’. Not too sure whether they still say that now with all of this so called ‘political correctness’. The mind boggles as to how you may ‘stuff an envelope’. Maybe like stuffing a chicken? Whoops. Don’t go there either……………………..lol


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  8. Anyway, Slainte to all you mob.

    Mme Zulu’s doctor says she’s showing every signs of recovery, and payday for self funded retirees, tomorrow, will be a snorter…


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  9. Timothy Neilsonsays:
    June 30, 2022 at 9:39 pm
    A special edition of 7:30 will air on Friday looking back over the years Sales spent as anchor.

    Just put the anchor around her neck and throw her in the……………………………………


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  10. shatterzzzsays:
    June 30, 2022 at 9:44 pm
    Why do the words “Good riddance” suggest themselves?

    You read these sort of media “farewells” and are expected to understand that it was all sacrifice .. that they were doing it out of “luv” and the massive recompense & “signing off” hand-out are superflous to the joy they imparted to the audience ……. FFS!

    James Dibble didn’t sign off like that as he was a Gentleman and a great Geezer as us Londoners like to say…………………..


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  11. Taught my son (5) on the Commodore 64 thinking it was better than him fiddling and maybe breaking it ( I won’t do an AnAl & mention “houso” lack of money/tuffness .. this time .. LOL!) and when he was 10 we upgraded to a DOS machine .. took to DOS like a duck takes to water and was teaching me by the time W3.1 & W95 came along .. he was a tech genius whilst still at school .. never did any formal computing courses until his late 20s when employers seemed to think without bits of paper your bluffing ..
    Nowadays, unlike AnAl he’s left his “houso” upbringing behind and would have to take a serious pay cut to “aspire” to PM .. LOL!


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  12. shatterzzzsays:
    June 30, 2022 at 9:38 pm
    Ah, the good old days!
    I can remember when we had “mainframes” and “mini computers”.

    You don’t anyfink’. I remember the abacus, logarithms, slide rules. the 12 times tables, and gob stoppers.


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  13. John of Melbourne:

    What options do we have? Voting?
    Or are asking about why do you need to hug your loved ones? ?

    It’s a fairly deep question, J O’M. Let me have a bash at it.
    In 100 years time, the continent of Australia will still be here.
    It will be inhabited by homo sapiens, hopefully. 🙂
    What will the dominant culture be?
    This is the question we need to be asking.
    Will it be similar to the current one? Similar but evolved in a manner we want?
    Cultures evolve whether we want them to or not. That evolution can be from within or it can be imposed from without, or even imposed from within by outside influenced players.
    The issue is about the individuals ability to influence the trajectory of the change. I’m not a Prepper because I’m going to survive a social meltdown – I’m a Prepper because my family and friends are going to inherit the opportunity to survive on my preparations and carry forward my ideals of what societal values need to be preserved.
    I’m not going to survive past 6 months of a social breakdown because I need an industrial society that can manufacture anti rejection drugs to keep me alive. That doesn’t mean I cannot ensure my community doesn’t get the benefit of my current existence.
    Voting isn’t going to change much, J. O’M, increasing the chances of cultural survival of the things you value, will.
    Stock up on Baked Beans and ammo.


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  14. Just put the anchor around her neck and throw her in the……

    Didn’t Leigh Sales write a very slobbering and very sympathetic biography of one David Hicks? “Detainee 002? “


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  15. Zulu Kilo Two Alphasays:
    June 30, 2022 at 9:34 pm
    Leigh Sales ends final 7:30 bulletin with tearful farewell

    In the good old days the bitch would have been burnt as a witch.


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  16. Re innovation in the 20th Century.

    The Global Positioning Network of satellites.

    Enabled farmers to steer straight.
    And the army to blow shit up with greater accuracy.
    Among other things.


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  17. We had an Olivetti M24, 10 m hard drive. Got it cheap when a mining company we did work for brought 4 of them. Upgraded to 20 meg. Year later a Ferranti AT 40meg plus an XT as well. Spent $800 on a NEC P3 Pinwriter. $400 for another golf ball for it when it wore out. You can still get bits for them. Had a loan of an HP Mini for a while. Job we did for a govt dept ran their paper tape backup for 2 days. Had a program on floppies that had 5 discs. The program was protected from copying by the sequence each part was loaded. Took about 2 hours to load changing each disc for a specific file. Wrong combination turned it to garbage.


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  18. Shatterzzz:
    I scored a spot as a TiT with the same mob and transferred over to City South Telephone Exchange where I did time sheets with the crew there, then got to wander all around the city delivering a briefcase? full of paper to the different exchanges. I remember Kent street because I could get Chiko rolls at the entrance…
    …long time ago.


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  19. You don’t anyfink’. I remember the abacus, logarithms, slide rules. the 12 times tables, and gob stoppers.

    Not forgetting teachers who could throw the board duster or chalk over their shoulder with unerring accuracy & no technical calculations involved! ..LOL!


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  20. I couldn’t understand the poor lady; what was he convicted of?

    Dunno but by the sounds of things the bloke who makes his coffee will be filing an appeal.


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  21. then got to wander all around the city delivering a briefcase?
    Early 1980s I worked for the NSW State Bank (O/S Trade) and spent my days hand delivering bank cheques & promissory notes to various bank branches and company office blocks around the CBD/North Sydney ..
    One highlight was a trip to the bullion vault in the CBA, Martin Place (Head office back then) .. only time in my life I’ve seen gold bars .. lotz & lotz of gold bars and wrapped pallets of notes & bins full of coins ..
    never , ever forget it! .. LOL!


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  22. I hereby seek the permission of Dover to change my moniker from Barking Toad to Braking Turd.
    moderated

  23. Not forgetting teachers who could throw the board duster or chalk over their shoulder with unerring accuracy & no technical calculations involved! ..LOL!

    My High School history teacher was a veteran of the United States Marine Corps, in the South Pacific, during the Second World War. He had a good, withering blast of drill sergeant’s sarcasm, was a crack shot with a piece of chalk, or a blackboard duster, but the love of history he instilled in me has lasted fifty years……


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  24. Prime Minister Blackface Castro, finally finding form (the Hun):

    He’s known across the globe for his good looks and effortless charm, but Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appeared to momentarily forget the name of his Australian counterpart Anthony Albanese before inexplicably calling him “Tony” tonight.

    Abbott? Soprano? Danza?

    Mr Albanese and Mr Trudeau held a one-on-one bilateral meeting in Madrid on Thursday to discuss global security, support for Pacific climate action, and the economy.

    But, at the top of the meeting — as TV cameras rolled — Mr Trudeau seemed to initially struggle to recall Mr Albanese’s first name after an awkward handshake that lasted one too many seconds.

    Red flag. Red flag!

    He initially welcomed “Prime Minister Albanese” and then stumbled over his words until ultimately referring to Australia’s leader as “Tony”.

    “It’s a real pleasure to be meeting with, ah, a … ah, a great … progressive leader,” Mr Trudeau said.

    Progressively getting worse.


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  25. 132andBushsays:

    June 30, 2022 at 10:22 pm

    Re innovation in the 20th Century.

    The Global Positioning Network of satellites.

    Completely fucked over Melways and Gregory’s, but.


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  26. “It’s a real pleasure to be meeting with, ah, a … ah, a great … progressive leader,” Mr Trudeau said.

    Albo would have replied how he was raised in public housing, by a single mum, surely?


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  27. Hugging your loved ones is the only thing left to do, because I don’t think it’s possible to stop them.

    I am very interested in the ‘why’

    I’ll give it a whirl.

    Because:

    Pure Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what they’ll eat for dinner.

    What stops this and prohibits ‘mob rule’, is a strong Constitution which protects the fundamental rights of minorities and individuals.

    COVID demonstrated that our Constitution does no such thing, and infers absolutely no inviolable rights.

    The mob will rule, and the mob has been indoctrinated over an extended period.

    Ipso facto, we are fucked (in simple terms).


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  28. H B Bearsays:

    June 30, 2022 at 10:58 pm

    Justin Trudeau never knew his Dad either. They would have a lot to talk about.

    Snort, cackle!
    Very noice, Mr Bear.


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  29. Mater:

    The mob will rule, and the mob has been indoctrinated over an extended period.

    That doesn’t mean we are powerless as society is rebuilt.
    A banker who has spent the day pulling a plough to seed a field and in return gets a bowl of gruel for his efforts is NOT in a position to complain about his margin calls.
    In very much the same way that a 46 year old Professor of Gender Studies who is in a competition with an 18 year old girl for the affections of the head of the Tribe, is in a dominant position.
    The society you are in defines your position on the Totem Pole.
    Either support the society that gives you power or be prepared to start from the ground up.


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  30. I couldn’t understand the poor lady; what was he convicted of?

    She didn’t say in the video.

    He is described as “a national security risk”. I thought he was just another talking head on youtube, posting spicy memes and mouthing off about gov’ment totalitarianism. That’s why I didn’t bother to ever follow his antics. Now I have to wonder if there is more to him? I should hope there is. If you can become a national security risk simply by posting youtube videos we must have a bloody flimsy country.


