1,980 thoughts on “Open Thread – Tue 23 Aug 2022”

  1. Will continue with now, well over 2 year AntiVirals, where back of house 5 have had Covid recently and currently lots of Flu

    You are a legend, Old Ozzie! Just keep on truckin’!! You are on the right track, my friend.


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  2. MatrixTransform says: August 26, 2022 at 3:54 pm

    tractors have nipples too

    Same ones as ploughs have.
    They’re a helluva lot larger than cockroach nipples.


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  3. The Chinese only have to announce their desire to reduce their reliance on coal to win as much, well more actually, credibility than any other nation.

    Afterward they just plead that they cannot also be expected to deny their people the benefit Western nations gained by two centuries of coal.

    And you could go to the beach and watch the flimsy kelp bow and sway in subservience to the surging whims of the seas and still not see anything with less backbone than the politicians who proclaim the justice of the Chinese’s case.


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  4. Matt Kean is doing everything he can to destroy his own government. He pulled the rug from under the Transport Minister while he was negotiating with the striking transport union. This tells everyone who’s the boss, and it certainly is not Perrottet.


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  5. “So what?” he replied. At that point it was not in husband’s interest for me to continue the argument.

    I seriously doubt it’s in your best interests to continuing seeing this doctor.


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  6. Duk, my sister got a top Firsts in Medicine from Syd Uni in the 70’s and then did a lot of general practice in the country before specialising. She liked medicine then, but grew to be disenchanted later, feeling that diagnostic art was dying out. She specialised in an area she didn’t much enjoy but it was a good living, which is always important and she had kids. She avoided Big Pharma research although they chased her to do some. You are not alone in feeling the medicine is not what it used to be; but it is not all bad.

    For yourself, the trauma of the way you have been treated has resulted in a desire to dismiss them all. And that is totally understandable. Take care not to let the worst ones win though. I have in mind for you two old but true proverbs: don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater, and don’t cut off your nose to spite your face. Why ignore the good that medicine can still do, especially in your field of anaesthesia? Or do a refresher course in some area you could find interesting. Once you let your Registration drop there is more paperwork then to get it back. And given time, you may find you want to do that.


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  7. British Foreign Secretary vows to use nuclear weapons if necessary
    British Foreign Secretary Truss said she was ready to use nuclear weapons if necessary

    what could possibly go wrong…


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  8. Thus the two children we had went to elite private schools and elite live-in colleges within elite universities and they now mix with and work with people who are similar in similarly hard-to-gain jobs.

    Lizzie – whilst this does often play out this way, it is not always the case. I find it interesting at the moment to watch the development of our two grandchildren. The boy went to a very prestigious eastern suburbs private school. Being a “challenged” scholar, but a talented athlete, we financed his full time boarding to allow early morning training. While boarding, he developed terrific friendships with country boys, as well as with boys with overseas parents. These have continued to this day. But growing up on the lower North Shore, and since moving with his parents to the Northern Beaches, his social circle has expanded yet again, and includes young local tradies that he drinks with regularly. So this easy going, likeable, funny and very fit teen has friends in wealthy eastern suburbs households, as well as from families in the bush, overseas (Papua & China) & from households on the northern beach suburbs. We think this is terrific and hopefully will preclude too defined a spread of social and business contacts.

    The girl has attended two lower North Shore schools, and has had some difficulties adjusting due to a fairly uncompromising head space (can’t understand where that comes from!). She will find like minded people of different backgrounds due to this independent world view. But I don’t think either kid will be circumscribed by the “elite” nature of their schooling.


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  9. “The prosecution has to prove that Joe got the money. So far there is no evidence of that.”

    Tony Bobulinski has publicly stated that he was involved and that he is sure Joe is “the big guy” – that’s evidence. Not proof, but certainly evidence.

    There is evidence that seems to indicate Hunter and Joe shared a bank account, and that Hunter gave his father half the money he “earned”.

    Were this DJT instead of Creepy Joe, they’d all be falling over themselves demanding an investigation.

    They said they were investigating Trump as soon as they started. Then leaked harmful bits like a sieve, only to eventually say “no evidence of collusion”. After 2 years and more than $50 million.

    Not a single word of an investigation into the Bidens though – even though the FBI has had Hunter’s laptop since 2019. So if they have investigated and found nothing, why no statement of same? They are not even investigating, so how will there be a grand jury and indictment, then a trial so the prosecution can present their evidence and let a jury decide?
    There won’t be because the FBI and DoJ are politicised, and Joe is on the “inside”, while Trump was ever an “outsider”.


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  10. Duk – to earn a quid – there’s dermatology, addiction medicine, occupational medicine, men’s health, remote community medicine, emergency room, and a flood of other niches where you won’t be much bothered. A current Netflix/Fox series called ‘This is going to hurt’ was well done about how medicine can stab its own good ones – hero is gay with a gay lover so you have to accept that, but the story is that he is an obs/gynae, and a good one, but done over by ‘the system’. You might enjoy it if you haven’t seen it already. It’s based on a real doc’s experience of same in the NHS, that great behemoth. My husband Hairy has had a similar disenchantment about his high-flying career too; plenty of people do when politics interferes with achievements.


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  11. Monty is now telling us the FBI smothering the laptop story which he judges a ‘non-story’, completely avoiding that the public are entitled to make that determination in the midst of an election, is not part of the laptop story.

    If you listen to what Zuckerberg said to Rogan:

    – the FBI warned Facebook of a pattern of election disinformation, it wasn’t specific that Zuck could recall

    – Facebook engaged a third party to monitor this issue

    – the Hunter stuff fit the pattern

    There is no scandal here.


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  12. I fired my accountants today and will be going with another firm after I confirmed the other firm actually work from the office.

    I’ve had this working from home bullshit. I contacted the accountants about a matter on Wednesday and never heard back. I contacted them again on Thursday leaving a message for the woman to call me back. She hasn’t.
    Today I called, and I couldn’t hear the receptionist because her fucking dog was barking in the background. I subsequently called the partner and told him I was donesky and will be looking to appoint another firm who happen to work from the freaking office.

    This working from home caper is codswallop. It’s crap and it’s just bullshit laziness.


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  13. Dover

    Monty is now telling us the FBI smothering the laptop story which he judges a ‘non-story’, completely avoiding that the public are entitled to make that determination in the midst of an election, is not part of the laptop story.

    m0nty-fa believes with all his heart that if he repeats a lie a dozen times a day, it becomes the truth. Not quite the George Costanza theory that “It isn’t a lie if you really believe it”, but similar.


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  14. British Foreign Secretary vows to use nuclear weapons if necessary
    British Foreign Secretary Truss said she was ready to use nuclear weapons if necessary

    I believe he later clarified that he meant on the British public.


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  15. We think this is terrific and hopefully will preclude too defined a spread of social and business contacts.

    lol, Vicki. Our two kids had my other two very challenging children as brothers so that was a lot of ‘difference’ to cope with, as well as my own family members, who were quite an eye-opener to them about the spread of circumstances in this country. Tell you more later, not here.


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  16. m0nty-fa

    If you listen to what Zuckerberg said to Rogan:

    – the FBI warned Facebook of a pattern of election disinformation, it wasn’t specific that Zuck could recall

    – Facebook engaged a third party to monitor this issue

    – the Hunter stuff fit the pattern

    There is no scandal here.

    AKA George Costanza.


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  17. 50,000 years ago some pervert looked at a cow and said “I wouldn’t mind sucking on those”!

    Fast forward to now and some pervert said the same about a cockroach.

    But enough about Monty.


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  18. This working from home caper is codswallop. It’s crap and it’s just bullshit laziness.

    My company leapt upon Covid mania when it came out (like those feinting teenage girls at airports when the Beatles landed). They demanded everyone work form home, and negotiated cancellation of the lease of two floors out of five in the building. When they decided to let people come back in they instituted a protocol whereby every second seat had to be kept empty as a coof-buffer.

    So they effectively reduced the number of desks to 30% of what it was pre-Covid, and now every desk is a hot desk – you cannot create a space for yourself with photos, trophies and awards you may have won, add non-standard items like you own desk-lamp, cannot be sure how many monitors you will get, or even get a keyboard that is worn in the way with which you are familiar. Docking stations disappear, the chairs have to be re-set everyday, you have no storage space because who uses storage for something you will only need for one day?

