Open Thread – Mon 10 July 2023


The Colosseum in Rome, Fyodor Matveyev ,1816

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Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 11, 2023 10:30 pm

JC

Jul 11, 2023 10:13 PM

Here’s the story that’s caused outrage over dog kills.

I’ll bet you’ve never even been on a building site.

JC
JC
July 11, 2023 10:37 pm

Alamak

The other day I was in a food store and talked to a dude wearing a chef coat (is that what they’re called). We were in line waiting to pay and I got talking to him. He seemed to be buying a small amount of stuff. I asked him about that and he said he was a chef for a family!

Colonel Crispin Berka
Colonel Crispin Berka
July 11, 2023 10:37 pm

gah, this new new catallaxy is configured for 100 comments per page instead of the old 250. It’s just change for the sake of change. STOP THE WORLD I WANT TO GET OFF.

inb4PHRASING.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 11, 2023 10:41 pm

Daily Mail.

Brittany Higgins starts planning for her wedding revealing details of her ‘basic and proud’ invitation for a special someone

Brittany Higgins has started planning her wedding
Fiancé David Sharaz proposed on New Year’s Eve

Hope she remembers to wear knickers to the church!

Mark from Melbourne
Mark from Melbourne
July 11, 2023 10:43 pm

gah, this new new catallaxy is configured for 100 comments per page instead of the old 250. It’s just change for the sake of change. STOP THE WORLD I WANT TO GET OFF.

No, it’s change because – until Dover can get the performance issues sorted once and for all – it is at least reducing the load on the database server a bit and thus keeping things actually going.

MatrixTransform
July 11, 2023 10:50 pm

It’s just change for the sake of change

the wank-burden on the server is simply too high

wanks per page matter

unfortunately, since most normal commentary has pretty much vapourised , despite the smaller pages, there is still a very high wank-density

it isn’t looking good

Colonel Crispin Berka
Colonel Crispin Berka
July 11, 2023 10:59 pm

Until the true source of the metaphorical wanking is addressed, beating around the page length bush is unlikely to resolve your wankery trauma.

JC
JC
July 11, 2023 11:00 pm

What bait do you use Sanchez. Live or lure?

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 11, 2023 11:01 pm

too many pages

too many mongs

not enough bob the builder banter

cohenite
July 11, 2023 11:02 pm

I got nothing. I’m going to bed.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 11, 2023 11:02 pm

JC

Jul 11, 2023 11:00 PM

What bait do you use Sanchez. Live or lure?

Rapidly expanding.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 11, 2023 11:04 pm

cohenite

Jul 11, 2023 11:02 PM

I got nothing. I’m going to bed.

Not even a tranny in gym gear before you go?

Gabor
Gabor
July 11, 2023 11:05 pm

MatrixTransform
Jul 11, 2023 10:50 PM

I don’t know Matrix, I follow a trade site (food industry) with many times the members of this blog and it’s lightning fast.

Not complaining mind, appreciate the efforts of Dover and thanks.
If it’s a matter of funds, offers have been made.
Links to that have disappeared as well.

cohenite
July 11, 2023 11:10 pm

Not even a tranny in gym gear before you go?

Alright, I wouldn’t do this for just anyone: cute owl. The chains are for head prefect. No sticky fingers.

JC
JC
July 11, 2023 11:11 pm

I’m not opening the link Cronkite.
So there.

JC
JC
July 11, 2023 11:13 pm

If only there was more post hoc’ing.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 11, 2023 11:15 pm

Alright, I wouldn’t do this for just anyone: cute owl. The chains are for head prefect. No sticky fingers.

Err, I wasn’t seriously asking for that.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 11, 2023 11:16 pm

JC

Jul 11, 2023 11:13 PM

If only there was more post hoc’ing.

No.
Post hoc’ing is bad.
The worst.

JC
JC
July 11, 2023 11:17 pm

How about ad hoc’ing then?

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 11, 2023 11:53 pm

No hoc’ing of any description.
Ad or post.
Poor form.

JC
JC
July 11, 2023 11:56 pm

At least that’s not nebulous though.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 12, 2023 12:10 am

WTF! You’d think the pilot in command would be legally responsible for all radio communication with ATC. I think the pilot might have a few words spoken to him about this.

With that said, all readback was correct.

It should put a smile on your face.

6-YEAR-OLD GIRL talking on Frequency | Controller loves it!

Fair Shake
Fair Shake
July 12, 2023 12:54 am

Attending a conference in Bavaria. Quote of the day by a Frau who got a bit mixed up: ‘ To climb everest first you must slice your elephant into little pieces!’ ???

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 12, 2023 12:55 am

Vicki wrote:

My reading of some of the estimates of writers some 70 or so years ago – before the invective started – is probably around 300,000.

Over time I have come to conclude that fatality counts in many instances of conflict are extremely exaggerated.

Why so? Because it’s beneficial in most cases to exaggerate.

If you are the winner, magnifying the number of dead on their side makes you seem brave and mighty. Doing the same on your side shows how brave you were.

If you are the loser, it can paint the winner as homicidal and nasty. Also showing you resisted bravely.

In a lot of medieval and ancient battles, bodies are almost entirely missing from mass graves afterwards. This is in countries where burial rather than cremation is the norm.

Cases in point include Towton – supposedly seeing 26,000 killed on one day. More than the Battle of the Somme, yet with club and edge and missile weapons rather than firearms.

A second example is the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Burial pits containing many hundreds have not been located.

Another is Darwin 1942, where “many hundreds” more have been alleged to have died on the Allied side rather than the 236 provable.

There are many more such examples.

To prove Aboriginal dead in Australia beyond doubt you’d need photographic or burial evidence.

JC
JC
July 12, 2023 1:43 am

No Shit.

The States in America Where Incomes Grow Faster
New federal data show a striking divergence between earnings growth in GOP-led states and progressive states.

President Biden will never admit it, but he has Republican-led states to thank for the resilient U.S. economy and labor market. Witness how an earnings surge in right-leaning states is helping compensate for sluggish growth in progressive ones.

New state personal income data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis highlights how aggregate worker and proprietor earnings in red states grew significantly more in the last year than in the blues. The disparity owes to GOP-led states adding more jobs, including in higher-paying industries like tech and finance, along with faster-growing wages.
Opinion: Potomac Watch
WSJ Opinion Potomac Watch
Gov. Doug Burgum’s Run for President
Explore Audio Center

Earnings nationwide rose 5.4% on average between the first quarters of 2022 and 2023, but much less in New York (2.6%), Indiana (2.6%), California (2.9%), Connecticut (3.4%), Rhode Island (3.6%), Maryland (4%), New Jersey (4.3%), Oregon (4.5%) and Illinois (4.6%). Apart from Indiana, these states are run by Democrats—and most have been for years. They boast high taxes and a high cost of living, which along with Covid lockdowns spurred increased out-migration during the pandemic.

Meanwhile, earnings in the same period surged in North Dakota (9.7%), New Mexico (9.6%), Nevada (9.1%), Florida (9.1%), Nebraska (8.6%), Hawaii (8%), South Carolina (8%), Alaska (7.9%) and Texas (7.7%).

States with higher earnings growth also tend to have lower tax rates as well as fast-growing populations. Consider neighboring Utah (7.2%) and Colorado (4.9%), which have similar economies but diverging political climates as Colorado becomes more like California. Could that be affecting its earnings growth?

WSJ

JC
JC
July 12, 2023 1:59 am

Ted Cruz should be on the Supreme Court.

Rafael Edward Cruz (/kru?z/; born December 22, 1970) is an American politician, attorney, and political commentator serving as the junior United States senator from Texas since 2013. A member of the Republican Party, Cruz was the Solicitor General of Texas from 2003 to 2008.

After graduating from Princeton University and Harvard Law School,

Story

Ted Cruz Lays Out Road Map for Next Big Conservative Supreme Court Battle

JC
JC
July 12, 2023 2:02 am

Slowly, but it’s happening. A black woman moving over to the GOP is a big deal even if it’s the Georgia state house. She wants to see school choice which the Demons refuse because of the Teacher unions.

You go girl.

Georgia Democrat Switches to GOP Claiming She Was ‘Tormented’ and ‘Deserted’ by Her Own Party

Mesha Mainor, a Democratic lawmaker from Georgia, has announced her intention to switch to the Republican Party, stating that Democrats have ‘exploited’ the African American community.

Mainor, a Georgia state House of Representatives member who fell out of favor with her Democratic colleagues due to her endorsement of a recent school choice bill, is projected to officially announce her party switch. She has represented District 56 in the Georgia state House as a Democrat since January 2021. She plans to announce her switch to the Republican Party on Tuesday, just before noon.

https://beckernews.com/georgia-democrat-switches-to-gop-claiming-she-was-tormented-and-deserted-by-her-own-party-51073/

Gabor
Gabor
July 12, 2023 2:10 am

Top Ender
Jul 12, 2023 12:55 AM

Vicki wrote:

She is a fine contributor but I feel she has an undue fascination with everything aboriginal.
Not every stone is significant or meaningful. Patterns do happen in nature without human interference and even it was done by humans, so what?

Is every campsite where you boiled a billy sacred? Or just the ones where aboriginals roasted a roo?

Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 4:00 am
Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 4:01 am
Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 4:03 am
Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 4:04 am
Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 4:05 am
Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 4:06 am
Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 4:08 am
Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 4:09 am
Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 4:10 am
feelthebern
feelthebern
July 12, 2023 4:16 am

Earlier this year, Justice Michael Lee found ten imputations put forward by the national broadcaster did hold defamatory meanings following a preliminary hearing in November 2022.

This Michael Lee is good.
PS the ABC redacted its documents?
In other words, that’s obstructing the discovery process.
The next time someone has a legal stoush with the ABC they should redact their documents & see how quickly the ABC howls about that.

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
July 12, 2023 4:21 am

Thanks Tom.

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
July 12, 2023 4:23 am

Nigel Farage – War on Cash

https://youtu.be/EsQ7SMEUWoQ

Only 4 minutes or so.

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
July 12, 2023 4:35 am

I’m not really conservative. I’m conservative on certain things. I believe in less government. I believe in fiscal responsibility and all those things that maybe Republicans used to believe in but don’t any more.

– Clint Eastwood

Top Ender
Top Ender
July 12, 2023 4:40 am

Meanwhile in Hobart:

Do you think the William Crowther statue should be taken down?
Yes 23 %
No 77 %
495 votes

Mercury but paywalled

feelthebern
feelthebern
July 12, 2023 5:18 am

Do you think the William Crowther statue should be taken down?

He played for Manly in the 70’s didn’t he?
Or Newtown?