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  31. Started with a Commodore 64 with cassette drive.

    Went to Mac SE … 9″ screen, twin floppy drives (Click … Whirrr … “Insert Disk 2″).

    Then SE with one floppy and my wife bought me a 20 MB (Yes, Mb) hard drive for $1500.

    Ran a publishing/DTP business for two years with that computer and a LaserWriter Plus ($6000 secondhand … all 600 dpi of it).

    Still have the computer (and a box full of 3.5” disks). Still works with 11 000 hours of service on it. Bit of phosphor burn on the screen, but that’s it.


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  32. I suppose Winston is talking about natural consequence

    might take a while to kick in

    yep … in this life, we’re fucked

    this is where you pay attention to the wogs … and the only things that matter

    family, capital, and self reliance


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  33. 🔔🗯🍻🔔🗯 Ding ding ding. 🔔🗯🔔🍻🗯
    🔔🗯🍻🔔🗯 Last comments. 🔔🗯🔔🍻🗯
    Get your last comments in on this thread before closing time.
    Dover is overdue to pull the plug on this one.


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  34. Mater:

    Agreed, but society, as we know it, is in a death spiral.

    No. It is in a state of flux that we can still affect the outcome of.
    Do not feel that we are helpless.
    Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to create the conditions that allow your culture to survive.
    Apologies – my left arm is compressing the C5 C6 nerve and it is akin to having an arm in a fire.
    MO refuses pain relief and I’m waiting for a surgical consult to bloody well deal with the pain.



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  35. Scotus has actually done it. It’s limited the administrative state.

    Supreme Court Limits EPA’s Authority
    The high court issued a decision limiting the power of regulatory agencies within the federal government, saying the Environmental Protection Agency overstepped its authority in 2015 when it tried to limit greenhouse-gas emissions from power plants.



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  36. Dates of new open threads.

    7 June (4 days)
    11 June (3 days)
    14 June (4 days)
    18 June (4 days)
    22 June (3 days)
    25 June (3 days)
    28 June

    😬
    Okay, it was as likely to be 4 days as 3 days.


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  37. Supreme Court curtails EPA’s authority to fight climate change
    In a 6-3 decision in West Virginia v. EPA, the court adopted a narrow reading of the Clean Air Act and limited the agency’s ability to regulate carbon emissions from power plants.

    Good news, monty!


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  38. Scotus has actually done it. It’s limited the administrative state.

    Cue another week to a month of m0nty and the trollherd howling and gnashing their snaggleteeth at us, and running in endless [il]logic circles while trying to demonstrate to us how wrong and evil these decisions are.

    #NPCs


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  39. Only powerplants, Dover?

    I was fairly sure that the key clause and argument under challenge was the EPA’s right to decarbonise ANY industry with carte blanche to demand as much as it desired so long as a few minor considerations where adhered to.

    As such, I expect to see the Californian EPA and Federal EPA dictates on trucks and port access restrictions to be significantly weakened (if not actually dropped outright), and the road and rail industries USA-wide given a chance to flourish without having to waste very big dollars on Tier I-IV shell games like repowering and AdBlue for the truckies.

    And given that the Class I railroads alone have thousands of locomotives either stored because the EPA said they were too polluting to run, or traded in for Tier IV-compliant new builds at significant loss or rebuilt at very significant costs, it will see big improvements in bottom lines everywhere.


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  40. Fuck it, I’m getting another whiskey. This deserves celebration.

    Shadilay, Cats!

    Shadilay for SCOTUS and the pendulum swinging back against our generation’s flirtation with Fascism!

    First with the Upholding of the Second Amendment

    Second with the Striking Down of imagineered ‘rights’ into a Constitutional Amendment never intended for such.

    And Third with a Check to a rampant Administrative State, and a Balancing of its power.

    Shadilay. 🙂


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  41. Not sure. I’ve only copied the headline at SCOTUSblog

    Ferra nuff.

    If it’s simply the cited example argued in the case presentations, then the headline makes sense as a summary.


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  42. Supreme Court curtails EPA’s authority to fight climate change
    In a 6-3 decision in West Virginia v. EPA, the court adopted a narrow reading of the Clean Air Act and limited the agency’s ability to regulate carbon emissions from power plants.

    I hold grave fears for m0nster’s Krispy Kreme stash.


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  43. shatterzzzsays:
    June 30, 2022 at 10:03 pm
    Taught my son (5) on the Commodore 64 thinking it was better than him fiddling and maybe breaking it ( I won’t do an AnAl & mention “houso” lack of money/tuffness .. this time .. LOL!) and when he was 10 we upgraded to a DOS machine .. took to DOS like a duck takes to water and was teaching me by the time W3.1 & W95 came along .. he was a tech genius whilst still at school .. never did any formal computing courses until his late 20s when employers seemed to think without bits of paper your bluffing ..
    Nowadays, unlike AnAl he’s left his “houso” upbringing behind and would have to take a serious pay cut to “aspire” to PM .. LOL!

    Life is good.


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  44. Even though these obnoxious ABC women depart their smell lingers on . Jorden Petersens interview with Cathy Newman where to my great satisfaction Newman represented Australia’s coven of left wing witches . That it resonated globally suggests that these offensive miserable women are to be found in all democracies.


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  45. Rex Angersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 12:57 am
    Fuck it, I’m getting another whiskey. This deserves celebration.

    Yes and whiskey is the Irish and American and whisky is Scottish.

    Happy July the 1st and here’s to the second half of the year being given over to more ‘Push Back’.


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  46. Scotus has actually done it. It’s limited the administrative state.

    The best part is now politicians will have to spell out any intentions of regularity oppression rather than simply appointing cronies to do that for them. Actual accountability for once!


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  47. Rex Angersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 12:45 am
    Scotus has actually done it. It’s limited the administrative state.

    Cue another week to a month of m0nty and the trollherd howling and gnashing their snaggleteeth at us, and running in endless [il]logic circles while trying to demonstrate to us how wrong and evil these decisions are.

    ‘Montypox virus’ is related to the Oozlum Bird that flew around in ever-decreasing circles until it finally disappeared up its own backside. This adds to its rarity. The ‘Montypox virus’ is known to infect certain Internet websites and Blogs. There is no known cure except that this virus must be challenged at all times.


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  48. 10m
    They’ve found the footage. Trump can’t recover from this!
    Quote Tweet

    Ha, ha, ha. I never knew that Trump had such a big head. So where is Melania as I was under the impression that she was in the back seat with Donald. Naaaaaaaaaaaaah. This the ‘Don’ getting upset on the way back from the Golf Course. He missed a simple put and lost his cool again but this time in the ‘Limo’.


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  49. Twas Monty Clown from ‘toonatown that caught the climate craze.
    He tossed away the humble coal that served us many days
    He drapped himself in putrid green, revolting to be seen
    He raced towards the newest Cat to screech and rant and scream
    But as he wheeled out taunt and scold, with air of ‘bristic pride
    The Cats in chorus grinned and asked, what SCOTUS did decide?


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  50. Clarence Thomas was chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for eight years, I suspect he is very familiar with overbearing bureaucracy.


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  51. I predict more elderly Australians will die due to underheated homes in winter and overheated homes in summer over the next twelve months than were ever felled by covid.
    And I will lay those fatalities fairly at the feet of climate fanatics.
    On the upside
    ‘The energy bills are changing in Kooyong’


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  52. Montypox virus? What goes on in the feeble Munster’s brain? Day after day we see this virus manifest itself all over in every walk of life. The utter rubbish foisted upon us by supposedly educated people. Do they not remember what they said even a matter of minutes earlier. The contradictions do my head in. They stand for everything but soon as an explanation is required to understand why they hold that view the answer is a balloon and they think that is an answer. They actually stand for nothing, its about belonging to the club. Leftism is the most insidious virus ever known. The Mongol hordes had nothing on this lot nor the Black death.


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  53. I don’t generally comment at any great length on US politics.

    However – there appears to be a lady person called Cassidy Hutchinson yelping about how Trump is history’s greatest monster, and receiving some publicity by doing so.

    I cannot understand why she is not being referred to as ‘Butch’ by the commentariat.

    A missed opportunity, in my view.


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  54. Even though these obnoxious ABC women depart their smell lingers on . Jorden Petersens interview with Cathy Newman where to my great satisfaction Newman represented Australia’s coven of left wing witches . That it resonated globally suggests that these offensive miserable women are to be found in all democracies.

    ‘Tis their white privilege wont dun it


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  55. Rex Angersays:
    June 30, 2022 at 11:35 pm
    Hey Monty
    Out of interest what do you do for a crusta

    Here is the Fat Man’s Twitter profile.

    Ha, ha, ha. I clicked on the Twatter link that you posted and oh wot’ a Profile.

    Firstly seeing that photo, I would like to know the number of the Bus. Wot’ Bus you may well ask. The number of the Bus that ran over his boat race (face).

    I didn’t read to much but I did clock onto the word ‘nerd’. Just about sums it up although ‘Montypox virus’ gives nerds a bad name.