    Now they are trying to entice people to come back to the office regularly with things like afternoon drinks on a Thursday (when, at most, only 30% of people will be there) or emails about how nice it is to work in the office with friends.

    Do you remember those books from when you were a kid where they had blue and red pictures overlaid and you put a piece of red cellophane over the top to see the blue image underneath? I think there are countless shades in what makes people work and these fuckers have only got one piece of cellophane.

    (Yes, I know the cellophane shows every colour other than its own, so if there are five colours it will show four, but I am on a roll.)


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  19. If you listen to what Zuckerberg said to Rogan:

    – the FBI warned Facebook of a pattern of election disinformation, it wasn’t specific that Zuck could recall

    – Facebook engaged a third party to monitor this issue

    – the Hunter stuff fit the pattern

    There is no scandal here.

    Yes, there was a pattern of disinformation. The alphabet agencies sent out their superannuated figureheads to promote the lie that the laptop was not Hunter’s and insinuate that the ‘laptop story’ was Russian disinfo, even though the FBI had possession of the laptop since Dec 2019 and had very likely already determined its authenticity, in the month prior to the 2020 election. Your attempt to whitewash this is obvious nonsense. It’s in the same ballpark as ‘the knife went in’.


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  20. To be fair to the FBI, they could be excused for being a little jumpy about Russian disinformation recycled by Trumpkins after 2016.

    Particularly when it involves a blind computer repairman, or whatever. The details sounded bogus.


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  21. Is ‘he’ her preferred pronoun?

    Gender is like an iridescent butterfly wing, a light-splintering diamond, the procession of hues in a day’s sky imprisoned in mollusk’s shell.

    Damn thing changes as soon as you look at it.

    She was a she when she spoke, which makes it almost certain she is a he now.


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  22. To be fair to the FBI, they could be excused for being a little jumpy about Russian disinformation recycled by Trumpkins after 2016.

    Particularly when it involves a blind computer repairman, or whatever. The details sounded bogus.

    They had the laptop since Dec 2019. You are just ‘playing’ dumb now.


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  23. The quote at the top right of this page a moment ago:

    Liberty Quote
    Every man is part of the community, and so, as such, he belongs to the community.
    — St Thomas Aquinas

    Why has dover placed this collectivist conformist creed of oppression under the banner of a “Liberty” quote?
    Dover is a part of a church congregation, therefore the congregation owns him?
    Dover is a part of the Visa Rewards Programme, therefore Visa owns him?
    Dover is a part of South-East Asia, therefore South-East Asia owns him?
    There are negotiated mutual obligations between the village and the individual, but let’s not jump straight to totalitarianism just by the fact of group membership.
    But Dover’s favourite Saint said it, so it gets a free pass?
    Sorry but seeing *that* as a “liberty” quote was just, ugh, right off.


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  24. And here we have it.

    A carefully selected “Precedent” aimed at keeping the lawyers in clover.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-08-26/families-clergy-abuse-victims-legal-precedent-litigation/101374948
    Families of clergy abuse victims’ new legal precedent paves way for litigation

    I cant wait for this to be extended to criminal trials.
    Does this mean bondage dad can get victims of crime compo???

    A Supreme Court ruling in relation to a lawsuit levelled against the Catholic Church has been heralded as a potential new precedent for loved ones of alleged victims of clergy abuse.

    The court this week ruled the Catholic Church could not use a legal argument pertaining to the so-called Ellis defence.

    The defence was named for choirboy John Ellis and prevented abuse survivors from suing unincorporated organisations such as the church.

    The ruling came after a lawsuit levelled at the Church and Cardinal George Pell by a father of one of Pell’s accusers, who has since died of a drug overdose.

    The court this week did not make any orders against Pell.

    Ballarat lawyer and victim-survivor advocate Ingrid Irwin said it was “huge” development, especially in south-west Victoria where there have been many high-profile cases of clergy abuse.

    “It can potentially open the floodgates to so many secondary victims now,” Ms Irwin said.

    The affects of child sex abuse don’t just stop at the institution’s door or with the individual victim … it bleeds into families, into communities, into sibling groups.

    ….
    Melbourne lawyer Judy Courtin said she was representing and had met with “secondary” victims of institutional sexual abuse.

    Dr Courtin said more information was coming to light about the intergenerational effects of abuse on family members.

    “I would strongly encourage any secondary victim who has suffered harm … to get some legal advice … to at least get an opinion,” Dr Courtin said.

    She said the “power base” was shifting and warned it wouldn’t be easy for those considering their legal options.

    “These claims are exhausting and … you have a secondary trauma,” she said.

    She said they were “fought hard”.

    “These claims are incredibly intrusive and the bar is high for proof,” she said.

    “[But] some find they reclaim, bit by bit, the power that was stolen from them.”


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  25. There are negotiated mutual obligations between the village and the individual, but let’s not jump straight to totalitarianism just by the fact of group membership.

    Aquinas was not a totalitarian.


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  26. This working from home caper is codswallop. It’s crap and it’s just bullshit laziness.

    Will you give me a pass because being unvaxxed I’m still not allowed back to the office?
    (Firm policy – not sure whether it’s global or just Australian.)


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  27. I thought Andrew Tate might be a hoot like a Bongino or Carlson. I was never so wrong in my life.

    He’s basically an uber rich 21 year old man who owns casinos (and brags about it), lays LOTS of chicks and brags about it, tells you why you’ll always be sad and poor and has lots of sports cars (and brags about it), is always on his jet (bragging about it) off to some exotic location (bragging about it) while telling viewers they have no dick like his and they’ll always be dumb and poor.

    I wasn’t sure if it was irony or a masochistic form of self-motivation for viewers?


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  28. m0ntysays:
    August 26, 2022 at 4:58 pm
    To be fair to the FBI, they could be excused for being a little jumpy about Russian disinformation recycled by Trumpkins after 2016.

    Particularly when it involves a blind computer repairman, or whatever. The details sounded bogus.

    Weak, very weak, m0nyty-fa. “The details sounded bogus”, but then pretty much everything you post sounds bogus. Around fifty intelligence “eggspurts” declared the laptop to be “disinformation” after the FBI (Famous But Incompetent) had almost a year to examine it. Now it is accepted to be genuine, and you and your ilk are still stuck with your heads up your rectums (recta?).


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  29. Every man is part of the community, and so, as such, he belongs to the community.
    — St Thomas Aquinas

    Why has dover placed this collectivist conformist creed of oppression under the banner of a “Liberty” quote?
    Dover is a part of a church congregation, therefore the congregation owns him?
    Dover is a part of the Visa Rewards Programme, therefore Visa owns him?
    Dover is a part of South-East Asia, therefore South-East Asia owns him?

    You slipped from ‘belongs’ to ‘owned’ without taking a breath. By the way, a Visa Rewards Programme or a geographical label aren’t communities.


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  30. Aquinas was not a totalitarian.

    Nor Donne:

    No man is an island,
    Entire of itself;
    Every man is a piece of the continent,
    A part of the main.

    If a clod be washed away by the sea,
    Europe is the less,
    As well as if a promontory were:
    As well as if a manor of thy friend’s
    Or of thine own were.

    Any man’s death diminishes me,
    Because I am involved in mankind.
    And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls;
    It tolls for thee


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  31. Why has dover placed this collectivist conformist creed of oppression under the banner of a “Liberty” quote?

    Did you think that it means he is subordinate to the community?


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  32. Did you think that it means he is subordinate to the community?

    Every man is part of the mUnty, and so, as such, he belongs to the mUnty.
    — St mUnty


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  33. No, Killing People Is Not A Humane Solution For The West’s Epidemic Of Despair

    Medically assisted suicide, a pet project of many progressives, is increasingly popular in Western nations and must be resisted.

    News surfaced earlier this month about the Canadian health care system’s planned expansion of medically assisted suicide and the shockingly low bar required for administering such procedures.

    Soon, Canadians will be able to request permanent release if they are suffering from something as commonplace as “mental health issues.”

    News surfaced earlier this month about the Canadian health care system’s planned expansion of medically assisted suicide and the shockingly low bar required for administering such procedures.

    Soon, Canadians will be able to request permanent release if they are suffering from something as commonplace as “mental health issues.”

