Open Thread – Sunday Evening 15 Aug 2021

Nighthawks, Edward Hopper, 1942

N.B. If you’re commenting here for the first time it goes into automoderation. Once I approve it it should appear immediately and without delay from then on.

Also, can people let me know if they like or dislike the nested comment format. I think it saves having to quote replies to existing comments as you can reply directly (there are also other benefits to this) or do you prefer the old format?

Any other suggestions are welcomed too.

1,419 thoughts on “Open Thread – Sunday Evening 15 Aug 2021”

  1. Arky at his finest:
    You need to understand how moist and weak in the knees your average middle aged chick in the public service gets at the idea of Muhhammed and Achmed and Muhammed and Ali and Muhammed and Muhammed arriving.
    I’ve seen 60 y.o state school teachers have standing up fully dressed multiple orgasms in such situations.
    For your average bloke to understand what we’re up against, imagine there was a war between Norway and Sweden, and you were asked to vet a hundred thousand big titted blonde chicks for refugee status:
    “Her. Her. Her … and her, her, her, her. Her. Definitely her. And her”.
    Over fifty percent of Afghanis are under the age of twenty.
    Imagine Jan. Public servant. Cat lady. 85Kgs. 49 years old. Childless.
    You expect her to give a shit about your family as her pen hovers over the “pass” checkbox for a million studly young blokes?

    And so, it begs the question:
    Dover, how can you not offer Arky posting privileges? 😉


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  2. David Burge
    @iowahawkblog
    Never let it be said that Joe Biden wasn’t ready to stroll right into the lion’s den and face a non-stop grilling from Bill Clinton’s coffee boy



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  3. Twitter soy boys are such a pack of cucks.
    Scrolling through my twitter feed.
    Since the above post, Iowahawk has been shadow banned.
    He’s been tweeting up a storm, none of which show up my feed.


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  4. Thanks Tom.
    I see the Editor of the Daily Mail has taken to prophesy as he whips up reasons to recommend police bullying with the announcement that there is to be a rise in Covid cases in Victoria. Reading the Daily Mail is a poisonous exercise ,,but thanks to the person who alerted us to how the DM Editor gives instructions to his reporters.


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  5. Michael Malice
    @michaelmalice
    UPDATE
    New Zealand: 100% of people imprisoned in their homes
    Afghanistan: 50% of people imprisoned in their homes



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  6. There are over 10,000 Americans still in Afghanistan.
    As at end of 2020, there were 10,000 visa requests which grew to a backlog of 18,000 as at the start of August.
    The Biden administration thought the embassy would stay.
    The are so retarded.


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  7. An Australian plane took off from Kabul overnight.
    Capacity 120.
    But only 26 on board.
    Surely they don’t enforce social distancing in situations like this.


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  8. feelthebern says:
    August 19, 2021 at 5:43 am

    An Australian plane took off from Kabul overnight.
    Capacity 120.
    But only 26 on board.
    Surely they don’t enforce social distancing in situations like this.

    surely they are not being flown to Australia to endanger us all!!


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  9. feelthebern says:
    August 19, 2021 at 5:43 am
    An Australian plane took off from Kabul overnight.
    Capacity 120.
    But only 26 on board.
    Surely they don’t enforce social distancing in situations like this.

    —————-

    Those are all who could get through the Taliban cordon around the airport. I’m surprised the plane was allowed to take off.


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  10. little hitlers everywhere

    Ok, so Coles has come out against mandatory vaccination, but QANTAS is into it with both feet.

    Good to know, on both counts.


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  11. The ABC and all the other empty vessels must be dying inside about Afghanistan.

    It’s like Handmaid’s Tale is no longer fiction.

    Remember the Handmaid March in Washington I think, when ACB was getting confirmed?


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  12. From the WSJ.
    Biden to Tell Nursing Homes to Vaccinate Staffs to Keep Medicare, Medicaid Funds

    The Biden administration plans to tell nursing homes to vaccinate their staff against Covid-19 or risk losing Medicare and Medicaid funding, officials said.

    Pre ACB actions re Indiana & vaccines, I would have said this would be given the boot by SCOTUS.
    But now, I can’t see it even being heard.


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  13. Cassie, can your man keep a treatment journal re his COVID?
    If any?
    Would be fascinating to see what is really happening inside the NSW health system in response to it.


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  14. Muddy, I liked your tactics, but as others have pointed out – it takes discipline that the crowd won’t have.

    Another tactic that bamboozles but doesn’t look like violence is just sitting down. Instead of marching from one spot to another, pick an area with plenty of entry points and sit. When the police come, sit. When they attempt to drag you off, remain seated. The manpower it takes to remove determined, immobile people is immense. And a passive, yet determined protest is achieved.


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  15. ‘Warped lessons must be dumped’
    EXCLUSIVE
    REBECCA URBAN

    Education Minister Alan Tudge says the board of the country’s schooling authority must substantially rewrite its draft national curriculum, warning he will not endorse the proposed document amid concern student outcomes would be harmed.

    Writing to the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority’s acting chairman Norm Hart, Mr Tudge criticised the proposal for supporting “ideology over evidence” and presenting an “overly negative view” of the nation in the study of history and civics.

    In the letter, seen by The Australian, Mr Tudge urged the board to seriously consider recent feedback from education experts, who have flagged concerns that the proposed changes amounted to a weakening of learning standards.

    “Some of these groups, such as Australia’s peak mathematics association, believe that the current draft will take Australian kids backwards,” he wrote. “If the current draft is simply tweaked, it will not be supported. It needs fundamental changes.”

    The warning comes as the ACARA board meets on Thursday and Friday to discuss feedback to the highly anticipated update of the Australian Curriculum – an important document laying out what students are expected to learn across the mandated subject areas of English, maths, science, the arts, humanities, health and physical education and languages.

    The curriculum also seeks to cover general capabilities, or skills, such as critical and creative thinking, as well as ensure young people develop an understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. Its release in April, however, sparked a torrent of criticism, including from highprofile historians, academics and reading specialists.

    Among the most scathing criticism was from the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute, whose membership spans leading universities, government agencies and industry, which called for any ongoing review of the maths curriculum to be halted pending further consultation.

    The institute was particularly critical of a proposed push towards having students learn maths by engaging in openended problem-solving activities, noting that “mastery of mathematical approaches is needed before student problemsolving can be effective”.

    Under way for more than a year, ACARA’s curriculum review was launched in the wake of Australia’s declining performance on the OECD’s PISA, which has shown that Australian students have gone backwards in reading, maths and science over the past 20 years.

    According to Mr Tudge, the curriculum should seek to be ambitious on students’ learning outcomes and should prioritise evidence-based practices, particularly in reading and maths.

    “However, to my great frustration, evidence-based practices have not been consistently embedded in your current draft,” he said. “There is still too much emphasis on whole-language learning of reading and insufficient emphasis on phonics.

    “Thirty years ago, determining the best way to teach reading may have been a legitimate debate, but it is not now. The evidence is crystal clear … that the teaching of phonics is vital.”

    The minister also urged the ACARA board to re-examine the draft history and civics curriculum to ensure that it provided a balanced teaching of Australia’s liberal democracy that has made the nation attractive to millions of migrants.

    “Your draft, however, diminishes Australia’s western, liberal, and democratic values,” Mr Tudge said. “The overarching impression from the curriculum is that the main feature of western civilisation is slavery, imperialism and colonisation.

    “Important historical events are removed or reframed, such as the emphasis on invasion theory over Australia Day. Even Anzac Day is presented as a contested idea, rather than the most sacred of all days where we honour the millions of men and women who have served in war, and the 100,000 who gave their lives for our freedom.”

    Referencing the coronavirus pandemic, Mr Tudge said the education system had “been shaken in the last 18 months … in ways we had never imagined”.

    “I believe that the best way to serve the interests of our young people now is to seize every opportunity to lift educational standards,” he said.