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  56. “Agreed, but society, as we know it, is in a death spiral.”

    Correct. And here in Oz I think the recent census results confirm this. The decline of faith and in particular Christianity in this country (and across the West) is fueling the death spiral. No society can survive and thrive without certain pillars, be they faith, family and freedom and all three of these pillars are under constant assault from Marxist progressivism. We here in Oz have just elected a government that will add fuel to this fire.


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  57. rosie says:
    July 1, 2022 at 6:52 am
    I predict more elderly Australians will die due to underheated homes in winter and overheated homes in summer over the next twelve months than were ever felled by covid.
    And I will lay those fatalities fairly at the feet of climate fanatics.
    On the upside
    ‘The energy bills are changing in Kooyong’

    Agreed.
    Statistics that can be swept under the carpet. It’s sickening.


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  58. On This Day – 106 years ago:

    The first day on the Somme, 1 July 1916, was the beginning of the Battle of Albert (1–13 July), the name given by the British to the first two weeks of the 141 days of the Battle of the Somme (1 July–18 November) in the First World War.

    Nine corps of the French Sixth Army and the British Fourth and Third armies attacked the German 2nd Army (General Fritz von Below) from Foucaucourt to the south of the Somme, northwards across the Somme and the Ancre to Serre and at Gommecourt, 2 mi (3 km) beyond, in the Third Army area.

    The objective of the attack was to capture the German first and second defensive positions from Serre south to the Albert–Bapaume road and the first position from the road south to Foucaucourt.

    And:

    [T]he Third Army diversion at Gommecourt cost 6,758 casualties against 1,212 German and the combined casualty count with the Fourth Army reached 57,470, (19,240 of which had been fatal). The French Sixth Army suffered 1,590 casualties and the German 2nd Army suffered 10,000–12,000 casualties.



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  59. Bruce in WAsays:
    June 30, 2022 at 11:22 pm
    Started with a Commodore 64 with cassette drive.

    Went to Mac SE … 9? screen, twin floppy drives (Click … Whirrr … “Insert Disk 2?).

    Then SE with one floppy and my wife bought me a 20 MB (Yes, Mb) hard drive for $1500.

    Ran a publishing/DTP business for two years with that computer and a LaserWriter Plus ($6000 secondhand … all 600 dpi of it).

    Still have the computer (and a box full of 3.5” disks). Still works with 11 000 hours of service on it. Bit of phosphor burn on the screen, but that’s it.

    Makes me larf’ with all this talk about computer disks. So we went from a floppy disk to a harder disk (a ‘stiffie’). Then there is software and hardware. Erogenous zones anyone?


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  60. After the EPA USSC decision, I guess that we can expect m0nty-fa to spend the next few days moaning about the end of (bureaucratic) life as it has been known since the days of Woodrow Wilson. Oh, the horror. Bureaucrats will need at least a fig leaf of Congressional (elected political) support before imposing their insane fantasies on the US at large.


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  61. Here is an Albert story.

    You drive past Albert on the way from Paris to the old front and the cemeteries. And there she is, floating above the fields, perched on the steeple. Hard to imagine all that green and productive and peaceful countryside was once a ruined mess of mud and craters.


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  62. [T]he Third Army diversion at Gommecourt cost 6,758 casualties against 1,212 German and the combined casualty count with the Fourth Army reached 57,470, (19,240 of which had been fatal). The French Sixth Army suffered 1,590 casualties and the German 2nd Army suffered 10,000–12,000 casualties.

    “Over the top lads”. How to wipe out a Generation of young men. Madness.


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  63. Bio Clandestine

    You know what, let’s go ahead and entertain the idea that Joe is right, that soaring high gas prices and economic depression are due to Russia’s war in Ukraine, and not due to the Biden admin’s failure. But NOBODY wants to address WHY Russia moved into Ukraine in the first place.

    According to Russia, it’s because JOE AND HUNTER BIDEN set up a massive black-site biological network in Ukraine. Nobody wants to admit that the reason Russia is in Ukraine, is largely due to Joe Biden and the ruling families of the DNC, allegedly creating biological weapons in Ukraine.

    So even if gas prices are rising due to Russia, the whole reason we are in this mess in the first place, is because of Joe Biden and the Dems doing shady shit in Ukraine. No matter how you slice it, this is still Joe Biden’s fault.

    If they allowed actual journalists into the White House press corps or on television, Joe Biden wouldn’t have lasted a week in office. I could generate articles of impeachment from asking Joe Biden ONE question.

    “Hey Joe, gas prices might be rising due to conflict with Russia, but what do you think caused this conflict in Ukraine in the first place? Because Russia, China, India, Brazil, South Africa, Mexico, and Gabon, via the UN, all seem to think it’s because you and your son created and facilitated a biological network in Ukraine. Russia also accused you of crimes against humanity and violating the BWC and Nuremberg Code. What is your response to these allegations?”

    At the UN Security Council, countries representing 3.2 Billion people accused Joe Biden of creating biological weapons in Ukraine. And I’d say less than 1% of Americans know these allegations even exist.

    Where are the journalists who are supposed to be holding the administration accountable? Trump gets two scoops of ice cream and they launch a full scale investigation, but Joe Biden gets accused of creating biological weapons and none of them bat an eye.

    We need lift the veil and get these allegations into the mainstream. Either a mainstream American “journalist” needs to step up, or someone needs to hand over their press pass and let me show you how it’s done.

    -Clandestine


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  64. Understand Winston has some serious medical issues. There are enough issues to worry about without additional health issues.

    Al the best.


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  65. https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-62000742

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has lost some of its power to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    The landmark ruling by the US Supreme Court represents a major setback to President Joe Biden’s climate plans.

    He called it a “devastating decision” but said it would not undermine his effort to tackle the climate crisis.

    The case against the EPA was brought by West Virginia on behalf of 18 other mostly Republican-led states and some of the nation’s largest coal companies.

    They argued that the agency did not have the authority to limit emissions across whole states.

    These 19 states were worried their power sectors would be forced to move away from using coal, at a severe economic cost.


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  66. rosiesays:
    July 1, 2022 at 6:37 am
    Twas Monty Clown from ‘toonatown that caught the climate craze.
    He tossed away the humble coal that served us many days
    He drapped himself in putrid green, revolting to be seen
    He raced towards the newest Cat to screech and rant and scream
    But as he wheeled out taunt and scold, with air of ‘bristic pride
    The Cats in chorus grinned and asked, what SCOTUS did decide?

    You’re a poet, and you really know it!


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    2
  67. More Push Back for ‘We the People’.

    “For decades, the Supreme Court has held that judges should generally defer to government agencies when interpreting federal law. On Thursday, the conservative majority continued a recent trend of chipping away at that practice.

    Instead, the court’s justices embraced what’s called the “major questions doctrine” – which asserts that a federal agency’s discretion is limited on big issues that involve broad regulatory actions. If Congress had intended the Environmental Protection Agency to be able to issue sweeping regulations of an entire sector of the US economy, they said, it would have explicitly written that power into the Clean Air Act.

    In January, a similar majority of the court cited the major questions doctrine to strike down an attempt by the Biden administration to use a federal workplace law to mandate vaccinations for employees in large companies.

    It’s now clear this court will turn a sceptical eye to agency attempts to cite vague or broad laws to enact any sort of major regulatory changes. That’s a significant development, given how difficult it has been for Congress to pass substantive new legislation in recent years. The time when presidents could find unilateral “work-arounds” in existing law may be coming to an end.”


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  68. Falling population to cost NSW and Victoria cash and possibly seats in parliament
    Shane Wright
    July 1, 2022 — 5.00am

    Victoria and NSW will pay a huge economic and political price for the COVID pandemic, losing potentially hundreds of millions of dollars worth of GST and seats in parliament to other parts of the country.

    New population estimates for the nation’s two largest states which show a “shortfall” of 101,000 Victorians and 95,000 people across NSW pave the way for a re-jig of the $79 billion GST pool and a loss of federal representation.

    If Victoria does not turn around the population crash it suffered through COVID, it could lose an unprecedented two federal electorates in boundary redistributions, while NSW is on track to lose one. Western Australia could reclaim the electorate it lost before the 2021 election as well as millions in additional GST payments.

    The Australian Bureau of Statistics this week released the 2021 census. That information was used to update the nation’s estimated population as at June last year at 25.6 million. This was 50,000 lower than the bureau had expected when it last updated its forecasts.

    While a 50,000 over-estimate of the population is not large, there were wide differences between the states and territories.

    The federal Treasury this week revised down Victoria’s estimated population by 101,000 to less than 6.55 million while NSW’s was revised down by 95,000 to less than 8.1 million. Both states, which had been growing pre-pandemic, now have fewer residents than at the start of the pandemic.



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    2
  69. Dover’s banner painting is a part of the Firebird cycle of fairytales, known throughout Slavic folklore.

    They are “quest” stories and have inspired many artists and illustrators over the centuries as well as influencing writers like Tolkien. I have a couple of painted enamel “eggs” bought in Russia showing pictures of the firebird. They were all I could afford – the sky’s the limit with Russian enamelware.