Knuckle Dragger
Knuckle Dragger
July 12, 2023 6:42 am

He played for Manly in the 70’s didn’t he?
Or Newtown?

Crowther is the noted haberdasher who also championed Tasmania’s first bicycle lane.

Obviously.

JC
JC
July 12, 2023 6:47 am

BBC apparently has a huge scandal resting on it’s belly with one of their prominent news presenters being suspended for buying porn pics of a 17 year old boy.

4chan has identified him. I bet, I’d bet he isn’t the only one there as the place would be infested with them.

feelthebern
feelthebern
July 12, 2023 6:52 am

I just can’t get over the ABC providing redacted documents during the discovery process.
Who precisely do they think they are?

Razey
Razey
July 12, 2023 7:38 am

Exposing the Corruption of Albo and ASIC!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuuS_0LsTbo

sfw
sfw
July 12, 2023 7:38 am

Great article from the Daily Sceptic, don’t know how applicable to the modern human world it is but makes me think it’s what’s happening to the west. The meek won’t inherit the earth, those who have something to fight for will.
https://dailysceptic.org/2023/07/11/the-mice-that-gave-up-reproducing-and-died-out/

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 7:40 am

But in that first case, the now 20-year-old has said the claims – made by their family – were “rubbish”.

Extremely curious. Two allegations now and first alleged victim denies it.

Indolent
Indolent
July 12, 2023 7:41 am

Utterly brilliant. Who was it that said show me the man and I’ll show you the crime? This is a case study of that for a man who is hated for encouraging men to stand up and be themselves.

Tucker Carlson
@TuckerCarlson

Ep. 9 The Andrew Tate interview

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 7:45 am

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-42003496

Internet pranksters tried to start a hoax campaign to change the cross on the Swedish flag to a Turkish-style crescent and star. Although a few people were tricked, the lacklustre response to the campaign co-ordinated on 4chan could be a sign that the extreme message board’s influence on internet culture is starting to wane.

Whatever helps you sleep at night, little buddy.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 7:46 am

Tate is a fraud.

Wally Dalí
Wally Dalí
July 12, 2023 7:48 am

Tucker Carlson will be feted in history as one of the heroes of the Reset Resistance- but I hope he doesn’t sleepwalk into becoming another one of these cyclical podcasters-podcaster’s guests, masticating each others’ life stories for teatowel slogan affirmations.
He needs to get back to headlines, current affairs and bulletin news. I’d subscribe for that.

Roger
Roger
July 12, 2023 7:53 am

The Guardian can hardly contain its glee as it reports today that academics from the University of Melbourne, University of QLD & Princeton have issued a report saying nuclear is too expensive and too slow in development to contribute to Australia’s net zero by 2050 emissions target. (You hear that, Peter Dutton…the experts have spoken.)

However, after modelling six scenarios, they also concede there are “too many uncertainties to map a single path to net zero” and call for more government intervention to make it happen.

So, it’s up to you, Chris Bowen.

Truly, only academics could be this stupid (closely followed by the journalists who have outsourced their thinking to them).

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 7:59 am

The Guardian can hardly contain its glee as it reports today that academics from the University of Melbourne, University of QLD & Princeton have issued a report saying nuclear is too expensive

Bullshit.

It all goes down to scale. This is evident if the costs of shale oil is compared to gas, conventional oil or tar sands.

Nuclear is the most scalable of all because it is the most energy intensive.

Indolent
Indolent
July 12, 2023 8:00 am
Tom
Tom
July 12, 2023 8:01 am

However, after modelling six scenarios, they also concede there are “too many uncertainties to map a single path to net zero” and call for more government intervention to make it happen.

The reason the left and the communist media have the hots for Net Zero is the bit they won’t say out loud: Net Zero means net zero capitalism and therefore net zero economy.

Net Zero is the battle cry of Year Zero communism.

johanna
johanna
July 12, 2023 8:02 am

The Australian Electoral Commission’s war on democracy continues unabated:

A Federal Court judge believes the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) behaved inappropriately when it warned former federal MP Craig Kelly about non-compliant political advertising in his electorate but did not tell him the exact location.

Mr Kelly is being pursued in a civil case by the AEC for what it says were 22 contraventions of electoral law over advertising in the lead-up to last year’s election.

and

During submissions from the AEC’s barrister Christopher Tran about the seriousness of the offending, Justice Steven Rares today questioned the AEC’s conduct.

Justice Rares said failing to disclose the location of the posters did not reflect well on the regulator.

“During an election campaign, one would have thought your client would have been assiduous to tell people ‘you’ve got contravention at this location, you’re misleading people here, get it down or get it fixed’,” the judge said.

“I just don’t think that is an appropriate way for a regulator to be behaving, particularly where it’s saying to the court this is such a serious thing there should be a pecuniary penalty and originally an injunction … on election eve.

“Yet, you’re not telling the person who’s committing what you say is a serious contravention where it is, so that they can fix it — when they’ve expressed a willingness to fix it, if you tell them.”

Mr Tran told the court the maximum penalty was $26,640, saying Mr Kelly’s advertising fell “well short” of requirements that authorisation information be “reasonably prominent”.

Unbelievable. And far from being a model litigant. The judge should throw the case out, and award Kelly full costs.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 8:04 am

The Net Zero Australia report, a partnership between major academic institutions and management consultancy Nous Group, says the federal government has a major role to play in accelerating all options that could make a “material contribution” to achieving net zero.

Who is the Nous Group?

It was funded by gifts and grants from Worley, a consulting firm to the energy and resources sectors, chemical company Dow, the Future Fuels Cooperative Research Centre, the Future Energy Exports (FEnEx) Cooperative Research Centre, APA Group and the Minderoo Foundation.

LOL!

The Australian Conservation Foundation was part of an advisory group that was consulted for the report.

Its chief executive, Kelly O’Shanassy, said renewables were at the heart of the conclusions the reports authors had reached.

“Everything depends on how fast you can deploy renewables,” she said. “It also shows that when you accelerate renewables, gas for Australia essentially becomes a peaking fuel. A gas-fired Australia is not an option.”

But she said some of the assumptions made about the role for CCUS were “heroic” given the technology had not worked at a large scale.

Do these idiots realise that electricity has increased in price by 40% + year on year whilst “renewables are accelerated”?

duncanm
duncanm
July 12, 2023 8:09 am

Someone mentioned Rosanne Barr’s most excellent definition of a woman the other day.

Here’s the whole interview with Piers Morgan, but the ‘definition of woman’ onwards is a good snippet. Watch to the end.

https://youtu.be/1zzXZOICjWA?t=721

feelthebern
feelthebern
July 12, 2023 8:09 am

Exposing the Corruption of Albo and ASIC!

Razey, can you keep us posted on the ASIC stuff.
The rumours regarding big wigs at ASIC have been around for a while.
If there is a mainstream media type breaking a story, it’s been a long time coming.
Being cynical, I expect your youtuber to post a video on why there was no story.
A little like Hannity & his Tick, Tock schtick.

Roger
Roger
July 12, 2023 8:09 am

The reason the left and the communist media have the hots for Net Zero is the bit they won’t say out loud: Net Zero means net zero capitalism and therefore net zero economy.

I think what they’re aiming for is a government controlled economy with the big corporates in the box seat.

Just yesterday the Business Council of Australia, which represents the CEOs of Australias hundred largest companies, was calling for the government to issue five year plans for how we are to reach the 0/2050 target.

It’s crony capitalism on a scale hitherto unimagined.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 8:09 am

Tucker Carlson will be feted in history as one of the heroes of the Reset Resistance- but I hope he doesn’t sleepwalk into becoming another one of these cyclical podcasters-podcaster’s guests, masticating each others’ life stories for teatowel slogan affirmations.

Martin Goldberg recently noted a lot of podcasts are becoming alike and repetitive as they’re all shilling each other and shilling worse and worse products.

Robert Kyosaki on Rollo Tomassi?

Jesus.

Aaron
Aaron
July 12, 2023 8:10 am

“The Guardian can hardly contain its glee as it reports today that academics from the University of Melbourne, University of QLD & Princeton have issued a report saying nuclear is too expensive”.

No “experts” needed to say that renewables are both too expensive and too unreliable.

You wonder why that elderly student activist who ” Fights Tories” wants to censor internet dissent.

duncanm
duncanm
July 12, 2023 8:15 am

Miranda Devine hitting it out of the park again on the Biden crime family.
https://twitter.com/mirandadevine/status/1676790337388400640

Roger
Roger
July 12, 2023 8:17 am

Do these idiots realise that electricity has increased in price by 40% + year on year whilst “renewables are accelerated”?

If you’re an academic on a generous publicly provided salary with all mod renewable cons at home (all subsidised directly or through rebates by government) the rising cost of electricity is only an abstract notion that spurs your research on towards to the sunlit uplands where power will be too cheap to meter.

Mak Siccar
Mak Siccar
July 12, 2023 8:20 am

Another excellent article in The Oz by Dr Janet.

What happens to boardroom activists if voice fails?
If the referendum is successful, we can be sure corporate boards will crow about being on the right side of history … If it fails, what will they do then?

By JANET ALBRECHTSEN

One word sums up the voice campaign: overreach.

The overreach by Indigenous activists, by legal activists, by much of the media and, of course, by the Albanese government is underpinned by deception and an arrogant belief that Australians apparently don’t need to consider the risks of the proposed constitutional amendment.

Corporate overreach deserves close scrutiny, too. A few weeks ago, businessman Michael Chaney claimed that opposing the voice would “betray” the Australian people. This paper reported him as saying other chief executives universally shared his view.

When I asked other CEOs, I discovered there was no universal agreement. Few would go on the record, though; who wants to be accused, even wrongly, of betraying their country?

As one hugely successful and very astute businessman, a big and committed donor to Indigenous education, told me: “We’re being asked to go into a huge experiment with just the promise that nothing will go wrong. Most government projects, as I’ve experienced them, absolutely go wrong, most of the time. They cost overrun, they’re often very poorly implemented and they often don’t produce the result that they’re supposed to produce. But somehow this one’s going to be perfect?”

This observation and Chaney’s intervention invites closer scrutiny of a host of Australian companies and not-for-profits that have sided with the voice. This would also be true if their boards advocated against the voice, but since there appears to be none, or a minuscule number, who are against the voice publicly, the analysis that follows focuses on board members who have signed up companies and other organisations they do not own to the Yes campaign.

Let’s start with legal overreach. The first thing governing bodies of companies and NFPs must do is discharge their statutory and fiduciary obligations of care. They shouldn’t make any decisions in relation to the voice, or any other matter, without getting appropriate legal and commercial advice on what this proposal, if successful, would mean for their enterprise.