    “The draft of the Australian Curriculum is such an opportunity.”

    Oz print edition


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  16. Rosie’s link above is very instructive. Here is some of the comment stream:

    Jason
    553 new cases of covid yesterday here in Berlin, and I had to hunt through a local papers website to find that number. No-one is bothered, life goes on as pretty much normal.

    Maybe every society has to go through two waves of covid before they’re considered largely normal (with vaccination) and no longer a source of terror.
    Replies
    Peking Pamela

    Replying to
    @AusBerlin84
    How many people in Berlin died to get to this point of complacency? I’m pretty glad Australia doesn’t accept this.
    Simon Rowe

    Replying to
    @AusBerlin84
    Fuck I wish I was in Berlin right now.
    SMH ? ????
    @smh_ch
    ·
    2h
    Replying to
    @AusBerlin84
    I know it’s the same where I come from. Even more cases but the main thing they care about are icu patients and deaths. No one looks at case numbers any longer. When will this ever happen in Australia where all that’s acceptable is 0.



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  17. Bruce in WA says:
    August 17, 2021 at 12:30 am

    Bruce calli et al, same here, Captain and I are the lone members of the family who haven’t and wont be vaccinated, at least with the current crop on offer. One daughter even rang him to suggest he was looney like a famed (mad?) great aunt. I dont know what the future will be but we will continue to speak out because we owe it to the grand kids.

    I dont want them to ask the question one day, ‘why did you not fight for me?’


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  18. Carpe, I reckon the talleyband will strike on the anniversary of 9/11, either somewhere big or in multiple places, that Biden will resign for health reasons soon after and Camella will be P by default.

    So put me down for a week after – Sept 18th for Biden lottery.


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  19. rosiesays:
    August 19, 2021 at 6:23 am

    little hitlers everywhere

    The guy says that he can’t see any other way. Hmm.

    Obviously he will lose customers to this stand of his. But he may well pick some up – other people who have been similarly cowed by the Premier, the press etc.

    But my feeling is that these would not be the best customers to have. That they will become demanding, telling the owner who and what he should approve of. And having been won as customers for his stance on vaccines he might end up losing them for his stance on something else.


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  20. NTG in strife again – 35 million allocated not by court order but by Department to juvenile crims locked up for committing crimes, yet victims of crime 3.5 years and still no compo.

    This is bigger than the great grandstand fiasco.

    From Steve Eddington member for Barkly

    Territorians deserve to know which Minister made the decision to pay $35 million in compensation to Don Dale detainees – and who instructed government lawyers to try and hide that figure.
    Which Minister made the call to settle for $35 million? Was it the Minister for Territory Families, Kate Worden? Was it the Chief Minister or was it the Attorney-General, Selena Uibo? – or was it a cabinet decision?
    This is $35 million in taxpayer funds. The Minister, or Ministers, who signed that cheque should own up to it and be held accountable.
    The Gunner Government then instructed its lawyers to attempt to suppress the $35 million figure so that Territorians would never know how much they were forking out.
    So the next burning questions are: which Minister(s) tried to keep the payout secret? And what is the total legal bill Territorians will be forced to foot?
    Let’s be clear, this is an out of court settlement – not a court order to pay $35 million. The Gunner Government wanted this to go away as quietly as possible.
    The suppression application to keep the payout figure hidden was either a decision by Minister Worden, a captain’s call from the Chief Minister, or Minister Uibo.
    In stark contrast, we have more than 1,650 people waiting for Victims of Crime compensation – and they wait an average of three years.



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  21. callisays:
    August 19, 2021 at 7:15 am
    Muddy, I liked your tactics, but as others have pointed out – it takes discipline that the crowd won’t have.

    Another tactic that bamboozles but doesn’t look like violence is just sitting down. Instead of marching from one spot to another, pick an area with plenty of entry points and sit. When the police come, sit. When they attempt to drag you off, remain seated. The manpower it takes to remove determined, immobile people is immense. And a passive, yet determined protest is achieved.

    Also, link arms. If one is hard to move, several linked together is impossible.


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  22. Isms and ideology are sapping our strength

    PETA CREDLIN

    Do you ever worry, as I do, that we may have lived through the best of times and that future generations may struggle to cope with a world that’s quite different and much worse? Of course, the end of the world (at least as we know it) is a perennial human fear. Still, it’s the wrong catastrophes that we now fret over while other looming disasters are ignored until it may be too late to avoid them.

    It’s not just the shameful scuttle from Kabul, or the cruelly oppressive lockdowns crushing our main cities here in Australia, that have prompted this primal anxiety so much as the readiness of otherwise intelligent leaders to indulge thinking that’s just wrongheaded and bound to end in tears.

    There’s no doubt that recent times have been the best in human history. Since 1945, in countries such as Australia, people largely have avoided the ills of earlier generations. Contrary to just about all other people in all other places at all other times, nearly everyone here has long been able to expect to die peacefully in old age after a safe and materially comfortable life.

    Remarkably, from about 1980 freedom and prosperity started to go global, so that almost everywhere the poor are now less poor and there’s a vast middle class even in many of the countries of Africa. During the past 30 years the percentage of the world’s population in absolute poverty has shrunk from over 30 per cent to under 10 per cent; likewise, the percentage without access to safe drinking water; and more wealth has been created in the past 25 years than in the previous 25,000.

    Three factors helped this along: technical and scientific advances that were rapidly disseminated around an increasingly interconnected world; an ideal of human solidarity, perhaps best exemplified by Martin Luther King’s powerful plea that children would one day live in a nation that judged them by the content of their character and not by the colour of their skin; and the readiness of the US, with its key allies, to keep the peace between the other substantial powers while not standing in the way of others’ own development. Underlying it all was a general faith in the possibility and desirability of human progress.

    But it’s now some time since any of this could be taken for granted. Not only has the pandemic disrupted travel and trade but it also has rekindled an “each country for itself” economic nationalism. And China has exploited globalisation to make itself more or less the equal of the US in economic and military power, but definitely not in largely disinterested benevolence.

    Worse, the Western world, especially its English-speaking parts, increasingly has succumbed to various isms and ideologies that have sapped its strength and smashed its self-confidence.

    Take climate change. Quite rightly, no one wants to take big risks with the only planet we have. But even if human emissions are causing dangerous temperature rises, why is it the West’s duty to make its power unaffordable and unreliable and to export its manufacturing industry when the world’s biggest emitter by far, China, is making no commensurate effort? Why were protesters last week daubing slogans on Parliament House against a country that’s meeting all its agreed targets but not on the Chinese embassy just down the road?

    Take the virus. Of course, no one should expose the sick and the old to avoidable danger. But continuing to keep whole cities locked up long after everyone in nursing homes has been offered vaccination is perverse. It’s not a policy of safety first but safety only. When Scott Morrison repeatedly observed this week, in response to the Afghanistan debacle, that it’s always right to defend freedom, no one seemed to notice the paradox that, simultaneously, our soldiers were enforcing against our own citizens the indefinite strict lockdown of our largest city; and in our second largest, police were patrolling playgrounds cordoned off from toddlers.

    To be fair to the US and the growing weariness of its people with fighting “forever wars”, America should never have been expected to fight harder for other countries than it would fight for itself. But President Joe Biden’s catastrophic mismanagement of the Afghanistan withdrawal has only amplified the fissures in the West and given succour to our enemies. The America of Donald Trump and Biden is not John Kennedy’s America, which would “pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend (and) oppose any foe to assure the survival and success of liberty”.

    But there’s a much deeper problem here too, exposed by last year’s often violent Black Lives Matter protests across the US and mimicked here and in Britain too. It’s not that Americans no longer think Afghanistan is worth defending; vast numbers no longer think America is worth defending

    – that it’s supposedly irredeemably blighted by a racism that “white privilege” renders incurable.