    Apart from illustration, the other famous “Firebird” is the one performed by the Ballets Russe.

    Worth reading up on the permutations of the tale during an idle hour or two. You can see why they captured generations of storytellers and readers.


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  70. Jab jab booster …………………. Short article from Cory.

    As more data rolls out about the COVID lies, it never seems to make the mainstream media. I wonder why?

    Two of the greatest lies of the modern world are assurances that the experimental COVID vaccines are safe and effective.

    They are neither yet the mainstream media have very little interest in discussing the problems. In order to get to the truth, you need to dig into the medical journals that are willing to publish some actual science.

    One of them is Nature, which despite the Green sounding name is a very credible scientific journal.

    https://www.corybernardi.com.au/posts/safe-and-effective-not/


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  71. rosiesays:

    July 1, 2022 at 6:52 am

    I predict more elderly Australians will die due to underheated homes in winter and overheated homes in summer over the next twelve months than were ever felled by covid.

    That and, “We better not call an ambulance. They’re really busy.”


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  72. NOBODY wants to address WHY Russia moved into Ukraine in the first place.

    According to Russia, it’s because JOE AND HUNTER BIDEN set up a massive black-site biological network in Ukraine. Nobody wants to admit that the reason Russia is in Ukraine, is largely due to Joe Biden and the ruling families of the DNC, allegedly creating biological weapons in Ukraine.

    It might have been helpful if the Poot hadn’t been so shy mentioning the obviously well-known “massive black-site biological network” before invading. Instead, he seems to have had the idea that marching his army up and down the Ukraine border for six months was a push back against Ukraine joining NATO:

    During their [December 2021] call, Putin told Biden that Ukraine’s bid to join NATO must be denied in return for assurances that Russian troops would not carry out an attack. Ukraine has sought acceptance into the alliance since 2002.

    Another, more cynical, view is that Putin was testing the ‘red lines’ set by Mr Afghanistan and his floundering Administration before reincorporating Ukraine into Mother Russia…


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    4
  73. Cassie of Sydneysays:

    July 1, 2022 at 8:25 am

    “rosiesays:
    July 1, 2022 at 6:37 am”

    Nice Rosie.

    Maybe St Ruth could come up with a ditty on the gittar and set it to music.
    They could perform it as a duo.
    Kenworth Rogers and Rosie Parton.
    Could work.
    Maybe.


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    4
  74. This morning we had Jason Clare lying blatantly into the cameras. With such a rich seam of mendacity on display, one was spoiled for choice.

    My pick (and it was obviously rehearsed so he can’t claim to have “misspoke”.

    It is exactly one year since Sydney started four months of lockdown because the government of the day did not order enough vaccine.

    Where to start? Why Sydney and not Melbourne? Why “not enough” rather than “unavailable”? Why bother anyway when vaccination stops neither spread nor infection?

    Naturally his fauxservative counterpart, the occultist Sus(s)an Ley had no comeback. She is as corrupt as he is and all she did was bobblehead and grin.

    So it fell to Natalie Barr to ask the obvious questions. Which she didn’t.


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  75. The problem will be they are counted as dying with Covid.

    rosie says:
    July 1, 2022 at 6:52 am
    I predict more elderly Australians will die due to underheated homes in winter and overheated homes in summer over the next twelve months than were ever felled by covid.


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    3
  76. Statistics that can be swept under the carpet. It’s sickening.

    Smart meter data over a couple of years, a little bit of weather information, and a touch of analysis, would tell the story.
    But no one will bother, they might find something.


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  77. Keep it simple: how best to design a voice referendum FRED CHANEY and BILL GRAY

    12:00AM July 1, 2022
    24 Comments

    Commendably, the Albanese government has committed to the implementation of all elements of the Uluru Statement from the Heart, including the early conduct of a referendum to enshrine a voice in the Constitution. If it is to meet its commitment, the government is going to have to demonstrate that it has the capacity to address more than the Uluru statement during the life of this parliament.

    While public polling shows a growing majority support for a constitutionally embedded Indigenous voice to the parliament, it remains unclear to the wider voting public as to how this will be done.

    Indeed, it is an issue on which the government’s newly appointed envoy with responsibility to oversee the preparations for the referendum, senator Patrick Dodson, has urged early and decisive action to identify the proposition that will be put to the people, ­supported by a broad educational effort to enhance the public understanding of the question(s) that would be put at the referendum.

    In considering the referendum, however, it is important for the wider public to understand that it is not necessary to have a detailed or agreed model of a voice finalised or legislated before going to a referendum.

    Those who authored and advocate the Uluru statement did not advocate the constitutional entrenchment of a specific model of a voice. Rather, they seek a constitutional right to have an Indigenous voice that would be heard by the parliament.

    In suggesting the need to proceed with the referendum before the finalising of a model for a national voice, we emphasise that there would be no reason to pause the extensive work already undertaken by the working group co-chaired by professors Marcia Langton and Tom Calma. Their report, given to the previous government in 2021, sets out a series of options and recommendations designed to operationalise a national voice. The Albanese government has yet to make known its position in relation to that report, but it may well follow all or some of the proposals contained in the report as it moves to implement the Uluru statement.

    We suggest that whatever model or mechanism may emerge from a process of negotiation and co-design, that model will inevitably need to change as circumstances evolve. No model will be perfect and will require tweaking and amendment going forward. By way of example, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission model and its legislation was the subject of many amendments and reviews during the 15 years of its lifetime. That reality alone makes it impractical and undesirable to entrench a detailed model within the Constitution.

    In addition, the cost of holding a referendum – currently around $170m – to amend a specific model each time it needed to be modified, is another clear reason it would be impractical and unachievable. We cannot hold a referendum every time there needs to be a change to the model.



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  78. Short article from Cory.

    Khori did nothing but corral conservatives and fuck them in the arse.

    He’s like a perverted pig farmer and probably a Turnbull plant.

    He can fuck off, too.


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  79. It is exactly one year since Sydney started four months of lockdown because the government of the day did not order enough vaccine.

    They ordered so much vaccine well be forced to take this shit for years before they admit they were wrong with their totalitarian public ‘elf response.


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  80. Monty

    You ridiculous clown you implied the other day the US federal government would have NO power to regulate anything if they lost the case re EPA.

    Yes, not even explicitly mentioned Article powers.

    All you do is reel off talking points.

    You useless eater.


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  81. “Over the top lads”. How to wipe out a Generation of young men. Madness.

    You drive past the area where the Newfoundland Regiment was annihilated on the first day – hardly a single man reached the German wire- and look at the memorial that features a Newfoundland caribou, bellowing in anguish, at the loss of the best and bravest……..


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  82. If Victoria does not turn around the population crash it suffered through COVID-19, it could lose an unprecedented two federal electorates in boundary redistributions, while NSW is on track to lose one.

    I wonder where those fleeing the Andrews and Parrothead regimes are fleeing to? Oh, that’s right — Queensland.

    Looks like the sunshine state, with lots of extra electorates populated by dissidents against governments down south that are deaf to their electorates — destroying the electricity system for ideological reasons and flooding the place with new migrants (without fixing the roads), for example — is going to be an increasingly important battleground for Australia’s future political wars.


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  83. Don’t believe that first lot of guff, Faustus. It’s from the government!

    Believe the second lot of guff, also from the government, but different!

    And donate NOW!


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  84. Don’t believe that first lot of guff, Faustus. It’s from the government!
    Believe the second lot of guff, also from the government, but different!
    And donate NOW!

    Well, only because you say so.


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    1
  85. From my MSN Newsfeed. Cant be said enough but Jane Halton is Chair of CEPI which was set up in Davos in 2017 and is funded by Bill Gates Foundation and Wellcome Trust amongst others. Sir Jeremy Farrar, and a couple of others connected to Wellcome were signatories to the controversial letter to Lancet saying virus from nature and not a lab. That letter became the “truth” and many suggestions it was from a lab were shut down by social media.

    I guess Susan Ley has not picked up on the fact 6 million have not taken the booster. That is a sign if ever there was one. That does not include the fact many only took the booster to remain employed.

    Meanwhile where are our investigative journalists ?

    “Mark Butler says existing vaccines and treatments are effective at preventing severe disease and wants Australians to have access to the best in new health measures.

    As virus variations emerge and new vaccines enter the market, Ms Halton will ensure Australia is at “the front of the queue” when it comes to access, Mr Butler said.

    “I want to be looking forward,” he told ABC radio on Friday.

    “I want to make sure that we’re prepared over the coming six- to 18-months for the rest of this year and into 2023, given what we can predict is going to happen with this virus mutating.”

    The health minister expects the review to be conducted in weeks and not months to prepare Australia for new waves of cases.

    A separate review of the former government’s pandemic management will be undertaken in the future but not while Australia was still grappling with health challenges, Mr Butler said.

    “We’re still seeing 300 Australians tragically die every week,’ he said.

    “Looking back and examining what we did well and what we didn’t do so well will be something we have to do at some point, but not yet.”