For example, did the boards of BHP and Rio Tinto seek clear advice on the possible and probable impact of the voice on environmental, planning and other processes for their existing and future projects? If they didn’t do this before throwing the company’s name and money behind the Yes case, then there are legitimate questions as to whether they breached their duties to shareholders.

Patently these companies – and other large Australian companies – woke up (in the proper sense of woke) far too late to the implications of the Albanese government’s industrial relations changes in relation to, among other things, pattern bargaining and “same job, same pay”. They claim they weren’t told about the government’s industrial relations plans.

That excuse won’t work when it comes to the voice. If these boards discover, as many of us suspect, that the voice will be able to hold future mining projects hostage as leverage for reparations and a treaty, board members cannot then claim they didn’t anticipate these consequences.

Shareholders may consider class actions against these companies for being negligent in failing to consider the foreseeable consequences of a major constitutional change that negatively impacts their company.

We’re not done with legal overreach. Companies and NFPs must use shareholder funds and company assets for proper purposes, and in the best interests of their entity. Directors are not entitled to devote company money to the pet political and social projects of a few directors, or even all of the directors, without clear evidence this is in the best interests of the company.

Using BHP and Rio as an example again, there is perhaps an argument that maintaining relationships with Indigenous Australians justifies them supporting constitutional recognition in a preamble. But it is entirely spurious to claim that maintaining relationships with Indigenous Australians requires the kind of maximalist, overreaching change to the Constitution proposed by the voice amendment.

A passionate director may take that view personally. But personal passion is not a legal substitute for using other people’s money, and a corporate brand, for a proper purpose. A more considered and proper course of action for passionate directors is to use their own money on the Yes campaign, not shareholders’ money.

NFPs, in some respects, face even tougher legal hurdles in actively supporting the voice. The Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission has published guidelines in relation to advocacy for the voice, pointing out that if “a charity plans to undertake advocacy activities, it must be able to demonstrate why it considers its advocacy furthers its charitable purposes”.

The “charitable purposes” of most NFPs are pretty tightly drawn for the reason that NFPs should stick to their particular objects and not be used by directors or governing bodies for their pet projects.

Failure by a charity to stick to its purpose should deprive it of the special tax advantages we confer on it, and the ACNC should be vigilant in policing activities of NFPs for this reason.

These legal issues are not the end of the overreach. Boards need to take accountability for their actions even if legal. After all, it takes great self-confidence, perhaps even arrogance, for a board to commit their entity to a position in a hotly contested political controversy, at best only marginally connected to their entity’s core business, which they know perhaps half their stakeholders deeply disagree with and may even resent.

Senior Australian businessman Graham Bradley is a rarity. He’s willing to speak up, and against the herd. He told me this week: “I don’t believe the voice is a topic where companies have a legitimate authority to take a public corporate position, unlike economic, industrial, trade, taxation or corporate governance policy issues where corporations have a responsibility to their shareholders, employees, customers and other stakeholders to advocate what they believe is good public policy in the national interest.

“Many companies have taken a public position on the voice prematurely, before the parliament had voted on the wording of the referendum proposal. This is poor governance even if you view the voice as an issue where corporate entities have some legitimate advocacy role.

“I question for whom companies speak on issues such as this. Is it their shareholders? Have they canvassed the views of their shareholders before becoming advocates? Or is it employees and have they been canvassed? Customers? If these stakeholder groups were to be canvassed and were likely found to be as divided as the general community, it would in my view be wrong for a board to take a public advocacy position in the name of the company. Better to let individual executives take positions in their own name, not usurp their stakeholders by taking corporate positions.”

If the referendum is successful, we can be sure those boards will crow about being on the right side of history. Alas, after the celebrations, a referendum win won’t hide the cost to the company – and shareholders who own the company – of the voice.

If the referendum fails – after the inevitable grumbles about a country being betrayed – what will board members who signed up a company owned by others to the Yes side do then? Accountability should translate into them resigning. But will they be accountable for their actions?

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 8:24 am

What a goofball.

comment image?w=683

What happened to him in the Romanian courts was complete bullshit and ironically is the best thing he ever did – he called out the naked Emperor.

His life story too, is nonsense.

He was never a great fighter (his record of fighting wins and losses changes like his self reported wealth). He is not intimidating (he’s an awkward goof). He’s not a trillionare as he has claimed. He’s possibly not even a millionaire. He didn’t grow up poor.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 8:28 am

Tate’s father wasn’t USAF intelligence, he was CIA and got in hot water over the sex trade in SE Asia.

Boambee John
Boambee John
July 12, 2023 8:29 am

Roger
Jul 12, 2023 8:09 AM
The reason the left and the communist media have the hots for Net Zero is the bit they won’t say out loud: Net Zero means net zero capitalism and therefore net zero economy.

I think what they’re aiming for is a government controlled economy with the big corporates in the box seat.

Use the correct title” Fascism.

Vagabond
Vagabond
July 12, 2023 8:30 am

The Guardian can hardly contain its glee as it reports today that academics from the University of Melbourne, University of QLD & Princeton have issued a report saying nuclear is too expensive

I can’t bring myself to read the Guardian. Were these “academics” power engineers or economics/political paper shufflers?

johanna
johanna
July 12, 2023 8:30 am

Here is an interesting article about applying the principles of financial risk management to public policy. A couple of tasters:

First, a clear chain of accountability should have been established. In financial markets, the actors might be an individual investor, responsible only to himself, or a trader reporting to his boss at a bank, both ultimately accountable to their clients, whose money they manage—but an accountability chain exists. For a pandemic, public-health authorities make recommendations to politicians, whose job it is to weigh the trade-offs—lowering infection rates versus social isolation and economic disruption from the restrictions potentially imposed. These politicians are accountable to voters. This is not an easy decision-making process, needless to say, given that everyone has different preferences and risk tolerance. The principles from finance can help politicians weigh these complex trade-offs. For example: evidence soon emerged from previous pandemics and wars that prolonged school closures reduce the future earnings of children from low-income families. This reality could have been weighed against the evidence that schools were not a high-risk pandemic environment. A simple cost-benefit analysis that makes projections about the future would have demonstrated, even to risk-averse policymakers, that many schools could have been reopened earlier. Instead, politicians tried to offload decisions onto the health authorities, “following the science,” as the saying goes. The accountability chain wasn’t so clear.

and

But pandemics and financial crises occur so infrequently that it’s always hard to predict them. They’re what finance calls “tail risks”: events considered so unlikely that they’re out in the tail of the probability distribution.

The tail risks that loom large in our minds tend to be existential—events that will kill many people, like a lethal pandemic, climate catastrophe, nuclear war, or an asteroid smashing the planet. An existential risk need not be a tail risk: famines and infectious-disease outbreaks once occurred with some regularity. They were not tail risks, in other words, even if they were catastrophic, because the odds of them happening were relatively high each year. We had to live with such risks, lacking the power to control them. But in modern times, technology and know-how have made them much rarer, moving them to the tail of a probability distribution.

Because tail risks are so unexpected, when they do happen, we often panic at first, and even turn to superstition, so that we feel as though we’re doing something. But such events can also be instructive. The financial crisis forced a reckoning in how we use models when dealing with tail risks. We can apply the lessons learned to tail risks in public health and other areas, too.

Of course, some people (e.g. Bjorn Lomborg on climate) are already using this approach. But if the nitwits in the Commonwealth and State treasuries had used these tools before standing at the top floor windows and hurling billions of dollars out during Covid, we would be in a very much better position than we are at present. As the author points out, blowing all that money for small returns leaves us in a much weaker position if we hit another speed bump in the next few years, which is quite likely to happen.

shatterzzz
July 12, 2023 8:30 am

A more considered and proper course of action for passionate directors is to use their own money on the Yes campaign, not shareholders’ money.

I’ve more chance of winning Lotto than this happening .. and I don’t buy Lotto tix .. LOL!

Mak Siccar
Mak Siccar
July 12, 2023 8:38 am

What we all here know but Prof Jim says it eloquently and decisively.

What’s unfair about the Voice referendum?
Not funding the ‘No’ case

James Allan

12 July 2023 5:30 AM

Last week in the Australian, Professor George Williams wrote a column lamenting the plight of the ‘Yes’ campaign in the looming constitutional referendum. One claim Williams made was that the framers of our constitution ‘set the bar for success deliberately high’ because change here requires winning both a majority of votes nationwide in a referendum as well as a majority in a majority of states.

I’ll be blunt. Not for the first time, I completely disagree with Professor Williams. I am probably the law professor in Australia who is most sympathetic to the unwritten constitutional models of Britain and New Zealand, where nothing is any harder to do than to pass a statute, but if you want a written constitution, then you are buying into the idea of locking certain things in.

But just how locked in are things in Australia? Well, compare the procedures for constitutional change here to what is needed in my native Canada or the US. There is simply no comparison. Change is orders of magnitude harder in North America.

In the US, you need a) to win a vote with a two-thirds majority in the Senate and the House of Representatives, and then b) you need to get three-quarters of the State legislatures to agree. Readers, tell me which lays out the harder procedural path, here or in the US.

Then there’s my native Canada. To change the constitution in the Great White North for most matters requires proponents to get it approved by a) the elected House of Commons in Ottawa, b) by the unelected upper house Senate, and c) to get it approved by 7 out of the 10 provinces (and only then if those seven account for over half the national population). Harder than here, I’d say. But for some special topics, such as jettisoning the constitutional monarchy, change in Canada requires proponents to get the approval of all ten provinces. All of them! The tiniest province of Prince Edward Island, which has a population of 157,000 all up, has a complete veto on this constitutional change in a country of 38 million. (Yes, a province with 0.4 percent of the country’s population has a veto.) Want to know why no progressives in Canada waste their time trying to become a republic? It’s because Canada has very tough procedures to change the constitution.

So, in contrast to our two nearest cousins in the Anglosphere, Australia has a very easy constitution to change if we are talking about procedural hurdles. Professor Williams’ lament about how procedurally hard things are for the ‘Yes’ campaign is, frankly, comparatively illiterate. Written constitutions are meant to be hard to change. Otherwise (and again, I like unwritten constitutions, remember), move to New Zealand or Britain. But amongst countries with written constitutions, ours is the easiest one to change. Convince half your fellow citizens plus one, and you meet the first hurdle. Then, also convince over half your fellow citizens in over half the states. You can call that many things but not ‘setting the bar for success deliberately high’. I suspect that what many on the left side of politics (so nearly all the university class) dislike is that constitutional change in this country was taken out of the hands of the political caste and given to regular voters like you and me. As a big-time supporter of democratic decision-making, I think that’s one of the best features of our constitution.