    After a black president, a black military chief and black Supreme Court judges, the only possible conclusion is that America has never been less racist, yet the less real racism becomes, the more it’s used as a weapon to destroy people’s faith in their country – it is the Marxist playbook to divide, demoralise and destroy.

    However sympathetic ordinary people may be to remedying minority disadvantage and to symbolic gestures to make amends, most of them still don’t believe their countries are fundamentally illegitimate. But how long can this common sense last in a country such as ours, where the national curriculum makes an abundance of references to Indigenous history, culture and spirituality – many of them worthy – but almost none to the Judaeo-Christian ethic on which Western civilisation is based?

    Take gender fluidity. If young people have survived politically correct brainwashing in class, they are now liable to have their sense of self undermined by the notion that something as basic as being male or female is just an arbitrary societal construct.

    In Victoria, 16-year-olds need parental supervision to drink in a restaurant but don’t need parental permission to change their gender; indeed, it’s now a criminal offence for a parent to try to dissuade them.

    Senator Matt Canavan’s droll question this week – “When will the Taliban sign up to net zero?” – was regarded as offensive precisely because it highlighted the double standards and folly of today’s zeitgeist.

    Even in our locked-up living rooms, the unfolding human tragedy in Kabul and the brutality that will come for a whole generation of women and girls are causes to count our blessings. But how vulnerable is our way of life right now, on so many different levels? As the Prime Minister has conceded, there’s an echo of the 1930s to these times, hence Winston Churchill’s words after Munich remain apt: “This is only the first foretaste of a bitter cup which will be proffered to us year by year unless by a supreme recovery of moral health and martial vigour we arise again and take our stand for freedom as in the olden time.”

    Peta Credlin is host of Credlin on Sky News, 6pm weeknights.


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  23. What’s really disturbing is that the Taliban are now in control of who walks into Kabul Airport. Think about that.

    How many Taliban fighters are jumping on these planes?

    It would be child’s play for the Taliban to draw up a few “death lists” with their own fighters names inserted amongst genuine ones. Or fabricate some “night letters”. Or get your mates to pretend to bash you up and record it on a mobile phone.

    “Here Mister Immigration Officer, here is my proof my life is in danger. Let me in to America”.

    Remember, the Taliban have seized control of the biometric identification system. It’s something else they might manipulate.

    As a reward for fighting the infidel, we are going to send you on an all expenses paid holiday to the US. We will give you a ring in 5 or 10 years time when we need your services again.


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  24. UK Chief of Defence General Sir Nick Carter yesterday:

    “The Taliban want an Afghanistan that is inclusive for all.”

    We “should be careful” of calling them an enemy.

    He must have missed the Taliban leader calling for world wide jihad earlier in the week.

    Someone stick a fork in us; we’re done. When the long march reaches the upper echelons of the military, resulting in useful idiots like Mark Milley & Nick Carter being in charge, the show is over. The West is like a white-anted piece of timber; the veneer may appear sound but everything of substance has been infested and consumed by the parasitical prog-left.


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  25. No matter how the Stephanopoulos interview is edited, it’s clear Biden has no idea what day it is.
    The directions to which gate to enter the airport are getting circulated to US passport holders.
    But because the gates keep changing people are tweeting directions.
    This is simply stunning.


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  26. Ah, more then 2 links kills the post. I tried to put up what I thought were the 3 best of Tom’s Toons. No matter, the yank ones were excellent. I don’t think Australia has woken up to the significance of what has happened in afshitistan yet. The significance is there are now no checks on islam, china or russia.

    Dan Bongino on the biden afshitistan debacle. Bongino says the yanks have always got it wrong in their overseas wars. They try to be too PC and surgical. They’re too aware of the optics and the leftie squeals. With afgshitistan Bongino says they should have gone in after 9/11 and obliterated it and too bad if some innocents (an oxymoron with islam) died. Then left with a warning: if it happens again, the next strike will be bigger. He says that’s what they should be doing now. But it won’t and the world is stuffed. Expect some chunk warships to arrive unannounced in Sydney harbour. Oh, that’s right, that’s already happened.


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  27. Nick Cave is very anti Ivermectin.
    Which is really odd considering he’s very pro “alternative medicine”.
    Sounds like he’s only pro the alternative treatments that fit a narrative.


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  28. “feelthebernsays:
    August 19, 2021 at 10:49 am
    Nick Cave is very anti Ivermectin.
    Which is really odd considering he’s very pro “alternative medicine”.
    Sounds like he’s only pro the alternative treatments that fit a narrative.”

    Nobody is perfect….I’ll still always love him.


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  29. Biden : I am sick of governors using COVID for their political gains.
    Also Biden : Let me now use this press conference to use COVID for my political gains.


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  30. Clinton : Can we drop some bombs to take the attention off my Monica problems?

    Biden : Can we gaslight more re COVID to take the attention off my Afghanistan problems?


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  31. Further to above, about demonstrators on the weekend sitting down and linking arms, the organisers should have with them many, many copies of the words to We Shall Overcome.

    Distribute them widely, when the police start trying to move poelpe sitting down with linked arms, start the singing.


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  32. Sounds like he’s only pro the alternative treatments that fit a narrative.

    A lot of people believe in alternative treatments rather than resorting immediately to allopathic treatments which they consider to be more jarring on the body.

    And Nick Cave has shown himself time and again to be anything but a sheep happily bleating the narrative with the rest of the flockwits.

    It is perhaps as easy to lose perspective of the threat of the vaccines as the threat of the virus. On the Cat there is a very strong distrust of the vaccines with countless posts of countless studies that can eventually lead to the impression that everyone who gets a shot has their body assimilated like the Borg.

    We laugh at the people who think Covid has become sentient and frickin’ Ninja.

    Fact is that it is a small proportion of all recipients of the vaccines who are sickened or killed by it. Same with the couf itself.

    I have no trouble with people who have opted for the vaccine in accordance with their thinking, as long as it is their own thinking.


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  33. How many Taliban fighters are jumping on these planes?

    At least they’re not ISIS.
    Otherwise there’d be some martyr jumping on a Globemaster, with a couple if kilos of PE2.


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  34. Further to above, about demonstrators on the weekend sitting down and linking arms, the organisers should have with them many, many copies of the words to We Shall Overcome.

    We’ve been thinking of ‘Do You Hear The People Sing’ – need some trumpets and drums to lead the singing and stir up the masses.

    Do you hear the people sing?
    Singing the song of angry men?
    It is the music of a people
    Who will not be slaves again

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2crRmKlbfxM


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  35. Ftb

    It’s so much money it’s hard to conceive.

    And such a contrast to fly over country spending.

    I remember my friend telling me how getting street lights on a bridge across the Mississippi near her home was a raging controversy because taxpayer’s money.


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  36. Bob in the Oz displays his lack of knowledge regarding physics and geography and economics – all at the same time.

    Electric cars to be here faster than we expect
    ROBERT GOTTLIEBSEN

    The US has learned once again that when it engages in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan-style wars it loses. But don’t write off the US because we are about to see its strength in action. When the US decides to mobilise its industrial base there are few countries in the world that can match it.

    So it’s not surprising that after a slow start the US thrust towards electric vehicles is nothing short of staggering.

    The piston engine, along with the old lead acid-style battery which have dominated global transportation since Henry Ford’s “Model T” was launched in 1908, are on the way out. The major motor makers led by Ford, GM and Stellantis (Chrysler, Fiat, Peugeot) plan to achieve half their sales volumes via electric vehicles by 2030. And that’s just the start.

    To replace petrol (Americans call it ‘gas’) will require enormous investment in power generation, usually by renewable energy facilities, new power grids and a new distribution system as new battery chargers appear in shopping centres and convenience stores.

    Americans will shop or dine while charging. Homes with garages will require charging stations and the second car may be the home battery storage that takes in solar panel power generated during the day. And all those US trends are going to be duplicated in Australia, China, Europe and around the world. We are looking at an industry transformation of huge magnitude.