    As medically assisted suicide becomes increasingly popular and easier to access, while rates of substance use, overdose, and depression also increase, people are turning to assisted suicide to escape their pain.

    Despair has increasingly come to characterize Western civilization, and more and more people are seeking release. The widespread insistence on escaping pain regardless of the consequences, instead of learning to live with it and thriving despite it, presents an existential crisis for the West.

    How can a civilization remain, let alone thrive, if it tacitly encourages people to opt out of life when faced with hardship?

    – Canada’s Death Cult

    – Embracing Decay

    – Resisting Decay


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  34. Well he’s sure fooled me with that comment.

    Aquinas would, like you, see the relation of the individual and the community as the relation of a part to the whole. What you might disagree on is the weight given to communal obligations. Not surprising, as you reflect different worldviews. Even now, though, it’s worth reminding ourselves that Western individualism is the exception, not the rule.


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  35. Matrix gets it. We’re kidding ourselves if we think our actions don’t affect others.

    Aquinas was coming from a mindset of service, not servitude. Pretty countercultural these days.


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  36. Bring on the pandemic Royal Commission

    By Pauline Hanson, One Nation Senator for QLD

    Australians impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic must be able to tell their stories.

    One Nation leader Senator Pauline Hanson said while the Prime Minister’s commitment to a Royal Commission into the pandemic was welcome, she saw no reason for a delay in starting the inquiry.

    “I’m delighted the Prime Minister sees the logic in One Nation’s demand for a Royal Commission into the pandemic,” Senator Hanson said. “This is an unprecedented event which has disrupted the lives of everyone in Australia.

    “We may still be dealing with COVID-19, but that’s not a legitimate reason for kicking the Royal Commission can down the road. After almost two and a half years of this wretched pandemic there is plenty of evidence for a Royal Commission to look at right now.

    “One Nation was the only party which committed to a pandemic Royal Commission at the election, and we have not been idle in the meantime. We will offer a preliminary draft of the Royal Commission’s terms of reference on our website for comment in early September.

    “These will focus on impacts on the economy, government accountability and transparency, systemic issues, legislation and policy, public trust, human rights, the role of the media, the role of international bodies and agencies, and the response of the private sector – all issues are on the table.

    “The world will be watching, so this must be a comprehensive and completely public inquiry which examines every aspect of how the pandemic was managed. We must be able to review the expert advice which was used to justify pandemic measures which caused so much disruption and pain across the nation.

    “It’s imperative Australians’ experiences of the pandemic are heard. This Royal Commission must give Australians the opportunity to tell their stories. It’s time for the truth.

    “We should be under no illusions this will be a long and sometimes difficult process. It’s one of the reasons we should get started on it right now. The Prime Minister does no service to the Australian people by delaying it.”

    Watch Senator Hanson’s discussion with Chris Kenny about the need for a pandemic Royal Commission


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  37. I don’t understand. I thought the Ellis defence has long been denied in Victoria, as when the Fosters, the parents of daughters who had brought allegations against the Church, were financially compensated.


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  38. Will you give me a pass because being unvaxxed I’m still not allowed back to the office?
    (Firm policy – not sure whether it’s global or just Australian.)

    How long before the corporate “smartest people in the room” admit that they fell for the COVID bullshit hook line and sinker?


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  39. Australians impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic must be able to tell their stories.

    Sign me up! These fucking arseholes aren’t going to get away with it!


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  40. Every man is part of the mUnty, and so, as such, he belongs to the mUnty.

    Not true!

    Earlier we were talking about prosthetic mUnties.

    Then, of course, the is the Caine MUnty, where Humphrey Bogart plays with his balls, like hUnty Biden.

    Or mUnty On the Bounty where the crew rose up against the captain on a voyage to bring BreadDonutfruit to England.


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  41. Colonel Crispin Berkasays:
    August 26, 2022 at 5:17 pm
    Aquinas was not a totalitarian.

    Well he’s sure fooled me with that comment.

    I’m not sure that that was a very good translation.
    I haven’t got the expertise to say so definitively but it doesn’t look to me as though the original (below) is saying that the community owns the individual or anything like that. It seems more like Donne’s “no man is an island”. It appears in the context of saying that suicide is wrong – perhaps a stringent libertarian would disapprove of the statement in that context anyway, of course.

    Quilibet autem homo est pars communitatis, et ita id quod est, est communitatis.


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  42. ABC: “The ruling came after a lawsuit levelled at the Church and Cardinal Pell by the father of one of Pell’s accusers, who has since died of a drug overdose.”
    He died in April 2014, eight years before the present matter. He never accused Pell of anything. Most trusted source of news and information.


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  43. MatrixTransformsays:
    August 26, 2022 at 5:26 pm

    Didn’t see this before posting my comment.
    Encouraging to know I’m ad idem with you on this one, MT.


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  44. You slipped from ‘belongs’ to ‘owned’ without taking a breath.

    I have a tough choice here. I can believe Dover’s New English Dictionary, or I can believe the Cambridge English Dictionary.
    I thought I could take a saint at their word, but even the saintly types need to be rehabilitated for modern times by their present day mortal helpers.

    I could accept that Aquinas meant the individual’s sense of belonging, but “belongs to” was an odd way to say it when other phrasings were conventional, and neither yourself nor MT nor Calli have put forward that particular meaning as the correction.
    Service to someone you “belong to” still sounds a lot like servitude. Maybe it’s just the language of his time and a misunderstanding.


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  45. Mother Lode says:
    August 26, 2022 at 4:51 pm
    My company leapt upon Covid mania when it came out…..

    I’m currently contracting to a large public company who have six floors in a multi-storey inner city building. Required to work in the office one day per week although this doesn’t seem to be monitored.

    Most days, maybe 10-12 people per floor on building floor plates of around 900 sq/m accommodating approx 70-80 workstations plus kitchen, meeting rooms, corridors etc. Typical of most offices. On Fridays or Mondays, maybe 4-6 people per floor. At most.

    Realistically, the company could do away with three floors, and possibly four, and thereby save many tens of thousands of shareholder dollars. I understand they have lease obligations but I’m told the company has no intention or plan to ask workers to commence relocation back into the office.

    Separately, a few months ago I was working at a different business and looking out my window at the neighbouring office building, I could see two utterly vacant, but still equipped, floors in that building. (and that was just what I could see). Further, I am told by a mate that many government departments are facing stiff opposition from staff and Unions about returning to work in the office.

    The longer work-from-home continues, only acts to further cement the change. I have heard people argue that they purchased home office equipment (desk, chair, better home computer, bigger computer screen etc) and they are not willing to scrap that ‘investment’ just because the government department/business has changed its mind.

    It seems to me that the office based landscape has changed permanently and it will be a rainy day in Hell before I would invest in the likes of Dexus, Charter Hall etc. The amount of available (or potentially becoming available) office floorspace must cause them nightmares.


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  46. Service to someone you “belong to” still sounds a lot like servitude. Maybe it’s just the language of his time and a misunderstanding.

    The original would be in Latin.

    Would be worth tracking down, but I would expect he means “is a member of” rather than “is owned by”.


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  47. British Foreign Secretary Truss said she was ready to use nuclear weapons if necessary

    Shirley not.
    Women’s natural instincts for peace and goodwill to all were the reasons touted for electing women.
    It was only the mean nasty war loving men who resorted to violence against each other.
    Elect women. Make society calmer, safer, nicer.
    Or else.


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  48. Quilibet autem homo est pars communitatis, et ita id quod est, est communitatis.

    Communitatis cannot simply be translated as ‘community’, a sort of sponge-word, absorbing numerous meanings. Communitatis carries the sense is of an identity of belief, of being and purpose. It is associated with the term ‘communion’, as a sharing of something, an exchange.

    Or what Tonnies struggled with in his C19th tomes:

    Tönnies distinguished between two types of social groupings. Gemeinschaft often translated as community refers to groupings based on a feeling of togetherness. Gesellschaft often translated as society on the other hand, refers to groups that are sustained by an instrumental goal.



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  49. Rogersays:
    August 26, 2022 at 6:01 pm

    The original would be in Latin.

    Would be worth tracking down,

    Quilibet autem homo est pars communitatis, et ita id quod est, est communitatis.