Professor Williams also claims that ‘the state vote often has proven decisive’. This claim is very hard to cash out in any plausible way. There have been 44 constitutional referenda in this country. Eight succeeded, and 36 failed. Of the 36 failures, 31 failed on the first leg – proponents could not get half of Australians to agree to the proposal. Pointing to how close some referenda came to getting to that 50 percent threshold is neither here nor there. They lost because over half of Australians said ‘no’. So that leaves only five referenda where the majority of Australians said ‘yes’, but the proponents failed to get over 50 percent in four of the six states. In my understanding of basic arithmetic, losing five referenda out of 36 does not warrant the use of the adverb ‘often’ to describe the frequency of such second-leg defeats.

I went on the record at the very start of the Voice proposal, back when the polls showed voters leaning to ‘Yes’ by two-thirds and more, to predict it would fail as its details became understood. I thought it would fail then, and I still think it will fail now because it proposes to undermine the core notion of equal citizenship on which liberal democracy is founded. I also think it will fail because it makes very likely the possibility of judicial activists rewriting the constitution at the point of application and because it will further clog up our already sclerotic law-making processes (only two other democracies have anything like our powerful upper house Senate), and because, at core, I have huge confidence in the good sense of the average Australian.

But as we’re on the topic of unfairness, when it comes to the Voice, how many voters realise that for virtually all 44 other referenda, the government fully funded the ‘yes’ and the ‘no’ campaigns? Mr. Albanese says he’s not funding either side, but he knows that huge corporate monies have poured into the ‘Yes’ side. Heck, even many charities have poured in money to the ‘Yes’ side. Imagine if Mr. Howard had only funded the side he agreed with in the republic referendum. Right now, the inequality in financial resources between the two sides is massive. And this is deliberate, not unintended.

That looks a lot more unfair to me than lamenting the fact that you can’t change Australia’s constitution – one of the world’s oldest and one of the most successful – unless you can convince half your fellow citizens nationally, as well as over half of them in over half the states.

If we on the ‘No’ side didn’t know better, we’d say those on the ‘Yes’ side were already making excuses for what many of them now think will be a loss. Don’t be fooled. This proposal deserves to lose because it’s a bad idea. Changing our written constitution is procedurally easier than anywhere else in the developed Anglosphere, and maybe anywhere else, period.

James Allan is Garrick Professor of Law at the University of Queensland.

Indolent
Indolent
July 12, 2023 8:41 am
shatterzzz
July 12, 2023 8:43 am

For a pandemic, public-health authorities make recommendations to politicians, whose job it is to weigh the trade-offs—lowering infection rates versus social isolation and economic disruption from the restrictions potentially imposed. These politicians are accountable to voters.

Reality is politicians don’t care about accountability cos they know that by the time the next election comes around folk are more focus-ed on the next lot of “promised” freebies than the, failured, materialization of the previous lot ..
Which is why the duds keep getting re-elected time after time .. Politics 101 ..

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 8:44 am

More creaking from the car industry as they get torn apart in opposite directions by competing government and customers. Three articles I saw this morning:

Unsold electric cars are piling up on dealer lots (10 Jul, via Powerline)

The auto industry is beginning to crank out more electric vehicles (EVs) to challenge Tesla, but there’s one big problem: not enough buyers.

Toyota Calls Biden’s EPA Plan To Boost EV Sales “Unrealistic” (12 Jul)

Toyota sent a letter to EPA administrator Michael Regan with comments on the agency’s tailpipe emission limits for vehicles produced in 2027 and beyond. The proposed rule calls for more electric vehicles to be sold, accounting for 67% of new light-duty vehicle sales and 46% of new medium-duty vehicle sales in model year 2032.

Renault Says A “Chinese Storm” Is Coming For Europe’s EV Industry (11 Jul)

Europe’s electric vehicle industry faces pressure from imports of vehicles from China, which dominates the supply chain for raw materials for batteries, Jean-Dominique Senard, chairman of France’s automaker Renault, told Reuters in an interview this weekend. … France’s Renault is looking for alternative zero-emission car technologies, its chairman told Reuters this weekend. “We’re looking for alternatives to avoid paralyzing the country if, for example, we run out of batteries,” Senard told Reuters.

The Left thinks they can write an edict and magically 67% of car sales in 2032 will be electric. But they oppose mining of the metals needed, so there aren’t enough batteries. Then the actual market for these overpriced electric Trabants is really quite small: limited to the green religious types and cashed-up inner city dwellers. The rest of the people, which is most of them, will hold onto their increasingly elderly ICE cars and utes for dear life.

The Germans have already started to realize that car manufacturing is becoming impossible in that country, and it’s going to be the same in the rest of the EU and the US. At least the likes of Renault and Toyota are starting to cautiously and timidly point this out.

Gilas
Gilas
July 12, 2023 8:45 am

Tintarella di Luna
Jul 11, 2023 6:58 PM

Elizabeth (Lizzie) Beare
Jul 11, 2023 7:18 PM

You are both welcome.

Will try and get the goss on the semi-finalist selection.
At least two vanilla-flavoured duds inexplicably managed to make the grade.
This is usual in these Comps, so better not get too excited.

PS. Didn’t realise I made a word wall with the last post, it looked different in the text editor…

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 12, 2023 8:46 am

Dot links to rollingstone … rollingstone ffs. Unbelievable.

D*ckhead.

—-

That Tucker interview with Tate is worth your time. I’m 50 mins in.

shatterzzz
July 12, 2023 8:48 am

If we on the ‘No’ side didn’t know better, we’d say those on the ‘Yes’ side were already making excuses for what many of them now think will be a loss. Don’t be fooled. This proposal deserves to lose because it’s a bad idea.

Well said, that man! .. Luv it! …..

Crossie
Crossie
July 12, 2023 8:49 am

I am listening to Tucker Carlson’s interview with Andrew Tate and am surprised at Tate’s self awareness, his attitude to God* and his relationship with him. His attitude to society is more Darwinian though. You would think Tate reads the Cat, he certainly has the time now.

*Tate mentioned that he was reading the Koran so I expect he is a Muslim.

rosie
rosie
July 12, 2023 8:54 am

Thank goodness for rational reasonable people making logical arguments against the Voice.
I’m sick of objectors being dismissed as racists.

Wally Dalí
Wally Dalí
July 12, 2023 8:55 am

politicians, whose job it is to weigh the trade-offs
I’m not into this anaemic neutering of what the U.S. calls “lawmakers”.
Each representative politician is elected on the explicit understanding that they have personal convictions on law, life, liberty, economy, environment, and that they will act in accordance with those principles for their term, or term as minister. The idea that anyone- press, constituents, industry bodies, advisors, their own appointees, international Climate Clubs, made up things like Chief Medical Officers or National Cabinets- saying to them “OMG but this is an unprecedented once in 100 years pandemic/fire season/invasion” and then they fall into lockstep with the Lizard People’s dictums, is pathetic.
We should not tolerate it in theory, or retrospect.
Never forget.
Never forgive.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 8:55 am

Steve trickler
Jul 12, 2023 8:46 AM
Dot links to rollingstone … rollingstone ffs. Unbelievable.

D*ckhead.

Shut up moron.

People here can read links and discern what is going on. RS is another CIA compromised publication. Did you see where I said Tate’s father was CIA too?

Tate got punished for going off script.

Tate is an idiot and a fraud. He’s a “Muslim” (so why would Isl critics even bother?) and has said it’s okay to date trannies.

I have the receipts, so STFU Trickler.

https://www.eviemagazine.com/post/andrew-tate-accused-of-being-gay-saying-have-sex-with-transwoman

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 8:56 am

*Islam

rosie
rosie
July 12, 2023 8:56 am

Molly Meldrum claimed to have read the koran, back in the day.
Pfft.
Plus unless you read it in the original Arabic you don’t really get it, allegedly.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 8:59 am

Are “red pilled manospherians” advocating for male – tranny relationships just part of ‘Da Matrix’? Inquirin’ minds wanna know.

As soon as a man tells you to have sex with trannies, they’ve lost all credibility to preach to you about Da Masculinity.

rosie
rosie
July 12, 2023 9:02 am

I didn’t know who Tate was now I’m sorry I do.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 9:02 am

The tail risks that loom large in our minds tend to be existential—events that will kill many people, like a lethal pandemic, climate catastrophe, nuclear war, or an asteroid smashing the planet.

The real problem is that almost all of these supposed tail risks are fake.

The Left has an incentive to declare existential emergencies at the drop of a hat, since they can use them to subvert democratic controls to get their cherished aims through where they couldn’t otherwise.

About the only one that might be real is nuclear war. Which no one can do much about anyway, so we should stop worrying and love the Bomb. I must watch the movie again, it’s such a fine black comedy.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 12, 2023 9:03 am

Hey Dot!

[ middle finger ]

Dot is a fraud.

rosie
rosie
July 12, 2023 9:04 am

A decent man would be telling men to find a decent woman and get married.
Not discuss the choices presented in that article.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 12, 2023 9:05 am

We can’t look the other way when our military fails, writes Senator Linda Reynolds
linda reynolds linda reynolds

12:00AM July 12, 2023

With the delivery of the Ben Roberts-Smith civil defamation case judgment, it is my hope that Australians are now ready to have an honest conversation about the Brereton Inquiry report into Special Forces misconduct in Afghanistan.

Not as a witch-hunt, but to understand how and why these alleged war crimes occurred and how they could go unchecked for so long. To this end, our military and political leaders must now explain what they believed happened. Why? As the Australian Defence Force chief said when the Brereton report was made public, so they can “set things right”.

As Defence Minister, I dealt with hundreds of sensitive and significant national issues requiring tough decisions to be made, many public, some not. Early in my tenure I started receiving briefs on the progress of the longstanding Brereton Inquiry into rumours of special forces misconduct in Afghanistan. This was a report that would be released publicly and became the most ethically challenging matter I dealt with as a Minister, and it still greatly troubles me.
Read Next

At the time, I thought I was mentally prepared to read the full report, but the long list of credible allegations of brutal war crimes still made me physically ill. This was not the army I had served in for nearly three decades and I know it did not represent the service of hundreds of thousands of past and current personnel. As a former senior officer working in army headquarters, I also understood the damage it would have on the moral authority of the Australian Army both domestically and overseas. I simply could not understand how the chain of command had allowed this to occur.

Since then, I have often reflected on how our special forces task groups had become so “special” they were able to commit alleged war crimes and for so long. The Brereton Report provides valuable insights on how a culture of exceptionalism had been allowed to develop across multiple rotations of Australian Special Operations Task Groups.