    You will remember that I explained yesterday that in 2019 BHP set up four US / world decarbonising scenarios, with “scenario one” the biggest change, resulting in a substantial rise in demand for steel, copper, nickel and other minerals. BHP’s “scenario one” has been embraced by the US and that contributed to BHP’s decision to shed its oil and gas assets and concentrate on maximising participation in the change.

    The US has been slow to start and at the moment China and Europe are way ahead, but that will change.

    According to the International Energy Agency the US last year had only about 17 per cent of the world’s total stock of 10.2 million electric vehicles. China has 44 per cent of all the EVs in the world (more than 4.5 million), and Europe at 3.2 million represents about 31 per cent. In Europe, Daimler’s plans that its Mercedes-Benz brand will go all-electric at the end of the decade “where market conditions allow”. Even more importantly, from 2025, all of Mercedes-Benz’s “newly-launched vehicle architectures will be electric-only”. If it is not designing petrol-driven cars it will not be making them.

    In the US President Biden’s “Build Back Better Plan” includes purchase incentives, help in develop a comprehensive charging network, investments in research and development, and incentives to expand the electric vehicle manufacturing and supply chains in the United States.

    Had electrification been delayed there may have been an opportunity for other technologies like hydrogen cars to drive decarbonisation. But the motor companies have made the decision and there will be no going back. Roads are set to be a lot less noisy because once cars go electric trucks will not be allowed to have their current exhaust and noise levels.

    But there is a separate and even more revolutionary development in the US and elsewhere —the self-driving car. Uber in its investor briefings makes no secret of the fact that its long-term objective is to use its brand and market share to embrace driverless vehicles. They will reduce the taxis’ market share and make an impact on public transport.

    If low-cost driverless Ubers become prevalent it will also reduce car ownership for those unable to charge vehicles at their residence. They will simply order a driverless Uber from their home. At this stage there are a lot of obstacles but the driverless car research is gathering intensity.

    Here in Australia we no longer make cars so as world motor makers switch to electric vehicles that require charging, so exactly the same sort of revolution will take place Down Under.

    Accordingly we will require a big increase in power generation. Just how this increase should be achieved and the backup required for renewable generation is a huge debate in Australia, with the states tending to have a different view to the Commonwealth.

    We will need to sort it out because whether we like it or not the transportation revolution around the world will have Australians driving electric cars much faster than they currently anticipate.

    Advocates of wind turbines say that the way turbines are now spread around different Australian regions is substantially reducing the need for an enormous back-up when the wind does not blow. It’s highly unlikely all wind generators will cease generating at the same time. There is also work taking place to increase the productivity of solar generation.

    Many Australian families will link the battery storage in their cars to their solar panels. But power networks will offer those with electric car battery storage cut price deals to be able to use those batteries for network storage.

    Like so many other areas power generation is going to be about data bases and networks. That’s why Telstra is looking to enter the arena and the Commonwealth Bank names it as a possible extension if its services.

    But in any revolution like this one there will be endless surprises.

    Oz online – the comments are tearing him apart


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  37. Ellen of Tassie

    We’ve been thinking of ‘Do You Hear The People Sing’ – need some trumpets and drums to lead the singing and stir up the masses.

    Too hard to organise. We Shall Overcome sounds great a capella.


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  38. Oz online – the comments are tearing him apart

    The only time I am tempted to subscribe to the Oz is when I am curious about the comments.

    Any stand outs, TE?


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  39. Cumia had Gavin back as his regular Wednesday guest today.
    There is zero chance any of that is coming out from behind the paywall.
    Based on today’s standards, Eddie Murphy Raw would have been the Eddie’s first & last piece of work.


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  40. Electric cars to be here faster than we expect

    All that means is the silly dealers who try to sell them will go bankrupt faster than we expect. People don’t want them, except in places like Norway where the subsidies are ginormous. Norway is a small country with a small population and big time petro revenues. And as soon as the subsidies are lowered or removed people go right back to ICE. And many who have EVs also have an ICE car for distance driving anyway, which sort of negates the whole idea of the wretched things.


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  41. A comment on NSW vaccination (treatment?) rates.
    Based on the current rate, considering the larger hubs are open on the weekend, NSW will get through the 70% rate for first jab (for people over the age of 16) by the 30th of August.
    If will be sooner if the some of the days from this week & last are matched where they are reportedly getting through over 2% of the population a day.


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  42. Using Polish pfizer they might be done end September.

    Then people who are fully vaccinated can get their hair and nail polish done by the fully vaccinated.

    Victory in our time.


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  43. Bob in the Oz displays his lack of knowledge regarding physics and geography and economics – all at the same time.

    I think it’s a type of Stockholm Syndrome: even if you’re a business writer (who once ran his own publishing business, Business Review Weekly, which he founded), it’s so much easier to run with the zombie fashion herd than apply actual economic analysis to dumb ideas like trying to replace internal combustion engines with electric lemons that can’t compete on performance without gigantic buckets of taxpayer subsidies. Go along with it and you avoid all the online hate for rejecting one of the pillars of the anti-scientific new zombie religion of global warmening.


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  44. Wow, over a ton of comments!

    What shit things are happening in The Penal Colony today?

    PS: Entire West Sunshine industrial area is now shut down due to COVID detected in sewage. All businesses called and told to shut down immediately.

    COMPLETELY FUCKING INSANE


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    2
  45. Thanks for linking Top Ender.
    I don’t think Bruce Pascoe cares about his reputation.
    If approx. 30,000 Dark Emu’s in physical or ebook version are purchased by the public schools across Australia, that’s around a $300k payday for him.
    It’s all about grift.


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  46. Some of the standout comments having a go at Bob Gottleibsen’s leccie car dream:

    Misc
    Electric vehicles may well be the Beta video tape of our life time.

    The Marmot
    If you are in a substantial traffic jam, say because of an accident on a freeway (or anywhere, I suppose), and the battery system in your EV runs flat, how do you get going again? And won’t you cause a worse traffic jam?

    Lionel
    At least you can walk to the nearest servo and carry back a jerry can of petrol. What can you do with an EV – carry around a really, really long extension cord?

    jim
    Robert, I would have thought that someone into dollars and sense like you usually are, would be able to explain how this can possibly work without 100% backup from either F/F power or nuclear generation.

    Mine
    Can’t see it. We are barely keeping up with power demand as it is.

    Governments push back continually on the easy options of more coal and/or nuclear power stations, so where can that extra electricity come from? Solar and wind would have to be stored – where?

    The USA can have a go at electric cars if they want – although I reckon most Americans will not abandon what they have in petrol vehicles without a fight. In the USA you can drive fairly easily from town to town. But in Australia you have massive distances even without petrol. The Stuart Highway for example has hundreds of kilometres between petrol stations. Adding electric chargers to those stations would not solve the problem – it would add to it. What if there is one charger and it’s occupied? What if it breaks down? And an electric car which breaks down on the open road needs a lift, not a fill up. How would such outages be coped with?

    JohnnY
    Who would want a lithium battery fire hazard in their garage or on the wall of their house? No thank you.


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  47. Thanks for those, TE.

    You have to wonder how Gottleibsen could write that nonsense. Is he really so far in the realm of abstraction that simple concrete obstacles are invisible?

    I would not be surprised to find he believes the Federal government offering financial incentives will make it work – he just sees money moving around, being diverted here and there to flow through formulas and metrics before rejoining the main flow, and thinks that is economic activity without any real thought for the flow of goods that actually makes it happen.

    In a more civilised world News will have led him to a lush green pasture with a stream so clear that it is visible only in the flashing sparks where warm sunlight and cool water collide, and where the wide blue sky sweeps to distant snow-sprinkled mountains. After a brief sojourn in this bovine paradise a heavy hearted editor could enter and, after some softly spoken reminiscences and sombre regret for the task at hand, and with teary eyes stave Rob’s skull in with a frickin’ mattock.