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  50. my reading instantaneously evokes ‘service’ rather than ‘servitude’

    I cannot read it the other way … it just doesn’t compute for me

    I do not expect servitude, I give service

    one of my fears or worries is that, in true post-modern form, too many people lately have enslaved themselves with language

    semantics are their shackles

    they built a cage of their own design and then threw away the key


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  51. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Bearesays:
    August 26, 2022 at 6:06 pm

    Communitatis cannot simply be translated as ‘community’, a sort of sponge-word, absorbing numerous meanings. Communitatis carries the sense is of an identity of belief, of being and purpose. It is associated with the term ‘communion’, as a sharing of something, an exchange.

    That helps to make sense of the statement in the context in which it appears.
    And doesn’t indicate that the statement was about servitude.


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  52. Gerald Henderson in fine form:

    CAN YOU BEAR IT?

    • 7.30’s SARAH FERGUSON/PETER GARRETT SOFT INTERVIEW IGNORES MIDNIGHT OIL’s EMITTING PAST

    Media Watch Dog has no particular objection to suck-up interviews – except that Jackie’s (male) co-owner is never the recipient of such largesse. So Hendo was keen enough to watch the (expected) soft interview of Midnight Oil lead-singer Peter Garrett by ABC TV 7.30 presenter Sarah Ferguson on 22 August. Here’s how the ABC described the occasion:

    It’s been a long journey for Midnight Oil frontman Peter Garrett – one that leads from Sydney’s pubs to concert halls around the world, from the halls of power in Canberra, to the red centre of the continent. But that journey is coming to an end as Midnight Oil is on their final concert tour. It’s already taken them across Europe and North America and on the weekend the band played at Mundi Mundi from where Peter Garrett speaks to Sarah Ferguson.

    The interview commenced with a reference to Midnight Oil’s campaign for Indigenous rights over the years – and a segment was shown of Peter Garrett singing Beds are Burning, which contains the following lyrics:

    The time has come
    To say fair’s fair
    To pay the rent
    To pay our share

    The time has come
    A fact’s a fact
    It belongs to them
    Let’s give it back

    Let’s go to the transcript:

    Sarah Ferguson: It, of course, was a call for Australians to give back to Indigenous people what had been stolen from them. Decades on we’re looking at a referendum to establish a Voice to the Parliament. How significant is that going to be for you and the band?

    Peter Garrett : I think it’s really, really important to us.

    Ms Ferguson did not ask – and Mr Garrett did not say – whether any members of the Oils have given back any of their privately owned land to Indigenous Australians. But, then, it was not that sort of interview.

    Then Comrade Ferguson (born 1965) put it to Comrade Garrett (born 1953) that “the generation who rushed out and bought” Midnight Oil’s 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 album in 1982 – “they’re the ones who failed the world on climate change and I’m not including you and the band in that charge”. She added that your man Garrett and his “followers [were] simply overwhelmed by the power of the fossil fuel lobby and the politicians aligned with it”.

    How about that? The fact that Midnight Oil burnt the oil (to coin a phrase) before and after was all the fault of, wait for it, the fossil fuel industry and politicians. Peter Garrett seemed to agree – despite the fact that he was a Labor Party parliamentarian between October 2004 and August 2013. He went on to apportion the main blame to “our banks, our financial regulators and our governments”. It was as if someone forced such boomers as Garrett to buy cars and to travel against their will.

    Sarah Ferguson continued to bang on about global warming and all that. But no one mentioned Midnight Oil’s personal contribution to global emissions.

    Look at it this way. Comrade Garrett and his merry band of leftist performers toured the world for over four decades from distant Australia on jet planes and by road. Midnight Oil performed with electric guitars under carbon-emitting bright lights and sang into carbon-emitting microphones supported by a carbon-emitting sound system. And they did live gigs – so their audiences made their own contributions to carbon emissions in travelling to and from Midnight Oil concerts. And then there are their carbon-emitting albums and all that which is needed to produce them.

    The interview ended – as it commenced – with a suck-up about Midnight Oil’s exit from the stage as a band:

    Peter Garrett: So when we get to that final moment, yeah, look, it will be emotional, it will be big, and it’ll have weight to it. But I also think we’ll probably have a great feeling of gratitude, to have been enabled to do this thing, which is so special.

    Sarah Ferguson : You said gratitude. Well, from us, from your fans everywhere, gratitude back at you. Thank you very much. Peter Garrett.

    Peter Garrett : Thank you, Sarah. Thanks.

    And so it came to pass that the eco-catastrophist 7.30 presenter expressed her gratitude to Peter Garrett and his Midnight Oil band for over four decades of unnecessary carbon emissions. Can You Bear It?


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  53. Further, I am told by a mate that many government departments are facing stiff opposition from staff and Unions about returning to work in the office.

    My son works in a stay-at-home-if-you-wish government office, and he absolutely loathes it. He is a social chap who likes to engage with people around him. He goes in regularly and says the actual work done is falling apart and morale is through the floor. No-one cares any more. He hopes things will improve by September 1 when a back-to-the-office has been called for at least some days of the week. There is still a lot of Covid panic, or confected panic, so that people have an excuse to slack off.

    Having no place of work where people interact has been a disaster and should be stopped before it gets any worse.


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  54. I have a tough choice here. I can believe Dover’s New English Dictionary, or I can believe the Cambridge English Dictionary.

    I see you went to A2 rather than B1 which is clearly the relevant meaning of ‘belongs to’ here because Aquinas is referring to man as a member belonging to a group, here, community, which in no way implies s/he is owned by the community.


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  55. OldOzzie says:
    August 26, 2022 at 2:19 pm

    Impermissible Notions

    Or, Things That Will Not Be Tolerated On Twitter.

    The thing in question this time is a cartoon, an illustration of an idea. It was shared, briefly, yesterday by biologist and Quillette contributor Colin Wright, and was promptly censored by Twitter’s moderators. Mr Wright has apparently been suspended from said platform until a confession of hateful wrongdoing – as yet unspecified hateful wrongdoing – has been extracted.

    Given the cartoon’s scandalous properties, I’ll reproduce it below the fold. Do feel free to grip the arms of your chair.

    This, apparently, is what’s verboten on Twitter. Note that no inflammatory commentary was added to the image. The image itself was deemed a basis for both indignation and speedy action. And so, the enormous list of things to which Twitter’s moderators take exception now includes the suggestion that strident activists often do harm to the cause they ostensibly champion. A phenomenon seen all but daily, and on many fronts.

    The article that the illustration accompanies, by Eliza Mondegreen, can be found here.

    Readers are welcome to comb through it in search of seething hatred or some great urge to oppress.

    Great find, Ozzie. Just like gays, the radical fringe has hijacked a group of people for its own ends.

    When I lived near Kings Cros in the 1980s, my GP had quite a few trannie patients. We were talking about it one day, and he said: ‘I asked my last (trannie) patient what she liked most about being a woman. Oh, she said, I just like to sit at home and knit.’

    It was not about changing the world or shoving it in everyone’s face. That was an add-on by people with a very different agenda.


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  56. So Novak Djokovic will miss this year’s US Open because of the Sniffer administration’s insistence foreigners such as Novak be “fully vaccinated”. I admire and respect Djokovic’s decision. Good on him.

    So, today John McEnroe has spoken up for Djokovic, stating “I would have had the vaccine and gone and played but he’s got very strong beliefs and you have to respect that“.

    Very nice Mr McEnroe, but I’m curious, whilst I agree with you, it’s a pity that you aren’t consistent in your defense of and respect for “strong beliefs”. I recall how you joined in the screaming pile on and vilification of Margaret Court a few years ago, all because she happens to be a devout Christian and she believes in traditional marriage. I recall how you even joined in on the progressive bandwagon to strip Melbourne’s centre court of the Court name and rename it after Yvonne Goolagong.

    You can’t be serious Mr McEnroe?


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  57. rickw

    How long before the corporate “smartest people in the room” admit that they fell for the COVID bullshit hook line and sinker?

    A very long time. The hardest thing for people to do, particularly those who regard themselves as “leaders” of communities or organisations, is to admit to having been wrong.