The hardest phone call I ever made as a Minister was to Afghanistan’s ambassador to Australia, to say the Brereton Report would contain credible allegations of systematic war crimes committed against his citizens by Australian special forces. The very people, who for nearly 20 years, the ADF had been fighting, and dying, to protect. What I shared with him were not fog-of-war incidents in the heat of battle, they were credible allegations of war crimes, of murder, and of sophisticated cover-ups. The ambassador was calm and dignified, which made the call even harder.

Successive Australian governments had over-tasked our Special Forces in Afghanistan long after other army units could and should have been deployed. By all accounts they were very willing to keep deploying. They did so with the clear understanding they would abide by the laws of war, no matter how many deployments they did.

The overwhelming majority served with great distinction and honour, in circumstances few of us could even imagine. But over time, it is clear the behaviours of some deviated and even became normalised. This was a clear failure of command and leadership. For many years there were persistent rumours within Defence of misconduct by our Special Forces in Afghanistan, which ultimately, due to the great moral courage of Special Forces insiders, resulted in the Brereton Inquiry and report. This was in the face of significant organisational resistance, including a warped Special Forces code of silence, enforced by threats and intimidation.

As a nation we must not look the other way when the behaviour of our military falls so far short of what is moral and legal. Admiration for the military service of the majority must never blind us to the very real dark side of human behaviour in war.

The truth is that we train our service men and women how to kill. Therefore, we must be vigilant to ensure their actions are moral and lawful on operations and in war and adhere to the Laws of Armed Conflict and the Rules of Engagement. All deployed personnel are well trained in both.

As shocking as the findings of the Brereton report were, almost as shattering to me was the ferocious response of some of my parliamentary colleagues and commentators, both to the report and to my response to it.

The responses were varied and, in hindsight, to be expected. I should not have been as surprised as I was by these responses to such a serious issue, one that went to the heart of our national identity.

Some were very angry at those of us who had acknowledged the report’s findings – as if acknowledgment was itself a betrayal of all who serve with distinction. Others conflated criminal culpability with ethics, military law and leadership accountability, believing that the report response should be left to Australian criminal courts. I also heard repeatedly that ‘S*** happens’ in war and that the rules of war should not be applied to our own military.

I had the advantage of more time to draw on my service experience and the time to consult lawyers and ethicists to prepare a government response. A response that dealt with both the issues of criminal culpability and the cultural and leadership failures.

After this consideration, I recommended to the Prime Minister and to cabinet that two separate entities be established. The first was the Office of Special Investigator to independently conduct criminal investigations into the allegations of war crimes. The second was an Implementation Oversight Panel to independently review Defence’s implementation of report recommendations and to provide transparency to the Australian people through the Minister and the parliament.

With the benefit of hindsight, as political and military leaders we jumped too quickly to solutions and action, without first giving the nation time to process this shocking Report’s findings and implications. It is my hope that as a nation, we are now ready to face up to the reality of what some of our Special Forces did.

While this occurs, we must remain vigilant to ensure we do not cause further damage to the individuals identified in the Report and their families, and both the criminal justice and military justice systems be allowed to take their course. We must also remember that the next generation of special services personnel should not burdened by the actions of some of their predecessors. Equally, we must ensure they serve our nation on operations morally and legally.

As a nation we owe a great debt of gratitude to the special forces personnel who did speak out, they exercised great moral courage to ensure the truth was told. We must also be grateful for the work of Justice Brereton and his team and to the investigative journalists who never gave up.

A functional and healthy democracy requires us to deal with both the good and the bad in human nature. If Australians want to live in a fair and just society, we can’t turn a blind eye to the crimes committed by our own, even in war. For if we do, we lose moral authority and become no better than those we fight against. It is time for us as a nation to come to terms with what happened in Afghanistan, so we can “set things right.”

These findings allege the most serious breaches of military conduct and professional values. The unlawful killing of civilians and prisoners is never acceptable. It’s my duty and that of my fellow Chiefs to set things right. Accountability rests with those who allegedly broke the law and with the chain-of-command responsible for the systemic failures, which enabled alleged breaches to occur and go undetected. To deal with what happened we need to understand how it could have happened. It starts with culture …. not correcting this culture as it developed was a failure of unit and higher command. – Defence Force chief General Angus Campbell

Senator Linda Reynolds served as Defence Minister from 2019 to 2021.

Good luck in recruiting for Special Air Service Regiment and Commandos after this one!

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 9:06 am

Let me explain rosie.

Tate is a goofy, awkward fraud who is a likely CIA asset (as his father was), advocates for “masculinity” and sex with trannies, who went off script and got railroaded thereafter.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 12, 2023 9:07 am

rosie
Jul 12, 2023 9:02 AM
I didn’t know who Tate was now I’m sorry I do.

That’s rich coming from a brainwashed vax pusher who’s linked to nearly every Big-Pharma backed news source on the subject.

shatterzzz
July 12, 2023 9:09 am

Some things should never be forgotten ….!
https://ibb.co/WGQ628K

Roger
Roger
July 12, 2023 9:09 am

I am listening to Tucker Carlson’s interview with Andrew Tate and am surprised at Tate’s self awareness, his attitude to God* and his relationship with him.

Erm…if this fellow – whoever he is – is a Muslim he doesn’t have a “relationship with God”; rather, he is a slave to Allah.

Only Christians have a familial relationship with God, being his sons (and daughters) through the Son, Christ.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 12, 2023 9:10 am

Thankyou Dot, Rollo Tomassi reminded me to watch the movie again. It’s been a while. For a moment I thought The Usual Suspects, but that was Keyser Soze. Same character though. Another excellent movie.

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 12, 2023 9:11 am

You linked to rollingstone, Dot.

Obviously you don’t know their history.

D*ckhead.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 9:11 am

Steve trickler Avatar
Steve trickler
Jul 12, 2023 9:03 AM
Hey Dot!

[ middle finger ]

Dot is a fraud.

I don’t advise young straight men wanting to reclaim their lives and to be successful to bang transsexuals – gender dysphoric men in drag.

Hate me, but I’ll never be as bad as Andrew Tate, fake kickboxer, fake millionaire, fake red piller, fake Christian, fake Muslim and fake dating coach (he’s a cockroach, so this might check out).

Steve trickler
Steve trickler
July 12, 2023 9:12 am

Have a good day folks.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 9:15 am

I linked to RS, which I trust most people have discernment to read through the bias, which I also consequently shat on and I showed you the receipts in Evie Magazine about Tate’s tranny fetish.

You are essentially complaining that I trust you to think for yourself (and also that I have the receipts). Only one person on earth can make that better or worse and it ain’t me, champ.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 12, 2023 9:16 am

Entebbe, Bibi Netanyahu’s brother gave his life.

Mother Lode
Mother Lode
July 12, 2023 9:18 am

You hear that, Peter Dutton…the experts have spoken.

He ought to acknowledge publicly that the universities are mouthpieces the renewable industry, that they have invested heavily in it in terms of the courses they teach, and more likely than not, in terms of outright investment.

The days of the hallowed halls of academe, with its dotty professors who shuffle awkwardly about in our world but transformed young, tall, and sinewy in their studies, have long gone – expelled as despised relics of white patriarchy to be vilified and then forgotten.

Universities are now the abode of the angry, self-adoring, narrow-minded ideologue, stung anew every day that their prescriptions for the whole world are not accepted by the mass of people they think so far below them – but who actually make the world work.

Go to an engineering consultancy, one with experience in nuclear and can provide a real costing, rather than leaving it to some people who ‘model’ it.

I do not think I saw what departments at the Australian universities were involved in the report. A rather striking omission I thought.

lotocoti
lotocoti
July 12, 2023 9:18 am

It’s not surreal.
It’s perfect.

shatterzzz
July 12, 2023 9:19 am

The tail risks that loom large in our minds tend to be existential—events that will kill many people, like a lethal pandemic, climate catastrophe, nuclear war, or an asteroid smashing the planet.

Not too worry! .. as I wrote yesterday I have a definite “au revoir” date so youse is all safe from an ‘end of world” catastrophe for a few years yet ..!

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 12, 2023 9:19 am

Leslie Van Houten, a disciple of notorious serial killer Charles Manson, was released from prison on Tuesday after more than five decades, California prison authorities said.

Crossie
Crossie
July 12, 2023 9:19 am

I find it almost funny that every few minutes Tate states that he is not suicidal and will not kill himself.

Roger
Roger
July 12, 2023 9:21 am

I find it hard to believe that nuclear energy, used on a mass scale in several countries, is ‘too expensive’. BTW, that appears to be the principal complaint used by the elites, why are it’s manifest benefits never mentioned?

Because the elites are heavily invested in renewables.

(If that wasn’t a rhetorical question.)

rosie
rosie
July 12, 2023 9:23 am

Yep, still not sorry im not devoting many hours of my life to ‘Tate’.

And yes I’m all in for Big Pharma and whatever Big Pharma backed is.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 12, 2023 9:25 am

Entebbe, Bibi Netanyahu’s brother gave his life.

In the aftermath of that raid, as the first of the films was being produced, a Hollywood mogul suggested making a film, using the actual commandos who had taken part in the raid.

The I.D.F. pointed out their lives wouldn’t be worth a cracker….

Crossie
Crossie
July 12, 2023 9:25 am

Tate reminds me of the Will Smith movie The Hitch.

rosie
rosie
July 12, 2023 9:27 am

Yes when it comes to renewables, follow the money, whether it’s wind and solar or the appalling carbon credits it seems to be an endless flow of funds from the humble PAYG taxpayer to Big Wind, Big Solar, Big Carbon Farm and the only people on the inside are the spivs and spruikers.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 12, 2023 9:28 am

Heard on the news ukeland is going to be rushed through the joining of NATO. Therefore guaranteeing it will cease to exist. The neocons sure do want a war with Russia. On the good side a name change will be easy for what is left. Nukeland. Time for the Russkies to target some neocons I think.

Crossie
Crossie
July 12, 2023 9:30 am

dover0beach
Jul 12, 2023 9:13 AM
I find it hard to believe that nuclear energy, used on a mass scale in several countries, is ‘too expensive’. BTW, that appears to be the principal complaint used by the elites, why are its manifest benefits never mentioned?

The elites love everything French and consider everything coming from them to be absolutely the bees knees. Even nuclear energy is OK for the French but not anyone else. Cognitive dissonance is now the major attribute of the elites.

shatterzzz
July 12, 2023 9:30 am

Good luck in recruiting for Special Air Service Regiment and Commandos after this one!

It would be a lot easier to accept this political piffle if she was referring to a”conventional” war situation .. uniforms v uniforms with the Geneva Convention in the background but this is about batting ‘terrorism’ where the enemy is everyone but the uniforms .. give the benefit of doubt to the local farmer, housewife or schoolkid and get shot in the back/blown up and not forgetting those wearing uniforms pretending to be gummint loyalists whilst waiting for their chance to kill ..
Good luck with that .. FFS!