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  48. DVA have just sent out a text message to what looks like all veterans of the Middle East wars. Words to the effect of we are proud of you and stay safe.


    Report comment

  49. A heads to anyone on zippy’s discord.

    We have a book reader channel if anyone is interested.

    We don’t discuss serious literature, well not yet anyhow.


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  50. Gottliebsen’s another geriatric like Grattan, Kelly and Sheridan who should just give it away. Nice of him to let his readers know what the Yanks call petrol.


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  51. “If John Howard had any dignity, he would remain silent on all things Afghanistan.”

    Indeed…he should STFU…..about a lot of things.


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  52. I remember Gottliebsen complaining how just a small number of EVs in his street regularly caused power outages and now he’s saying the future.

    It’s not just the practicalities in the US; my US friends despise the government telling them to do anything.


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  53. With the benefit of hindsight, Howard with mass migration, the RET, the ICCC, off shoring of manufacturing to China etc etc with taking us the same way as Krudd-Gillard-Trumble-Scummo. Just more slowly. He only looks good because of his successors. Trumble’s pal. Say no more.


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  54. PS: Entire West Sunshine industrial area is now shut down due to COVID detected in sewage. All businesses called and told to shut down immediately.

    Capricious and malicious.


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    1
  55. What is it with the 21st century being ruined by foul geriatrics? Schwab, Botoxia, the old thief. To think that players from the Vietnam war/Watergate era are still hanging around. Just fuck off.


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  56. I don’t believe these official jab stats.
    A week ago, NSW was lagging the national average.
    Now NSW is 10% above the national average.
    Think about that the numbers involved in that shift.
    I haven’t seen numbers move like that since the Pennsylvania, Arizona & Michigan electoral returns from the 2020 election.


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  57. Heartless NDIS con artists stole for money and power

    The greed and power struggles within a money-hungry western Sydney family who callously conned people with disabilities can now be revealed.

    DAILYTELEGRAPH.COM

    “You will be surprised how much you can charge for cutting grass,” one wrote to another, revealed in agreed facts tendered to the NSW District Court.

    The six family members — led by Alaedine ‘Alan’ Rifai and his partner Amal Hilmi who are now behind bars — lodged $1.5 million worth of fraudulent National Disability Scheme (NDIS) claims between September 2017 and March 2018.

    Alhassane Hilmi pictured leaving Parramatta District Court in April this year.
    Sumaiah Al Shakhshir turns her back on cameras at court in April.

    The syndicate made fake claims pretending they were providing services such as cleaning and transport to more than 70 disabled Australians, causing them to lose access to money for their health needs.

    Hilmi’s two younger brothers — Alhassane ‘Hassan’ and Mostafa ‘Mus’ were charged — along with their partners Sumaiah ‘Sumia’ Al Shakhshir and Michelle Ross, with Michelle the last to be sentenced on Monday.

    The agreed facts show Hassan instructed his wife via text message to start making false requests on behalf of people with disabilities at the start of 2018.

    He said: “I just took some of (a NDIS customer’s) maintenance money literally right now”.

    His wife Hassan responded: “Why did you take money from her (smiley face).”

    “Cause my wife can spend it better than she can (smiley face). Baby what you doing. Take maintenance money,” Hassan said.

    She responded: “From?”

    He replied: “Brad, Allan, David (naming people with NDIS plans). There’s sooo much (money)”.

    After learning how to rort the system from their sister Amal and her partner Alan, brothers Mus and Hassan spoke of starting their own business, the facts show.

    Hassan wrote to Mus: “We gotta start running around for our selfs…we gotta take the lion share”.

    Mus responded: “Yeah bro, hundred per cent…You will be surprised how much you can charge for cutting grass.”

    Hassan said: “F**k bro…(the federal government) will eventually crack down on this.”

    Tensions grew between Hassan and ringleader Alan, which played out in texts between the pair.

    Hassan texted Alan: “Your office is really comfortable. Expensive chairs. You must be making a killing. Mashallah (an Arabic phrase meaning impressive).“

    Alan responded: “Maybe join the team instead of playing for the other team. I’ll accept you.”

    To which Hassan replied: “I need to be the captain of my team. No hard feelings.”

    The family splurged on a Porsche ($83,000), Mercades ($64,000), a Golbourn home ($280,000) a Rolex, a Tag Heuer watch and flights to Morocco.

    Obsessed with making money, Alan told Michelle in a message: “I want gold teeth, charge everyone”.

    But tensions came to a head when Alan, Amal, Mus and Hassan purchased land on Indonesian island Lombok ($40,000), which they planned to turn into a resort.

    Alan told his brother-in-law Hassan in a WhatsApp message on April 16, 2019: “Work out how to end this nicely, either buy me out of the projects or I’ll buy you out, I can’t deal with you any longer.”

    At one point, Amal called her sister-in-law Sumia a “sneaky b***h”.

    When the syndicate‘s payments were barred by NDIS, Michelle told the group: “We shouldn’t be stressed. No one’s done anything wrong at all. Ya get me.”

    Michelle told Sumia: “I always said, never mix business and family, it never ends well.”

    Losing hope, Alan texted his wife realising they could not afford to fund the Lombok investment.

    “Babe we need like $500k…we thought money would roll in. But it isn’t,” he conceded.

    Amal responded: “We thought we were millionaires.”

    The day before Michelle was arrested, she planned to start a new business with her sister rorting the system, telling her: “If all goes well, (we should) start next week.”

    On Monday, Ross was sentenced to a two-year prison term, to be served in the community after pleading guilty to providing false or misleading information.

    In April, both Hassan and Mus were sentenced to three years in prison and Sumia was sentenced to two years in prison, to be served in the community.

    They each pleaded guilty to dealing with property reasonably suspected to be proceeds of crime.

    Alan and Amal received the harshest penalties after pleading guilty to obtaining a gain and dealing with property reasonably suspected to be proceeds of crime.

    They were both sentenced to four years and nine months in prison, with a non parole period of three years for Alan, and two years and nine months for Amal.

    NDIS spokesman Mel Woodburn said the organisation had a “zero tolerance” policy for fraud.

    “Our priority is protecting participants and ensuring they can access the disability supports they need,” Ms Woodburn said. “Participants, families and carers should have full confidence that the agency is preventing, detecting, and responding to this type of criminal behaviour.”

    In July, NDIS Minister Linda Reynolds announced an extension of the NDIS Fraud Taskforce to deal with similar matters.


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  58. I wonder how different the soon to be $US140/t Mark McGowan will be to the previous $US240/t Mark McGowan.
    Ever since the 5 Year Plan was announced earlier in the year, my view was that it was going back to $US100/t.
    It went to $US240/t first though so no showboating from me.
    A lot of people still don’t realise that Vale, even with all their problems, is on target to export 230mill/t on a rolling 12 month basis.


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  59. Entire West Sunshine industrial area is now shut down due to COVID detected in sewage

    that story stinks (excuse the pun)

    shit flows from way further north and west all the way through Sunshine.
    This is either a media lie or a Govt lie … or both


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  60. Zach Rolfe murder trial to go ahead as planned unless High Court intervenes before Monday

    The murder trial of NT Police officer Zach Rolfe will go ahead as planned on Monday, pending an 11th hour bid for intervention by the High Court of Australia.

    Jason Walls, NT News
    Subscriber only

    THE murder trial of NT Police officer Zach Rolfe will go ahead as planned on Monday, pending an 11th hour bid for intervention by the High Court of Australia.

    Rolfe has pleaded not guilty to the unlawful killing of 19-year-old Kumanjayi Walker in a police shooting in Yuendumu during an arrest gone wrong in 2019.