    But Australians want the new government to hit the ground running, not reviewing, deputy opposition leader Sussan Ley said.

    “I’ll be out there today urging people to get vaccinated where they haven’t been, and to remind them that the vaccines are safe, efficient (and) they work,” she told the Seven Network on Friday.

    “That’s the most important thing for this government to focus on: protecting the population.”


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  86. You ridiculous clown you implied the other day the US federal government would have NO power to regulate anything if they lost the case re EPA.

    The major implication of the ruling is that SCOTUS has declared itself to have the power to abolish any regulation it doesn’t like, for arbitrary partisan reasons. It just has to do it one by one.

    The fact that it has not declared all regulatory bodies to be illegitimate immediately – which is evidently what you were hoping for – does not dilute the power of the ruling.


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  87. But Australians want the new government to hit the ground running, not reviewing, deputy opposition leader Sussan Ley said.

    “I’ll be out there today urging people to get vaccinated where they haven’t been, and to remind them that the vaccines are safe, efficient (and) they work,” she told the Seven Network on Friday.

    Corrupt, useless, clueless, lying bitch.


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  88. The fact that it has not declared all regulatory bodies to be illegitimate immediately – which is evidently what you were hoping for – does not dilute the power of the ruling.

    Shorter ridiculous Fatman:

    “Just wait until Blackface Thomas stops a President & Commander in Chief using explicit Article II powers to regulate the military!”

    Good lord you are a shameless booster.


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  89. “I’ll be out there today urging people to get vaccinated where they haven’t been, and to remind them that the vaccines are safe, efficient (and) they work,” she told the Seven Network on Friday.

    Meanwhile, the soon to be dominant Omicron sub-variant in Australia is vaccine resistant and so far relatively harmless.


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  90. to? Oh, that’s right — Queensland.

    The current forecast/plan is that by the time of the Olympics the Sunshine Coast will double in population.

    While I hate the Olympics with every fibre of my being, the state govt is using them as the “excuse” to upgrade/build a lot of desperately needed infrastructure eg Bruce Hwy widening, Sunshine Coast Hwy widening, railway Beerwah to Maroochydore, new overbridge to replace the most congested intersection (Kawana Way and Caloundra Rd). Interestingly in the budget there was no mention of increased firey, ambo, plod or hospital services


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    4
  91. I hate poetry with a passion, especially that rhymes.

    Amusing poems he does detest
    And rhyming sort he hates the best.
    The feet and metres that do infest,
    The measured syllables duly stressed,
    The cocky bard with swollen chest,
    The cock of the walk – with cock’s own crest;
    The fawning fans, with tears, impressed
    And deem themselves to be so blessed.
    Like hatchlings craning in the nest
    For Mum, in splendid plumage dressed,
    To drop them morsels to digest.
    Does this demand such strong protest?
    How mean the spirit by this distressed?
    Sorry Gabor, I write in jest.


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  92. Federal Icac should have power to sack parliamentarians, independent MP says

    The new independent MP for the seat of North Sydney, Kylea Tink, says she wants to see a code of conduct for parliament that has consequences for MPs, suggesting the new integrity commission could be empowered to sack parliamentarians if necessary.

    Ideal. An unelected Commissar to fill in the gaps between illegal conduct, dealt with by the police/parliament, and shitty conduct, dealt with by the electorate.

    Exactly what a functioning democracy needs.
    Thank God for the Big Brained independents…


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  93. Speaking of big boxes of tissues, heeeere’s m0nster …

    The major implication of the ruling is that SCOTUS has declared itself to have the power to abolish any regulation it doesn’t like, for arbitrary partisan reasons.

    Ah, no.
    If a Federal Agency wants to impose regulations on states, it has to be done under cover of clear and Constitutional legislation. By which Congressmen will have to stand (or fall if necessary) every four years. No more hiding behind “experts” in the bureacracy.

    It just has to do it one by one.

    It’s OK m0nster.
    We’re patient.


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  94. While I hate the Olympics with every fibre of my being, the state govt is using them as the “excuse” to upgrade/build a lot of desperately needed infrastructure

    Where would we be without those coal royalties.


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  95. “Where would we be without those coal royalties.”

    Indeed. Last night I attended an end of year work function. I sat with some of the young ones, all university educated. I was talking about Western Australia with one of them and the topic of mining came up. One of the other young ones piped up and blithely said she wanted to “ban mining”. I was rather stunned and so I asked her, politely, if she “knew what she was talking about”? I then said that that without mining royalties, our healthcare, our education system, our transport infrastructure and much of what we take for granted would end….because it’s mining that funds all of these things. I said that wind turbines and solar panels require minerals from the ground. She then blankly looked at me and said, I kid you not, that we should create “manufacturing”. That’s when I snapped and I laughed our loud and said that we once had a manufacturing industry that’s been off-shored to China because of high energy costs and anyway, did you know that manufacturing also needs minerals from the ground?

    That’s the end result of our indoctrination….aka education….system in action right there. And for nine years the stupid fucking Liberals did nothing, absolutely nothing to curtail this. We will reap what we sow.


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  96. I still don’t understand Bitcoin and don’t like the idea of investing in something you can’t see or touch.

    Bitcoin is worthless as soon as governments deem it to be. They don’t like competition. Also if there’s no electricity you no longer have any bitcoin, although that goes for any money these days. Well, almost.

    Zimbabwe Central Bank To Offer Gold Coins As Inflation Ravages The Country (Again) (1 Jul)

    The Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe plans to issue gold coins as a way for investors in the country to store value as inflation runs rampant in the economy.

    The United States isn’t the only country battling rapidly rising prices. The inflation rate in Zimbabwe spiked from 132% in May to 191.6% in June, and the Zimbabwean currency is quickly devaluing against other global currencies, particularly the US dollar.

    Enter gold.

    On Monday, Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe, John Mangudya, announced the new gold coins would be minted by Fidelity Gold Refineries (Private) Limited and available to the public through normal banking institutions.

    Doubtful this will last long, and almost certainly all the coins will end up in the hands of well connected insiders, but the idea is fun. If I was a punter though I’d be testing any Zim gold coins before I accept them.


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  97. I remember the ATO
    Re tax deductions
    Would just say no
    To relief for donations
    To Religious Institutions
    If the parliament had wanted it
    They would have said so

    You’d think that a court ruling that government bureaucracies are limited to powers
    explicitly given them
    by the people
    would have bipartisan support but no


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  98. Just encountered an ad on fakebook from Moderna,

    A clinical trial is studying an investigational (sic) mRNA vaccine for seasonal influenza.

    mRNA seasonal influenza vaccines could potentially provide stronger immune responses.


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    2
  99. I still don’t understand Bitcoin and don’t like the idea of investing in something you can’t see or touch.

    1) Best stay clear of electricity then.
    2) Bitcoin is private money – non censorable, non seizable, non inflatable, non freezable, but as a new asset that threatens the existing order, it is demonised by the old guard. Its ‘4 year cycle’ typically sees it lose 85% of its value at the low, then rebound much higher at the high, with its value inexorably going upwards. If you care about government over-reach, its worth a look.


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  100. Major Breakthrough Puts Dream of Unlimited, Clean Nuclear Fusion Energy Within Reach

    The old joke is that nuclear fusion is always 30 years away. However, the dream of plentiful clean energy is no laughing matter as we meet an ITER researcher to catch up on progress at the reactor facility.

    Prof Donné added: “JET has shown now that fusion is plausible. ITER has to show that it’s further feasible, and DEMO will need to demonstrate that it really works.”

    Planned to provide up to 500 megawatts (MW) to the grid, he thinks it is realistic for DEMO to come into operation around 2050. “We hope to build DEMO much faster than we built ITER, making (use of the) lessons learned,” he said.

    So, now only 28 years away.


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  101. Also if there’s no electricity you no longer have any bitcoin, although that goes for any money these days. Well, almost.

    Given the worlds reliance on electricity (and the internet) for all of the industrial processes that sustain its population, if there is no electricity, we all have bigger problems to worry about than bitcoin.


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  102. Lex
    1 hour ago
    Sure, let’s just go with “the vibe” of the thing and rely on the people who say “trust me, it’ll be alright on the day”.

    The only thing I found encouraging in this article was reference to “First Australians” rather than “First Nations” to describe our indigenous peoples.

    I find it abhorrent that this term, plagiarised from the Canadian lexicon and having absolutely no relevance to the Aboriginal people of Australia, is used as if the hundreds of disparate tribes who roamed the country before the white man arrived were in any way a “nation” sharing common ideals, a common language, and common laws.

    Even now it’s highly unlikely that you would find two tribes agreeing on anything much at all, unless it was a desire for more Government assistance.

    Comment, from the Oz, on the article regarding the referendum about a “voice” to Parliament.


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  103. In the early days our states in were in competition in different fields. The Federal government either had not the resources nor the inclination to interfere too much.

    Now that rivalry has been dropped and instead each state looks at the others as villains and somehow ‘ripping them off’, and they look to the Federal government to get and give them what is due to them. Look at the bickering during Coof.