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  58. dover stop flogging your dead latin horse.
    Whatever the 2nd clause means it is something different to the first, avoiding redundancy, so Aquinas clearly did not mean merely “a member of”, because he has already said that with “a part of”.
    He was thinking in Italian, he translated that to Latin for writing, then someone at a much later date has had to translate that to English, and there was plenty of room for misinterpretation there even before I got involved at the last minute.
    MT *did* suggest “sense of belonging” but I glossed over those two lines “Any man’s death diminishes me/ Because I am involved in mankind” in my first reading.
    The Gemeinschaft trumps the Gesellschaft and old Thomas seriously needs some new translators.
    I’m finished with this topic!


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  59. Communitatis cannot simply be translated as ‘community’, a sort of sponge-word, absorbing numerous meanings. Communitatis carries the sense is of an identity of belief, of being and purpose. It is associated with the term ‘communion’, as a sharing of something, an exchange.

    Communitatis is just a substantive definition of community; it is simply any community prior to the atomizing effects of modernity and the subsequent emmiseration of the term, which is why it offends the sensibilities of some moderns.


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  60. To be fair to the FBI, they could be excused for being a little jumpy about Russian disinformation recycled by Trumpkins after 2016.

    Thanks, Monty. Roared laughing.

    My God, you’re stupid — totally entrapped by the bullshit you’re commanded to repeat from social media central.

    You’re not meant to believe the Democratic Party’s disinfo — that’s for the dumb lefty peasants on Twitter.


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  61. • 7.30’s SARAH FERGUSON/PETER GARRETT SOFT INTERVIEW IGNORES MIDNIGHT OIL’s EMITTING PAST

    Would this be the same Midnight Oil, who may, or may not, have preformed in Johannesburg, and may, or may not, have donated the proceeds to the African National Congress?


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  62. Elite schools don’t get you into university if you are as dumb as a box of rocks, and if you get into a decent university you need to do more than merely pass.
    And while some firms might like graduates of certain private schools they also like competence.
    Graduates with first class honors who’ve taken every opportunity to improve their employability eg vac work, get very good jobs too, irrespective of where they went to secondary school.


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  63. Bummer. Hairy has just received notification that our August 2023 cruise on the Trade Winds line’s huge four master high-tech sailing ship from Croatia down the Adriatic to Corfu and the Agean Greek Islands has been cancelled. They will refund our deposits. Apparently this ship has been leased to UAE for some elite long-term private use for later 2023. We will have to search around for something similar now.

    We are due in the UK in September too, we were going to do that as an add on.

    Good job we hadn’t booked the flights for the cruise yet.


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  64. I can’t imagine much worse than driving to and from work in commuter traffic to sit at a desk with a computer on it and have to interact with dickheads IRL and share their germs. It is expensive, resource intensive and nowadays, stupid.


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  65. Driving home through western NSW it was canola, canola, canola.
    Hoping that means big cheques this year.
    Quite a bit selfseeded on the road side, I was wondering if one day Australians would be reduced to gathering it in by hand as we come to grips with green induced shortages of everything.


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  66. Whatever the 2nd clause means it is something different to the first, avoiding redundancy, so Aquinas clearly did not mean merely “a member of”, because he has already said that with “a part of”.

    Sure, let’s concede that the 2nd clause, “he belongs to the community”, is saying something more than the 1st, “part of the community”, that could simply be ‘inseparable from’ rather than ‘owned by’, because the 2nd is implied by the 1st because it is talking about the relation of a part to the whole, whereas ownership isn’t immediately implied by being a part.


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  67. This working from home caper is codswallop. It’s crap and it’s just bullshit laziness.

    It just doesn’t work for the customer in many settings. A little over a year ago we were having a farmhouse addition done.

    But early discussions with regional Council were often hampered by officers (mostly women) working from home and unable to access historic paperwork in archives etc. In fairness, it didn’t slow us down too much – but it may be worse now.


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  68. Who’s Andrew Tate and why was he banned from every place?

    JC, Tucker Carlson had a brilliant interview with him today that explains how all the tech monopolies acted suddenly and in concert to ban and demonetise him because he was standing up for men — verboten by the Silicon Valley sociopaths.


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  69. …whereas ownership isn’t immediately implied by being a part.

    The trajectory of Christian thought from the early church to the middle ages and thereafter was away from from slavery, not retaining it.


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  70. Hard to feel sorry for Scott Morrison and the news that he’s facing an inquiry. Sure it’s a political witch hunt but chickens do come home to roost. Since May 2019, Morrison stood by, said nothing, did nothing and in almost all situations, actually sided with the left against his own side, think Bettina Arndt, Craig Kelly, George Christensen, Alan Tudge, Christian Porter and Andrew Laming.


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  71. Forgive me if this sounds presumptuous, but in view of the increasingly concerning possibility of a war with China, it is useful to get hold of an old fashioned world globe on a stand.

    I have just acquired one for my desk. It is SO more compelling and instructive than the usual flat plane maps of the world that we now use. Our school students should be immediately afforded the opportunity to use them.

    Heck – I had forgotten how large the land mass of Australia is compared to populous nations like China and India. And wow – the island chains of the Pacific are so much more relevant to Australia’s security when you look at their proximity in the ocean to our east. How close the Solomon Islands are to our north and how far away is the American base in Hawaii. And the South China Sea – through which most of our trade and fuel supplies transits – what a strategic vulnerability.

    I’m sure most on this blog – especially the military trained and interested – will be familiar with all of this geography and strategic significance. But it would help if more Australians were familiar with the the literal global topography and relativity, rather than words and a flat arrangement of a few countries on a page.


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  72. “Heck – I had forgotten how large the land mass of Australia is compared to populous nations like China and India.”

    Vicki, Australia is considerably smaller than China.


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    2
  73. Colonel Crispin Berka says:
    August 26, 2022 at 6:32 pm

    The Gemeinschaft trumps the Gesellschaft

    True, completely different thing.
    Community ver. mates in the pub.


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  74. Vicki, Australia is considerably smaller than China.

    At roughly a 20% differential, I wouldn’t say we’re considerably smaller in land size.

    Although if you took readily useable land mass into consideration, that’s certainly a point.


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  75. How close the Solomon Islands are to our north and how far away is the American base in Hawaii.

    I noted this when Mrs Eyrie bought me a nice globe a few years ago for my birthday. I’m amazed the war in the Pacific was fought across those distances with the technology of the early 1940’s.
    Just had a look. Australia and China are comparable in size. Much of China is useless too, like Australia. Suitable for storage of nuclear waste, strip mining and keeping the coasts apart.


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    4
  76. Australia is the planet’s sixth largest country after Russia, Canada, China, the USA, and Brazil.

    But most importantly, those other countries are wholly habitable without too many problems.
    China has a few areas that are similar to AUS.


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    2
  77. But it would help if more Australians were familiar with the the literal global topography and relativity, rather than words and a flat arrangement of a few countries on a page.

    I fear that’s the least of our worries, Vicki.

    Education in civics and history is probably at its lowest ebb ever.


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    5
  78. Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare says:
    August 26, 2022 at 4:17 pm

    Duk, my sister got a top Firsts in Medicine from Syd Uni in the 70’s

    Of course she did.

    It never stops, the boasting and rank-pulling, mired in sludgy prose, as correctly identified by Armadillo.

    How’s the very learned book you’ve been telling us about for more than a decade going?


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  79. Eyrie says:
    August 26, 2022 at 7:36 pm

    Noted, I think I mentioned it, maybe not in detail.
    Leaving it aside, Russia and Brasil could be populated by billions, if needed and prepared for.
    Make the Earth habitable before Mars is my motto.


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    1
  80. So they effectively reduced the number of desks to 30% of what it was pre-Covid, and now every desk is a hot desk – you cannot create a space for yourself with photos, trophies and awards you may have won, add non-standard items like you own desk-lamp, cannot be sure how many monitors you will get, or even get a keyboard that is worn in the way with which you are familiar. Docking stations disappear, the chairs have to be re-set everyday, you have no storage space because who uses storage for something you will only need for one day?

    That would be hot-desking in another guise. Stupid companies keep trying this on.

    As anyone who has worked in an office knows, being able to personalise your space, however humble, is very important to a substantial percentage of employees. It operates on two levels – being able to have your office supplies available and where you want them to be, and having personal stuff like photos around.