    On Thursday, Crown prosecutor Philip Strickland SC applied for the trial to be stayed to allow the High Court to hear an application for an appeal of an earlier ruling of the NT Supreme Court which found an immunity defence under section 148B of the Police Administration Act could be put to the jury.

    Mr Strickland said the decision to allow the “good faith” defence was “manifestly wrong” as it was inconsistent with a similar provision in the Criminal Code that requires police officers’ actions to be reasonable for the immunity to apply.

    “If it is correct, a police officer could shoot a suspect dead and avoid criminal liability under s148B if a jury finds a reasonable possibility he was, in good faith, performing a core function,” he said.

    “Those functions are very broadly couched — maintaining social order, protecting life, preventing the commission of an offence.”

    Mr Strickland said the reasonableness clause in the Criminal Code provision served “to protect the citizens of the NT against the excessive use of force” by police.

    “We say the effect of the full bench ruling is, really, to very significantly widen the immunity in s148B and in effect, to undermine those protective provisions in the Criminal Code by removing the issue of reasonableness,” he said.

    In reply, Rolfe’s barrister David Edwardson QC said there was “no reason” to suspect any error in the reasoning of the Supreme Court judges, “who were all fiercely in agreement on this particular question”.

    “There is, in our respectful submission, absolutely no reason to think that the High Court is likely to intervene and particularly at this stage when the trial has already commenced,” he said.

    “The notion that my client would have his trial put off into the ether for a very significant and potentially substantial period of time cannot and should not be countenanced.”

    In declining to grant the stay, Justice Dean Mildren said he thought the prospect of success in the High Court was “limited” and on balance, the trial should proceed.

    “The accused has now had the spectre of the most serious charge known to the law threatening his liberty for almost two years,” he said.

    “Approximately 50 witnesses have endured the uncertainty of the requirement of having to give evidence at the same time.

    “In the case of the police witnesses, the deleterious impact of the burden of giving evidence in relation to the actions of a colleague is self-evident.

    “In the case of the civilian witnesses in the community at Yuendumu, it could be fairly said that the burden is equally if not more intolerable.”

    Justice Mildren said the Crown could still lodge an appeal after the trial was complete, although any decision on the application of s148B at that point would not affect an acquittal.

    “Although it will not be of much comfort to the Crown in this case, it will resolve the question of law for the future, should the High Court decide to grant special leave,” he said.

    But Mr Strickland said he would now apply for the High Court to grant a stay of its own, either on Friday or before the trial is due to begin on Monday morning.


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  61. Oh joy.

    The Soviet Union Is Gone, But The Young Yearn For Socialism (19 Aug)

    Recent opinion surveys by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation in the United States on, “U.S. Attitudes Toward Socialism, Communism, and Collectivism,” (October 2020) and by the Institute of Economic Affairs in the United Kingdom in a report, Left Turn Ahead? Surveying Attitudes of Young People Towards Capitalism and Socialism (July 2021) about people’s views about the socialist and capitalist systems, especially among the younger segments of the population, make it clear that knowledge and understanding about what socialist reality has been like has gone down an Orwellian memory hole.

    In the United Kingdom, 67 percent of those in the younger categories of the British population said they would like to live under a socialist economic system, and identified socialism with the words, “workers,” “public,” “equal,” and “fair.” Capitalism was identified by 75 percent in the survey with global warming, destruction of the planet, and racism, and 73 percent said that capitalism fosters “greed,” “selfishness,” and “materialism,” compared to socialism, which cultivates “compassion, cooperation, and solidarity.” A large majority said that socialism had never really been tried and that places like Venezuela have been instances in which the socialist idea was simply poorly implemented and therefore not a real test of a socialist system.

    Wow. Seventy five percent of them! That it. we’re stuffed. You can’t ever come back from having a generation three-quarters of which a Marxist nutcases.


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  62. shit flows from way further north and west all the way through Sunshine.
    This is either a media lie or a Govt lie … or both

    I got it first hand from a bloke who’s factory had just been shut down. He tried to reason with them. Reasoning with them is not an option.


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  63. Today I learned that Russia will be maintaining their diplomatic mission in Kabul.
    Not a grand embassy like the US had.
    But still a proper set up.
    Are we in a simulation ?


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  64. Wow. Seventy five percent of them! That it. we’re stuffed. You can’t ever come back from having a generation three-quarters of which a Marxist nutcases.

    You can, it just takes an awful lot of bullets.


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  65. Old School Conservative says:
    August 19, 2021 at 1:19 am
    No mention that I have seen in the MSM about the attackers who stabbed Totai Kefu, and slashed his wife and both children.
    One report I read says African


    Report comment

  66. I always disliked Jackson’s replacement of Glorfindel with Arwen. It was silly, completely “you go girrrrrl”.

    Almost as stupid as the way he portrayed Faramir.


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  67. Gandalf was also thought to be a Maiar, like Melian.

    The Inklings discussed “true myths” at the Bird and Baby. Perhaps Tolkien built one into TLOTR – the first story pointing to the second. Always an interesting conjecture.


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  68. Did others just hear Angus Taylor’s final comment to Credlin tonight “We all want to see a strong Afghan economy and society”. Credlin was incredlinus. Where do they find these people?


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  69. Gandalf was also thought to be a Maiar

    Definitely Maiar.
    Tolkien Jr has collated so much over the years that has filled in a lot of gaps.
    As per that video on Glorfindel, it references a collation that confirms the Glorfindel at Gondolin was the Glorfindel at Rivendell.
    Which always was a grey area.


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  70. Calli, as a Tolkein buff, perhaps you can ease my curiosity and resolve a mystery that has long puzzled.

    What was the basis of Rohan’s economy? Galloping about on empty plains doesn’t put Lembas on the table nor finance the construction of a Helms Deep.

    Makes the rest of the book very hard to believe (german accent appropriate here)


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  71. Did others just hear Angus Taylor’s final comment to Credlin tonight “We all want to see a strong Afghan economy and society”. Credlin was incredlinus. Where do they find these people?

    They might as well come from another planet. An economics-law drone.


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  72. What was the basis of Rohan’s economy?

    Interesting question.

    The book is about a war, so naturally you’re going to get a lot of martial stuff. There is also a reference to plundering the Westfold dales and “burning rick and byre” by the enemy, so I would assume grazing and some food production as crops (similar to maybe Scotland or Ireland), maybe trade in skins for all that vellum in Minas Tirith’s library.


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  73. When you see a NDIS carer pushing a disabled person in a wheelchair around for some fresh air, remember, the NDIS service provider is charging you taxpayers A$80 per hour and paying the carer @20. It’s a feature.


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    1
  74. The Inklings discussed “true myths” at the Bird and Baby. Perhaps Tolkien built one into TLOTR – the first story pointing to the second. Always an interesting conjecture.

    Well, if you will allow yourself to be influenced by obsolete concepts such as Truth, Justice, Honour et cetera, I suppose it’s natural that you should be in favour of Tolkien. He will have to be cancelled. Perhaps a remake of LOTR with lots of gays and trannies is needed. Frodo and Sam can bugger each other regularly.


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  75. Oh. And while we are talking about TLOTR.

    Sam is the true hero of the tale.

    He is the only character, without any external influence, who wears The Ring and experiences its power but gives it up voluntarily.


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  76. Geoff Kennett was just on ACA.
    tales of business woe
    his solution was to let the vaxed, open up and the vaxed get fed.

    Stupid fucking Libs don’t understand that they have been Hegeled
    So they go the compromise

    we have been dragged down an artificially constructed dialectic road to hell.

    tsk tsk


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  77. Tom, I am one of those ‘rare’ people who enjoy tales of medieval combat. Thanks for the link, which I have just heard and appreciated. Well done to seek the truth of the matter of exaggerated numbers and ways of combat that just couldn’t have taken place. I like the bit where you say that the Brits don’t appreciate an Australian putting them right about medieval history. I guess I might fall into that category too with my rewriting of Arthurian history. You rightly point out however how the Romans made an art of combat, and like you, I have looked at the original Bayeux tapistry and seen much of interest there – I was in particular struct by the fact that the dragon biting its tail was a symbol appearing here and there, showing a belief in some very old mythology, not Christian, but Norse, for after all, William was fundamentally a Norseman. When that dragon lets go of its tail,then Ragnorok is brought upon the world of men.