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  104. The new independent MP for the seat of North Sydney, Kylea Tink, says she wants to see a code of conduct for parliament that has consequences for MPs, suggesting the new integrity commission could be empowered to sack parliamentarians if necessary.

    This just doesn’t work. An MP’s HR Department IS the electorate.

    Surely such a move would require constitutional change?


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  105. The major implication of the ruling is that SCOTUS has declared itself to have the power to abolish any regulation it doesn’t like, for arbitrary partisan reasons. It just has to do it one by one.

    Munted, you’re going to get so sick of #Winning!


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    1
  106. Now that rivalry has been dropped and instead each state looks at the others as villains and somehow ‘ripping them off’, and they look to the Federal government to get and give them what is due to them.

    The change came in 1942 when the Federal government consolidated income tax powers in its hands, citing the war emergency.

    Surprise…when the war ended the Feds had no inclination to return those powers to the states.

    Since then the tax to GDP ratio has more than trebled. Hello, big government!


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  107. New Study & Pfizer Documents prove Covid-19 Vaccination is going to cause mass Depopulation through Infertility & Death

    Despite various signals that abnormal cancer and death rates are occuring, the government shows not only no interest in investigating but is actively suppressing information through it social media cohorts


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  108. The major implication of the ruling is that SCOTUS has declared itself to have the power to abolish any regulation it doesn’t like, for arbitrary partisan reasons. It just has to do it one by one.

    The fact that it has not declared all regulatory bodies to be illegitimate immediately – which is evidently what you were hoping for – does not dilute the power of the ruling.

    This is typical Monty overreacting, but reading Vermeulle’s take, as well as others, suggests the decision is less wellfounded in the Founding then originalists claim. The ‘major questions doctrine’ seems to share the impetus and legal basis as ‘substantive due process’.


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  109. This just doesn’t work. An MP’s HR Department IS the electorate.

    It fails on many levels.
    However I could just about buy an ICAC with the power and resources to investigate corrupt and shitty conduct – and then report facts and names, for follow-up action by prosecutors, individuals, parliament, or the electorate.
    It won’t happen like this, of course.

    Pretty grim when the standard of parliamentary behaviour that parliamentarians are prepared to step past is so disappointing.


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  110. Despite various signals that abnormal cancer and death rates are occuring, the government shows not only no interest in investigating but is actively suppressing information through it social media cohorts

    Take the hint, they want you dead.


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  111. Marc Henricks has a good essay at the Spec demanding that new immigrants have a voice if the 3rd nations have one. It’s a good point but he makes one mistake when he calls the new immigrants the 3rd wave.

    Actually they’re the 5th Wave. The history is plain. The first Australians walked here 47000bya. They were the Negritos and came from SE Asia . ~27000 the second wave came. They were the Murrayians. They walked from Japan and were related to the Ainu. The 3rd wave is the current mob and they were called the Carpentarians. They walked from Sri Lanka and are related to the Vedda people. All these groups exterminated the Mega Fauna, burnt the rainforests down and fought with each other.

    The 4th wave was Capt Cook and the English with their great laws and incipient democratic society, the best the world has seen. Then came the 5th wave, the immigrants which this essay speaks of.

    My sources are Nathan Tindale, Joseph Birdsell, Manning Clark, Blainey, Windschuttle, Josephine Flood and these guys:

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312577659_Humans_rather_than_climate_the_primary_cause_of_Pleistocene_megafaunal_extinction_in_Australia

    I find it repugnant that the 3rd wave of peoples should demand so much and have no moral authority to do so. They were themselves invaders and environmental vandals. Their society was as tough and oppressive as any society on Earth, yet they claim a moral ascendancy. The people supporting this are betraying Australia and misrepresenting Australia’s true history.


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    22
  112. Dozens of cruise ship passengers were involved in an all-out brawl in a nightclub on a ship as it sailed through international waters headed for New York City overnight into Tuesday, according to reports.

    Security for the Carnival Magic tried to intervene when the physical fight escalated to as many as 60 people but eventually had to call in the Coast Guard to help escort the ship back, according to the New York Post.

    The fight broke out around 5:20 a.m. after two people got into an argument on the dance floor. Authorities estimated that around 40 to 60 people eventually joined in on the fight.

    It’s unclear if anyone was arrested


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    1
  113. Khori did nothing but corral conservatives

    He might have used a wrong strategy or tactics, but was there anyone else who tried to do anything about SFL moving at light-speed to the left? I don’t understand why many Cats hate him so much.
    The real reason for his failure, I believe, is this – he overestimated the size of this mythical “silent majority” people keep talking about. Australia has moved to the left as a whole. The silent majority stayed silent when this experimental shit was shoved down (up?) their bodies. Not many people complained. Outside of this blog I know only a few, who did so loudly and didn’t submit, even to the point of loosing their jobs like RickW.
    Majority now supports moving to ruinables either because they worry about the future or because they believe it will really be cheaper than the good old king coal. And that is even people otherwise conservatively inclined.
    As Cassie mentioned, there is no common ground anymore. With Christianity pushed further and further out of public life, what’s going to replace it? You can’t even discuss certain things anymore, because starting points are so much different. What’s been considered good is now disparaged and all perversity is the new “normal”. I understand that a lot of people still negatively react to that, but first, they are doing this silently, and second – wait a few years, their kids are growing up thinking it’s all normal and good.
    And people cheering for the Supreme Court’s decision in regards to EPA reach, your joy might be short-lived. This, most likely, is a temporary setback for people pushing certain agendas. Just yesterday I had to add more than a hundred “coal related” stocks into “do not invest” list for a couple of big industry superfunds. It’s all done from the corporate side nowadays. And it’s done on a global level, but mostly in the West.

    That’s why I said I don’t see any way out of this at this stage.


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    10
  114. I hate poetry with a passion, especially that rhymes.

    Here’s one for you, arguably the first Modernist poem in English:

    A touch of cold in the Autumn night –
    I walked abroad,
    And saw the ruddy moon lean over a hedge
    Like a red-faced farmer.
    I did not stop to speak, but nodded,
    And round about were the wistful stars
    With white faces like town children.

    Autumn, T.E. Hulme (1883-1917), 1909.

    Hulme was literally blown to bits on the Western front.


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    1
  115. Diogenes,
    Today’s Courier Mail has article about next few years having 1,000 new police recruits and now actively seeking to recruit straight from school.

    I am wondering if this, and pay, is part of the trade off for the Union being all in on Vax mandates.

    Still not seen anything about the Supreme Court review into the police mandate and almost a month since hearing ended.

    “Interestingly in the budget there was no mention of increased firey, ambo, plod or hospital services”.


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    1
  116. In considering the referendum, however, it is important for the wider public to understand that it is not necessary to have a detailed or agreed model of a voice finalised or legislated before going to a referendum.

    No need to fill in the numbers, just sign the cheque and Ill do that for you later on.

    FFS its the most bald faced ambit grab in history.


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    10
  117. “Aboriginal fossils”….

    What do they teach them at journalism schools?

    Illegal camping surge on WA’s Ningaloo Coast sparks fears for endangered turtle habitats, Aboriginal fossils

    You know what would help?
    Allowing a few sections of the vast area to be leased to people to create camp grounds.
    I know it would mean some of those horrible small businesses would thrive supplying what people want and provide a service to the general public, but its a price you have to pay.


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    4
  118. ZK2A:

    You drive past the area where the Newfoundland Regiment was annihilated on the first day – hardly a single man reached the German wire- and look at the memorial that features a Newfoundland caribou, bellowing in anguish, at the loss of the best and bravest……..

    My understanding is that a large proportion of the men didn’t even make it to their own front lines – the communications and first trenches were so full of the dead and dying that the second wave had to advance across the Canadian defences to get to the start line.
    On 1 July 1916, Allied forces launched a major offensive in France during the First World War. The opening of the Somme offensive turned into one of the deadliest days in the history of modern warfare. At the village of Beaumont-Hamel, the Newfoundland Regiment suffered catastrophic losses. More than 80 percent of the soldiers who advanced that day were either killed or wounded. In one morning, the regiment suffered approximately 700 casualties, including more than 300 dead.
    https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/battle-of-beaumont-hamel


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    4
  119. “Interestingly in the budget there was no mention of increased firey, ambo, plod or hospital services”.

    But of course! The very point of ALL of these government jobs is to provide jobs, not deliver services …. thats why they always talk about how many more nurses/firemen/teachers are getting hired, NOT how many more patients are treated, kids taught etc etc etc.

    Exhibit A, the Pyne class subs – all you heard was that x000 workers would be hired, not that the subs would never be delivered. To point out the bleeding obvious, the number of workers required to complete a project is a COST of the project, not a BENEFIT of the project – to illustrate this fact, suppose you got 2 quotes to renovate your kitchen. One involves 4 guys doing it in a week, and the other 1000 workers for 5 years – which reno is going to cost you more?


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    12
  120. McClown throwing $400 at every house for energy price relief (on top of $600 last year).