    Number one is of primary importance, there is nothing more annoying and time-wasting than having to scout around the office for a stapler or whatever every time you need one. Number two matters a lot to some employees, not so much to others. Combined, they make for a very unfriendly workplace for most people.

    For some unknown reason, they keep trying it on.


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  81. Vicki says:
    August 26, 2022 at 7:16 pm
    Indeed, Vicki. I snagged a small one on a clearance table at Safeway/Woolworths many moons ago and, like you, enjoy using it as my go-to view of the planet in context, whether for geopolitical aspects or just imagining the seasonal aspects of it’s tilt.

    Approaching the spring equinox. Yay!


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  82. The FBI is now as deeply corrupt and politically compromised as Vikpol. They are the DemoCraps Gestapo, where no low or vicious act is too out of bounds for this fetid agency to deploy against their political foes.
    I hope to see another Revolution, where brutal and efficient justice is meted out to these corruptocats and their political masters with not one ounce of mercy shown.


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  83. That would be hot-desking in another guise. Stupid companies keep trying this on.

    Hot desking, and open plan offices are the inventions of the Devil.


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  84. Cassie of Sydney says:
    August 26, 2022 at 7:21 pm

    “Heck – I had forgotten how large the land mass of Australia is compared to populous nations like China and India.”

    Vicki, Australia is considerably smaller than China.

    Forget countries (sort of) and look at the size of Africa. It’s ginormous.


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    2
  85. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:
    August 26, 2022 at 6:39 pm

    • 7.30’s SARAH FERGUSON/PETER GARRETT SOFT INTERVIEW IGNORES MIDNIGHT OIL’s EMITTING PAST

    Would this be the same Midnight Oil, who may, or may not, have preformed in Johannesburg, and may, or may not, have donated the proceeds to the African National Congress?

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:
    August 26, 2022 at 6:39 pm

    • 7.30’s SARAH FERGUSON/PETER GARRETT SOFT INTERVIEW IGNORES MIDNIGHT OIL’s EMITTING PAST

    Would this be the same Midnight Oil, who may, or may not, have preformed in Johannesburg, and may, or may not, have donated the proceeds to the African National Congress?

    For more recent readers, at Sinc’s I reported a publicity event in the 1980s where Peter Garrett arrived riding a bicycle. What was not widely known was that his wife, driving the Volvo, dropped him and the bike around the corner.

    I know, I was there.

    Every single one of them is a hypocrite.


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  86. Lode, earlier this arvo:

    Excellent red cellophane analogy, made in relation to the work from home shitfight.

    Imagery, plus nostalgia. Superb.


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  87. 7.30’s SARAH FERGUSON/PETER GARRETT SOFT INTERVIEW IGNORES MIDNIGHT OIL’s EMITTING PAST

    The daughter of a farming family was having a rather tradition twenty first birthday bash, way back when – D.J. and all. He put “The beds are burning” on the sound system….”Let’s give it back” elicited a bellow of “Turn that shyte off.”……


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  88. You know, I’ve been thinking that we don’t have enough University Medals around here these days.

    In times past, they were everywhere, like buttercups in the fields in Spring.

    This site must be going downhill. 🙂


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    5
  89. Posts up thread about the uselessness of the Austro Hungarian Army, and the incompetence of the Chief of General Staff, in the opening stages of the war in 1914.

    Just after the start of that war, an Austrian unit, involved in heavy fighting against the Russians, demanded a small arms ammunition resupply, which was duly delivered.

    The ammunition was blank.


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    1
  90. Western individualism is the exception, not the rule.

    Unfortunately, the usual condition is for the powerful to rule over the unpowerful, using whatever convenient excuse they can think up.

    On the lighter side, Muttley thinks he will get to rule in the socialist paradise.


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  91. miltonf says:
    August 26, 2022 at 8:58 pm

    Midnight oil – marxist agitprop from nasty, spoilt privileged brats who never wanted for anythin

    milton, as someone who knew one or two of them (including Garrett) that is a stupid generalisation. It is the sort of crap that gets legitimate questions put into the nutcase box.

    The soft left was a very different animal – and in the case of Midnight Oil, who always had rock solid management to protect their business – it is a joke to talk about who did or didn’t want for anything. Some members did, some didn’t ‘want’ for ‘anything’ when they were growing up. As a band, that made not a jot of difference.

    As a young gel I interacted in various ways with top bands like Cold Chisel and Midnight Oil, and Radio Birdman and The Saints. This business was cutthroat. Equipment was stolen. Leads were cut while a band was onstage.

    That was fun. But, the survivors had battalions of managers and lawyers backing them up. Not to mention one or two large Samoans on staff.

    All that ‘we care’ stuff is a classic example of gliding over the surface while a big machine is grinding away beneath.


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  92. gliding over the surface while a big machine is grinding away beneath

    The Oils.
    Rio Tinto.
    Cold Chisel.
    Standard Oil.
    Metallica.
    BHP.

    They all work on the same principle. Follow the money.


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  93. This whole Albansleazey Goat Rodeo is proving to be even more staggeringly z-grade than I ever could have imagined.

    On behalf of goat rodeos, I’m insulted to be associated with the clown in chief.


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  94. milton, as someone who knew one or two of them (including Garrett) that is a stupid generalisation. It is the sort of crap that gets legitimate questions put into the nutcase box.

    ‘don’t serve your country don’t serve your king’ – insulting at best. I have no time for Garret whatsoever. As for his time in government- absolutely disgraceful.


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  95. Or it might have been Wallis Simpson. She was skinny and definitely wanted to be rich.

    I’ve heard the quote attributed to Wallis Simpson, indeed.


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    2
  96. Grate – NSW Govt youtube ads – let’s reimagine them, Cats!

    “The NSW Government is composed of a bunch of big gay homosexual fascist greenfilth pooftahs* who’ve never pretended to be anything otherwise – yet the collective muscle memory of gliberal voters continues to support those loathsome degenerate frauds”

    This is not a good thang, Cats. 😕

    *BIRM


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  97. Copy this and give it to your federal MP:

    Vikki Campion: Electric vehicles are for inner-city elites, not the regions

    Electric vehicle policy proves yet again that the government is focused on inner-city elites at the expense of those in rural Australia, writes Vikki Campion.

    The electric car subsidy gives the biggest tax breaks to the highest earners, sends tax money overseas to buy cars that we cannot attain due to supply shortages, and imports to a nation that does not yet have a workforce trained to deal with them. But those are not the biggest problems with the policy.

    As senators examining the impact of the electric car discount this week heard, subsidising EVs paved the way for activists masked as “non-profit organisations” to insist that older, higher emitting vehicles should pay more taxes, forcing us to buy EVs that cost an average $20,000 more than their internal combustion engine counterparts.

    Not only that, EVs should get free rego, priority parking and priority lanes, while combustion engines pay more. This is how extreme socialism works, where the few enlightened instruct the masses.

    Who drives older, higher-emitting vehicles? Older, poorer people and bigger families.

    Yet the biggest beneficiaries of the electric car discount will be employees of big businesses on the highest tax rate of over $180,000.

    All EV sales were “inner-urban-centric”, motor vehicle sales organisations told the inquiry, with sales decreasing the further from “inner-city leafy suburbs”, as regional buyers worried about how far an electric car could actually go and how long it would take to charge.

    Just 10km required an hour of charging on the wall, the inquiry heard, with the Hyundai Kona Electric taking 28 hours to charge at home on mains power. This creates serious problems in the bush if you quickly need to get to a hospital. Bear with me while I charge the car while you have that asthma attack.

    There are regional members of parliament driving 80,000km a year. That’s 8000 hours of charging or about 50 days’ worth. Every regional politician should be forced to trial EVs first, not with coal-fuelled fast chargers, but emission-free rooftop solar batteries, before that system is imposed on the bush.

    Labor Senator Deb O’Neil was a voice of reason in drilling EV activists on what they had done to engage with regional communities before spruiking amendments to the bill. Repeatedly, the answer was not a lot.

    Climateworks spoke to “decision makers” – which is code for “we only talk to the clique of our own while imposing our decisions on you”.

    The Australia Institute, fresh from a dalliance with Mike Cannon-Brookes, insisted the range was so good, “nine out of 10 regional Australians would make a trip without having to stop to charge”.