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  78. Further to my comments about protest crowd tactics late last night: If such tactics cannot be implemented, or don’t work, might there be other benefits to putting the idea forward and giving it a go? Might chatter on social media (#protestmoves, #protestcountermoves, etc.) be of some benefit?

    ‘Set a big, hairy, audacious goal, and fake it, ’til you make it.’
    [Don’t know the source of that].


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  79. The MSM reporting that “refugees” are struggling to get out of Kabul and are being prevented from getting to the airport.
    However, they are remarkably coy about who is doing the preventing and, indeed, what is motivating people to be so desperate to leave.


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  80. Did others just hear Angus Taylor’s final comment to Credlin tonight “We all want to see a strong Afghan economy and society”. Credlin was incredlinus. Where do they find these people?

    One of the single most stupid comments. Taylor is a fucking moron.

    What I want to see in afshitistan is 40000 sq kilometers of rubble and nuclear created glass.


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  81. What I want to see in afshitistan is 40000 sq kilometers of rubble and nuclear created glass.

    Please.
    Let’s not throw any more of our money at an upgrade.


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  82. Yes I remember when Howard dismantled the CES and brought

    Milton, did you ever have to deal with the CES?

    Yes in the 80s – their TempLine service. They got me a holiday job. Better than enriching ther Krudds.


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  83. Regarding the CES- a fairly ordinary outfit but it did make some contribution. You could justifiably argue the the Feds shouldn’t be in that business at all. What came after was worse- rent seekers pretending to find jobs for people who didn’t want them anyway.


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  84. Old School Conservative says:
    August 19, 2021 at 1:19 am
    No mention that I have seen in the MSM about the attackers who stabbed Totai Kefu, and slashed his wife and both children.
    One report I read says African

    At least 2 of them are Sudanese .. not sure about the others


    Report comment

  85. On the LORD OF THE RINGS ..
    I have a one volume hard cover copy .. picked up at a garage sale coupla years ago ..
    never, ever seen another one volume H/C before or since …….


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  86. Kevsays:
    August 19, 2021 at 6:34 pm

    Old School Conservative says:
    August 19, 2021 at 1:19 am
    No mention that I have seen in the MSM about the attackers who stabbed Totai Kefu, and slashed his wife and both children.
    One report I read says African

    Presumably we saw the same reporting.

    The police union head honcho has allegedly said “Deport them back to Africa
    He’s probably just made that up & has no way of knowing anybody who’d know the pedigree of the attackers.


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  87. Forget which Cat recommended it, but Colditz, the series on YouTube, is filled a few locked-down hours.

    Colditz, Australia — same difference, except in Colditz you could still smoke indoors


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  88. never, ever seen another one volume H/C before or since …….

    * thumbs in braces*

    I have a boxed single volume on rice paper with gold embossed cover*. All the appendices included.

    * Tolkien’s drawing of the throne of Gondor with the tree and stars over


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  89. Muddy, am trying to get a protest up in Sydney with friends and family.
    Our chant is “shoot up , lock down!”
    Can’t get any support.
    moderated

  90. Isn’t it just peachy? The ABC now likes John Howard as long as he dumps on Trump. Is he about to join Turnbull and KRudd and destroy his reputation?

    I suppose he, like George W Bush, needs to point fingers elsewhere to exonerate himself.


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  91. Just watched a doco about John De Lorean.
    A total charlatan.
    If he lived in Australia today he’d be running an unemployment revolving door job-club, an NDIS service provider and have a string of child-care centres.


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  92. However, they are remarkably coy about who is doing the preventing and, indeed, what is motivating people to be so desperate to leave.

    Can’t be the all new and inclusive taliban.
    H/T General Sir Nick Carter


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  93. Howard said a very weird thing yesterday.
    That the Afghanistan thing “strengthened ties with the US”.
    WTF?
    We have to invade somewhere … anywhere … to shore up our relationship with Washington?


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  94. Graham Richardson excusing Biden’s dementia was a bit rich but it makes sense when you consider that Richo is no spring chicken either.

    Stitch Richo and Hiden together and you’d have a moderately functional geriatric.


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  95. Forget which Cat recommended it, but Colditz, the series on YouTube, is filled a few locked-down hours.

    That would be Salvatore – he believes it is a very underrated series (or couple of series’) & is well worth watching.

    Whatdja think of it?


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  96. Stitch Richo and Hiden together and you’d have a moderately functional geriatric.

    Or something completely unfunctional. Richo can’t move but is not demented; biden can move but is demented. You might get a non-moving, demented thing.


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  97. Or something completely unfunctional. Richo can’t move but is not demented; biden can move but is demented. You might get a non-moving, demented thing.

    Cut them in half crosswise, switch and sew. Sane Richo will be able to walk about but needs to take care with stairs. The other demented bit won’t be able to wander off into traffic.


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  98. I have a boxed single volume on rice paper with gold embossed cover*. All the appendices included.

    I know the exact one you are talking about.
    A family member has one.


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  99. “Isn’t it just peachy? The ABC now likes John Howard as long as he dumps on Trump. Is he about to join Turnbull and KRudd and destroy his reputation?”
    ..
    Just give me five minutes alone with him and a rosella.
    moderated

  100. Good crop Tom.

    I’ve realised that Warren Brown has been influenced by the style of those immensely better thought-out, drawn and far funnier pieces in the Australasian Post.


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  101. Of course, the greatest-ever cartoon in the Post was a bloke on a beach, about to take a photo of a couple of Scandinavian backpackers with their camera.

    One of the backies says ‘You want to focus? Okay, but take our photo first.’


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    2
  102. Thanks Tom! Knight #3 is glorious. Who invented the nickname TaliDan? I know it’s been going around on the Kittens for a while, but it’s unlikely he delves into our obscure Cattish OT musings.


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  103. Jeff Kennett, in The Hun and apropos of Andrews:

    So many of the young have lost the sense of discipline that is learnt with attending school regularly. Many have lost the importance attached to the social development that goes with attending school.

    Then there is the stress, and, in many cases, the residual damage being done to parents, in the main women, trying to homeschool their children. So many of the restrictions have been applied almost instantaneously, imposing great costs on businesses and families.

    I could go on, but we saw this week the greatest disregard and insult by Mr Andrews to the community of which he is part. He arbitrarily closed down the Victorian parliament with the words “I answer enough questions here every day”.

    What an appalling but very clear illustration of how he sees his authority. Answerable to no one.

    We can play football matches, we can buy alcohol, go to supermarkets and a limited range of activities, but the parliament can’t meet because he says so. Parliament is the ultimate body within our democracy. And Mr Andrews decides to close it down. That is dictatorial!

    And:

    We must be rid of Mr Andrews, who is knowingly damaging our children every day. Australia has never seen or had an individual in a position of elected office who is so abusing the process of which he is part, and the people whose interests he is meant to be acting in.

    As there is no way of constitutionally removing him, his colleagues must wake up and do so. Or the people of the state will remove them all when the chance next arrives, and when the damage that is being caused by this self-appointed demigod is fully understood.

    All this is clear, and accurate. Unlike the immediate pre-Kennett era though, there is no visible viable alternative. Kennett was an anti-bush city-centric who released the mentally ill en masse to roam Victorian streets, but he didn’t fall into the trap of believing his own press until he had nothing left but more paint with which to corral himself in that corner.