Roger
Roger
July 12, 2023 9:32 am

Heard on the news ukeland is going to be rushed through the joining of NATO.

It would appear even the neo-cons aren’t that stupid.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 9:32 am

Good luck in recruiting for Special Air Service Regiment and Commandos after this one!

Lions led by donkeys.

Biden Administration Says It Opposes Using ‘Merit’ in Military Personnel Decisions (11 Jul)

Stacking the military with true believers is a necessary step to prevent the Left from being Pinocheted. They might find have a tiny weenie problem fighting an actual war though.

Indolent
Indolent
July 12, 2023 9:32 am

Tate got punished for going off script.

Exactly. And did you hear the bit about all of the media lying about him all of the time?

This is the first time I’ve ever set eyes on him and I hadn’t really been aware of him before, beyond his name, but I have to say that this is someone who knows how to express himself and has successfully identified many of the issues facing us today. He is absolutely right in saying that in the second half of last century you could go along to get along and still have a decent life but that this certainly is not the case now. Without resistance there will be no normal life or any glimmer of freedom in the future.

What he said about degrading the masculinity of men in the West while at the same time importing hundreds of thousands of high testosterone immigrants also rang a bell. As did the comment that Putin ended Covid. I hadn’t made that connection before.

There was certainly a bit of braggadocio but mostly a great deal of common sense. He seems to focus on practical matters while understanding the forces at play around us.

johanna
johanna
July 12, 2023 9:33 am

I find it hard to believe that nuclear energy, used on a mass scale in several countries, is ‘too expensive’. BTW, that appears to be the principal complaint used by the elites, why are it’s manifest benefits never mentioned?

The regulatory hurdles generate massive upfront costs and timelags, with no way of knowing whether approval will be given. This means that the money spent on getting to sod-turning stage is very high risk, hence very expensive in terms of opportunity cost of those funds.

Given that large scale nuclear power plants are now a mature technology, the imposition of the disproportionate regulatory hurdles is simply a way of preventing these proposals from coming to fruition.

OTOH, you can get approval of wind and solar ‘farms’ or massive powerlines linking them to the grid comparatively quickly and easily, no matter what the genuine environmental concerns might be.

Crossie
Crossie
July 12, 2023 9:33 am

In his one regard I agree with knickerless Brittney, Linda Reynolds was given the Defence portfolio simply to stop the misogyny accusations from Labor, Greens and the media. She, and most women, are not suited to that job. Sometimes I think most of the parliamentarians are not suited to any jobs.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 9:36 am

Andrew Tate seriously claimed he was a trillionaire.

Which would make him richer than 13 wealthiest people/families on earth combined at a minimum.

The guy is delusional.

Take advice off a delusional person, what could possibly go wrong?

Cassie of Sydney
July 12, 2023 9:38 am

Andrew Tate is not a man other men, particularly disaffected young men, should model themselves after.

There are better role models for young men.

Crossie
Crossie
July 12, 2023 9:39 am

Roger
Jul 12, 2023 9:09 AM
Erm…if this fellow – whoever he is – is a Muslim he doesn’t have a “relationship with God”; rather, he is a slave to Allah.
Only Christians have a familial relationship with God, being his sons (and daughters) through the Son, Christ.

Tate used the word God, never mentioned Allah. The only reason I assumed he was Muslim is that he mentioned reading the Koran but not mention the Bible.

Crossie
Crossie
July 12, 2023 9:44 am

Given that large scale nuclear power plants are now a mature technology, the imposition of the disproportionate regulatory hurdles is simply a way of preventing these proposals from coming to fruition.

OTOH, you can get approval of wind and solar ‘farms’ or massive powerlines linking them to the grid comparatively quickly and easily, no matter what the genuine environmental concerns might be.

It’s the vibe, literally.

Roger
Roger
July 12, 2023 9:45 am

Tate used the word God, never mentioned Allah. The only reason I assumed he was Muslim is that he mentioned reading the Koran but not mention the Bible.

A search reveals he converted to Islam last year.

Further to what I wrote upthread, this is why you’ll never hear a Muslim refer to God as “Father” or “our Father”, as Christians are taught to do by Jesus.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 12, 2023 9:46 am

The Guardian can hardly contain its glee as it reports today that academics from the University of Melbourne, University of QLD & Princeton have issued a report saying nuclear is too expensive

I can’t bring myself to read the Guardian. Were these “academics” power engineers or economics/political paper shufflers?

Economic modellers.
The worst.

The Grauniad-moistening Net Zero Australia report actually came out in April. Written for wonks with the patience of Job, it is a masterpiece of green fantasy that probably takes stenographers a few months to digest.

Brim full of astonishing assumptions: by 2050:

• EV’s everywhere;
• A fully formed hydrogen economy – either thanks to the Sun, or by reforming natural gas and burying the naughty CO2;
• Agricultural practices transformed – forget fertiliser, meat, and high emission cropping;
• Australia no longer exports coal and gas;
• Australia no longer exports iron ore etc – but becomes a World Hub for green metals, because plentiful hydrogen (see above) and more efficient transport density;
• Apparently solar panels, batteries, and windmills never break down, or reach the end of their effective lives;
• The oil and gas industry voluntarily goes into care and maintenance mode in order to produce Satan’s Energy a few days per year (literally) when the renewable system is under stress;
• Luddites like Farmer Gez can get stuffed, there will be infrastructure everywhere – except for where “the Indigenous Estate” says otherwise.

In an unexpected flash of candour the Authors note: “The physical and social changes of the transition to net zero emissions are immense and are not necessarily benign.

But Transitioned Australia will be a Nirvana – a beacon to the World.

Oh, and the report doesn’t completely rule out noocular: “We also only see a potential role for nuclear electricity generation if its cost falls sharply and the growth of renewables is constrained.”

Cassie of Sydney
July 12, 2023 9:50 am

Walked to the bus stop this morning. An elderly couple were hanging around the bus stop, and they were wearing t-shirts with the words “Wentworth votes “YES”. I recognised the couple from last year, when they spruiked for Allegra prior to the 2022 federal election. They are, no doubt, very well-heeled, Wentworth retirees with too much time on their hands.

I wasn’t rude however when the women asked if I’d take a brochure and if I’d have a chat with her, I said, politely and firmly, that I will be voting NO. I then said the following, again politely….

“I find it arrogant that you are both wearing t-shirts proclaiming “Wentworth votes “YES”. You don’t know this, you don’t speak for everyone living in this electorate, and there will be many people who, like me, will be voting NO.”

Roger
Roger
July 12, 2023 9:51 am

In an unexpected flash of candour the Authors note: “The physical and social changes of the transition to net zero emissions are immense and are not necessarily benign.”

Funny…I think the Guardian left that bit out.

Wally Dalí
Wally Dalí
July 12, 2023 9:53 am

After seeing photos of biden at the beach- I’ve now realized why he shuffles along, trips on stairs, keels off bikes and sh*ts himself-
the vain old fag wears a corset.

Salvatore, Iron Publican
July 12, 2023 9:53 am

Crossie Jul 12, 2023 8:49 AM
*Tate mentioned that he was reading the Koran so I expect he is a Muslim.

Crossie, was this chap reading it for spiritual guidance, or because of academic interest?

Though I’ve not read the entire Koran (or read it much at all) I’ve read most hadiths, great reams of “The Teachings of Buddha” & the Book of Mormon.
Likewise I’ve read great heaps of Marx, especially Das Kapital & the communist manifesto, lost of Mao’s little red book, & Mein Kampf.

I’m not & never have had any inclination, to have been: Muslim, Buddhist, Mormon, Communist, or Nazi.

(Communist Manifesto & Mao’s little red book – being short easy reads, designed for dumbasses, are the only ones of the above which aren’t turgid, boring, insomnia cures)

Salvatore, Iron Publican
July 12, 2023 9:56 am

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha Jul 12, 2023 9:05 AM
We can’t look the other way when our military fails, writes Senator Linda Reynolds
linda reynolds linda reynolds

12:00AM July 12, 2023

With the delivery of the Ben Roberts-Smith civil defamation case judgment, it is my hope that Australians are now ready to have an honest conversation about … [blah blah blah] …

This makes me really really really really really hope for Roberts-Smith to prevail at appeal.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 9:58 am

The potatoes are out in force.

A good role model:

Your. Dad.

Roger
Roger
July 12, 2023 10:01 am

We can’t look the other way when our military fails, writes Senator Linda Reynolds

OK…let’s start with the Generals.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 12, 2023 10:03 am

I would say I must have misheard Dover but probably not as the local newsreaders get it wrong all the time. English is almost a second language to them even if it’s the only one they know. One of the best things about the Cat is commenters delving deep into newsworthy articles, finding the original statement. I tell my wife about something only for her to hear about it a couple of days later and the story is reported with context removed or changed to suit the lefts view. Lying by omission is their favorite. I have been sucked in myself not checking.

rosie
rosie
July 12, 2023 10:03 am

I’m now completely convinced Tate is great.

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 12, 2023 10:03 am

Steve trickler

Jul 12, 2023 9:03 AM

Hey Dot!

[ middle finger ]

Dot is a fraud.

Easy tiger.
I blame the chemtrails.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 12, 2023 10:07 am

OK…let’s start with the Generals.

Well said!

DrBeauGan
DrBeauGan
July 12, 2023 10:10 am

give the benefit of doubt to the local farmer, housewife or schoolkid and get shot in the back/blown up a

The politicians and generals send soldiers to a place where the choice is to commit what is probably a war crime or almost certainly get killed eventually by a disguised enemy. And they talk about consulting ethicists.

Putting women into politics was the dumbest thing the West ever did.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 10:13 am

The word “burger” seems to be somewhat malleable lately.

‘This is not a joke:’ Burger with only cheese released (11 Jul)

The fast food chain Burger King has recently launched a new product in Thailand, which is causing a stir.

The name of the product is the “cheeseburger”, but it does not include the traditional meat patty. It consists of a bun with 20 slices of high-fat American cheese inside. In addition, the new “cheeseburger” does not contain any sauces or toppings.

Im Jiptash, a 25-year-old engineer from Thailand who tried the new cheeseburger, told CNN about the experience in an interview. “I like cheese, but this was a little more than I could handle. I could only finish half of it. That’s a crazy amount of cheese added to one hamburger bun.

Meanwhile here ourlocal Hungry Jacks, which is the Australian arm of Burger King, has again proudly put up a big banner advertising their fake meat Vegeburger. I sure that business will be brisk…at the Maccas across the road.