    What did I write yesterday?

    Once the pain of electricity bills hits the electorate, Labor governments across the land will be scrambling for short term political fixes.


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    8
  121. One involves 4 guys doing it in a week, and the other 1000 workers for 5 years – which reno is going to cost you more?

    It depends. Is the AWU paying some or not? 😛


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    2
  122. This is probably not a good thing.
    Its a poling story so mounds of salt needed.

    A quarter of Americans open to taking up arms against government, poll says
    Survey of 1,000 registered US voters also reveals that most Americans agree government is ‘corrupt and rigged’

    More than one quarter of US residents feel so estranged from their government that they feel it might “soon be necessary to take up arms” against it, a poll released on Thursday claimed.

    This survey of 1,000 registered US voters, published by the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics (IOP), also revealed that most Americans agree the government is “corrupt and rigged against everyday people like me”.

    The survey also stated that almost half of respondents expressed averting political talk with other people “because I don’t know where they stand”. One-quarter described losing friends, and a similar proportion claimed to have avoided relatives and friends, due to politics, per the survey.



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    2
  123. m0nty-fa

    The major implication of the ruling is that SCOTUS has declared itself to have the power to abolish any regulation it doesn’t like, for arbitrary partisan reasons. It just has to do it one by one.

    The “arbitrary partisan reasons” essentially being that there is not clear Congressional approval of the regulatory measure concerned.

    If m0nty-fa were not a partisan political hack, he would comprehend that the US divides power between the Executive, the Legislature and the Judiciary. The bureaucracy is part of the Executive. It can only act on legislation passed by the Legislature (at least if its actions are to be Constitutional). If the Legislature does not make its intentions clear, with specific legislation, then any bureaucratic actions that are not clearly specified risk being unconstitutional. It is the task of the Judiciary to verify that bureaucratic actions are Constitutional.

    m0nty-fa is so stupid that he cannot comprehend that reality, or so partisan that he doesn’t care (unless the president is a Republican), or, most likely, both stupid and partisan.


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    4
  124. rosiesays:
    July 1, 2022 at 10:00 am
    I remember the ATO
    Re tax deductions
    Would just say no
    To relief for donations
    To Religious Institutions
    If the parliament had wanted it
    They would have said so

    You’d think that a court ruling that government bureaucracies are limited to powers
    explicitly given them
    by the people
    would have bipartisan support but no

    A nice poetic reply to m0nty-fa’s hysterical comment about the USSC decision.

    Of course, m0nty-fa is only concerned about blocking regulations that meet his partisan predilections; those with which he agrees should be abolished, with out petty court cases.


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    1
  125. McClown throwing $400 at every house for energy price relief (on top of $600 last year).
    Here’s a tip Daddy, make electricity cheaper by using the millions of square kilometres of resources that we have!?

    The question to ask: what would you be doing differently if you wanted more and more people to become increasingly depended on government?


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    5
  126. Security for the Carnival Magic tried to intervene when the physical fight escalated to as many as 60 people but eventually had to call in the Coast Guard to help escort the ship back, according to the New York Post.

    The 21st century version of “Murder on The Orient Express”.


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    1
  127. But don‘t worry, a steady supply of dried insects and wastewater is included in the weekly rent!

    The free Wi-Fi is the main thing.

    But $250 a week for a sleeping pod?!?!? That is madness.


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  128. The major implication of the ruling is that SCOTUS has declared itself to have the power to abolish any regulation it doesn’t like, for arbitrary partisan reasons. It just has to do it one by one.

    vs

    A non elected regulatory body can impose a sweeping regulation with the force of law which can wipe out whole industries, for arbitrary partisan reasons, and leave whole states facing blackouts if they comply.

    One appears, on the face of it, just a little more tyrannical than the other.


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    7
  129. More than one quarter of US residents feel so estranged from their government that they feel it might “soon be necessary to take up arms” against it, a poll released on Thursday claimed.

    This survey of 1,000 registered US voters, published by the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics (IOP), also revealed that most Americans agree the government is “corrupt and rigged against everyday people like me”.

    The survey also stated that almost half of respondents expressed averting political talk with other people “because I don’t know where they stand”. One-quarter described losing friends, and a similar proportion claimed to have avoided relatives and friends, due to politics, per the survey.

    It is not surprising that with the US federal and state governments becoming so big and using their powers indiscriminately that this feeling is occurring.


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    6
  130. Speaking of Australian defence builds…

    WA made Guardian class patrol boats gifted to Pacific island nations have been found to have multiple defects. Defence is sending engineers to examine the problems.


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    3
  131. “John of Melsays:
    July 1, 2022 at 10:37 am”

    Excellent comment JoM and one I agree with wholeheartedly.

    As an aside, I see a future where people like us separate ourselves from the mainstream. This is what Rod Dreher talks about in his book “The Benedict Option” . Throughout recorded history separate communities within the mainstream have existed, Jewish communities across Eastern Europe and Catholic recusants in England before emancipation and the Amish and Mennonites communities in America. It can be done because it has been done before. The future for conservatives is that we will most likely be prohibited from working in government or for large corporations, we won’t be allowed to send our children to universities but I don’t see any of these prohibitions as such a bad thing. Home schooling will rise and our children and grandchildren can learn trades and so on.

    And sadly we can’t look to political parties for assistance. Most certainly not the Liberals, but even the Lib Dems and other small right of centre parties can’t help us. They’re too fractured and they can’t get traction.

    I’m going to be blunt here, we’ve lost the war. It’s over, for the time being and probably within my lifetime. I do see some hope, among migrant communities or maybe I’m being pathetically optimistic and naive. However there’s one thing I’m sure of, the vacuum being created by progressivism in the West is leading to the rise of a particular religious ideology and that’s not going to end well.


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    13
  132. More than one quarter of Aus residents feel so estranged from their government that they feel it might “soon be necessary to take cooking utensils” against it, a poll released on Thursday claimed. The rest said they were really happy being employed by Government, Quangos and Contractors to Government.

    My guess at what an equivalent poll in Aus might look like.


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    5
  133. My understanding is that a large proportion of the men didn’t even make it to their own front lines – the communications and first trenches were so full of the dead and dying that the second wave had to advance across the Canadian defences to get to the start line.

    Quite correct. Martin Middlebrook “The First Day on the Somme” has a very good account.


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    2
  134. Today’s Courier Mail has article about next few years having 1,000 new police recruits and now actively seeking to recruit straight from school.

    I am wondering if this, and pay, is part of the trade off for the Union being all in on Vax mandates.

    Still not seen anything about the Supreme Court review into the police mandate and almost a month since hearing ended.

    “Interestingly in the budget there was no mention of increased firey, ambo, plod or hospital services”.

    Before Fitzgerald the Police Academy recruit intake was nearly all grade 12 graduates. One of the recommendations from the Fitzgerald inquiry was that older, degree graduated persons be recruited instead. The main reason being that these older recruits would resist offers for graft and corruption better than the young recruits. Back to the future indeed.


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    2
  135. Today’s Courier Mail has article about next few years having 1,000 new police recruits and now actively seeking to recruit straight from school.

    They will merely replace retirees.
    What I meant to say was additional positions/vehicles/stations on the coast.

    Most of the


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    2
  136. Dozens of cruise ship passengers were involved in an all-out brawl

    That’th dethpicable! Would never happen on a Disney ship.

    Disney Unveils ‘Wish,’ 1st New Cruise Ship in a Decade (29 Jun)

    It took more than six years to bring the 144,000-ton Wish to the market, Chapek told guests at a christening ceremony that featured fireworks and appearances by Mickey and Minnie Mouse, Ant-Man, Chewbacca and other characters from Disney’s vast portfolio.

    Should’ve been called the Swish since it’ll be the wokest ship on the planet.


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    2
  137. I find it repugnant that the 3rd wave of peoples should demand so much and have no moral authority to do so.

    When you’ve had every federal gummint since “Lord” Gough bowing & scrapin’ to give them more and more for nuttin’ in return why wouldn’t they keep getting shriller & shriller .. ya never letz a mug off the hook does ya! .. it’s all .. come in spinner & pass the sandpaper! .. it’d be unOrrr-strayan wouldn’t it ..
    and the chorus, maestro pleeeze …. “We still call CENTRELINK HOOOOOOME!”


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    7
  138. Diogenes:

    Interestingly in the budget there was no mention of increased firey, ambo, plod or hospital services.

    Nor were there any new power stations, dams, airports, or mines.
    But they’ll be along, aaannnyy ddaaaaayyy now.


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    3
  139. Shouldn’t be so defeatist Cassie. Keep on fighting. Never give up. Plenty of good people out there. Even in allegedly red Vicco LNP UAP got three senators up last May.


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    12
  140. Doc Faustus:

    The new independent MP for the seat of North Sydney, Kylea Tink, says she wants to see a code of conduct for parliament that has consequences for MPs, suggesting the new integrity commission could be empowered to sack parliamentarians if necessary.

    Now think of this power in the hands of Dan.