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  104. Thanks KD.
    Kennett wasn’t/isn’t perfect, but in such times, we need to forgive small foibles.
    O’Farrell was removed over a bottle of Grange!
    My, how the scale and magnitude of said foibles, and our assessment of them, have changed in the last 18 months.


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  105. Has anybody heard anything one way or another about the Vax being developed in SA.

    From what I saw on the news last night, it looks like a traditional Vax like Novavax, which ATM would be my first choice if I have to be jabbed.

    Mrs D is considering trying to sign up for the phase 3 trial … and being given $1000+ to participate makes it more attractive.


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  106. Following on from the bookish conversation with Bern – the best book experience of my life was Cecil Rhodes’ library of first editions in Cape Town. Could have spent hours in that beautiful, old fashioned private library.

    Not to be…we had to zoom out to a reception in the marquee behind the house to be sung to by a children’s choir. Wouldn’t have missed that for the world either, but it was hard to prise me out from amongst those books.


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  107. The spouting of the usurper’s groupies in the face of the fall of Kabul is hilarious in a deepest black comedic sort of way. You don’t even need to ridicule them, they do it to themselves:

    Annals of Liberal Cluelessness | Power Line (19 Aug)

    Hillel Neuer @HillelNeuer | 12:42 PM · Aug 18, 2021
    Flag of United States Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield says U.S. expressed “in no uncertain terms” at the United Nations through “a very strongly worded press statement” from the Security Council that “we expect the Taliban to respect women’s rights” and “to be respectful of humanitarian law.”

    She makes Comical Ali look like a piker.


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  108. In all fairness, Australian cricket coach Justin Langer is both short and left-handed.

    But he was a tough little bastard when it counted. Brought in to replace the hand-patting style of Darren Lehmann, who like it or not allowed the monstrous cheating in South Africa several years ago to occur, Langer has apparently alienated some of the princesses in the serially-underperforming Australian team to the point where there are calls for his head.

    Langer’s former opening partner Matthew Hayden, quite rightly, believes this state of affairs to be a load of shit:

    Test great Matthew Hayden believes any Australian cricketer offended by Justin Langer’s intensity should be thankful they were not born 30 years earlier.

    “There is no more sure and centred leader than Justin and if his greatest crime is being intense then … go and deal with (former Australian coach) Bob Simpson and Allan Border,’’ said Hayden.

    Oh yes.

    “In 1989 Border created a new culture for Australian cricket by getting rid of some prima donnas who wanted to go this way that way and working hard. Justin can bring back that culture if he is listened to.

    “Bob and Allan decided in 1989 they were not going to pick talent but culture. It worries me we are heading back to the pre-1989 era.

    And:

    “No-one can speak about Justin like I can. I have seen him under the most extreme pressure and there is absolutely no-one you would prefer to have crossing the trenches with you.’’

    Hayden believes players should not be able to pick and choose which national tours they go on.

    “If you want to play for Australia you play for Australia. That is an absolute non-negotiable. You don’t cherry pick the calendar. You are available for every game.’

    That last bit is, of course, bang on. One of the most enjoyable cricketing moments in recent years was during a doco they made on the team, where porky training-averse batsman Usman Khawaja was complaining to Langer in front of the team that their net routine ‘wasn’t working for him’.

    Langer ferociously blistered him in public, mentioning on several occasions that the routine that worked for Khawaja in the nets was the same routine that had led to 20 consecutive batting collapses in Tests.

    Khawaja never mentioned it again, he was almost immediately removed from the team and everyone lived happily ever after.

    Langer needs to double down and accelerate. The abject failure of the chick hockey team in the Lympics is testament to what happens when hand-patting and pandering is chosen over results.


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  109. As there is no way of constitutionally removing him, his colleagues must wake up and do so. Or the people of the state will remove them all when the chance next arrives, and when the damage that is being caused by this self-appointed demigod is fully understood.

    —————-

    Jeff Kennett seems to think that Talidan will be voted out at the next election. Not a chance, all those who could would have left the state by then and the majority of those remaining love what he’s doing to the place.


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  110. Knight #3 is glorious. Who invented the nickname TaliDan?

    No doubt the IstandwithDan twitter army will be using the HRC to put Knight through the wringer.


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  111. The WSJ is now reporting what some independent journalists were saying for months about Afghanistan.
    If Biden even knows what day it is, he’ll be particularly surly today seeing the State department has hung him out to dry.


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  112. “We must be rid of Mr Andrews, who is knowingly damaging our children every day. Australia has never seen or had an individual in a position of elected office who is so abusing the process of which he is part, and the people whose interests he is meant to be acting in.

    As there is no way of constitutionally removing him, his colleagues must wake up and do so. Or the people of the state will remove them all when the chance next arrives, and when the damage that is being caused by this self-appointed demigod is fully understood.”

    A question for Jeff Kennett….where is the opposition in Victoria? We all know the answer to that…just like the Liberals are MIA in WA and QLD as well. For twenty years the Liberals have been MIA. In Victoria the only resistance to Dan and Labor is coming from the Liberal Democrats and its articulate leader, someone who actually does believe in small government and free speech, David Limbrick.

    The point is that the supine, ineffective, spineless Liberals are also responsible for maniacs like Andrews.


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  113. Wow, WSJ has finally pulled it’s finger out & being critical of the Biden administration.

    NEWS ALERT
    Putin Rebuffed U.S. Plans for Bases Near Afghanistan at Summit With Biden

    Russian President Vladimir Putin, during a June 16 summit meeting with President Biden, objected to any role for American forces in Central Asian countries, senior U.S. and Russian officials said, undercutting U.S. plans to act against new terrorist dangers after its Afghanistan withdrawal.


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  114. If you believe anything Gladys says, you are a retard.
    First she says, 70% initial jab before freedoms are restored (FMD that sentence alone enrages me).
    Next she starts moving that up to 80% of initial jabs.
    Overnight, the narrative is 70% double jabbed.
    What a weak, scummy political creature.
    If this hasn’t red-pilled rusted on Liberal voters to vote elsewhere, nothing will.


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  115. If this hasn’t red-pilled rusted on Liberal voters to vote elsewhere, nothing will.

    Too damn right- they are worse than Carr-Egan. That’s why I could never get excited about the Nats retaining Upper Hunter. Come to think of it, where does the Barilarlo twerp stand on this shift to stalinism?


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  116. A question for Jeff Kennett….where is the opposition in Victoria? …The point is that the supine, ineffective, spineless Liberals are also responsible for maniacs like Andrews.

    Jeff Kennet is the de facto Victorian opposition leader because the Stupid.Fucking.Liberals replaced him with a vacuum after his government began drinking its own bathwater and was voted out in 1999.

    As you see from the spineless idiot in Canberra, who couldn’t lead a horse to water, the Stupid.Fucking.Liberals are the ruling class establishment who believe in nothing but the perks of power.


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  117. Okay. It’s a setting problem.

    For those here who are not seeing any formatting buttons, scroll to the bottom of the page. An option will come up – “Exit Mobile Version”.

    Press it and formatting functions are restored.


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  118. Question – my view is without formatting buttons. Is this the same for everyone or do I need to change a setting?

    Yes calli. Go down to the very last thing on the page where it says _Exit Mobile Setting_ and tap on it.

    The new page has the requisite buttons.

    I said what you did and Dover told me what I’m telling you.


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  119. The US media has grown a set overnight.
    CNBC is giving a lot of airtime to the push-back against jab #3.
    From people who were all in on jab #1 & jab#2.
    And twitter isn’t tagging their tweets with COVID misinformation notices.


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  120. And twitter isn’t tagging their tweets with COVID misinformation notices.

    Bern, that’s currently a trial on a limited number of customers in the US, NZ and Australia.


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  121. & now the NY Times has down a big story on the Israeli case study.
    Saying vaccines aint no silver bullet (derrrrrhhh).
    It’s a full court press on Cathedral thinking today…from parts of the Cathedral (WSJ, CNBC, NYT).


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