    Their view of regional Australia is a hobby farm near Bowral or a weekend in the Blue Mountains.

    To get to a sealed road, I drive 14km on dirt. After heavy rain, it becomes almost impassible without a 4WD.

    Second-hand diesel 4WDs are selling for almost as much they were originally purchased for because that is the economic need that must be fulfilled.

    The EVs for sale in Australia bear no resemblance to the list of top-selling vehicles here, where the top two sellers of 2021 were utes, as were seven of the 20 top-sellers. In Australia, there is no commercially available battery electric or plug-in hybrid electric ute or work truck for sale. People don’t buy utes to impress their girlfriend. They need them to do their jobs.

    This is also a socialist tax on large families. If you have four kids, what car can you buy?

    EVs are for a white-collar inner-urban workforce, not the reality of regional Australia or even big families in Western Sydney.

    While EV activists claim households with an EV charged from a home solar-battery system “can expect an average total electricity bill of about $230 each year”, in England that plan is working so well they are turning off their deep freezers, gambling with food poisoning, to
    stop power bills soaring.

    Even if we did have the mass take-up that these green organisations so desire – and somehow beat the supply shortage of right-hand drive electric vehicles – we would not have enough power to charge them.

    Australia has 20 million internal combustion engines and some 20,000 electric vehicles. For a mass transition, we need to treble our power generation, which won’t happen with the projected closure of coal-fired power stations.

    Australia will also require a different workforce to handle and maintain EVs. Like going from horse and cart to automobile, we are changing the propulsion system.

    Tradies know it brings potential unintended consequences, as right now we do not have the skills to maintain them.

    Also notably absent from any of the discourse were the changes to road safety and fire brigades, who overseas have realised that once a fire starts in an electric vehicle, the only real option is to let it burn out.

    A burning Tesla requires about 17 fire engines’ worth of water to extinguish. That’s fine if you can connect to a city main, but is impossible in the bush, which relies on volunteer fireys who often need to take water from farmers’ dams to stop a blaze.

    It’s like the Hindenburg on wheels. When it’s not on fire, it’s low emissions. It’s clean and green – until there’s a spark.


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    18
  98. I’ve heard their poisonous songs of hate- ‘tear it down’

    The most political I could ever cop was Vs Spy Vs Spy’s DON’T tear it down.


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  99. A burning Tesla requires about 17 fire engines’ worth of water to extinguish. That’s fine if you can connect to a city main, but is impossible in the bush, which relies on volunteer fireys who often need to take water from farmers’ dams to stop a blaze.

    A burning Tesla, on a 44 degree day, a howling Easterly, in the middle of a tinder dry country side, with a total fire ban?


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    15
  100. Nelson_Kidd-Players says:
    August 26, 2022 at 8:27 pm

    Not really being into contests of size, I do however concede that your Eight-incher is way bigger than my Four-incher.

    When you mentioned the size of yours, I just had to measure mine to see how large it was.


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  101. From The Oz…

    The Daniel Andrews era to live on in Victoria, Newspoll finds

    Daniel Andrews has ­defied unrest over some of the world’s toughest Covid-19 restrictions and is on track to win a third term for Labor in the Victorian election as Liberal leader Matthew Guy’s personal ratings slump to record lows three months from polling day.

    A Newspoll conducted exclusively for The Weekend Australian reveals Labor’s primary vote has fallen only slightly since the 2018 election rout, while dissatisfaction with Mr Guy’s performance has soared seven points since voter sentiment was last tested in ­November last year. Labor holds a 56-44 per cent two-party-­preferred lead in the latest poll taken between Monday and Thursday compared with the 58-42 per cent lead Labor held in the previous Newspoll.

    The numbers suggest the ­Coalition is heading for another major loss in the first state ­election since Scott Morrison’s federal ­defeat in May, when Kooyong and Goldstein fell to independents and large swings away from the ­Liberals were recorded in other key seats.

    At 41 per cent, Victorian Labor’s primary vote, while down three points from last ­November, is equal to or higher than at any time before the 2014 or 2018 elections. Mr Andrews’ satisfaction rating of 54 per cent is higher than at any time before the 2014 or 2018 elections and has barely changed since the last Newspoll in November. Dissatisfaction with Mr Andrews is 41 per cent for a net satisfaction rating of 13.

    Only 32 per cent of voters were satisfied with Mr Guy’s performance compared with 49 per cent dissatisfied. Mr Guy’s net satisfaction of minus 17 per cent, is the ­lowest he has recorded in ­Newspoll, worse than his previous low of minus 15 a month ­before the 2018 election. The result is certain to increase chatter about his ­viability in the run-up to the election.

    There will also be concerns about suggestions independents will stand in key seats after the success of teal candidates in the May federal election. Statewide support for “others” is running at 10 per cent.

    The Greens have increased their primary vote support to 13 per cent, which could – if the swing falls in the right seats – help the minor party win up to three extra lower-house positions.

    The Newspoll numbers suggest Mr Andrews would be returned to office with a workable majority if an election were held this week, killing off chances of Labor being forced into a minority power-sharing ­arrangement.

    Labor won 55 seats at the 2018 election compared with the ­Coalition’s 27, and a redistribution notionally handed a net gain of one seat to Labor and took one off the ­opposition.

    This month marks the 20th ­anniversary of the Victorian Liberals dumping Denis Napthine as leader in the run-up to the 2002 election, which contributed to a landslide Labor win.

    Senior Liberals have been ­informally discussing the merits of whether to keep Mr Guy in the position, arguing the transition from former leader Michael O’Brien hasn’t worked. “If there is another scandal, he’s gone, but who would ever want that job now?” a senior Liberal said. “He wanted it badly enough; he can deal with the mess.”

    Multiple Labor sources have said momentum had shifted ­towards the Coalition until the ­opposition was engulfed in an integrity scandal over a botched pay rise for a former adviser and ­debate raged about Mr Morrison’s decision to secretly take on extra cabinet appointments during the Covid-19 pandemic.

    “I am not expecting a clear-cut Labor victory, it will be more ­nuanced than that, with losses in strange places. But we will win,” a senior Labor MP said.

    There are 14 key seats that Labor is at risk of losing on ­November 26, six of which the Coalition was hopeful of winning.

    Senior Liberal sources said no one was realistically expecting a Coalition majority, with a Labor minority government the best ­result likely.

    If this weekend’s Newspoll is replicated on election day, the Labor losses could be contained to between three and six seats, ­despite the carnage caused by the pandemic.

    The support comes despite Victoria having been one of the world’s most locked down ­communities during the pandemic.

    A senior Labor source said that while there was not universal love for Mr Andrews, the Coalition had failed to present as a trustworthy, viable alternative. “Dan is not loved but in order for people to switch allegiances, there has to be faith in the ­opposing parties,’’ the source said.

    “There is no faith because Guy is a total dud.”

    On the better premier rating, Mr Andrews is down three points to 51 per cent and Mr Guy is ­statistically unchanged on 34 per cent.

    The Coalition primary vote of 36 per cent has barely moved since 2018 while Labor is down nearly two points to 41 per cent, with an expectation the November election result would have Labor in the 30s.”

    Sad, really sad, Victoria desperately needs a change of government but why change a Labor government for a “Labor lite” government?


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  102. According to Midnight Oil:

    “Our shoreline was never invaded, our country was never in flames”

    Tell that to the 236 people who died in the first Japanese air raid.

    Or the thousands more who died in the following 207 air attacks.


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    18
  103. I think you have misattributed
    I thought that was Coco Chanel

    No f*cking way, Sweeties.

    I had never heard that truism until I saw and heard Patsy Stone state it in an episode of AbFab.


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    1
  104. And no, the clip is not on f*cking youtube – I’d have posted it here already if it was.

    “Gee, that obviously means Rabz is wrong, for a change, we tells ya”

    Yeah, well no, he is not (again) …


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    1
  105. Daily Mail – taking the pizz out of Kiwi’s….