Crossie
Crossie
July 12, 2023 10:23 am

dover0beach
Jul 12, 2023 9:28 AM
NATO says ‘No’ to Ukraine again. The pics of Zelensky standing alone while they ham it up are incredible.

It could have been worse, they could have treated him like they did Trump.

Scroll down for the second image

Vicki
Vicki
July 12, 2023 10:29 am

Re Gabor’s suggestion that I am a bit soft of Aborigines:

At the risk of boring everyone, I thought I should outline my experience over the years with Aborigines. I will do this because although quite a few Cats have had personal experiences, many have not, and may or may not be interested.

I guess my interest in them was sparked as a teenager when I first glimpsed two young Aboriginal teenagers (a girl and a boy) at the Sydney Royal Easter Show many many decades ago. I think they were probably brought on a holiday by a Christian mission as they were smartly dressed in new dress and pants. They stood shyly alongside a cattle pavilion, eying the crowds of local visitors. They were the first Aborigines that I believed I had seen – very black, thin, and (I thought) tall.

Little did I know at that time in my life that my uncle (on my dad’s side) had married a part Aboriginal woman. Aunty Betty was quite dark skinned, as was her mother (“Chook”), but it didn’t strike me as unusual. Both women were more kind hearted than many other female relatives on both sides of the family.

I must be a bit daft or I don’t see “colour” because years later we employed a part Aboriginal man as a manager of one of our companies and it didn’t occur to me that he may be indigenous. It wasn’t until an acquaintance inquired if we were still employing “that boong” that I realised that he was part Aboriginal. I must say that it then did explain how he sometimes went “walkabout” mentally. And it was very disappointing when he became quite bitter when we promoted someone else (who did a far better job) to an important position. He left shortly after to work for a competitor.

My next encounter with an Aborigine was with a full blood Yankunyjtjara man from the Central Desert. I think I may have related this before…….I met him through an Aboriginal art dealer who he worked for. I was beginning an art collection of desert art at the time, so I encountered him quite a lot. I always found him to be respectful and kind. Nonetheless, at one stage he was charged with an assault in a bar & quite a few of his friends – including little me & a Norwegian diplomat- were character witnesses at his trial. He served time in Maitland gaol (as I recall) & was asked by the warden to stay to work there as he was helping some youngsters. We lost track of him for a number of years & then heard that he had married a white woman – but was “beating the tripe out of her”. We were quite amazed to hear that – but there it is – “traditional culture.”

Otherwise, we have travelled all over outback Australia and have seen for ourselves the hellholes of places like Yuendemu. So I don’t really think I am “soft” on Aborigines. I always favoured the policy of Assimilation which has worked so obviously well for countless urban Aborigines, and those of Aboriginal descent. A decent education and the opportunities of cities has allowed them to live a modern life. It was the idiot policy of “return to country” of Nuggett Coombes and his idealistic Labor acolytes that fostered the cesspools in the remote communities.

We all need to oppose the Yes vote as fiercely as we can. It is wrong in every possible way, and will cause division in this country that will be almost unsurmountable.

Salvatore, Iron Publican
July 12, 2023 10:30 am

GreyRanga Jul 12, 2023 9:16 AM

Entebbe, Bibi Netanyahu’s brother gave his life.

Entebbe, Sorin Hershko stayed on in the army, beyond the end of his enlistment, to remain in the team & on the raid. Took a bullet in the spine toward the end of the raid, has been 100% paralyzed ever since.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 12, 2023 10:32 am

In an unexpected flash of candour the Authors note: “The physical and social changes of the transition to net zero emissions are immense and are not necessarily benign.”

Funny…I think the Guardian left that bit out.

Odd, that.
But no doubt Team Albanese has a cunning plan to avoid the horrors and deliver sparkly unicorns instead.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 10:35 am

I can’t bring myself to read the Guardian.

Speaking of that august tome…

More Nauseating Climate Grief from the Guardian (10 Jul)

David Shearman
Wed 5 Jul 2023 01.00 AEST

Our leaders’ addiction to economic growth and its consumption of environmental resources has me paralysed with fear and solastalgia

I have now realised that I have a grief disorder which has arisen slowly over the past few decades and is likely to remain prolonged.

My brain suddenly came to the diagnosis when I tried to watch Tim Winton’s series on Ningaloo Nyinggulu, one of the Earth’s last truly wild and intact places. I use the word “tried” because it hurt to watch, and I had to turn it off. After many years of working on environmental issues and being steeped in the wonder and beauty of the natural world I had realised it would inevitably die soon.

Now I cannot watch these images of a dying partner.

I suspect that this grief had probably festered in my brain since the Ash Wednesday fires of 1983 in South Australia and Victoria, which caused 75 deaths and enormous structural and environmental damage. I was able to externalise my distress by painting the beautiful new epicormic leaves of rejuvenation.

We’re definitely not in Kansas anymore Toto. Did I just see a flying monkey?

Morsie
Morsie
July 12, 2023 10:46 am

Chatting to an Indian guy who is a vegetarian.He and his mate were wandering around Melbourne and saw a sign offering cheeseburgers at McDonalds.
Thought they would be ok .It wasnt until they had scoffed them that it dawned on them
what theyy had eaten

H B Bear
H B Bear
July 12, 2023 10:51 am

I expect I would struggle with Tim Winton on matters environmental. Although possibly not for the same reasons as your average Grauniad reader.

Vicki
Vicki
July 12, 2023 10:53 am

Russians With Attitude
@RWApodcast
·
3h
Our American subscriber has recently visited Russia

Thank you for this post, Dover. It confirmed my conclusion that the Russian standard of living has changed radically since I was there in the days of Glasnost. I chanced upon a video of a tourist in Moscow who was in a shopping mall & was amazed that it duplicated what we see in western countries – from the brands of outlets to the carparks full of late model vehicles. I was astonished.

How human affairs and events overturn our comfortable conclusions.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 12, 2023 10:54 am

Dr Faustus does the cunning plan involve a turnip or the usual sausage.

Cassie of Sydney
July 12, 2023 10:58 am

“Entebbe, Bibi Netanyahu’s brother gave his life.”

Back in the 1990s I had a relationship with one of the IDF commandos from that raid. As he told me, nobody was going to save the Jews at Entebbe apart from Jews of Israel, and that’s what the Jews of Israel did.

Several factors about Entebbe are worth mentioning..

1. The terrorist scum who hijacked the plane were made up of Palestinians and two German Baader Meinhoff cockroaches (including a woman). Their names were Wilfried Bose and Brigitte Kuhlmann. Both were shot dead during the operation. Good, you don’t negotiate with garbage.

2. The French pilot of the Air France plane was a man by the name of Michel Bacos. When the terrorists scum separated the Jews from the non-Jews, Bacos refused to abandon and leave his Jewish passengers, and was with them when Israeli commandos released them. Bacos died in 2019. A true hero.

3. When separating the Jews from the non-Jews, a Holocaust survivor showed German hijacker Wilfried Bose his camp registration number tattooed on his arm. Apparently Bose protested “I’m no Nazi! I am an idealist”. Of course he was an idealist, and those words sum up the far-left.

I could go on. And I haven’t forgotten Dora Bloch, an British Jewish woman who was taken to hospital and never seen again.

Israel had watched the slaughter in Munich, when the Germans f*cked up the operation, refused any Israeli help, and the result? 11 murdered Jews, in Germany. Israel vowed that such slaughter would never happen again, and that next time they would take matters into their own hands, and that’s what they did four years later in Entebbe.

Johnny Rotten
Johnny Rotten
July 12, 2023 11:07 am

The Guardian can hardly contain its glee as it reports today that academics from the University of Melbourne, University of QLD & Princeton have issued a report saying nuclear is too expensive

I bet that all of the Nations and Countries that have Nuclear Power, with the exception of ‘Once Great Britain’ maybe, have cheaper electricity prices than Australia, the ‘Cleva’ Country.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 11:09 am

Wind farms vs whales.

Wind farms to be built in NSW Hunter and Central Coast regions despite community backlash (Sky News, 12 Jul)

The Minister for Climate Change will declare a zone in the New South Wales Hunter and Central Coast regions suitable for an offshore wind farm despite backlash from the community. Residents in Norah Head are furious over the lack of consultation and hold fears the project will destroy their environment.

The whale killing study the Feds are afraid to do (11 Jul)

The Feds have admitted that offshore wind development can cause the death of whales and other marine mammals, but they refuse actually to assess that threat for any wind facilities. So I here outline what such a study should look like. This sort of study is what they are afraid to do because it would give numbers to the deaths that are likely to occur, species by species.

First off, here is the Feds’ own description of some of the known deadly threats. In this case, the offshore wind activity is driving the monster piles that support the turbine towers, but there are others. The Feds say this in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the proposed Empire Wind project off of New York and New Jersey

The research question is simple: What is the mortality rate of harassment for a given offshore wind project? The Feds must answer that mortality rate question before a project’s environmental impact assessment is complete. They should also assess multiple projects, as discussed in the DEIS quote above.

I’m sure Mr Bowen is very concerned for the environment, so will immediately commission an urgent study for the NSW offshore wind farm effects on the southern right whale migration.

Ah, who am I kidding?

Barking Toad
Barking Toad
July 12, 2023 11:14 am

not correcting this culture as it developed was a failure of unit and higher command. – Defence Force chief General Angus Campbell

Am I reading this right? Reynolds is pointing the finger specifically at General Campbell?

Hand ya medals back sonny.

rickw
rickw
July 12, 2023 11:15 am

Good luck in recruiting for Special Air Service Regiment and Commandos after this one!

I love the liberal use of the word allegation, without any hint of irony.

How about some evidence?!

Wally Dalí
Wally Dalí
July 12, 2023 11:29 am

Tate is like Russell Brand
A self-promoter with no convictions, but the gift of loghorrhea, who can see which way the wind is blowing and wants the customers who come with the zeitgeist.
Carlson- and Catallaxians- should stay off his bandwagon.

Dr Faustus
Dr Faustus
July 12, 2023 11:29 am

Dr Faustus does the cunning plan involve a turnip or the usual sausage.

The cunning plan is being implemented by a pack of ‘thingies’ that resemble turnips.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 12, 2023 11:36 am

2. The French pilot of the Air France plane was a man by the name of Michel Bacos

An intersting post, Cassie. From what I’ve read of the raid, all the crew of the aircraft stayed with the Jewish passengers.

local oaf
July 12, 2023 11:36 am

The name of the product is the “cheeseburger”, but it does not include the traditional meat patty. It consists of a bun with 20 slices of high-fat American cheese inside. In addition, the new “cheeseburger” does not contain any sauces or toppings.

Dot
Dot
July 12, 2023 11:46 am

Tate is like Russell Brand
A self-promoter with no convictions

That’s harsh. Brand realises he was wrong and hates the state crushing the little guy with crony capitalism.