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    6
  141. Phone did silly things and my post posted before I was ready

    Whilst there IS a record spend on health and new beds, that is only a catch-up on what was needed years ago. There is no forward planning for new beds in other planned growth areas.


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    1
  142. Miranda Devine
    @mirandadevine
    ·
    39m
    Lunatics. Another example of what a menace the Brookings Institution is.
    Quote Tweet

    Gray Connolly
    @GrayConnolly
    · 3h
    As someone who has gone on about Konigsberg for years here (the nouveaux here can repent), the idea that Lithuania gets to have a blank cheque for starting WWIII is part of the leadership drift that got NATO into this current mess. Shades of July 1914….
    https://theamericanconservative.com/articles/does-lithuania-want-to-start-a-war-with-russia/?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1656625052

    Indeed.


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    1
  143. In considering the referendum, however, it is important for the wider public to understand that it is not necessary to have a detailed or agreed model of a voice finalised or legislated before going to a referendum.

    No need to fill in the numbers, just sign the cheque and Ill do that for you later on.

    Exactly what Fred Chaney is proposing:

    The referendum should not become a vote for a particular model but rather a vote that endorses the principle and obligation to have an Indigenous voice. The referendum question(s) put to the people must be kept simple and direct. The more complex the question, the less likely it will be supported.

    Once the obligation is embedded in the Constitution, the voice can be made operational by way of further negotiation between First Australians and the parliament. Such negotiations would proceed on a constitutionally endorsed basis rather than relying on the goodwill of political parties and the government of the day. This would provide a much more secure and empowered base from which First Australians could negotiate with the parliament. It is important to note that the form of the voice will be as laid down by parliament.

    So, anything between:

    • an advisory office with a desk; and

    • a standing smoking ceremony of everything; administered by huge munni-pit of Commissioners and advisors and researchers and support-staff and praise-singers and family members with ill-defined functions. And indexed remuneration and allowances and 15% super and Comcars and private-plated fully-serviced LandCruiser Safari’s for constituency work.

    Which way would parliament go?


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    4
  144. Rogersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 11:45 am
    Could someone kindly send some global warming this way?

    7 degrees below average.

    Don’t panic. Don’t panic Captain Mainwaring, the UN Climate models tell us that Climate Change (Warming) is on its way very soon now.


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    4
  145. the idea that Lithuania gets to have a blank cheque for starting WWIII is part of the leadership drift that got NATO into this current mess.

    Maybe if Vlad had been nicer to Lithuania, instead of threatening them, they might not’ve limited transport across their country to Konigsberg.

    Oops, might’ve made a spelling error.


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    2
  146. The Australian and US news media are determined you will never see or read anything favourable about the conservative Christian president of Brazil – just smears because he isn’t a globalist zombie like the glove puppet in the White House being operated by the Democratic Party’s AOC wing.

    Tucker Carlson explains why the Western media is giving Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro the Trump treatment.


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    5
  147. Dr Faustussays:
    July 1, 2022 at 11:50 am
    In considering the referendum, however, it is important for the wider public to understand that it is not necessary to have a detailed or agreed model of a voice finalised or legislated before going to a referendum.

    No need to fill in the numbers, just sign the cheque and Ill do that for you later on.

    Exactly what Fred Chaney is proposing:

    Rubbish !!!!! If you want to change the Australian Constitution then it needs to be a specific change. And that is voted on by ‘We The People’ and not legislated by a load of corrupt ‘Pollies’. The ‘Pollies’ don’t like the People to have their say but rules are rules. Thank goodness that it was set up that way all those years ago.


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    7
  148. In Cheerful news:

    Never-before-seen microbes locked in glacier ice could spark a wave of new pandemics if released

    In a new study, researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences took ice samples from 21 glaciers on the Tibetan Plateau — a high-altitude region in Asia wedged between the Himalayan mountain range to the south and the Taklamakan Desert to the north. The team then sequenced the DNA of the microscopic organisms locked inside the ice, creating a massive database of microbe genomes that they named the Tibetan Glacier Genome and Gene (TG2G) catalog.

    Evidence suggests that some of the newfound bacteria could be very dangerous to humans and other organisms. The team identified 27,000 potential virulence factors — molecules that help bacteria invade and colonize potential hosts — within the TG2G catalog. The researchers warned that around 47% of these virulence factors have never been seen before, and so there is no way of knowing how harmful the bacteria could be.

    I guess we’ll find out when they start appearing in wet markets…


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    3
  149. “The Australian and US news media are determined you will never see or read anything favourable about the conservative Christian president of Brazil”

    Yep and they do the same with Victor Orban who, much to the chagrin of the left and MSM, keeps on winning elections, despite foreign interference.


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    7
  150. “Shouldn’t be so defeatist Cassie. Keep on fighting. Never give up. Plenty of good people out there. Even in allegedly red Vicco LNP UAP got three senators up last May.”

    Don’t worry, nobody can shut me up.


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    10
  151. Rogersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 11:45 am
    Could someone kindly send some global warming this way?

    7 degrees below average.

    Just checked Bom website Roger. With a little bit of manipulation its the hottest day ever. Dontchano


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    3
  152. Maybe if Vlad had been nicer to Lithuania, instead of threatening them, they might not’ve limited transport across their country to Konigsberg

    Also, for all the Vlad Bae’s fussing and his minions’ threats of dire atomic retribution, Konigsberg is not navally blockaded as well. Russia can still resupply its city with the sanctioned materials (note that it’s only construction materials and minerals blockaded under EU sanctions. Not food, water, people or general consumer goods) by sea and air as and when it so desires.

    Some people out there are trying a little too hard to publicly display their antipathy to Europe and Sleepy Joe. However justifiable it may be…


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  153. Knuckle Draggersays:
    July 1, 2022 at 10:22 am
    I hate poetry with a passion, especially that rhymes.

    Roses are red
    Violets are blue
    Warner’s a cheat
    Tractor

    Roses are red
    Violets are blue
    My farts stink
    And so do you

    No Tractor needed.


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    1
  154. Never-before-seen microbes locked in glacier ice could spark a wave of new pandemics if released

    This is pretty transparent, isn’t it?

    China has seen how the FearPorn re Covid19 has tipped the balance in hastening the demise of the economies and political stability of western countries. Why wouldn’t they keep pressing our buttons when we react so predictably?


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    1
  155. “Walked from Japan? To Australia? LOL. Could they walk on water then? Who writes this BS?”

    They certainly didn’t walk, fly or swim across the Wallace Line.


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    2
  156. John S

    Don’t panic. Don’t panic Captain Mainwaring, the UN Climate models tell us that Climate Change (Warming) is on its way very soon now.

    Regrettably, it seems that Hell is going to freeze over first!


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    2
  157. More than one quarter of US residents feel so estranged from their government that they feel it might “soon be necessary to take up arms” against it, a poll released on Thursday claimed.

    If true, that is truly frightening … only 1/4?



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    8
  158. Even in allegedly red Vicco LNP UAP got three senators up last May.

    LNP is useless. A few people who tried to say something against the narrative were ostracized by their own party (Bernardi, Craig and a few others).
    UAP got in on 4% (only 1% more than Legalise Cannabis party). What can they do in practical terms?
    It doesn’t mean we shouldn’t fight. But it means that we need to concentrate our efforts on something different – like building networks and communities of like-minded people. Political solutions do not work anymore.


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    2
  159. m0ntysays:
    July 1, 2022 at 9:22 am
    You ridiculous clown you implied the other day the US federal government would have NO power to regulate anything if they lost the case re EPA.

    The major implication of the ruling is that SCOTUS has declared itself to have the power to abolish any regulation it doesn’t like, for arbitrary partisan reasons. It just has to do it one by one.

    The fact that it has not declared all regulatory bodies to be illegitimate immediately – which is evidently what you were hoping for – does not dilute the power of the ruling.

    You fat ugly twat. The US Supreme Court is applying the law as to ‘The Clean Air Act’. Blame Congress who drafted and enacted the Act but not the Supreme Court. That Court is doing its job and applying the law.

    Stiff shit if you don’t like this application of the legal process. Go to North Korea and tell them how it is. They will likely feed your body to the sharks. Have a nice day and Happy Friday.


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    2
  160. Thanks for the link Tom.

    Interesting that since Brazil relaxed gun laws over a year ago, guns deaths and crimes are down 40% to 1980 levels!!!


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    2
  161. Lysander says:
    July 1, 2022 at 10:40 am

    McClown throwing $400 at every house for energy price relief (on top of $600 last year).

    He’s also been talking about reducing our dependence on coal generated electricity by increased investments in renewable energy.

    He appears to be intent on undoing some of the good work done by previous Liberal / National governments such as the upgrades to our coal power station at Collie and the mandatory retention of 10% of the natural gas exports for the local market, both of which have given WA the nation’s lowest electricity and gas costs.

    If the man had any sense he would capitalise on our lower electricity and gas costs to encourage more manufacturing industries to WA. We’re a long way from the market for manufactured goods on the east coast, but transport costs would be minimal as most of the trucks and trains returning east go back empty.


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    2

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