    New Zealand man, 49, was left unable to urinate for three months after suffering grisly penile injury when he fell 10 FEET onto a fence post

    Man started bleeding from the end of his member following the three-metre fall
    Doctors found he had a small hole in his urethra that was allowing blood into it
    He was given an indwelling catheter for months that left him urinate into a bag



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  106. Chad Pecknold
    @ccpecknold
    · 15h
    “LaBeouf told ?@BishopBarron? that the traditional form of the Catholic mass — celebrated in Latin — was key in both his conversion and his performance as an actor playing Pio.” https://foxnews.com/entertainment/shia-labeouf-converts-catholicism-studying-padre-pio-movie

    Chad Pecknold
    @ccpecknold
    ·
    19m
    Ad orientem, smells & bells, mystery, real reverence: the form really fits the matter of the holy sacrifice. It’s not that the guitar masses are like selling cars, as Shia puts it, because they are valid masses; it’s that they are less fitting to the elevated object of worship.

    Great news and the interview with Bishop Barron looks very interesting. And looking forward to the Padre Pio movie.


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    4
  107. Of course she did.

    It never stops, the boasting and rank-pulling, mired in sludgy prose, as correctly identified by Armadillo.

    How’s the very learned book you’ve been telling us about for more than a decade going?

    Oh do shut up you silly fool, and all your uptickers.

    There is a point to telling Duk that someone who did very well is as fed up with medicine as he is.

    Not that you and your ilk could ever see that. Far too much pre-judgement there.


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  108. That grotesque deformed jug eared imbecile has ­defied unrest over the world’s toughest bat flu restrictions and is on track to win a third term for labore in the Disasterstan election as Gliberal leader Matt “Groundhog” Guy’s personal ratings slump to record lows (again), three months from polling day

    If you were a conspiracy hypothesist, you might claim all of the above was deliberate, if just stating those bleedingly obvious assertions.

    “Why?” would remain the more tricky question.


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    4
  109. as someone who knew one or two of them (including Garrett)
    … As a young gel I interacted in various ways with top bands like Cold Chisel and Midnight Oil, and Radio Birdman and The Saints.

    Of course you did. You have never left us in any doubt about your rock n’rolling past. Up it rises, over and over again. You were such a rager and a looker and right in there with all the pub groupies.

    Your glory days. lol.


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    7
  110. I hope too that Duk at least considers what I had to say re his medical registration and work in medicine. My sister, disillusioned with the way medicine was going in this country, worked for a year in a third world hospital in a country where she saw some illnesses and long-left medical problems rarely seen in the West and that she really had to work hard on to diagnose and cure, all with very little in the way of modern resources.

    It brought her back to practicing real medicine so when she returned she tossed in the city lights for a country practice as a GP.

    I am off to read a novel now. A good Friday nite rather than waste it here with at least 16 people I have no interest in interacting with. Apologies to those those friendly folk I like who are here too.

    I need good times not the crap I’ve received above. I’m always busy and need to relax not get cross.


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    5
  111. This working from home caper is codswallop. It’s crap and it’s just bullshit laziness.

    Yet I’ve been engaged in it since Beryl’s hitlerist schlockdown from June last year. Until then I’d been going into the office nine days a fortnight, since May 2020.

    I hate working from home. The only reason I’m still doing it is because the f*cking bean counters reasoned they could save many, many thousands ditching our office lease as of 1 January this year.

    Our new office will be ready in about four/five weeks (allegedly).

    Grate work, knobheads. Send your staff spare (those you still have) and demonstrate the savings in the annual report.

    I’ve gone “quiet quitting”, performing my job and nothing else, while hanging out for the big multiple payouts that will erase my mortgage and allow some semblance of a “dignified retirement” – if such a concept exists in this brave new Woild Economic F*ckwits future.


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    5
  112. JC @ 4.27 firing accountant
    The mariampole silasean Jew leapt out from inside me.
    Don’t do any rash until you have met with Louis Litt – you will be lit up.
    We meet in person and shake hands – none of this Covid globo homo nonsense.


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    1
  113. Top first?

    That would presumably mean university medal.

    Dot, my Big Sis was on track for that, highest results in every year, because she was fanatical.
    She had a lot to prove as she came from Mt. Druitt and sounded like it. That accent has mellowed now.

    From what I saw of the Faculty of Medicine when I was in it, her accent and manner probably did her in. Excellent First, but she just wasn’t middle class enough for the medal standards of those times. Even in the mid-eighties I had to undergo an interview to ensure I was the right sort of person before they ticked off on graduation. I’d say more but I don’t want to identify her by it.


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    3
  114. AAP: Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews is on track to win a third term for Labor, according to the latest Newspoll, as Opposition Leader Matthew Guy’s personal ratings plummet.

    The Newspoll, published by The Weekend Australian late on Friday, shows Labor’s primary vote has fallen only slightly since the 2018 election.

    Dissatisfaction with Mr Guy’s performance has risen seven points since voter sentiment was last tested in ­November.

    Labor holds a 56-44 per cent two-party-­preferred lead in the latest poll taken between Monday and Thursday, compared with the 58-42 per cent lead Labor held in the previous Newspoll.

    At 41 per cent, Victorian Labor’s primary vote is equal to or higher than at any time before the 2014 or 2018 elections.

    Mr Andrews’ satisfaction rating of 54 per cent is higher than at any time before the previous two elections. His dissatisfaction rating is 41 per cent.

    Only 32 per cent of voters were satisfied with Mr Guy’s performance compared with 49 per cent dissatisfied.

    The Greens have increased their primary vote support to 13 per cent.

    The Newspoll numbers suggest Mr Andrews and Labor would be returned to office with a workable majority if an election were held this week.

    If the latest Newspoll is repeated on election day, the Labor losses could be contained to between three and six seats, ­despite Victoria having been one of the world’s most locked-down ­communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    On the better premier rating, Mr Andrews is down three points to 51 per cent and Mr Guy is ­unchanged on 34 per cent.

    Just imagine, you live in a state ruled by a thug, every institution has been corrupted to do his bidding, state debt is more than Qld, NSW, Tas and SA put together (and rising) — and the SFLs still get their arses handed to them on a plate.


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    9
  115. Three years ago I decided I would never, ever visit China again (and, more recently, Hong Kong). Given the events of the last 2-3 years, and the increasingly apparent complicity of the populace there, I never want to visit Victoria ever again.


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    13
  116. Rabzsays:
    August 26, 2022 at 10:47 pm

    Yes, but why would anyone vote for a pissweak collection of “me too”ers who won’t challenge any premise underlying what Maximum Leader has wreaked on us?
    Margaret Thatcher said “first you win the argument then you win the vote”. The coalition are too gutless to make an argument, because that might not immediately resonate with an electorate who has been sold on Labor’s propaganda. They haven’t done the hard yards of presenting an alternative that doesn’t instantly get approval from the focus groups. It’s too late for this election, but if they’d actually shown some ticker two or three years ago they might have been further down in the polls before now but now be in a position to reclaim some ground – now they’re mired in the excrement of their own hopeless perennial capitulation, because no-one will believe them if they suddenly start to make a case as to why their prior acceptance of the rationale of Labor’s policies was totally wrong.
    They’ll get belted this time, and deservedly so. The sad thing is that they won’t learn. They’ll spend the next four years chasing illusory small gains in the next opinion poll by aping Labor’s stance, and wondering why voters prefer the real thing to the pale imitation.


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    8
  117. The sad thing is that they won’t learn.

    Dead right. Which is why we need a new ‘conservative’ party. This one is fuddily-ucked from arsehole to breakfast


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    2
  118. According to Midnight Oil:

    “Our shoreline was never invaded, our country was never in flames”

    The screeching fucking commie hypocrite says it like it’s a bad thing. Get fucked you bald piece of shit.


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    2
  119. Having a succulent Italian meal right now. Is this fascism manifested?

    Everything within the plate. Nothing against the plate. Nothing falling off the plate.


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  120. What sort of a cowboy outfit is the AFL? It’s just been reported that the 2 coaches at the heart of the allegations made in the so called report were not consulted about them before it was released.

    Robinson on AFL 360 is flabbergasted that a partner was allegedly asked to abort her child. These are the woke individuals who consider an unborn child is not human and has no rights yet here they are shocked that someone might have made such a suggestion. This happens probably every hour in this country and it’s airbrushed away a women’s rights.

    There is no due process in this case and 2 coaches have had their reputations trashed. Gerard Wheatley doesn’t think this is such a big problem. The players “truth” needs to be told. Just appalling!!


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