That’s a good start.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 12, 2023 11:47 am

when the Germans f*cked up the operation,

Again from what I’ve read, the German police who bungled the operation had no counterterrorist or sniper training – they were more used to writing traffic tickets and breaking up fights on Friday night. The West German constitution wouldn’t allow them to call in the army…

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 12, 2023 11:48 am

Cassie at 10:58.
Legitimate grievances again.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 11:55 am

Again from what I’ve read, the German police who bungled the operation had no counterterrorist or sniper training – they were more used to writing traffic tickets and breaking up fights on Friday night. The West German constitution wouldn’t allow them to call in the army…

Echoes of certain events at a Sydney chocolate shop.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 12, 2023 11:58 am

Echoes of certain events at a Sydney chocolate shop.

Two Commando had built a replica of the Lindt Cafe, and worked out how to storm it, but the senior police officer in charge thought handing over to the Army would damage their career, and, besides, there were all these Mooslime voters in Western Sydney…..

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 11:59 am

Elon is so far ahead of everyone else it’s ridiculous.

SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches for record-breaking 16th time, lands on ship at sea (11 Jul)

Cassie of Sydney
July 12, 2023 12:01 pm

“Again from what I’ve read, the German police who bungled the operation had no counterterrorist or sniper training – they were more used to writing traffic tickets and breaking up fights on Friday night. The West German constitution wouldn’t allow them to call in the army…”

Israel begged the West Germans to allow IDF personnel to assist. It was refused. IDF personnel flew to Munich and watched in real time as Jews were murdered.

Never ever again.

Ed Case
Ed Case
July 12, 2023 12:09 pm

LONDON, Israel’s secret service may have been involved in the hijack of an Air France plane in 1976 by pro-Palestinian hijackers, according to newly-declassified British government documents released Friday.

The claim emerged in a document written by official DH Colvin at the British embassy in Paris, quoting a contact at the Euro-Arab Parliamentary Association, as the crisis unfolded.

According to his information, the hijack was the work of the PFLP, with help from the Israeli Secret Service, the Shin Beit, he wrote.

Link

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 12:11 pm

Phone addiction news.

Zoo asks visitors to stop showing phone videos to gorillas (10 Jul, via Instapundit)

July 10 (UPI) — The Toronto Zoo is asking visitors to help limit screen time for certain primates by refraining from showing cellphone videos to the facility’s gorillas.

The zoo posted signs outside the gorilla enclosure asking visitors not to use their phones to show photos or videos to the gorillas “as some content can be upsetting and affect their relationships and behavior within their family.”

“We just want the gorillas to be able to be gorillas,” Hollie Ross, behavioral husbandry supervisor at the zoo, told CP24.

Officials said [a] gorilla named Nassir has been seen showing a particular interest in the videos on visitors’ phones.

Nassir, born in 2009, is “fascinated by videos and screen time would dominate his life if he had his way,” the zoo’s website states.

Sounds a lot like another species of ape.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 12, 2023 12:23 pm

I used to have a book on the Entebbe raid. Got lost in the move overseas several times along with others. When Jews say “never again” they mean it, not like the mealy mouthed scum we have for government we have been stuck with for so long now. Sometimes I think I was born in the wrong place. How did we end up with such useless government of all persuasions. Middle income welfare I suppose but it started a long time before that.

shatterzzz
July 12, 2023 12:27 pm

quoting a contact at the Euro-Arab Parliamentary Association,

Why am I not surprised he involved the Israelies .. LOL!

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 12:28 pm

Purple party.

Jim Chalmers is ‘moving in the right direction’ with his financial management (12 Jul)

Shadow Finance Minister Jane Hume says Treasurer Jim Chalmers is “moving in the right direction” with his financial management of the Australian economy.

“I think he’s actually listening to the messages from the Coalition that the most important thing he can do to bring down inflation is to reign in those spending ambitions,” Ms Hume told Sky News Australia.

Just in case you didn’t think the Liberal Party could get any leftier.

turnip
turnip
July 12, 2023 12:28 pm

The cunning plan is being implemented by a pack of ‘thingies’ that resemble turnips.

As the only resident Turnip, I deny any involvement in this plan.
It’s just not cunning enough.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 12, 2023 12:29 pm

Oh dear Special Ed has checked his CCTV feed from the British Embassy. He must have the longest penis in history. There’s no end to the prick.

johanna
johanna
July 12, 2023 12:29 pm

I just watched a show on TheirABCTV called Great Australian Stuff, billed as being about important Australian inventions. It was a mixed bag, at best.

Firstly, who knew that Aborigines were the first people to make bread on the planet? The ‘evidence’ was the grooves commonly found around the place showing that somebody ground something there at some point. QED, apparently.

Secondly, again and again, we had the ‘business and advertising victimising wimmenses’ theme – one presenter even said that ‘advertising directed at women has always been appalling.’

The part about Vincents and Bex was not too bad – although claiming that the advertising was directed at women is misleading. In 1971, I had a job in retail where my male boss was hooked on them, taking one every couple of hours. It wasn’t just about bored housewives who needed a career to fulfil them. Also, I distinctly remember a jingle that went ‘take Vincents with confidence’ which was omitted, no doubt due to sloppy research.

It was interesting to learn that the Hills Hoist was invented by someone else a good while before, often the fate of inventors who lack capital and marketing skills. The disdain for traditional suburban life just kept seeping through, though.

5/10, which is better than most of their ‘documentary’ efforts.

GreyRanga
GreyRanga
July 12, 2023 12:32 pm

A turnip disguised as a thingy is pretty cunning. You do have to have a can of Coke as well of course. Things go better with Coke.

Boambee John
Boambee John
July 12, 2023 12:35 pm

Cassie

Israel had watched the slaughter in Munich, when the Germans f*cked up the operation, refused any Israeli help, and the result? 11 murdered Jews, in Germany. Israel vowed that such slaughter would never happen again, and that next time they would take matters into their own hands, and that’s what they did four years later in Entebbe.

If you have not come across him, check out books by Daniel Silva. The principal character, Gabriel Allon, is an Israeli intelligence agent (moonlights as a restorer of Old Masters), who started off as one of the men sent to kill the Munich kidnappers.

Ed Case
Ed Case
July 12, 2023 12:35 pm

Read the link, clown.

The objectives in the British diplomat’s communication were all realised.
Either the guy had second sight or he was passing on the facts.
Since those facts weren’t for public consumption and were only released 30 years later, it’s reasonable to assume they’re true.

duncanm
duncanm
July 12, 2023 12:39 pm

“We just want the gorillas to be able to be gorillas,” Hollie Ross, behavioral husbandry supervisor at the zoo, told CP24.

.. while confined in a relatively small enclosure and locked in an even smaller cage at night.

They don’t do irony, do they?

Boambee John
Boambee John
July 12, 2023 12:40 pm

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Jul 12, 2023 11:47 AM
when the Germans f*cked up the operation,

Again from what I’ve read, the German police who bungled the operation had no counterterrorist or sniper training – they were more used to writing traffic tickets and breaking up fights on Friday night. The West German constitution wouldn’t allow them to call in the army…

The end result for the Germans was the establishment of GSG-9 as a specialist counter-terror unit. IIRC, they assaulted successfully an aircraft hijacked to Somalia.

Boambee John
Boambee John
July 12, 2023 12:44 pm

GreyRanga
Jul 12, 2023 12:29 PM
Oh dear Special Ed has checked his CCTV feed from the British Embassy. He must have the longest penis in history. There’s no end to the prick.

That is why he has never been circumcised – the doctor couldn’t find the end of the prick.

Boambee John
Boambee John
July 12, 2023 12:47 pm

Ed Case
Jul 12, 2023 12:35 PM
Read the link, clown.

The objectives in the British diplomat’s communication were all realised.
Either the guy had second sight or he was passing on the facts.
Since those facts weren’t for public consumption and were only released 30 years later, it’s reasonable to assume they’re true.

If Turd Case thinks that everything ever written in any classified diplomatic communication is true, he has led a very sheltered life. Or he is an idiot. Or both, probably both.

Bruce of Newcastle
Bruce of Newcastle
July 12, 2023 12:50 pm

Sometimes I think I was born in the wrong place. How did we end up with such useless government of all persuasions.

Ranga – Israel sadly is going down the same lefty rabbithole as everywhere else in the West.

Protests across Israel ahead of vote on judicial overhaul bill vote (9 Jul)

Jerusalem (CNN) — Large crowds of protesters across Israel have come out in the 27th consecutive week of demonstrations against the government’s judicial overhaul plans.

Rabbi David Stav: Current political divisions reminiscent of what destroyed Temple’ (11 Jul)

Rabbi David Stav, the chairman of the Tzohar rabbinical organization, spoke to Israel National News – Arutz Sheva about the widespread protests against the government’s planned judicial reforms and the heated discourse and divisions in the country over the issue.

The Left are playing for all the marbles. They totally control the Israeli judiciary and AG’s office, and are using that to persecute Netanyahu, like the DoJ is doing to Trump. Democracy is out the window, and the 600,000 protesters who demonstrated in support of the judicial reform legislation have been ignored by the MSM.

I would not be moving to Israel, not with the muzzies just waiting for an opportunity to be presented by a Lefty insurrection.

Btw the thing about the Temple is from Josephus, his history is a fine read.

Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
Zulu Kilo Two Alpha
July 12, 2023 12:53 pm

IIRC, they assaulted successfully an aircraft hijacked to Somalia.

Quite so – a Lufthansa aircraft was hijacked and the pilot murdered, but the German performance at Munich was still pretty limpwristed.

Lysander
Lysander
July 12, 2023 12:54 pm

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky tore into NATO leaders including President Biden Tuesday for not extending NATO membership to his war-torn country — introducing fresh diplomatic drama into the annual gathering of the military alliance’s leaders.

https://nypost.com/2023/07/11/zelensky-slams-weakness-of-absurd-biden-stance-on-nato/

duncanm
duncanm
July 12, 2023 12:54 pm

We can’t look the other way when our military fails, writes Senator Linda Reynolds

why doesn’t this apply to politicians? They fail constantly.

duncanm
duncanm
July 12, 2023 12:59 pm
Ed Case
Ed Case
July 12, 2023 1:00 pm

The only sensible conclusion is that the Brereton Report is a cover up of worse things.
Otherwise, why would Reynolds be shilling for it?

Sancho Panzer
Sancho Panzer
July 12, 2023 1:00 pm

I see Googlery is drinking deep from the Joe Vialls Kool-ade fountain.
Vague references to “government sources” and “intelligence reports” claiming that Mossad organised Entebbe.

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